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Addendum to the
Williams College Courses of Instruction 2009-2010

Last updated: 2/12/10 4:30 PM

New crosslisting with AFR 201 Fall 2009:
AFR 201 now Same as DANC 201

New crosslisting with AFR 206 Spring 2010:
AFR 206 now Same as DANC 202

Cancelled Fall 2009:
Aubert's section of AMST 201(01)

Newly designated writing intensive Spring 2010:
ANSO 402 Spring 2010 Senior Seminar

Cancelled course Fall 2009:
ARAB 305 Egyptian Colloquial Arabic

Moves from Spring 2010 to Fall 2009:
ARAB 402(F) Advanced Arabic: Media and Translation

New course Spring 2010:
ARTH 216(S) Body of Evidence: Greek Sculpture and the Human Figure (Same as Classics 216)

From the beginnings of Greek sculpture in the eighth century B.C.E. until the end of the Hellenistic period in the first century B.C.E., the human figure remained the most prominent choice of subject for Greek artists. Introductory classes will cover sculpture in the Neolithic and Bronze Ages but the goal of this course is to study Greek sculpture in the first millennium B.C.E. with emphasis on ancient Greek attitudes toward the body. We will consider the function, surroundings and reception of male and female figures, both human and divine, from athletic, religious and funerary contexts, and look at dedications of individuals figures as well as the complex mythological narratives found on Greek temples. Reading material includes ancient literature in translation as well as contemporary critical essays.
Format: Lecture. Requirements: two short papers, midterm, final exam.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30 (expected 25.) The course satisfies the pre-1400 and pre-1800 requirements.
TR 11:20-12:35 MCGOWAN

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
ARTH 305 Art, Life, Death: Studies in the Italian Renaissance

Lab component added Spring 2010:
ARTH 311(S) North American Suburbs
(Same as ENVI 311)

Lab component added Spring 2010:
ARTH 318(S)The American Pastoral Mode
(Same as ENVI 318)

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
ARTH 317 Topics in Chinese Art

New course Spring 2010:
ARTH 417 Gender Construction in Chinese Art (W)(D)
“One is not born, but rather becomes a woman”—Simone de Beauvior

This course will investigate how gender as a cultural and social construction is visualized in Chinese art.  Issues of interest include how gendered space is constructed in Chinese painting; how landscape paintings can be decoded as masculine or feminine; and ways in which images of women help construct ideas of both femininity and masculinity.  This course will also discuss Confucian literati’s [ideals] [of] reclusion and homsociality; didactic art for women; images of concubines, courtesans; and lonely women’s isolation and abandonment.  For example, while nature is often seen as feminine, Chinese landscape painting may be coded as masculine due to its association with the Confucian scholar’s ideals of eremitism, a means for the cultivation of the mind, and homosociality.  On the other hand, the placement of a masculine landscape in feminine space may be seen as rhetorical strategy, accentuating the lonely woman’s isolation and abandonment, which are important tropes in Chinese erotic poetry as well.  
This course fulfills the EDI requirement in that it is designed to enable students to study the logic of gender and sexuality in a context different from their own; to see how both genders are constructed in relation to each other, and how they interact in the context of class, ideology, politics, and ideals, as well as how we may compare their representation in China with those of other cultures, notably Japan and the West.  Using both visual art and literature, this course also challenges the gender stereotyping that still exists in current scholarship.
Students will submit five to six 1- to 2-page position papers about readings for the class; one 3- to 4-page midterm paper (draft and revision); two 2- to 3-page respondent’s written critiques; one 3- to 4-page pre-focus/focus paper (for final research paper proposal), and one 12- to 15-page final research paper (draft and revision).
Format: seminar/discussion.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10 (expected: 10).
JANG

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
ARTH 470(S) American Orientalism, Then and Now

New course Fall 2009:
ARTH 506(F) Nostalgia/Modernity: Landscape in Britain, France, and America, 1650-1900 and Beyond
This seminar rests on two suppositions, one a core principle, the other an assertion to be tested. The first part of the course, articulated through discussions of readings and images (both real and virtual), will focus on the principle: that the primary mode of representing the “natural world” through a Western genre of art called “landscape” developed in early modern Europe and remained relatively consistent for over two hundred years. We will explore the theoretical, critical, and practical implications of this historical phenomenon. The second part of the seminar, developed through student presentations of research topics, tests the assertion: that, despite seeming to undermine the traditions of “landscape,” modern and contemporary European and American art, with its expanding vocabulary (land art, earthworks, new media, etc.) and overt political dimension (ecological, environmental, etc.) nevertheless remains wedded in many ways to the framework developed centuries before. Format: seminar. Students will be evaluated on the basis of their participation in class, oral presentations, and final project (format to be determined; perhaps a paper of 20-25 pages). Enrollment limit: 12. Preference given to Graduate Program students and then to senior Art History majors.
R 1:10-3:50 RAND

New course Fall 2009:
ARTS101/AMST101(F) Artists Respond to Contemporary Events 
This introductory video production course focuses on how contemporary artists engage their historical moment. We will look ways in which the moving image can be used to reckon with the force that historical events have on us, and the ways in which we might hope to have force on historical events. Examples will include works made in Hollywood and for broadcast television, as well as work by artists and activists. Our focus will be on work related to U.S. events in the present and the recent past. Films and videos studied may include works by: S.R. Sidarth, Julia Meltzer and David Thorne, Oliver Stone, Omar Fest, Michael Winterbottom, Gus Van Sant, Marco Loera, Spike Lee, WITNESS, ACT UP, Paul Chan, the Yes Men, and many others.
M 7-9:40 p.m. LIZA JOHNSON

New course Spring 2010:
ARTS 241(S) Painting
In this course, we will begin to explore the options that painting with acrylic has to offer. The class will be focused on developing necessary technical skills, such as the manipulation of color, value, surface, and texture. We will also begin to consider issues of content and representation by looking at a diverse range of paintings, both in the museums that we have on campus as well as in regular slide presentations.
Evaluation will be based on fulfillment of assignment objectives, technical execution/craftsmanship, conceptual and physical investment of time, participation in critiques, and attendance. Lab fee.
Prerequisites: ArtS 100. Enrollment limit: 12.
T 9:55-12:35 TAKENAGA

Offered course Spring 2010:
ARTS 263 Printmaking: Intaglio and Relief
An introduction to printmaking through the process of intaglio and relief. Techniques will include drypoint, etching, and collagraphy. Monotypes, some color work, collage, and hand tinting will also be covered. Both technical skill and a strong conceptual basis will be emphasized in order to create finished fine art prints. Experimentation is encouraged. Class time will consist of studio work, demonstrations, lectures, critiques, and field trips.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation in class, and the quality of work produced. Lab fee.
Prerequisites: ArtS 100 or ArtS 103. Enrollment limit: 12
Takenaga       

New course Fall 2009:
ARTS 284(F) Writing for Film, Video, and Performance (Same as THEA 284)
Participants in this writing workshop will generate scripts, monologues, and voiceovers for film, video, and performance in any of its forms. Students will examine examples of the use of language in narrative cinema, avant garde film, video art, performance art, documentary, and essay films, and use these examples to refine their own voices and to prepare their future productions in time-based media through the writing stage. Students will generate monologues, voiceovers, screenplays and avant-garde forms, and will also write several response papers about the use of language in media and performance. Considerable attention will be paid to the development of personal vision and voice, as well as to formal attributes of writing for media. Midterm and final projects will help students develop revisions of weekly assignments. The course is appropriate for students interested in screenwriting, theater, performance art, video art, documentary, creative writing, and the relationship between text and image.  Grades will be based on in-class writing, weekly assignments, and workshop discussion.
T 1:10-3:50 LIZA JOHNSON

New course Fall 2009:
ARTS 323(F) Live Television Production
This advanced video course will focus on producing video for television in a live studio context.  Students will be trained hands-on to work in production teams in the studio and beyond, rotating through roles as director, editor, camera, art direction, and talent.  Studio skills will include advanced video techniques such as chroma key, lighting, live video switching and post-production.  The studio exercises will culminate in an original half-hour program to be aired on Williamstown Cable Access television locally and other broadcast contexts as determined by student research and interest.  Possible content segments could include PSA/commercial, editorial/news, music/performance or roundtable/debate.  Students will be expected to work in a highly independent manner.  Prerequisites: at least one class in video production or permission of the instructor. Lab fee: $100-150.
Preferences: Studio Art, History and Practice, and Art History majors.
Enrollment limit: 10 (expected: 10). 
T 1:10-3:50 LANE

New/revised course description:
ARTS 329(F) Architectural Design II
A continuation and expansion of ideas and skills learned in Architectural Design I. There will be four to six design projects requiring drawings and models, each of which will emphasize particular aspects of architectural theory and design. Visiting critics will discuss student work. The course is useful for students thinking of applying to graduate school in architecture.
Evaluation will be based on quality of designs during the term. Lab fee.
Prerequisites: ArtS 220; ArtH 262 highly recommended.
F 1:10-3:50 MCCALLUM

Spring 2010 update to who gets preference to the course:
ASTR 330 The Nature of the Universe open only to juniors and seniors


New crosslisting with NSCI 341 Spring 2010:
BIOL 410(S) Cell Dynamics in Living Systems (Same as NSCI 341)

New course Fall 2009 & Spring 2010:
BIOL 499(F,S)   Biology Colloquium
Scientists from around the country who are on the cutting edge of biological research come to talk about their work. Students of Biology at any level are welcome.  This is not a for-credit course. Registration is not necessary to attend. 
F 1:10-2:25 ZOTTOLI

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
CHEM 368T Quantum Chemistry and Molecular Spectroscopy

New crosslisting with ANTH 235 Fall 2009:
CLAS 235 Introduction to Roman Archaeology and Material Culture (Same as ANTH 235)

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
CLLA 405(S) Livy and Tacitus: Myth, Scandal, and Morality in Ancient Rome

Cancelled course Fall 2009:
CLGR 403 Poetry and Revolution in Archaic Greece

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
COMP 272 Literature of the Americas: Transnational Dialogues on Race, Violence and
Nation-Building (Same as AMST 256, LATS 272 and RLSP 272) (D)(W)

New course Fall 2009:
DANC 201(F) African Dance and Percussion I (Same as AFR 201)
This course will focus on two or more dance and percussion forms from the continent of Africa or the African diaspora. All students will learn the fundamentals of dance and drumming technique that provide the skills for learning forms such as Kpanlogo (Ghana), Lamban (Senegal, Mali and the Gambia) as well as Ring Shout from the United States.
Format: studio/seminar. This course may be taken for academic and/or PE credit.  Students enrolled for academic credit are required to attend two dance/percussion technique classes weekly, attend a third meeting for lectures and discussion of reading or media that provide context for the impact of these forms, write a critique of a relevant concert or screening of a documentary film, keep a journal that documents learning, take a bi-weekly physical or written quiz to assess learning, prepare and present a final project based on course content that demonstrates understanding of technique and the ability to use forms to create a composition, and submit a short research paper that supports their project. Students enrolled for PE credit are required to attend two dance/percussion technique classes weekly, take a bi-weekly physical or written quiz to assess learning, attend a relevant concert or screening of a documentary film during the semester, and prepare and present a final study using dance or percussion that demonstrates understanding of technique and ability to use the forms in a composition. All students will be evaluated on the quality of participation in technique classes and demonstration of ability to use and understand forms in quizzes and the final project, Students enrolled for academic credit will also be evaluated on the quality of two papers (performance critique and short research paper) and participation in discussion.
Prerequisites: dance or music experience in any form or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limit: for PE credit, 12; for academic credit, 10.
MWF 11-12:15 BURTON

DANC 205(F) Irish Traditions in Dance and Music I
This course will introduce students to the dance and music forms that provide a fundamental understanding of Irish dance and music traditions. The technique aspect of the course will include: soft shoe reels. jigs and slipjigs in their role for solo, ceili and long dance forms and hard shoe treble jigs, reels and Hornpipes in their role for solo and set dances.
Format: studio/seminar ; two dance technique classes per week for all participants; students enrolled for academic credit will attend a third session per week which includes; lectures, discussions, readings and media presentations prepared and selected by professor which include the history of Irish dance and its relationship to Irish dance in North America, the musical influence to Irish dance forms and compositional aspects of Irish dance choreography. One field trip may be included  at cost to the student. Evaluation will be based on participation and progress throughout the semester. All students are required to take a bi-weekly quiz on course content, attend one live performance during the semester (field trip may be used for this requirement), and prepare movement study (outside class time) for final demonstration of their technical and compositional development. Academic credit participants must submit a journal that reflects their learning periodically and at end of the semester, critique  a live performance (field trip may be used for this requirement), give comment on their personal development through video tape support, and give written documentation to support final movement study.
PE credit participants must meet with the professor for mid-term assessment.
No prerequisites; open to all. Enrollment limit: for PE credit, no limit; for academic credit, 10. Preference given to experienced dancers if academic limit is exceeded.
MWF 11-12:15 H. SILVA and SAUER

New course Spring 2010:
DANC 202(S) African Dance and Percussion II (Same as AFR 206)
This course will focus on two or more dance and percussion forms from Africa and the African diaspora such as Manjani (Mali and Guinea), Gum Boots (South Africa) and Samba (Brazil). All students will learn the fundamentals of dance and percussion techniques that provide the skills for learning these forms.
Format: studio/seminar. This course may be taken for academic and/or PE credit. Students enrolled for academic credit are required to attend two dance/percussion technique classes weekly, attend a third meeting for lectures and discussion of reading or media that provide context for the impact of these forms, keep a journal that documents learning , write a critique of a relevant concert or documentary film, take a bi-weekly physical or written quiz to assess leaming, prepare and present a final project based on course content that demonstrates understanding of technique and the ability to use the forms to create a dance or music composition and submit a short research paper that supports the final project  Students enrolled for PE credit are required to attend two dance/percussion technique classes weekly, take a bi-weekly physical or written quiz to assess learning, attend a relevant concert or documentary film during the semester, and prepare and present a final study using dance or percussion that demonstrates understanding of technique and the ability to use the forms in a composition.
All students will be evaluated on the quality of participation in technique classes and demonstration of ability to use and understand forms in quizzes and a final project. Students enrolled for academic credit will also be evaluated on the  quality of two papers (performance critique and short research paper) and participation in discussion.
Prerequisites: students with dance or music experience in any form or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limit: for PE credit, 12; for academic credit, 10.
MWF 11-12:15 BURTON

DANC 206(S) Irish Traditions in Dance and Music II
This course will continue to train students in the dance and music forms that provide a fundamental understanding of Irish dance and music traditions. The technique aspect of the course will include more advanced soft shoe reels, jigs and slipjigs in their role for solo, ceili and long dance forms and hard shoe treble jigs, reels and Hornpipes in their role for solo and set dances and an introduction to Sean nós dance.
Format: studio/seminar;  two dance technique classes per week for all participants; students enrolled for academic credit will attend a third session per week which includes lectures, discussions, readings and media presentations prepared and selected by professor which will cover aspects of Irish costume and the introduction of performance dance in relationship to traditional, social and competitive Irish dance forms. One field trip may be included  at cost to the student. Evaluation will be based on participation and progress throughout the semester.
This course may be taken for academic and/or physical education credit All students take a bi-weekly quiz on course content and prepare movement study (outside class time) for final demonstration of their technical and compositional development. Academic credit participants must submit a journal that reflects their learning periodically and at end of semester, critique at least one live performance (field trip may be used for this requirement), give comment on their personal development through video tape support and give written documentation to support final movement study. PE credit participants must meet with the professor for mid-term assessment.
Prerequisites: open to all students with any previous dance experience or to students who have completed DANC 205 Irish Traditions in Dance and Music I. Enrollment limit: for PE credit, 12; for academic credit, 10. Preference given to experienced dancers if academic limit is exceeded.
TBA H. SILVA and SAUER

Cnacelled course Spring 2010:
DANC 212(S) Prelude to Revolt: The Life and Work of Martha Graham

Cancelled course Fall 2009:
ECON 203 Gender and Economics (Same as WGST 203)

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
ECON 204 Economic Development in Poor Countries(Same as ENVI 234)

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
ECON 352 Regulatory Reform and Innovation (W)

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
ECON 380
Population Economics

Cancelled course Fall 2009:
ECON 386 Environmental Policy and Natural Resource Management (Q) (Same as ENVI 386 & ECON 515)

Cancelled course Fall 2009:
ECON 454 Topics in Macroeconomics

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
ECON 461 Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Modeling (Same as ECON 504)

New course Spring 2010:
Designated as Creative Writing:

ENGL 239(S) The Long, Short, and Extreme In-between
(W)
It takes a certain finesse to craft the vibrations in Gwendolyn Brooks’ 8 line, 24 word poem “We Real Cool,” or to create Ezra Pound’s crisp 2-line vignette “In a Station of the Metro.” At the other end of the spectrum, how does one establish a singularity of vision and sustain the voice necessary for lengthy poems and projects? Notable examples are Larry Levis’ enchanting and winding elegies and David St. John’s novella in verse, “The Face.”
This class is primarily a creative writing course in which we will be focusing on some poetic “extremes” —very long and very short poems—that challenge what we think of both poetry and the page. To undertake our own creative writing work, we will be examining certain poems and their methods to understand how these different lengths and forms build their own effectiveness and instruct us how to read them. Do we stick with two lines, or go the distance, page upon page? And if we go with a middle ground, what kind of reinvention can we give that recognizable space? We will also be looking at other less common forms and projects like curtal sonnets or double-jointed hinge poems. The class will be a mix of readings, discussions, and our own poetic production in imitation of some of these “extremes”. Readings will include individual poetry collections, selected poems, and essay handouts. Readings are likely to be drawn from the works of Richard Hugo, Tony Hoagland, Larry Levis, Denise Duhamel, David St. John, Galway Kinnell, Claudia Rankine, among others.  
Format: seminar/discussion. Requirements: regular attendance, participation in class discussions and workshops, several short exercises, and a substantial final creative exercise.
Prerequisites: a 100-level English course. Enrollment limit: 15. In the event of over-enrollment, preference is given to students with prior creative writing experience.
TR 11:20-12:35 BERTRAM

New course Fall 2009:
ENGL 248T(F) Bearing Witness (Gateway) (W)
"And I only am escaped alone to tell thee," says the messenger who reports back to Job the disaster he has witnessed. This course will focus on the figure of the "sole survivor," the one who alone returns from a harrowing ordeal to tell the world the story of what happened. We will ask: what motives and pressures propel the lone survivor to narrate the experience s/he has undergone? how do these pressures influence the shaping of the story? In what ways do the stories of "sole survivors" become part of a collective, social account? In the first section of the course, students will read pre-20th-century narratives of "sole survival," including the book of Job and Dante's Inferno. The final two sections of the course will each focus on a 20th-century historical event in which survivor testimony has played an important role: the Holocaust (here, materials will include Lanzmann's documentary film Shoah, Primo Levi's Survival in Auschwitz, the poetry of Paul Celan, and Art Spiegelman's Mauss); and the proceedings of South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission following the dismantling of apartheid (here, materials will include transcripts of testimony, the Handspring Theater's Ubu and the Truth Commission, and Antjie Krog's Country of my Skull). 
Format: tutorial. Requirements: Students will meet in pairs with the instructor once a week; one student will present a short analytical paper on the texts covered that week, and the other will write a response paper and join the instructor in a discussion of both papers.
Evaluation will be based on the quality of written work, discussions and oral presentations. 
Prerequisites: 100-level English course (except 150) or advanced placement. Enrollment limit: 10 (Expected: 10). Preference given to sophomores; the course is also open to first-year students with the prerequisites.
(Post-1900)
Tutorial meetings to be arranged. 
SWANN

New course Spring 2010:
ENGL 283(S) Introductory Workshop in Fiction
A course in basic problems that arise in the composition of short fiction. Individual conferences will be combined with workshop sessions; workshop sessions will be devoted to both published and student work. Considerable emphasis will be placed on the process of revision.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit:15 (expected: 15). Interested students should preregister for the course and attend the first class; selection will be based on writing samples.
GATES  M 7-9:40

New crosslisting with THEA 411 Spring 2010:
ENGL 411(S) Staging Identities: Selfhood, Theatricality and Performance in Twentieth Century Drama (Same as THEA 411)

Cancelled course Fall 2009:
ENGL 434 William Blake

FALL 2009 ENVI 101
Environmental Department added a second session to ENVI 101

New course Fall 2009:

ENVI 208(F)  The Challenge of Climate Change Climate: Policy Responses
Climate change has emerged as the keystone environmental issue of this generation -- and most likely for many generations to come. It now appears inevitable that temperatures will increase this century by 2-3ºC, though this projection may prove too far too optimistic if greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise. Under many scenarios, temperatures could continue to increase in the 22nd Century absent stringent mitigation measures by the global community. This course examines the international and domestic legal and policy mechanisms to address the threat, including potential long-term responses. While this class will consider some of the scientific underpinnings for predicted climate impacts, it will focus primarily on the policy options open to individual countries and to the international community It will also consider the human, ecological, and social dimensions of climate unchecked climate change. The course will culminate in an in-class simulation of negotiations for a successor treaty to the Kyoto Protocol.
Format: lecture/discussion. Requirements: short papers, participation, and a final exam.
Prerequisites: ENVI 101 or permission of the instructor.Enrollment limit: 30  (expected: 20) Preference given to ENVI concentrators.
This course satisfies the “Environmental Policy “ requirement for the Environmental Studies concentration.
TR 8:30-9:45 BURNS

Cancelled course Fall 2009:
ENVI 306 Interpreting Nature and Society: The Study of Meaning, Values and Worldviews (W)

Cancelled course Fall 2009:
ENVI 307 Environmental Law (Same as PSCI 317)

New course Fall 2009:
ENVI 308(F) U.S. Environmental Law and Policy (Same as Political
Science 316)
This course provides an introduction to the historical development of environmental policymaking in the United States, as well as key institutions and mechanisms in the policymaking process (scientific, economic and legal), and several current salient issues of environmental policy in the United States, including implementation of key U.S. environmental legislation and the implications of U.S. environmental policymaking for the global commons and the environment of other nations. Specific topics will include the respective roles of the executive, legislative and judicial branches in environmental policymaking, key federal environmental laws, and the role of environmental justice considerations in the policymaking process. The course also emphasizes skills development, including how to read judicial decisions and statutes, legal research, and public speaking. Format: lecture.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: none. Preference given to ENVI concentrators.
This course satisfies the "Environmental Policy " requirement for the Environmental Studies concentration.
TR 9:55-11:10 BURNS

Course revision--NO prerequisites:
ENVI 309(S) Understanding Public Policy: Discourses of Science, Politics and Ethics (Same as History of Science 309, Political Science 301 and Science and Technology Studies 309) (W)

Cancelled Spring 2010:
ENVI 328 International Environmental Law (Same as PSCI 328)

Course revision- new course description Spring 2010
ENVI 402(S) Perspectives on Environmental Issues: Senior Seminar (Same as Maritime Studies 402)
The Environmental Studies and Maritime Studies programs provide students with an opportunity to explore how humans interact with diverse environments at scales ranging from local to global. This discussion-based seminar course is designed to facilitate student explorations of complex environmental issues from a variety of perspectives, thereby appreciating that many environmental problems lack distinct, sharp-edged boundaries. Students, after exploring their own environmental values and biases, will analyze a complex environmental issue of their choice through a series of papers written from social science, humanities, and natural science perspectives. This process will lead to a final synthesis paper (in lieu of final exam) in which the students must present their own integrated perspectives and defend them in a presentation to the class.
Format: seminar. Evaluation will be based on class participation and papers.
Prerequisites: Environmental Studies 302 or MAST 351 Maritime Policy.
Enrollment limit: 20 (expected: 15). Required course for students wishing to complete the Environmental Studies or the Maritime Studies concentrations.

New course Spring 2010:
GEOS 214(S) Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems(S) (Same as ENVI 214)
This class provides a practical look at fast-evolving methods used to integrate information about the earth’s surface with spatial data collected by disciplines such as archaeology, economics, the field sciences, history and political science.  Remote sensing involves collection and processing of data from satellite and airborne sensors to yield environmental information about the Earth's surface and lower atmosphere. Remote sensing allows regional mapping of rock materials, analysis of vegetation cover and measurement of urban areas and land-use change over time. A Geographic Information System (GIS) links satellite-based environmental measurements with spatial data such as topography, transportation networks, and political boundaries, allowing display and quantitative analysis at the same scale using the same geographic reference. This course covers concepts of remote-data capture and geographic rectification using a Global Positioning System (GPS), as well as principles of remote sensing, including linear and non-linear image enhancements, convolution filtering, and image classification. Principles of GIS include display and classification, spatial buffers, logical overlays and techniques of spatial analysis. Weekly labs focus on training in the application of techniques using data from the region and other areas of North America.
DETHIER and MACKLIN

New Exploring Diversity Initiative course:
HIST 111(S) Movers and Shakers in the Middle East (Same as Leadership Studies 150) (W)(D)

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
HIST 225 The Middle Ages (Same as Religion 216)

Cancelled course Fall 2009:
HIST 162 “New Worlds for All”: European-Indian Encounters in Colonial North America (W)

Not offered Fall 2009, to be offered Spring 2010:
HIST 229(S) European Imperialism and Decolonization (D) (Same as AFR 229)

New crosslisting with LEAD 310 Fall 2009:
HIST 311(F) The United States and the Middle East (Same as LEAD 310)

Cancelled course Fall 2009:
HIST 325 The World of Charlemagne (Same as Religion 219) (W)

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
HIST 329 The Christianization of Europe (Same as Religion 214) (W)

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
HIST 353 North American Indian History: Pre-Contact to the Present (Same as ENVI 353)

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
HIST 396(S) Muslims and Europe: From the Conquest of Algeria to the Present (D)

Cancelled course Fall 2009:
HIST 425 The First Crusade (Same as Religion 215) (W) (D)

New course Spring 2010:
HIST 473(S) The United Stated, Revolution, and the Postcolonial World (Same as LEAD 373)
The United States is a country born of revolution and steeped in anti-colonialism. Nevertheless, by the second half of the twentieth century, the U.S. government found itself allied with European imperial powers and battling emerging revolutionary movements around the developing world. This course will examine this transition and consider the nature and long-term implications of the U.S. response to revolution in the postcolonial world. We will look at a number of revolutionary movements in Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa with a focus on the 1960s and 1970s. Case studies will include the Cuban, Vietnamese, Palestinian, Angolan, and Iranian Revolutions. Students will write an original 20-25 page research paper, based on primary sources, on a topic to be chosen in consultation with the instructor.
Format: seminar. Evaluation will be based on class participation, several short papers, and a 20-25 page research paper.
Enrollment limit: 15 (expected: 10-15). Preference given to advanced History majors and Leadership Studies concentrators.
Group F
W 1:10-3:50 CHAMBERLIN

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
HIST 481T The American Revolution, 1763-1798: Meanings and Interpretations (W)

New course Spring 2010:
INTR 252(S) The Human Image: Photographing People and Their Stories (Same as ArtS 252)
The single most photographed subject is the human form. The motivations and strategies for imaging faces and bodies, both individual and aggregate, are as varied as the subjects themselves. In this course, we will examine some of the many approaches used to photograph people. We'll start by exploring self-portraiture, and progress to photographing others-both familiars and strangers, in the studio and in less controlled environments. We'll end with a consideration of "documentary" photography and other visual narratives. In each case, we'll examine our reasons for making an image, and the methods available for achieving these goals. Thus, the class will have a significant technical component, dealing with the creative use of camera controls, the properties and uses of light, and digital capture and processing. We will also examine the conceptual and scientific bases for how we perceive and evaluate images. Students will initially use school-supplied digital cameras, and later have the option of using film. Lab fee: $100-150.
Format: Studio/lecture. Requirements: Students will be expected a) to photograph extensively outside of scheduled class hours b) to participate in class discussion and in both oral and written critique, c) to present one paper, and d) to exhibit their work at the end of the semester.
Prerequisites: Students from all disciplines are welcome. Previous photography experience is desirable, but not essential. Students are strongly encouraged to contact the instructor if they have questions about course requirements. Enrollment limit: 12 (expected: 12). Preference to upper class students.
TBA B. GOLDSTEIN

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
JAPN 152 Japanese Film (Same as COMP 152)

New crosslisting with ENVI 221 Fall 2009:
LATS 220(F) Introduction to Urban Studies: Shaping and Living the City (Same as AMST 221)

New crosslisting with ENVI 313 Spring 2010:
LATS 312(S) Chicago (Same as AMST 312)

Cancelled course Fall 2009:
LATS 338(F) Theorizing Popular Culture: Latinas/os and the Dynamics of the Everyday (Same as AMST 339 and COMP 338) (W) (D)

Cancelled Course Spring 2010:
MUS 204T Composition II

Cancelled course Spring 2010 & Fall 2009:
MUS 211 Arranging for Voices

New course Fall 2009:
MUS 231(F) Nothing But the Blues (Same as AFR 231) 
For the past 100 years, blues has been an important and influential form of African-American music that has spread its influence far beyond Black Americans. This seminar examines the history and evolution of the blues and asks several questions. What values and beliefs are implicit in or are expressed through the blues? How has the social experience of African-Americans affected blues music? How has this music changed over time and in different places? Have these changes allowed this music to speak to audiences? What have various forms of the blues meant to African-Americans, to white Americans, to Europeans, Africans, and other peoples? Are there significant differences in the ways in which men and women approach singing or playing the blues? What has been the impact of the blues on other forms of music?  
Evaluation is based on oral presentations and four 5-7 page papers.  No exams.  If over-enrolled preference to concentrators in Africana Studies and students with a musical background.
Prerequisites: prior knowledge of, or course work in, music, African-American history, or African-American culture. Enrollment limit: 10.
This course is part of the Critical Reasoning and Analytical Skills Initiative.
M 7-9:40 p.m. E. D. BROWN

Cancelled course Fall 2009:
MUS 234 Afro-Pop: Urban African Dance Music (Same as AFR 234)

New crosslisting with AFR 242 Fall 2009:
MUS 241 Introduction to the Music of John Coltrane(Same as AFR 242)

New Exploring Diversity Initiative course:
PHIL 224(S) The Philosophy of Sex and Domination (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 223) (W) (D)

Course number change for REL prefix:
PHIL 281T Philosophy of Religion (Same as Religion 302) (W)

Cancelled Spring 2010:
PHIL 304T Authenticity: From Rousseau to Poststructuralism (W)

Satisfies the Women's and Gender Studies Feminist Theory requirement for the major:

PHIL/WGST 327(F) Foucault (W)(D)

New Fall/Spring course:
PHYS 499(F,S) Physics and Astronomy Colloquium (Same as ASTR 499)

Physics and Astronomy researchers from around the country come to explain their research. Students of Physics and Astronomy at any level are welcome.
This is not a for-credit course. Registration is not necessary to attend.
S. BOLTON

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
PSCI 229 Global Political Economy

Cancelled course Fall 2009:
PSCI 300 Research Design and Methods
(Q)

New Experiential Education course:
PSCI 309(S) Problems and Progress in American Democracy

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
PSCI 311 Congressional Leadership (Same as Leadership Studies 311)

New course Fall 2009:
PSCI 347(F) Enlarging Europe: Political Transformations and Current Challenges

In this course we will analyze and assess the major political, social and economic transformations taking place in Europe. First, European states have intensified their cooperation and pooled sovereignty within the European Union. How and by what means can states that fought each other during the second world war and represented two competing alliances during the bipolar world order make common policies in an increasing number of policy areas within the EU? Second, the older and younger democracies in Europe are facing a multitude of challenges. Even though democracy is widely supported by European citizens, traditional forms of democratic citizenship such as voting and membership in parties and organizations are in decline in the “west,” whereas citizens in Central and Eastern European states manifest low trust in political institutions and political parties. The party political landscape is transforming. In the 1980s new political cleavages, such as environmentalism, were added to the traditional left-right dimension. Since the 1990s populist and right-wing radical parties voicing criticism against the political and economic establishments and representing xenophobic and anti-islamic ideas have gained support. Third, some claim that the European welfare states based on taxation and redistribution are under threat due to globalization and europeanization. Is the welfare state in terms of publicly provided health services, education, child and elderly care an asset or a burden in the current economic crisis? Similarities and differences among the European welfare systems will be analyzed and compared. 
Format: seminar.  Requirements: class participation, two 4- to 6-page papers and a research paper.
Prerequisites: one course in political science or permission of instructor.  Enrollment limit: 16 (expected 13).  Preference given to Political Science majors.
Comparative Politics Subfield
TR 11:20-12:35 JUNGAR 

Designated as Writing Intensive:
PSYC 334T(F) Magic, Superstition, and Belief (W)

Designated as Writing Intensive:
PSYC 346T(F) Social Psychology and the Environment (Same as Environmental Studies 346) (W)

Cancelled course Fall 2009:
REL 246(F) India's Identities: Religion, Caste, and Gender (Same as Anthropology 246 and Women's and Gender Studies 246) (D)

New crosslisting with LATS 273 Fall 2009:
REL 273(F) Scriptures and Race (Same as AFR 273 and LATS 273)

New title and course description for RLFR 312(F) Francographic Islands:
RLFR 312(F) Cannibalism and French Caribbean Literature (W) (D)
Cannibalism and the Caribbean have been intertwined since 1492. The two words stem from the same root: Carib, the name of the people Columbus encountered in his first voyage. For five hundred years, cannibalism has represented all that is opposed to the civilizing force of European colonialism and modernization. And yet Caribbean writers have come to embrace a cannibal past by recuperating the idea of cannibalism as a metaphor for linguistic and literary appropriation. This course will begin with the early portrayal of cannibalism in the greater Caribbean through readings including Jean de Léry's Histoire d'un voyage fait en la terre du Brésil (1578), Montaigne's essay "Des cannibales" (1580), and Shakespeare's The Tempest (1611). Aimé Césaire's adaptation of Shakespeare's play, Une tempête (1968), bridges the early modern and the modern and introduces the theme of the rest of the course: namely, the development of a kind of literary cannibalism by New World authors. We will read carefully three novels by two authors from the island of Guadeloupe: La migration des coeurs (1995) and Histoire de la femme cannibale (2003) by Maryse Condé and L'isolé soleil (1981) by Daniel Maximin. We will discuss to what extent these novels are cannibalistic, either of European literature or of history, while engaging concepts such as difference vs. repetition, the value and possibility of originality, the limits of translation, and the cultural effects of globalization. Rather than dismiss the cannibal as a sign of a savage past, this course asks: what can the cannibal teach us about the present and the future? Conducted in French.
Format: seminar. Requirements/Evaluation: active class participation, weekly online reading responses, one midterm essay and one final paper.
Prerequisites: open to students who have taken a literature course in French at Williams, or permission of instructor. Enrollment Limit: 15 (expected: 15). Preference to French and Comparative Literature majors and concentrators in Africana Studies.
W 1:10-3:50 TONKS

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
RLFR 370 Displaying, Collecting and Preserving the Other: Museums and French Imperialism (Same as Africana Studies 370 and Comparative Literature 370)

Cancelled course Spring 2010:
RLSP 202T 1898: Spain's Fin de Siglo and the Crisis of Ideas (W)

Cancelled course Spring 2010:

RLSP 219 Humor in Spanish-American Literature (D)

New course Spring 2010:
RLSP 266(S) The Exemplary Short Fiction of Cervantes
Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) is considered by some to be the father of the modern novel, and known worldwide for authorship of Don Quijote. This course will offer students the opportunity to read another body of work by Cervantes: his collection of short prose works collectively titled Las novelas ejemplares. Attention will be given to the structure and design of the tales, the socio-political and literary context that shaped them, and the often unsettling implications of Cervantes' approach to themes such as insanity, woman's honor, man's relationship to Nature and animals, and the place of representation in art and life. Conducted in Spanish.
Format: seminar. Requirements: active and meaningful participation, two short papers, one final research paper.
Prerequisites: RLSP 200 or above, or permission of the instructor, or results of the Williams College Placement Test. Enrollment limit: 20 (expected: 20).  Preference given to Spanish and Comparative Literature majors.
MWF 12-12:50 ROUHI

Satisfies the Women's and Gender Studies Feminist Theory requirement for the major:
WGST 223(S) The Philosophy of Sex and Domination (W)

 


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