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Addendum to the
Williams College Courses of Instruction 2013-2014

Last updated: 2/6/14 2:26 PM

08/07/13
Cancelled Course Spring 2014:

AFR 316 Sacred Cinema: Black Religion and the Movies (Same as AMST 316 and REL 265)

08/07/13
Cancelled Course Spring 2014:
AFR 320 Dangerous Bodies: Black Womanhood, Sexuality and Popular Culture (Same as AMST 320 and WGSS 320)

10/28/13
Cancelled Course Spring 2014:

ARAB 245 Revolution in Arab Cinema (Same as COMP 245)

10/28/13
Cancelled Course Spring 2014:
11/18/13
New Course Description and Active Spring 2014:

ARAB 302 Advanced Arabic II

This course is a continuation of Intermediate Arabic. It focuses on expanding the students' knowledge of vocabulary and grammar while stressing the development of reading, spoken, and written skills in Modern Standard Arabic. The material covered in class will include lessons from the Al-Kitaab series. This year the course is being offered through the Critical Languages Program: students will work independently using the textbook and a syllabus created by the instructor, meet regularly with a tutor, and complete a midterm and a final, each with a written and oral interview component. Please contact Jane Canova for details.
HOUR: TBA
CANOVA

10/28/13
Cancelled Course Spring 2014:

ARAB 309 An introduction to Egyptian Colloquial Arabic

9/11/13
Cancelled Course Fall 2013:

ARTH 103(F) Asian Art Survey: From the Land of the Buddha to the World of the Geisha (Same as ASST 103) (D)


6/26/13

New Course Fall 2013:
ARTH 214(F) The Landscape of Allusion: Gardens and Landscape Design to c. 1800 (Same as ENVI 216)
This lecture course investigates how humans have shaped and interpreted nature through a study of gardens, architecture, and painting from antiquity to the early nineteenth century, with a focus on Europe and the early modern period. Starting with the ancient world, it traces the persistence of the classical tradition in European landscape design and also addresses to a lesser extent Islamic gardens and America. Approaching landscape and the garden as expressive media, we examine the social and intellectual contexts of their design and themes such as the sacralization of landscape, its use as an instrument of power, and the invention of landscape as an idea. The course will include a field trip to a local historic garden.
Format: lecture. Requirements: one short paper, one 6-8 page papers, midterm and final exams; field trip to local historic garden.
Prerequisite ARTH 101-102 or permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 25 (expected: 25). Preference given to Art majors or Environmental Studies concenration. This course satisfies the pre-1800 requirement.
HOUR: TBA
HEINRICHS

9/11/13
Cancelled Course Fall 2013:

ARTH 274(F) Chinese Calligraphy: Theory and Practice (Same as ARTS 274 and ASST 274)

6/13/13
New Course Description and New Fall Hour:
ARTH 301(F, S) Art About Art: 1400-2000
This thematic seminar focuses on subjects through which artists referred to their own profession and its products, e.g., self-portraits and other portraits of artists, legends about the origin of art, contemporary and historical artists in their studios, finished art on display, and allegories of art. By analyzing specific examples we will track the major changes in art theory from the end of the Middle Ages to the present.
In exploring the theme of art about art, we will apply various methods used for an historical study of art, among them iconography, social functions of art, spectatorship, narratology, and gender and sexuality.
Format: seminar. Requirements: three7-10 page papers, 5 and 20 minute oral reports.
No prerequisites. Preference to Art History majors; required course for ARTH majors.
HOUR: 1:10-3:50 MR First Semester: FILIPCZAK
1:10-2:25 TF Second Semester: SOLUM

7/2/13
New Course Spring 2014:

ARTH 316T(S) The Italian Villa: Complexity and Contradiction (W)

The villa, or country house, has been interpreted as a paradigmatic cultural institution of the Italian Renaissance. But it has proven difficult for scholars to construct a definition of the villa that accounts for the geographical diversity and variety of functions and forms that such buildings possessed. This tutorial will examine villas and villa culture in Italy during the Renaissance and Baroque period, with each meeting organized around a specific case study or theme. Readings from primary and secondary sources will help us to trace the architectural, cultural, and geographical contours of this slippery concept and to grapple with the various scholarly approaches to it. We will consider such questions as: How did architects, theorists, and patrons interpret and transform the villas of Roman antiquity? What is the relationship of villa architecture to its painted decoration and surrounding landscape? What can the villa tell us about social relations in this period, or about conceptions of city and country, and work and leisure? What did home mean in the early modern period?
Format: tutorial. Evaluation based on: quality of and improvement in contributions to discussion, biweekly 5-7-page papers, and alternate-week response papers; final written exercise addressing major themes of course.
Prerequisites: at least one art history course Enrollment limit: 10 (expected: 10)
Satisfies the pre-1800 requirement.
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis or Gadino option.
HOUR: TBA
HEINRICH

6/26/13
New Course Fall 2013:

ARTH 418(F) Myths of Venice: Art and Architecture in a Renaissance City

The Most Serene Republic of Venice perceived itself as unique because of its manmade aqueous environment, stable government and social order, and tradition of mercantile and cultural ties to the Byzantine Empire and the Levant. The Venetian Renaissance, too, distinguished itself from parallel cultural developments in Central Italian cities like Florence and Rome such that it complicates the very notion of "rebirth." This seminar investigates the society and culture of Venice in the sixteenth century through the lens of its art, architecture, and urbanism. We will examine public, private, urbanistic, and ecclesiastical commissions by Titian, Tintoretto, Veronese, Sansovino, and Palladio, among others. In doing so, we consider how these artists and architects together with the Venetian state and individual patrons collectively fashioned an image for and of the city, one that perpetuated the so-called Myth of Venice. The course assesses the validity of the term Renaissance for Venice and the claim for Venice's uniqueness, and explores the ways in which the city itself can be understood as a work of art.
Format: seminar. Evaluation based on reading responses, leading class discussion, development of a research project culminating in an oral presentation and 15-20-page paper.
Prerequisites: ARTH 101-102. Enrollment limit: 14 (expected:14. Preference given to Art majors.
Satisfies the pre-1800 requirement.
HOUR: TBA
HEINRICHS

6/13/13
Cancelled Course Fall 2013:

ARTH 449 Poses and Gestures in 17th-Century European Art (Same as WGSS 449)

4/24/13
New Spring 2014 Course :

ARTH 503(S) Studies in Decorative Arts, Material Culture, Design History, 1700-2000
The course will explore the methods, goals, and theoretical framework in which three-dimensional, functional objects have been and are interpreted. Class discussion will include distinction between "fine arts," "decorative arts," and "design"; role and limitation of connoisseurship; the current relationship of object study to aesthetics, social history, history of technology, anthropology, sociology, gender and ethnic studies; the effect of the market on history and scholarship; and current theories on the role of objects in human life.
Format: seminar. Evaluation will be based on leading class discussions of selected readings, one 20-page paper, two 3-page papers, and an oral presentation on the main research topic.
Enrollment limit: 14. Preference given to Graduate Program students and then to senior Art History majors.
HOUR: 2:10-4:50 T
CONFORTI

5/2/13
New Spring 2014 Course:
ARTH 567(S) Modern/Postmodern
This course explores cleavages and links between modernism and postmodernism, specifically as visual art discourse deploys these terms. Treating its subjects as variable phenomena, it prioritizes the close reading of art practices; curatorial and archival models; theories of art; and salient attitudes towards the production of knowledge about art's past, some of which do not take the form of art history.
Format: seminar. Evaluation will be based on class participation, presentation of research, and a term paper of 20-25 pages.
Enrollment limit: 14. Preference given to Graduate Program students and then to senior Art History majors.
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the Gauino option.
HOUR: 10:00-12:40 W
ENGLISH

10/11/13
New Spring 2014 Course:
ARTS 112(S) Introduction to Three-Dimensional Design
This studio art course will introduce you to the foundational skills necessary for designing and building forms such as sculpture, furniture, apparel, and architecture.  You will make three-dimensional objects in a variety of media.  You will gain confidence in your design abilities as you work quickly through many ideas and take risks in seeing your ideas to fruition.  Through a series of short in-class and homework projects, you will explore the following themes: function and form; part to whole relationships; how bodies and forms occupy space; scale; additive and subtractive processes; organic and manmade forms; mass, volume, and visual weight.  You will learn about the design process by creating drawings, sketches, study models, mock-ups, and ultimately finished objects.  Since this is a studio art course, additional outside-of-class time will be expected for you to complete assignments.  We will have a critique for each project, which will help you learn to articulate your ideas.  In this course, beauty is yours to define: there are no preconceived solutions for each project, and there is ample room to discover. 
Format: studio. Evaluation will be based on Sketchbook, assignments, and final project; the quality of work produced, depth of investigative process, participation in critiques, and attendance.
Prerequisites: none, open to all students. Enrollment limit:10 (expected: 10). Preference: Art Majors (declared); first-year and sophomore students.
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the Gaudino option.
HOUR: 1:10-3:50 T
ENCK

10/17/13
New Spring 2014 Course:
ARTS 231(S) The Studio as Laboratory: Cross-disciplinary Investigations
This inter-disciplinary course explores the intersections of artistic and scholarly inquiry, looking at ways in which artists have engaged in studies outside of their own discipline in order to inform their artistic practice.
Students will be introduced to artists from Albrecht Dürer to Mark Dion, whose rigorous investigations in the realms of science, mathematics and music to social and political histories have directly impacted and shaped their work.
This course combines both lecture and studio, where students will approach  given studio assignments through the lens of their own in-depth research.
This course is open to a range of media including drawing, painting, sculpture and video.
Format: studio. Evaluation will be based on the student's active class participation including open discussions, critiques, presentations, a semester-long research journal and three studio projects.
Prerequisites: Any one Art History class and any one studio class or permission of instructor. Preference given to Art majors.
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis.

HOUR: 1:10-3:50 T
WATERSTON

5/20/2013
Cancelled Course Spring 2014
:
BIOL 136 Studying Human Genetic Diversity: Individuals, Populations, and `Races'-Dangerous Biology

5/20/2013
Cancelled Course Fall 2013:

BIOL 416 Epigenetics

5/20/2013
Cancelled Course Fall 2013:

BIOL 426T Frontiers in Muscle Physiology: Controversies (W)

5/10/2013
Cancelled Course Fall 2013:

BIOL 319 Integrative Bioinformatics, Genomics, and Proteomics Lab (Same as CHEM 319, CSCI 319, MATH 319 and PHYS 319) (Q)

5/9/2013
New Spring 2014 course:

BIOL 406(S) Dynamics of Internal Membrane Systems

Eukaryotic cells build and maintain a diverse set of internal membrane compartments that control the functionality of proteins at the cell surface and allow the cell to create immensely disparate internal chemical environnments. Despite a high rate of exchange between the constituents of this interconnected and dynamic membrane system, it has become apparent that compartmental identity (i.e. a unique set of protein constituents) can be established by regulated cargo selection and membrane fusion reactions. This course will utilize classic and current primary literature articles to examine mechanistic questions in the membrane trafficking field and the importance of specialized membrane compartments in homeostasis and immunity.
Format: seminar. Requirements: discussion, three hours per week. Evaluation will be based on class participation and several short papers.
Prerequisites: BIOL 202. Enrollment limit: 12 (expected 12). Open to juniors and seniors with preference given to senior biology majors who have not taken a 400-level course, then to juniors.
Not available for the Gaudino option. May not be taken pass/fail.
Satisfies distribution requirement in the major.
Hour: 9:55-11:10 TR, 11:20-12:35 TR
A. ENGEL

4/23/2013
Cancelled course Spring 2014:

BIOL 408 RNA Worlds

5/10/2013
Cancelled course Fall 2013:
BIOL 413 Molecular Basis of Biological Clocks

8/16/2013
Cancelled Course Fall 2013:

CHEM 343 Medicinal Chemistry

6/24/13
Cancelled Course Fall 2013:
CLGR 412 Herodotus

6/24/13
New Course Fall 2013:
CLGR 413(F) Hellenistic Poetry
After the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BCE, a new cultural center emerged in the recently founded city of Alexandria in Egypt. From across the Greek-speaking world, intellectuals who were both scholars and poets flocked to Alexandria's Museion (the shrine to the Muses) and its renowned library to categorize and organize the literature of the past while creating new kinds of poetry and poetic ideals. This course surveys the poetry of Hellenistic period with a focus on the "big three" poets of the third century, Callimachus, Theocritus, and Apollonius of Rhodes, who were especially influential on later Latin poetry of the Republic and Augustan ages. As we read a variety of texts including epigrams, hymns, mimes, pastoral idylls, and selections from epic, we will pay close attention to issues of genre, the tension between tradition and innovation, and the cultural context of Greco-Egyptian Alexandria.
Format: seminar. Evaluation will be based on class participation, shorter written exercises and/or oral reports, midterm and final exams, and a final paper.
Prerequisites: CLGR 201 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limit: 12 (expected 5-7). Preference given to Classics majors.
HOUR: 1:10-2:25 MR
BOYCHENKO


5/29/13
New Course Fall 2013:
COMP 236(F) Screens of Terror: Representations of War, Terror, and Terrorism in Western
Films after 9/11 (Same as INST 239)(W)(D)
How has Hollywood contributed to "the war on terror?" What is the effect of the media on public opinion about this new kind of war? This course will seek to answer these questions through a critical examination of recent Western films with explicit portrayals of 9/11, acts of terrorism, terrorists, Arabs, Muslims, and western military and politicians. Using methods of literary analysis, we will examine such films as Syriana (2005), United 93 (2006), The Hurt Locker (2009), Avatar (2009), and Iron Man 3 (2013) among others to reflect on how experiences of war, terror, and terrorism have been recently represented on screen. We will also investigate how Hollywood practices have been implemented in other world cinemas in the recent years. Among others, we will look into how the on-going Russo-Chechen conflict has been represented in Russian cinema before and after 9/11. Readings in film interpretation will range from early film theorists such as Eisenstein and Krakauer to contemporary literary critics such as Eagleton and Jameson. We will also review relevant cultural theory and criticism addressing questions of orientalism (Said and Shaheen) and the role of media in the construction of public opinion (Zizek, Baudrillard, and Chomsky). This EDI course will engage with questions of ethnic, religious, and national identity in the highly polarized post 9/11 landscape and ask students to (re)consider the tangled notions of perspective and representation. Students will also come away with techniques in film analysis, practice in writing reviews, and a deepened understanding of the relationship between society and film today.
Format: seminar. Requirements: active class participation, frequent short writing assignments (3 pages), a final paper (3 pages), and an oral presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 19 (expected:19). Preference given to Comparative Literature Majors or International Studies concentrators.
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis or Gaudino option.

HOUR: 9:00-9:50 MWF
LADYGINA

8/30/13
Revised Course Description Fall 2013:

DANC 100(F) Foundations for Dance
This course is a primer of basic dance technique and an introduction to the history of dance in several cultures. It is also a foundation for all other courses taught in the Dance Department. Students will study the fundamentals of ballet, modern and African dance and music as well as the historic and cultural context of these forms. Regular studio wor k, reading,discussion and viewing dance are required.
Format: studio/lecture/discussion. Evaluation will be based on active participation and progress in techniques, participation in discussions, quality of written assignments and project presentations.
No prerequisites. Experienced dancers who wish to enroll in upper level courses may waive the DANC 100 prerequisite by taking the advanced placement class or by permission of the faculty. Enrollment limit: 30 (expected: 30). Preference given to beginning dancers and students with no prior experience.
*Option: Dance Department ensemble members in good standing may fulfill the studio portion of the course within their weekly ensemble classes and attend seminar sections only; any ensemble member who drops membership during the semester must remain in company classes to receive credit for DANC 100.
Hour: 1:10-2:25 MR Lab: 2:35-3:50 MR
BURTON and PARKER

4/24/13
New Spring 2014 Course:
DANC 202(S) African Dance and Percussion (Same as AFR 206 and MUS 213)
Students will learn dance and music traditions from the African continent. To more fully understand the art form, students will also study the culture and history of the African regions in which selected dance and music evolved. This course can be taken for academic and /or PE credit
Prerequisites. DANC 100 or advanced placement or permission of the instructor.
Format: studio/ lecture/discussion. Requirements:students enrolled for academic credit must attend weekly lecture/discussion sessions and write a final 5-page research paper that is related to his/her final performance project;students enrolled PE credit have no final paper and do not attend the weekly lectures. All students must participate in a performance project of course material.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20 (expected: 20). Preference given to students who have taken DANC 100 or advanced placement.
HOUR: 1:10-3:50 TF
MUPARUTSU

4/25/13
Newly Cross-listed with INST; Fall 2013:
ECON 217(F) Economics of East Asia (Same as ASST 220 and INST 217)

This course will provide students with an understanding of economic growth in East Asia and the region's current microeconomic policy issues. For the purpose of this course, we will focus on China, Japan, Korea, and a few Southeast Asian countries. Those interested in economic development and applied microeconomic policies characteristic of East Asia will find this course useful. We first examine the process of economic growth. Cross country comparisons will help draw similarities but also differences in the development processes. The second part of the course will focus on specific economic issues such as, privatization in China, education and inequality in South Korea, demographic challenges in Japan, health care in Indonesia, etc. The course will involve readings from various texts, policy reports, academic journals, and case studies. Throughout the course students will learn how to read empirical evidence presented in these articles.
Format: lecture. Requirements: problem sets, one midterm, individual short papers, a group project that involves a research proposal, presentation, and a final paper.
Prerequisites: ECON 110 and ECON 120. Enrollment limit: 35 (expected: 25). Preference given to Economics and Asian Studies majors.
Hour: 9:55-11:10 TR
LEE

10/7/13
Cancelled Course Spring 2014:
ECON 378 Long-Run Perspectives on Economic Growth (Not offered 2013-2014) (Q)

10/7/13
To be Offered Spring 2014:
ECON 468(S) Your Money or Your Life: Health Disparities in the United States
A 25 year-old man living in a high-income household can expect to live 10 years longer than his low-income counterpart. There are also stark differences in mortality and health by education, employment status, race, immigrant status, region, and gender. This course will explore many of the potential explanations for health disparities, including access to insurance and health care, health behaviors, stress, environmental exposure, and intergenerational transmission of health. We will emphasize causal inference and focus on assessing the quality of evidence. We will also investigate how government policies contribute to or ameliorate health disparities in the U.S.
Format: seminar. Course will include frequent small group meetings, a computer lab, and a poverty simulation. Evaluation includes class discussion, oral presentations, 4 short response papers, two 5-page critiques of published articles, and one 15-page original empirical research paper.
Prerequisites: ECON 251 and ECON 255 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 19 (expected: 19). Preference given to senior Economics majors.
Hour: 1:10-2:25 MR
WATSON

6/19/13
To be Offered Spring 2014:

ECON 515(S) Developing Country Macroeconomics II

This lecture course is a continuation of Economics 505. The first part of the course extends the analysis of the first semester to several open-economy issues that arise in developing countries, especially with respect to the interactions among exchange rate regimes, monetary policy regimes, and policies directed at the financial account of the balance of payments. The second part of the course will apply these analytical tools, as well as those developed in Economics 505, to an examination of the various types of crises that have afflicted developing countries over the past three decades, considering in particular the implications of such crises for growth and development.
Format: lecture. Requirements: two midterms and a final project.
Prerequisites: Economics 505. Expected enrollment: 25-30. Undergraduate enrollment limited and requires instructor's permission.
Hour: 8:30-9:45 MWF
KUTTNER

4/22/13
Not offered Spring 2014; to be offered Fall 2013:

ENGL 117(F) Introduction to Cultural Theory (Same as COMP 117) (W)

4/22/13
Cancelled Course Spring 2014:

ENGL 224 The Origins of Literary Modernity, 1530-1750 (W) (Gateway)

10/17/13
Cancelled Course Spring 2014:
ENGL 323 A Novel Education

1/21/14 added WGSS cross-listing
1/20/14 updated EDI information
12/23/13
New Course Spring 2014:
ENGL 381(S) Who's Afraid of Failure? (Same as AFR 380, WGSS 381 and AMST 381) (D)
Success is demanding, as any Williams student knows, and all that discipline-hard work, sacrifice, perseverance-can come to seem an end in itself. But as the great theorist of children's animation and stoner movies Jack Halberstam has noted, sometimes failure turns out to be a better bet than success: it can reveal the blindspots of dominant ideologies, while opening up alternative ways of living in the world. This course will take a long detour through meditations on failure emerging from queer theory, Asian American studies, and black studies, with a particular interest in what failure can reveal about higher education and related disciplinary institutions, such as prisons or the so-called "internment camps" for Japanese Americans during World War II. This course fulfills the Exploring Diversity requirement by considering how the stigmatization of difference and justification of social inequality are inscribed in supposedly neutral rubrics of success and failure.
Readings may include Halberstam's Queer Art of Failure, Junot Diaz's Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, and works by Fred Moten, Roderick Ferguson, Angela Davis, Hisaye Yamamoto, Toshio Mori, Nella Larsen, Victor Lavalle, and others. Students will also have the opportunity to bring these concepts to bear on other social concerns and/or cultural objects (music, film, etc.) of their choice, as we attempt to figure out just what a course in cultural criticism might be good for in a society infatuated with success. What are you planning to do with that liberal-arts degree, anyway?
Format: seminar. Requirements: class participation, frequent short writing assignments, a midterm take-home exam, and a final project.
Prerequisites: a 100-level ENGL course, or a score of 5 on the AP English Literature exam, or a score of 6 or 7 on the Higher Level IB English exam or permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 25(expected: 10). Preference given to English majors and Africana Studies concentrators.
(LH-C and CRITICISM)
HOUR: 11:00-12:15 MWF
SCHLEITWILER

12/19/2013
New Course Spring 2014:
ENGL 390T(S) Donne, Shakespeare, and Wroth (Same as WGSS 390T) (W)
"Wit! Wonder-exciting vigour, intenseness and peculiarity of thought," Samuel Coleridge wrote, "this is the wit of Donne!" There are no greater, wittier, or more daringly original lyric poems in the English language than Donne's Songs and Sonnets, Shakespeare's Sonnets, or Mary Wroth's Pamphilia to Amphilathus, the first collection of secular poems written and published by an Englishwoman. This tutorial will explore the following questions. What are these writers' stylistic characteristics? How peculiar or unconventional are these poems, and what innovations do they seek? What is the impact of their coterie audience? How do questions of sexuality and gender animate these poems? To what extent are biography and history pertinent or helpful in understanding this poetry? Why have these poems inspired such provocative critical responses from modernists, and more recently, post-modernists and gender studies?
Format: tutorial;students will meet with the instructor in pairs for an hour each week. Requirements:students will write a 5- to 7-page paper every other week (five in all), and comment on their partners' papers in alternate weeks.
Prerequisites: a 100-level ENGL course, or a score of 5 on the AP English Literature exam, or a score of 6 or 7 on the Higher Level IB English exam. Enrollment limit: 10 (expected:10). Preference given to English and WGSS majors or potenial majors.
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis.
(LH-A)
HOUR: TBA
I. BELL

10/17/13
4/22/13
New Spring 2014 course:
ENGL 396(S) Happiness
Happiness is one big puzzle. The Greek philosophers were largely agreed that nothing was more important, but they couldn't agree on how to get it. The Declaration of Independence makes a big deal about it, and yet modern politicians talk about happiness almost not at all. They offer to make us freer or safer or richer, but they almost never say they'll make us happier. Academic psychologists, meanwhile, have shown that we're really bad at identifying what will make us happy; we think we know, and we're usually wrong. Some living philosophers have concluded that we don't even know what the word means. In this seminar, we'll have to ask all the hard questions: What is happiness? What makes people happy? How do you decide what kind of life is worth living? Does happiness change from society to society or culture to culture? Is there a politics to happiness?What, if anything, does happiness have to do with justice? Why does the song tell you to clap your hands "if you're happy and you know it"? Is it possible to behappy and not know it? Are some of us happy behind our own backs? The course will be held inside the Berkshire county jail; enrollment will be divided equally between Williams students and residents of the jail. Final enrollment will be settled on the basis of face-to-face interviews with the instructor. The jail setting is a way of opening up the classroom to the one group that college students almost never get to hear from around the seminar table: people who have not thought of themselves as college-bound. One class meeting per week. Attendance is required, except in cases of emergency. Transportation will be provided by the college.
Format:seminar/discussion.Requirements:short weekly writing assignment; final essay, 12-15 pages.
No Prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 9(expected:9) Open to all Williams students, men and women.
HOUR: 1:10-3:50 W
THORNE

12/18/13
Cancelled Course Spring 2014:

ENGL 414 Donne, Shakespeare, and Wroth (Same as WGSS 414) (W)

4/22/13
Cancelled Course
Fall 2013:

ENGL 456 Special Topics in American Literature: Derrida

06/24/13
Cancelled Course Fall 2013:

ENVI 209 Ecologies of Place: Culture, Commodities and Everyday Life (Same as AMST 209 and ANTH 209)

7/17/13
New Cross listing with AFR
6/28/13

New Fall 2013 course:
ENVI 212(F) African American Environmental Culture from Slavery to Environmental Justice (Same as AMST 214 and AFR 218) (D)
Until the environmental justice movement rose to prominence over the past few decades and invited a more critical perspective on the connection between race and the environment, popular understanding of the American environmental (and environmentalist) tradition had effectively been whitewashed. But why? This course will work to find answers to that question while unearthing the deeper roots of African American environmental culture in conversation with key moments in African American history - from slavery to sharecropping, from migration and urbanization to environmental justice. With an interdisciplinary approach that considers sources as diverse as slave narratives, fiction, poetry, songs, photographs, maps, and ethnographies, we will consider African American intellectuals, writers, and visual and musical artists not always associated with environmental thought, from W.E.B. Du Bois and Zora Neale Hurston to the Black Panthers and Marvin Gaye.
Format: lecture/discussion. Evaluation considers active, informed participation in class discussion based on assigned readings, midterm and final exams, and three 5-7 page essays. Students are also expected to research and respond to at least one news article exploring some aspect of the intersection between race and the environment over the course of the semester, and to share your findings with the class for discussion. This course fulfills the Exploring Diversity Initiative requirement by examining the themes of empathetic understanding and power and privilege. Among many other paths of inquiry, we will examine how African American environmental culture has evolved in conversation with an historical context of discrimination, racism, and inequality.
No prerequisites; open to first-year and continuing students. Enrollment limit: 20 (Expected:15). May not be taken pass/fail. Not available for the Gaudino option.
Hour: 11:20-12:35 TR
MCCAMMACK

7/31/13
Cancelled Course Spring 2014:

ENVI 217 Environmental isms": Ideology in the Environmental Humanities (Same as AMST 216) (D)

10/9/13
New Spring 2014 Course:

ENVI 251(S) Discovering New England's Environmental Culture: From Howling Wildernesses to Managed Forests
(Same as AMST 251)
Williams College was founded in 1793, and in its first century, it was surrounded more by farmland than forest. How did we get from there to here, and why? More broadly, how and why has New England's material environment-and the way writers, politicians, farmers, and common laborers understood that environment-changed so drastically in the past two hundred years? This course will begin to answer those questions by exploring the historical, literary, and political trends that have defined New England's environmental culture, from European contact and settlement in the 17th century to the 21st century's battle over Cape Wind. Topics discussed will include deforestation and reforestation, fishing and overfishing, urbanization and industrialization, and gendered perspectives of the landscape. Key texts include Henry David Thoreau's Walden, Sarah Orne Jewett's The Country of the Pointed Firs, and Michael Rawson's award-winning environmental history of Boston.
Format: lecture/discussion. Evaluation based on attendance and participation, weekly written responses to readings, two 5-7 page essays, and a final group research assignment (10-12 page essay and presentation) that situates Williamstown's/North Adams's local environment in relation to course themes.
No Prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25 (expected: 15).
Hour: 11:20-12:35 TR
MCCAMMACK

10/9/13
New Spring 2014 Course:
ENVI 252(S) A Perfect Storm: How Economic and Environmental Disaster Defined America During the Depression
(Same as AMST 252)
What happens to environmental priorities and perspectives when the economy crashes? Since 2008, the "Great Recession" has been disastrous not only for Americans' financial well-being, but also for the political will to take action on climate change (to name just one environmental issue). But it wasn't always this way. The 1930s, one of the most traumatic decades of the twentieth century in America, actually spurred environmentally-conscious action in an economic context far worse than what we are experiencing today. Why? This class will explore the many ways Americans understood their diverse local environments and took action to save them during the Great Depression. Although the Dust Bowl is perhaps the most iconic of these environmental upheavals during the 1930s, this course will explore diverse geographical regions: from the Appalachian mountains to the (de)forested Upper Midwest, from the agricultural South to the Dust Bowl plains and the water-starved West. In each region, we will trace the impacts of economic turmoil on the environment and the people who depended on it for their livelihoods, as well as the way the economic disaster paved the way for the federal government's unprecedented intervention in environmental matters. Key texts will include John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath and the John Ford film adaptation, Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, and Aldo Leopold's A Sand County Almanac.
Format: lecture/discussion. Evaluation based on attendance and participation, weekly written responses to readings, two 5-7 page essays, and a final examination consisting of essays and identifications.
No Prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25 (expected: 15).
Hour: 1:10-2:25 MR
MCCAMMACK

7/31/13
Cancelled Course Spring 2014:

ENVI 303 Cultures of Climate Change (Same as SOC 303) (W)


10/9/13
New Spring 2014 Course:
ENVI 353(S) Apocalypse in Post-War America: Environmental Fear from the Atomic Age to Climate Change
(Same as AMST 353)
One dominant strain of the postwar American environmental imagination has been fear, from diffuse anxiety to paralyzing terror. This course will explore this culture of fear through a variety of topics in postwar American environmental consciousness, including the specter of atomic annihilation, the anti-ecotoxics and environmental justice movements, food security, and climate change. We will also explore issues surrounding the idea of wilderness, the relation of native peoples and other minority groups with the landscape, the natural environment in urban spaces, human labor in the natural environment, and the ways in which a variety of disciplinary perspectives such as law, politics, and public health inform our historical understanding of environmental fear. Key texts will include Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove, Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle, Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, Eric Schlosser's Fast Food Nation, and Cormac McCarthy's The Road.
Format: seminar/discussion. Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation, weekly written responses to readings, structuring and leading discussion during one class meeting, one 5-7 page review essay, and a final 12-15 page research paper.
No Prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15 (expected: 10).
Hour: 1:10-3:50 W
MCCAMMACK

06/03/13
New Spring 2014 Course:
HIST 117(S) Bombay/Mumbai: Making of a Modern Metropolis (Same as ASST 117 and INST 117) (W)

In the summer of 1661, a marriage alliance between the Portuguese and the British crowns resulted in the hand over of a set of seven small, swampy, spottily inhabited islands on the west coast of India to the latter. Through the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, these islands, turned into a contiguous landmass by the British, emerged as the thriving port city of Bombay. Known today as Mumbai, it is the heart of India's commercial life comparable in vibrancy and multiculturalism with the world's foremost cities like New York and Shanghai. Yet, Mumbai also has its own unique character. In fact it is it is often said that Mumbai is not just a city but also a state of mind. Its vibrant culture and dark underbelly of poverty and violence have inspired numerous books and films. In this course we will explore the many narratives about Mumbai, from colonial to contemporary times to understand how this city of dreams has been imagined throughout its history. These narratives will be placed alongside recent research on the specific themes in order to understand the different elements that went into the making of this modern metropolis.
Format: seminar. Requirements: class participation, weekly essays (3 pages), final research paper (10 pages).
Prerequisites: first-year or sophomore standing. Enrollment limit: 19 (expected: 15-19). Preference given to first-year students, then sophomores who have not previously taken a 100-level seminar.
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the Gaudino option.
Group A

Hour: 1:10-2:25 TF
KAPADIA

05/28/13
New Spring 2014 Course:
HIST 205(S) Pre-Modern Middle East to 1500: From Muhammad to the Mongols (Same as ARAB 205 and REL 238)

This survey course introduces some of the most fascinating figures, puzzling problems, and heated debates in Middle Eastern history. We will explore trends in the pre-Islamic Middle East; traditional and revisionist interpretations of Islamic origins; the expansion of the Islamic polity throughout the Middle East; the great Islamic caliphates based in the flourishing capitals of Baghdad and Cairo; the disruptive impact of the Crusades, Mongol conquests, and Black Death on the medieval Middle East; and the rise of the Ottoman Empire. After reading primary and secondary sources, students will be equipped to form their own interpretations of this foundational period in Middle Eastern history.
Format: lecture/discussion. Requirements: class participation, weekly response papers, two 5-page essays, and a self-scheduled final exam.
No prerequisites; open to all. Enrollment limit: 40 (expected: 20-25).
GROUP G
Hour: 1:10-2:25 TF
URBAN

4/25/13
Newly Cross-listed with LEAD; Fall 2013:

HIST 207(F) The Modern Middle East (Same as ARAB 207, INST 101, JWST 217, LEAD 207 and REL 239) (D)
This survey course addresses the main economic, religious, political and cultural trends in the modern Middle East. Topics to be covered include the cultural diversity of the Middle East, relations with Great Powers, the impact of imperialism, the challenge of modernity, the creation of nation states and nationalist ideologies, the discovery of oil, radical religious groups, and war and peace. Throughout the course these significant changes will be evaluated in light of their impact on the lives of a variety of individuals in the region and especially how they have grappled differently with increasing Western political and economic domination. This course is part of the Exploring Diversity Initiative because it compares the differences and similarities between different cultures and societies in the Middle East and the various ways they have responded to one another in the past.
Format: lecture/discussion. Evaluation will be based on participation, short papers, quizzes, group project and final exam.
Prerequisites: none; open to all. Enrollment limit: 40 (expected: 30-40). Completion of course admission survey if overenrolled.
Group E

Hour: 9:55-11:10 TR
BERNHARDSSON


4/29/13
New Fall 2013 Course:
HIST 220(F) History and Society in India and South Asia: c. 2000 to 1700s CE
(Same as ASST 222)
This course is an introduction to the history of South Asia from prehistoric times to the emergence of "early modernity". During these centuries, the subcontinent emerged as one of the most diverse and complex regions of the world, as it continues to be even today. The course will cover the period between the rise of the Indus Valley civilization to the end of the Mughal Empire and will address topics such the as the "discovery of India", the coming of the "Aryans", society and culture in the great epics like the Ramayana, the beginnings of Jain and Buddhist thought, politics and patronage under Islamic polities, the formation of Mughal imperial authority through art, architecture and literature, among others. Through the study of social processes, the course will focus on the diversity and connectedness that have defined the subcontinent throughout its history. It will also consider the role of history in the region and how a number of events from the past continue to inform its present.
Format: lecture/discussion. Requirements: Evaluation will be based on participation, response papers, short essays, and a final exam.
No prerequisites; open to all. Enrollment limit: 40 (expected: 20-25).
Group B

Hour: 2:35-3:50 MR
KAPADIA

06/03/13
New Spring 2014 Course:

HIST 221(S) The Making of Modern South Asia: 1750-1950 CE (Same as ASST 221 and INST 221)
This course will focus on the history of South Asia with the aim of providing an overview of the political and social landscape of the region from the end of the Mughal Empire through British colonial rule and the Partition of India and Pakistan.
We will explore a range of themes including the rise of colonialism, nationalism, religion, caste, gender relations, and the emergence of modern social and political institutions on the subcontinent. In addition to reading key texts and primary sources on the specific themes, the course will also involve regular screenings and discussions on important, related films.
Format: lecture/discussion. Requirements: class participation, map quizzes, response papers (2 pages), short paper (6-8 pages), final exam.
No prerequisites; open to all. Enrollment limit: 40 (expected: 20-25).
Group B

Hour: :10-2:25 MR
KAPADIA

06/03/13
Cancelled Course Fall 2013:
HIST 281 African-American History, 1619-1865 (Same as AFR 281) (D)

05/28/13
New Fall 2013 Course:
HIST 306(F) Women and Gender in Middle Eastern History (Same as ARAB 306, INST 306 and WGSS 305)

Contrary to the stereotypical image of an unchanging, universally oppressed Middle Eastern woman, the experiences of women in the Middle East have not remained static across time and place. We will begin by framing questions of current interest, such as the veil, women's rights in Islamic law, and female access to economic resources and political power. We will then examine the foundations of these issues in religious scriptures, legal treatises, historical narratives, and biographical accounts from the pre-modern Middle East. By investigating how issues of modern relevance have been approached throughout history, we will learn to appreciate the diversity of Middle Eastern women's lived experiences and to combat stereotypes with careful historical arguments.
Format: lecture/discussion. Requirements: class participation; three short (2-3 page) response papers; one medium-length essay (8-10 pages) and accompanying oral presentation; and a collaborative project (the creation and execution of a dramatic performance of Middle Eastern women's life stories, in monologue form).
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25 (expected: 20-25).
Group E
Hour: 1:10-2:25 MR
URBAN

4/25/13
New Fall 2013 Course:

HIST 391(F) When India was the World: Trade, Travel and History in the Indian Ocean
(Same as ASST 391 and INST 391)
Can historians study oceans rather than lands? Is it possible to think about an aquatic space as an integrated cultural region rather than simply focusing on terra-centric empires and societies? What can we learn about human interactions in the past through the study of oceanic histories? This course seeks to answer these questions by focusing on the oldest maritime highway in history: the Indian Ocean. The Indian Ocean connected diverse regions, cultures and communities for millennia, thus making it a vital element in the birth of globalization. South Asian ports and port cities remained the fulcrum of the Indian Ocean world throughout its history; traders, travellers, nobles, scholars, pilgrims and pirates from all over the world travelled to the Indian coast in search of adventure, spices, knowledge and wealth. Thus we will primarily focus on India's role in the Indian Ocean roughly from the rise of Islam in the seventh century CE through the intrusion of various European communities in the region and the subsequent rise of the global economy and colonialism in the nineteenth century. Rather than following a strict temporal chronology we will concentrate on themes such a travel and adventure; trade and exchange; trust and friendship; religion and society; pilgrimage; piracy; the culture of port cities; and food across time.
Format: seminar. Requirements: Evaluation will be based on participation, response papers based on primary sources, and two essays.
No prerequisites; open to all. Enrollment limit: 25 (expected: 15-20).
Group B

Hour: 1:10-2:25 TF
KAPADIA

7/15/2013
Course Change from Fall 2013 to Spring 2014
JAPN 130(S) (formerly 230) Introduction to Linguistic Analysis

7/15/2013
Course Cancelled Spring 2014
JAPN 231 Survey of Linguistic Diversity: Meaning, Context and Communication (Same as ANTH 231)

7/15/2013
Course Cancelled Fall 2013

JAPN 274T JAPN 274T Confronting Japan (Same as COMP 274T) (W)

05/29/13
New Fall 2013 Course:

LATS 208 Introduction to Latina/o Literatures (Same as AMST 207 and COMP 211) (D)
This discussion course serves as an introduction; the reading list is not meant to be exhaustive or comprehensive, but will rather provide a sampling or range of texts for students to engage. We will explore a number of readings across different genres (the novel, play, poem, short story, graphic novel). Students will endeavor to understand how each author defines Latinidad. What characterizes Latina/os for each of these writers and how do their works articulate the historical conditions out of which they emerge? How is Latina/o literature marked by notions of language, nationality, gender, sexuality, class, race, politics, form, and genre? The readings will provide both a survey of general ideas in the study of Latina/o literatures as well as specific case studies and historical examples from which we will extrapolate about the larger field. Readings include works by Tómas Rivera, Cristina García, Cristy C. Road, Oscar Zeta Acosta, Junot Díaz, Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez, and more. This course fulfills the Exploring Diversity Initiative requirements as it offers students a comparative study of cultures and societies by examining the U.S. racial project of constructing a Latina/o people out of various peoples.
Format: lecture. Requirements: students will be evaluated based on weekly online discussion forum posts, two short papers, a midterm exam, a final comprehensive project, as well as classroom participation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30 (expected: 20). Preference to Latina/o Studies concentrators, American Studies and Comparative Literature majors .
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis.

Hour: 1:10-2:25 MR
HERNÁNDEZ

08/07/13
New Spring 2014 Course:

LATS 254(S) U.S. Cuban Life-Writing: Nationalism, Narrative, and Exile (Same as AMST 255, COMP 254 and ENGL 243) (D)
This course introduces students to the genres of life-writing that have become principal forms of artistic, social, and cultural expression amongst Cubans in the United States. Learning about several examples of life-writing including memoir, autobiography, {testimonio}, and the bildungsroman, students will question how literary form is linked not only to culture but also to the social, economic, and political conditions out of which authors and writings emerge. Common themes or narrative arcs across U.S. Cuban life-writing will be charted throughout the semester in order to understand the currency of particular stories of exile, displacement, and the American dream. The primary question of the course asks: how, and towards what ends, are the genres of life-writing utilized, adapted, and revised by those disavowed by the nation? Readings will include works by Eduardo Machado, Carlos Eire, Virgil Suarez, Gustavo Perez Firmat, Olga Karman, Evelio Grillo, Pablo Medina, Emilio Bejel, Mirta Ojita, and Emilio Estefan. This course works under the Exploring Diversity Initiative's theme of empathetic understanding allowing students to think through the experiences of exile, as well as the theme of power and privilege, examining how U.S. Cuban exile and writing about it has been structured by political, social, and economic institutions.
Format: lecture. Requirements: Students will be evaluated based on weekly online discussion posts, two short papers, a midterm exam, a final comprehensive project, as well as classroom participation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Core elective for Latina/o Studies concentration. Preference to Latina/o Studies concentrators.
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the Gaudino option.

Hour: 9:55-11:10 TR
HERNÁNDEZ

08/07/13
New Spring 2014 Course:

LATS 308(S) Diaspora and Displacement: Theories and Literatures (Same as AMST 308) (D)
This seminar blends theories on the definitions of diaspora, with scholarly research on particular diasporic communities, and literary depictions of the experience of the diasporic subject. This combination is meant to provide students with the intellectual frameworks that prevail amidst diaspora studies while simultaneously grounding these scholarly concepts in the approachable lens of fiction. The first section of the course examines theoretical notions of diaspora through the work of such scholars as Khachig Tölölyan, William Safran, Stuart Hall, James Clifford, and Brent Hayes Edwards. The second section introduces literary works alongside further research on particular diasporic communities, including writings by Avtar Brah, Lok Siu, Georges Eugene Fouron, Saidiya Hartman, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Marjane Satrapi. The final portion of the class turns to the work of scholars and authors that revise diaspora studies in exciting ways, including David L. Eng, Gayatri Gopinath, JeeYeun Lee, Stefan Helmreich, R. Zamora Linmark, Nam Le, and Cristina Garcia. This course fulfills the critical theorization theme for the Exploring Diversity Initiative through its comparative analysis of scholarship and literature on difference in diasporic communities.
Format: seminar. Requirements: Students will be evaluated based on weekly write-ups on the readings, two in-class presentations on the readings, participation, a midterm annotated bibliography, and a final seminar paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 21. Core elective for Latina/o Studies concentration. Preference to Latina/o Studies concentrators.
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the Gaudino option.

Hour: 2:35-3:50 MR
HERNÁNDEZ

06/26/13
Not offered Spring 2014; to be offered Fall 2013:
LATS 313(F) Gender, Race, Beauty, and Power in the Age of Transnational Media (Same as AMST 313 and WGSS 313) (D)

4/25/13
Cancelled Course Fall 2013:

LATS 330 Connective Approaches to Race, Ethnicity, and Diaspora (Same as AMST 330)

06/26/13
Not offered Spring 2014; to be offered Fall 2013:

LATS 338(F) Latina/o Musical Cultures: Gender, Race, Sexuality and the Dynamics of the Everyday (Same as AMST 339 and WGSS 338) (W) (D)

10/15/13
New Spring 2014 Course:

LATS 370(S) Immigrant Social Movements: Bridging Theory and Praxis (Same as AMST 370, INST 370, JLST 370 and SOC 370) (D)
What routes are available to immigrant communities seeking to fight for inclusion and political participation? Do undocumented immigrants have rights in the United States and if so, what are these rights? Also, what agencies, political bodies or local/national organizations are responsible for making such determinations? Focusing on the activism of undocumented immigrant communities (parents, youth and allies), this course analyzes political mobilization by a group of individuals thought by many not to have rights. In doing so, comparisons will be drawn with the strategies and campaigns of those in the LGBT community and that of civil rights activists of the 1960s. Seeking to understand the origins and effects of what anthropologist Nicholas DeGenova refers to as "migrant illegality," students in this course will become familiar with the factors leading to international migration, the role of laws and federal/state policies in criminalizing and disenfranchising migrants, and the various forms of resistance in which undocumented communities have engaged in order to fight oppression and marginalization. Readings and course materials will be highly interdisciplinary drawing from disciplines such as ethnic studies, sociology, anthropology, political science and legal studies; course readings will be supplemented by films and an experiential learning component. As part of this component students will spend a total of 30 hours over the semester interning at a local community-based organization, and write a 15-page final paper that connects course readings with their internship experience.
Format: seminar. Requirements: 15-page final paper thta connects course readings with internship experience.
No Prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16 (expected: 12). Preference will be given to LATS concentrators, AMST and JLST juniors and seniors.
Core elective for Latina/o Studies concentration.
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the Gaudino option.

Hour: 1:10-2:25 MR
ESCUDERO

05/29/13
New Fall 2013 Course:
LATS 412(F) Latina/o Collectivities: Family, Community, Nation (Same as AMST 412) (D)
This seminar will interrogate the three scales of belonging and un-belonging that are the family, the community, and the nation. Each of these, as social constructions, are sights of contestation and cooperation. Students endeavor to understand the everyday identifications made by the Latina/o subject through these scales. The central questions of the course will be: How has the family, the community, and the nation been utilized by Latina/o subjects and towards what ends? What are the social, political, economic, and affective possibilities and limitations within such practices of belonging? How do these possibilities and limitations emerge within the Latina/o condition? What alternative modes of Latina/o social belonging and/or political collectivity can we imagine? As a senior seminar, emphasis will be placed on students generating and leading discussion of a range of both foundational texts as well as current monographs. Readings will include primary writings from José Martí, José Vasconcelos, and Elizabeth Martínez; theoretical foundations from Benedict Anderson, Miranda Joseph, Kath Weston, Paul Gilroy, Patricia Hill Collins, and Friedrich Engels; and contemporary, critical Latina/o scholarship with an emphasis on literary, sociological, and cultural analyses from Richard T. Rodriguez, Marisel C. Moreno, Gilda L. Ochoa, and David J. Vázquez. This course will be of particular interest and use to those students engaged with Latina/o Studies, American Studies, Literary Studies, and/or Queer Theory. It also falls under the critical theorization theme for the Exploring Diversity Initiative through its comparative analysis of collectivities across differences within and beyond Latina/o peoples.
Format: seminar. Requirements: students will be evaluated based on weekly write-ups on the readings, co-leading discussion twice during the semester, participation, and a final seminar paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment Limit: 20 (expected: 12). Preference to LATS and AMST seniors followed by LATS and AMST juniors.
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the Gaudino option.
Hour: 1:10-3:50 W
HERNÁNDEZ

12/12/2013
New Spring 2014 Course:
PHIL 120(S) Existentialism: An introduction (W)

Existentialism is considered to be one of the 20th century's most important philosophical movements, with key figures such as Sartre, Beauvoir and Merleau-Ponty. In the aftermath of Nietzsche's famous claim that God is dead, together with the sensation of a loss of a foundation for human and moral values after the two world wars, existentialism seeks to examine the philosophical and ethical conditions for human existence that can no longer take transcendent foundations for granted. What becomes of moral responsibility, if no moral values are absolutely given? What is freedom, if no longer granted by divine or human essence? How can meaning be created, and on what grounds, if no higher meaning is given anymore? In this course, we will explore a number of existentialist questions and themes, such as meaning, nihilism, humanism, the absurd and anguish, but also hope, ethics and intersubjectivity through various texts by such as Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Sartre, Camus, Beauvoir, Heidegger and Arendt, and also through literature and films inspired by or inspiring for the existentialist movement: Beckett, Kafka, Dostoievski and Bergman among others.
Format: seminar. Requirements: each week, you will write a 1-2 page paper corresponding to the reading assignment. In addition to that, you will write a 5-6 page paper on assigned topics for mid-term and for finals. Active participation in class discussions is required.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 19 (expected: 15-19). Preference given to first year students and sophomores.
Hour: 9:55-11:10 TR
SPINDLER

12/12/2013
Cancelled Course Spring 2014
:
PHIL 123 Objectivity in Ethics (W)

12/12/2013
New Spring 2014 Course:
PHIL 210T(S) Nietzsche: How One Becomes, What One Is (W)

It might seem curious to read Nietzsche starting out from his very last book: his autobiography, Ecce Homo. Indeed, this book was written right before his mental and physical breakdown, leading a good many commentators to assume that its unusual tone - with chapters bearing titles such as "Why I am so wise" or "Why I write such good books" - already constitutes a prelude to Nietzsche's final collapse and thus invalidates itself as philosophy. However, a closer reading reveals this book to be not only one of the best possible starting points to Nietzsche's own philosophy precisely because he gives us an overview and a critical analysis of his whole project through a reading of his previous books, but also makes it possible for us to raise a certain number of questions central to philosophy itself. What is the self, the "autos" concerned in a philosophical autobiography, and what does it mean to, as Nietzsche says, "become what one is"? How can the history of philosophy be understood it we apply a Nietzschean genealogy to its Socratic heritage of "knowing oneself", and how can we understand its necessary and continuous overcoming of itself? Through Nietzsche's own re-reading of a number of his books - The Birth of Tragedy, The Genealogy of Morals, Human, all too Human, Thus spoke Zarathustra, Beyond Good and Evil and The Gay Science, among others, he invites us to undertake an investigation of some of his key questions - body and mind, health and illness, knowledge and creation, morals and ethics, nihilism, affirmation and Amor Fati. Hereby, is rendered possible an open discussion about the power and destiny of philosophical thinking, about its relation to history and its need for "untimeliness", about its critical capacity to question its own foundations, and its ability to create while - sometimes - also destroying.
Literature:
Friedrich Nietzsche: Ecce Homo
Selections of: The birth of Tragedy, The Genealogy of Morals, Human, all too Human, Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Beyond Good and Evil, The Gay Science, The Will to Power, Posthumous Fragments.
Secondary literature, chapters and articles by, among others, Gilles Deleuze, Michel Foucault, Martin Heidegger, Walter Kaufmann, Sarah Kofman, Plato.
Format: tutorial. Requirements/evaluation: Each week one student will write a 5-6-page paper on the assigned reading and the other student will write a 2-3-page critical response paper. Roles will be reversed the following week. In all, each student will write 5 papers and 5 critical response papers. Papers will not be graded but you will receive feedback and an oral evaluation after every session. The final grade will be set after an individual evaluation meeting at the end of the term.
Prerequisites: at least one previous course of philosophy, or permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 10 (expected: 10). Preference given to current and prospective Philosophy majors and students with a sufficient background in political or critical theory.
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis.
[History]

Hour: TBA
SPINDLER

11/08/13
Newly cross-listed with AFR and SOC; Spring 2014:
PSCI 318T(S) Declining Significance of Race and Racism in U.S. Politics? (Same as AFR 318T and SOC 318T) (W)

Historically, America has faced a dilemma. On one hand, the United States was founded on the principles of liberty and equality, and consequently the American ethos is largely characterized by individualism and egalitarianism. On the other hand, the U.S. has faced and continues to be challenged with matching its expectations and ideals of itself with reality, as there are on-going inequalities based on race, gender, religion, and sexuality. Nonetheless, one would have difficulty in arguing that American society has not improved at all, especially over the past half-century. The U.S. government-via Congress, the Supreme Court, and Executive Orders of various Presidents-has improved the well-being and status of racial minorities. Further, the overwhelming majority of American citizens eschew racist language and attacks on racial and ethnic minorities. Some would argue that the election of the United States' first Black president is a clear indication that the country is approaching-if not already realizing-its post-racial, American Dream. But, scholars who have tried to measure the significance, impact, and effect of race on American politics are currently engaged in a highly contested debate on the extent to which racism has declined in this society. In this tutorial, we will explore a variety of debates concerning the role of race in American society and American Politics. Have racial attitudes improved over the past 60 years or has the language of racial animus simply changed over that time? Are racial minorities failing to live up the opportunities provided to them by the U.S. Constitution and various other laws or are there structural barriers that are too high for them to overcome? Is the election of minority leaders in majority white districts a sign that racial attitudes have an insignificant influence on candidate evaluation and elections or have minority candidates deracialized their campaigns in a way that may ultimately disserve minority groups? These are just a few of the questions we will consider. Students will be exposed to texts on at least two sides of various debates.
Format: tutorial. Requirements: five 5-page essays, five 2-page response papers; one final 5-page reflection essay.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10 (expected: 10). Preference given to seniors.
May not be taken on a a pass/fail basis.
Hour: 2:35-3:50 TF
C. SMITH


10/7/13
New Spring 2014 course:
PSCI 346(S) Race in Latin American Politics (Same as LATS 345)(W)

This course examines the political practice of racial identity in Latin America. It will consider how constructions of race and ethnicity in Latin America and the Caribbean shape notions of group identity and membership, and how notions of group identity affect political attitudes, participation, and mobilization. The course will also look at the effect of racial identity on candidate evaluation and voting preferences in a number of Latin American nations and across the Latino electorate in the United States.
Format: seminar. Requirements: three 1-page paper evaluations; three 3-page reflective essays; a 12-page research proposal.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 19 (expected: 10-12).
Hour: 7:00-9:40 p.m. M
CONTRERA

7/23/13
To be offered Fall 2013:

PSYC 350 Child Psychopathology

This course explores the rapidly evolving field of psychological disorders in childhood and adolescence.  We will examine the intertwined effects of individual characteristics (e.g., genetics, neurobiological factors), relationship processes (e.g., parenting, family functioning, peers), community settings (e.g., schools, neighborhoods), and the broader cultural context (e.g., poverty, stigma, media).  Using a developmental framework, we will examine the emergence and maintenance of specific psychological disorders, as well as variations in how children cope with cataclysmic stressors (chronic illness, physical and sexual abuse).  The goals of this course include (1) appreciation of the dynamic interplay between biology and experience in the unfolding of psychopathology, (2) exploration of diagnostic criteria and phenomenology of specific disorders, and (3) exposure to a wide range of research-based strategies for prevention and intervention. 
Format: Seminar.  Requirements: classroom participation, response papers, midterm, final paper
Prerequisites:  Psychology 232 or 252. Enrollment limit: 19 (expected 19).  Preference to Psychology major.
Hour: M 7-9:40pm
M. SANDSTROM


06/04/13
Cancelled Course Spring 2014:

REL 231 The Origins of Islam: God, Empire and Apocalypse (Same as ARAB 231 and HIST 209)

06/12/13
To be Offered Spring 2014:

REL 233(S) Islamic Mysticism: The Sufis (W)

Studying Sufism, the mystical tradition of Islam, is an excellent introduction to the Muslim world. The Sufis represent a delightful and many-faceted spiritual tradition that both enriches and criticizes orthodox Islam. This course will explore the origins of Sufism in the ascetic and revolutionary piety of the early Islamic community; the systematization of the Sufi path to God; Sufi themes in art and poetry; the development of the Sufi orders and techniques of ecstasy, both at high and popular levels. We will read in the classics of Sufi poetry and thought, including Rumi, Attar, Suhrawardi, and Ghazali; we will also explore the Sufi theosophy of Ibn Arabi. We will conclude with an examination of contemporary Sufi life in Pakistan, Egypt and Turkey.
Format: lecture/discussion. Requirements: four 5- to 7-page papers based on the readings and revised in editing workshops.
No prerequisites; open to all. Enrollment limit: 19 (expected: 19).
Hour: 1:10-2:25 TF
DARROW and NAEEM

06/11/13
New Fall 2013 Course:
REL 237(F) Islam, Pluralism, and the Religious Order

In recent years, Islam has become a major topic in the media, in political rhetoric, among intellectual communities, and among ordinary citizens in the Western world. A recurring refrain in these discussions is the question of the position of Islam and Muslims vis-Ã -vis other religious and secular traditions in a pluralistic world. In this course, we will situate this discourse as the product of a particular set of circumstances and an end result of particular historical and contemporary discourses that have portrayed Islam and Muslims as the West's "Other". It is only when this perception of Islam as the other has been established that we can understand the self-perception of Muslims and the Islamic tradition and it is only when we understand this "self" that we can fruitfully understand how that tradition has perceived its own "others". This course will examine the historical and theological interface between Islamic and other religious traditions and between Muslims and religious others. We will look at: 1) the Qurâ'an, focusing on verses that deal with questions of religious diversity and otherness, and their multiple interpretations; 2) the concept of prophecy and the particular example of Muhammad in relation to religious others; 3) how the different schools of Islamic thought and practice- in scriptural exegesis, jurisprudence, philosophy, theology, and mysticism- have used their specific methodologies to theorize religious difference; 4) how Muslims have theologically situated and culturally interacted with other religious traditions, specifically Christianity, Judaism, Hindu traditions, Buddhism, and the Chinese religions; 5) how new discourses on religious diversity that articulate new modes of hermeneutics in relation to the Qurâ'an and the Islamic tradition are being developed in the contemporary period by Muslim intellectuals and scholars and how they relate to global issues of identity, otherness, and pluralism.
Format: lecture. Requirements: active engagement, short weekly assignments, final paper or project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25 (expected: 15). Preference given to Religion majors.
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis.

Hour: 2:35-3:50 MR
NAEEM

06/12/13
New Fall 2013 Course:

REL 240(F) Islam and Muslims in South Asia

South Asia, or the Indian Subcontinent, has been home to a rich tapestry of expressions of Islamic culture and thought. From the arrival of Muslims in Sindh in 711 to the Delhi Sultanate through the Mughal Empire, British colonialism, to the present nation-states of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh, South Asian Muslims have developed intellectual, religious, and cultural traditions that have both been locally rooted and part of the broader Islamic world. In this course, we will survey diverse Muslim theological, philosophical, religious, juridical, literary, artistic, political, and spiritual traditions across the different regions of South Asia and in different temporal contexts, with a view to understanding how the broader Islamic tradition becomes embedded in particular cultural contexts. We will look at both Sunni and Shiâ'i, mainstream Twelver and Ismaâ'ili, scholarly and popular traditions. Particular attention will be paid to Sufism, the Islamic mystical tradition, and the major role it played in Muslim life in South Asia. One theme of the course will be the multifaceted encounters of Muslims with Indian religious traditions: we will explore Muslim narratives on Indian religions, mutual encounters resulting in borrowing, assimilation, and hybridity, and the transformation of these relationships under British colonial rule resulting in new religious identities and the construction of modern forms of "Hinduism" and "Islam". We will also look at the major changes in South Asian Islamic traditions in the modern period and the emergence of new intellectual schools and forms of Muslim modernism, messianism, fundamentalism, traditionalism, and nationalism.
Format: lecture. Requirements: active engagement, short weekly assignments, final paper or project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20 (expected: 15). Preference given to Religion majors.
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis.

Hour: 8:30-9:45 TR
NAEEM

06/11/13
New Spring 2014 Course
:
REL 241(S) Muslim-Hindu Interactions in South Asia

This course will examine the long history of interactions between religious communities in South Asia that in the colonial period came to be defined as Hindu and Muslim. We will look at how religious traditions were constituted in pre-modern South Asia, how they interacted with and related to each other and finally, how they were transformed in the colonial period, giving rise to modern religious identities. The material we will examine will include poetry and stories from the Sufi, Sant, Bhakti and Sikh traditions, Sufi spiritual manuals that incorporate Yogic practices, Islamic theological and philosophical texts on Indian religions, Sanskrit and other indigenous sources on Muslims, liminal Ismai'li Muslim hymns of religious universalism, Sunni Muslim legal and political definitions of the other, colonial and Orientalist constructions of Hindus and Muslims, writings on the Two-Nation theory that led to the modern nation-states of Pakistan and India, Hindutva, or Hindu nationalist, historiography, and postcolonial deconstructions of religious identity in South Asia.
Format: lecture. Requirements: active engagement, short weekly assignments, final project or paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20 (expected: 15). Preference given to Religion majors.
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis.

Hour: 2:35-3:50 TF
NAEEM

06/12/13
To be Offered Spring 2014:
REL 270T(S) Father Abraham: The First Patriarch (Same as COMP 272 and JWST 270T) (W)
The figure of Abraham in the Hebrew scriptures is interesting for at least two reasons: he comes first and seems more universal rather than particular. He first received the covenant and the promise of the land of Israel, but before the full revelation of the Torah to Moses. He fathers both the Jewish people and the Arabs and the significance of that wider identity was later captured both by Christianity in the work of Paul and in the Qur'an where Muhammad identified with Abraham as the prototypical and non-sectarian monotheist prophet. This course will trace the figure of Abraham by a close and multidisciplinary reading of the Jewish, Pagan, Christian and Muslim sources on Abraham. Our task is not to decide on the historicity of Abraham, but rather to explore the history of the figure and his continuing relevance for today in understanding Jewish/Christian/Muslim conflict and cooperation. We will begin with an intensive reading of the Genesis material on Abraham (12-25), where the issues of idolatry and monotheism, the covenant and circumcision, relations of the patriarch to his women and sons, and primal model of faith all are articulated. We will then turn to later Jewish developments in the figure of Abraham in midrash and apocalypse. We will then explore the view of Abraham in the classical world, the uses made of Abraham by Christianity as it broke from an emerging Rabbinic Judaism and the development of Abraham's specific connection with the view of the afterlife. We will then treat the figure of Abraham in the Qur'an and later Islamic traditions. We will conclude with an examination of the cult surrounding Abraham in the city of Hebron, a currently contested site on the West Bank where we will consider the current religious practice regarding Abraham by both Jews and Muslims. The purpose of this tutorial is to read closely a variety of primary religious texts and to explore the variety of tools available for the reading of those texts.
Format: tutorial. Requirements: each student in the tutorial will write and present orally five 5- to 7-page essays every other week on the readings for the week and a final 7- to 10-page essay. Students not presenting an essay will be responsible for offering an oral critique of the work of their colleague. Evaluation will be based on written work and critiques.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10 (expected: 10). Open to all.
Tutorial meetings to be arranged.
DARROW

10/29/13
Cancelled Course Spring 2014:
REL 293 Religion, Play and Politics


06/11/13
New Spring 2014 Course:

REL 332(S) Scholars, Philosophers, and Mystics: Knowledge and Its Transmission in the Islamic Tradition

This course will explore the significance of knowledge, its sources, its production and its transmission in the Islamic tradition. We will begin with an in-depth examination of the primary epistemologies, or modes of knowing, classically elaborated in the Islamic tradition, which were principally categorized into three: transmitted (or scholarly), intellectual (or philosophical), and spiritual (or mystical). These were the roots of all the distinct disciplines that Muslims developed, each with its own methodology, such as Qurâ'anic interpretation, Hadith studies, jurisprudence, dialectical theology, philosophy, and practical and theoretical Sufism (Islamic mysticism). We will closely examine how knowledge was defined, derived, and produced in these disciplines and the myriad ways that Muslim scholars, philosophers, theologians, and mystics sought to understand God, the world, humanity, and religion, through their lens. We will conclude with seeing how knowledge and its production have been transformed in the modern period, from the emergence of Muslim modernism to various puritanical reformisms to the "democratization" and globalization of knowledge through modern means of communication, to various paths of Muslim resistance to hegemony in the postcolonial world.
Format: seminar. Requirements: active engagement, several short writing assignments, three small projects, final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15 (expected: 12). Preference given to Religion majors,
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis.

Hour: 1:10-3:50 W
NAEEM

8/5/13
New Fall 2013 Course:
RLSP 222(F) Mexican Underworlds: Visual Configurations of Life beneath the Ground
The notion of the underworld evokes several images: mythical hell, the space of the repressed, and the breeding ground of conspiracy, to name just a few. In this course we will explore how the image of the underground appears repeatedly in Mexican cultural objects throughout history. We will use the theoretical approach of visual studies and psychoanalysis to explore the multiple meanings that the underground can carry when we think about it as a relation between concealment and revelation. Our readings will include Aztec and Mayan myths; classic novels by Azuela, Revueltas, and Rulfo; essays by Octavio Paz and Carlos Fuentes; contemporary novels by Roberto Bolaño and Guadalupe Nettel; and films. Attendance at the three film screenings outside the scheduled class time is required. Canonical Mexican texts will be re-read from a visual studies perspective, incorporating visual studies as a critical discourse separate from but compatible with literary studies.
Format: combination lecture and seminar. There will be two short essays (2-3 pages) due on weeks 5 and 10, an annotated bibliography, a final paper (5 pages), and a class presentation based on the final paper.Every main reading/topic will be introduced by a 15-20 minute lecture, followed by discussion questions. The course will have a Glow site in which students will post their initial responses to the readings in advance as preparation for class discussion.
Prerequisites: RLSP 105 or higher. Enrollment limit: 22.
Hour: 1:10-2:25 MR
ROMERO

5/29/13
New Course Description:
RUSS 203(F) 19th-Century Russian Literature in Translation (Same as COMP 203)
Whereas 18th-century Russian literature was largely derivative and imitative, 19th-century Russian literature-literature of The Golden Age-developed into a distinct national literature. It acquired its own style, developed along its own trajectory, and engaged with local social and political topics. This course will offer a survey of major works of Russian 19th-century fiction from Pushkin, the "father" of modern Russian literature, through Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov. Primary materials will be supplemented by readings in cultural and intellectual history (Chaadaev, Belinsky, Herzen, Pisarev, and Dobrolyubov) to help us better understand the milieu in which 19th-century Russian literature developed. The course will consist of short introductory lectures and discussions devoted to analyzing stylistic, cultural, and ideological idiosyncrasies of our primary texts. In addition to examining each author's distinctive style and contribution to Russian and world literature, we will explore a number of critical themes that have come to define the 19th-century Russian intellectual discourse: the rise of the Russian Empire and its encounter with East and West; the haunting duality of Russian urban and rural life; and the role of the Russian nobility and intelligentsia in Russia's cultural and socio-political transformation.
Format: lecture/discussion. Requirements: include a short term paper, a midterm, and a final.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30 (expected: 12). Preference given to students in Russian or Comparative Literature.
May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis or Gaudino option.
HOUR: 1:10-2:25 TF
LADYGINA

5/14/13
New Spring 2014 Course:
RUSS 331T(S) The Brothers Karamazov (Same as COMP331T and ENGL 371T) (W)
Widely hailed as one of the greatest novels ever written, Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov contains a series of enigmas, not the least of which is precisely who murdered the Karamazov father. In addition to exploring the shared guilt of all four of the brothers Karamazov in the crime of patricide, Dostoevsky poses the most probing questions of his day: Are families tied together merely by blood or by deeper spiritual bonds? Is religious faith possible in an age of reason, science, and technology? Can man's earthly laws ever carry out divine justice? Is humanity prepared to bear the burden of responsibility that comes with freedom? This tutorial will spend an entire semester exploring Dostoevsky's masterwork, and we will read a variety of secondary sources alongside The Brothers Karamazov, including history, philosophy, and literary theory. Our goal will be to understand Dostoevsky's answers to these so-called "accursed questions" through the unique artistic form of The Brothers Karamazov.
Format: tutorial. Requirements: based on completion of weekly reading and writing assignments, as well as active engagement during tutorial sessions.
Prerequisites: at least one 200-level literature class. Enrollment limit: 10 (expected: 10). Preference given to students majoring or considering a major in Russian, Comparative Literature, or English.
May not be taken as pass/fail or Gaudino.
HOUR: TBA
CASSIDAY

5/23/13
New Fall 2013 Course:
RUSS 343(F) Spectacles on His Nose and Autumn on his Heart: The Oeuvre of Isaac Babel (Same as COMP 343, JWST 343 and INST 343) (W) (D)
Known alternately as "master of the short story" and "Russian Maupassant," Isaac Babel was not only one of the most celebrated and intriguing authors of early Soviet Russia, but also a cultural figure of profound national and international significance. For a number of reasons (political, aesthetic, professional, ethical) Babel was not prolific and this will allow us to read almost all of his creative output, something we rarely get to do in the course of a single semester. Babel's writing is extremely varied-it includes sketches, journalistic prose, short stories, plays, movie scripts, one unfinished novel-and richly intertextual. This will afford us the opportunity to read the work of some of his contemporaries and predecessors, from both Russia and abroad, with whom he fashioned brilliant literary conversations, among them Guy de Maupassant, Anton Chekhov, Sholem Aleichem, and Ivan Turgenev. Babel saw self-definition as the core of his writing and as an EDI offering, this course will ask students to reflect on what it meant to be a Russian, a Jew, and a non-party author-an outsider, insider, and problematic hybrid rolled into one-in the highly unsettled, and unsettling, 1920s and 1930s. All course readings will be in translation, but students are highly encouraged to read in the original (Russian, French, Yiddish) whenever possible.
Format: seminar. Requirements: based on active class participation, frequent short writing assignments, a final project, and an oral presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12 (expectred: 10). Prefrence given to Russian and Comparative Literature majors, Jewish Studies and International Studies concentrators.
HOUR: 8:30-9:45 MW
VAN DE STADT

5/29/13
New Course Fall 2013:
RUSS 401(F) Senior Seminar: Representations of the Caucasus in Russian Literature and Film (W)
Media coverage of the recent Chechen wars and terrorists acts in Moscow has exposed the troubled relationship between Russia and the Caucasus, a conflict that is hundreds of years old. Over the past two centuries, Russian writers and filmmakers have addressed this tension in central works of poetry, prose, and film. This course offers a survey of the most emblematic representations of the Caucasus in Russian cultural productions of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. We will focus on literary works by Pushkin, Lermontov, Tolstoy, Esenin, Mayakovsky, Pristavkin, Pelevin, and Politkovskaya, and will analyze a number of relevant films--Kidnapping, Caucasian Style (1966); The Color of Pomegranates (1968); Prisoner of the Caucasus (1996); War (2002); and Aleksandra (2007). We will strive to investigate how the Russian writers and filmmakers have used the image of the Caucasian Other to address the issue of Russia's self-representation, and to what degree contemporary Russian artists have transformed the image of the Caucasians compared to the Romantic period.
The course will be conducted entirely in Russian. All readings and viewings will be in Russian.
Format: seminar. Requirements: consist of four short essays, a conference-style presentation, and a final paper.
Prerequistes: Russian 251, 252 or consent of instructor. Enrollment limit: 10 (expected: 4). Preference given to Russian Majors.
May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis or Gaudino option.
Hour: 9:55-11:10 TR
LADYGINA

1/17/14
Newly Cross-listed with INST; Spring 2014:
SOC 269(S) Globalizing India (Same as INST 269) (D)
India's dramatic rise to global prominence has captured public attention. In newspapers, magazines, and popular books, we read about economic prosperity, growing cities, and new consumers. In this course, we will investigate the social issues behind these headlines by drawing on sociological accounts of contemporary life in India. Case studies will provide us with nuanced perspectives on issues such as migration, outsourcing, consumption, and economic development and enable us to re-consider popular and scholarly characterizations of globalization. As we explore the re-configurations of politics, power, and social life that have occurred since economic liberalization began in the early 1990s, we will tease apart the complex relationships between global economic integration and social change. We will investigate how globalization presents possibilities for social mobility and political change as well as for exploitation along existing fault lines of inequality and exclusion. Course materials will include ethnographic case studies, documentary films, commercial films, and items from contemporary Indian media. Lectures will contextualize this material by providing background on Indian society, history, and politics.
Format: lecture/discussion. Requirements: attendance at film screenings; participation, research project and oral presentation; quizzes, midterm and final.
No prerequisites; open to all. Enrollment limit: 20 (expected: 15). Preference given to Anthropology and Sociology majors.
Hour: 8:30-9:45 TR
SEARLE

4/24/13
Newly Cross-listed with COMP; Spring 2014:

THEA 250T(S) Gender, Sexuality and the Modern Stage (Same as COMP 247T, ENGL 253T and WGSS 250T) (W) (D)

This interdisciplinary tutorial explores aspects of gender sexuality, performativity, and representations of the body in modern theatre and art. Close analysis of plays by dramatists -such as Sophie Treadwell, Lillian Hellman, Caryl Churchill, Milcha Sanchez-Scott, Ntozake Shange, Tony Kushner, Tim Miller, Naomi Iizuka, Paula Vogel, Suzan-Lori Parks, Tarell McCraney, and Sarah Kane-will occur alongside consideration of works by both artists and celebrities, such as Cindy Sherman, Karen Finley and Lady Gaga. Our approach to this varied material will be comparative and will be enriched by readings of select work by contemporary theorists, such as Judith Butler, bell hooks, Cherríe Moraga, Eve K. Sedgwick, and Donna Haraway. This course meets the criteria of the Exploring Diversity Initiative as it draws focus towards the diversity of race, class and ethnicity represented by the subjects of our study as well as towards the political power of theatre and performance.
Format: tutorial. Requirements: students will meet with instructor in pairs for an hour each week; they will write a 5- to 7-page paper every other week (five in all), and comment on their partner's papers in alternate weeks. Emphasis will be placed on developing skills in reading, interpretation, critical argumentation, and critical written and oral response.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10 (expected: 10). Preference if over-enrolled: Majors in Theatre, English or Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Hour: TBA
HOLZAPFEL




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