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Addendum to the
Williams College Courses of Instruction 2015-2016

Last updated: 4/18/16 3:05 PM

1/21/16
Course Cancelled Spring 2016:

AFR 132 Contemporary Africana Social and Political Philosophy (D) (Same as PSCI 132 and AMST 132)

1/21/16
Course Cancelled Spring 2016:

AFR 299 Rastafari: Dread, Politics, Agency (Same as PSCI 233 and REL 261)

5/15/15:
Newly Offered and Cross-Listed with THEA Fall 2015:
AFR 202—Public Speaking: Traditions and Practice (Same as THEA 209)
Effective oral communication skills are necessary for any student, regardless of major or area of concentration. This course is designed to give students an introduction into the fundamentals of oral communication. We will discuss the critical role of both speakers and listeners within the transactional process of communication. Together we will explore African American oratorical traditions through viewing, listening to, and reading speeches from notable figures such as Frederick Douglass, Fannie Lou Hamer, Barak Obama, and many others. With an emphasis placed on Aristotelian and African American rhetorical methods of persuasion, evidence-based research, and organization, students will gain a better understanding of what it means to be an ethical and responsible communicator. Students will give three formal speech presentations with a focus on informative and persuasive elements. Through discussions, lectures, activities, readings, and speech presentations, students will develop meaningful skills to effectively communicate in the public setting.
Class Format: seminar
Requirements/Evaluation: students will give three formal speech presentations with a focus on informative and persuasive elements; through discussions, lectures, activities, readings, and speech presentations, students will develop meaningful skills to effectively communicate.
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment Preference: first and second year students.
Enrollment Limit: 19
Expected Enrollment: 19
HOURS: TR 8:55-9:45
FORD

5/15/15
New Course Spring 2016:
AFR 258 The Rhetoric(s) of Black Religious Traditions (Same as REL 258)
This course will introduce students to the rich religious expressions of Black Americans through their rhetorical traditions. We will begin with a survey of rhetorical productions like sermons, music, and other forms of public address in the historical literatures on Black religions. Our review will yield some of the primary themes of Black religious experiences—the injustices of modern racism, the significance of liberation, and continued meaning of Africa as a homeland. We will then investigate how secular processes like commodification alter rhetorical practices.
HOUR: TF 2:35-3:50
FORD

8/18/15
CANCELLED COURSE FALL 2015
AFR 272(F) Africa + the Internet: Producing Global Citizenship (Same as AFR 272/GBST 272/ANTH 274) (D)

8/18/15
CANCELLED COURSE SPRING 2016
AFR 270(S) Digital Diaspora: Interrogating Race, New Media, and Black Cultural Production Online

5/15/15
Newly Offered Spring 2016:
AFR 302—Complexion Complexities: Colorism in Literature, Lyrics & Everyday Life (Same as COMP 309)

Often viewed as the “dirty laundry” of the Black American past, colorism, or skin color bias, is a pervasive force within modern global society. Although it is not a new issue, its impact is far reaching and continues to have damaging effects on people of color–especially members within the African Diaspora. From skin bleaching creams like “Whitenicious” to rap music’s fetishization of light–skinned women, colorism is a very real and present issue affecting Black life. From the literary works of Wallace Thurman and Toni Morrison, to the lyrics of blues crooner Big Bill Broonzy and rapper Lil Wayne, we will analyze the many ways that the politics of color influence standards of beauty and attractiveness, perceptions of behavior and criminality, and economic attainment and stability.
Class Format: seminar
Requirements/Evaluation: evaluation in this course will be based upon class participation, response papers, one 6– to 8–page paper, and a formal class presentation
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment Limit: 25
Expected Class Size: 20
HOUR: TR 8:55–9:45
FORD

5/5/15
No longer EDI
AFR310 Womanist/Black Feminist Thought (Same as AMST 309, REL 310, WGSS 310)

5/15/15
New Course Fall 2015:
AFR 325 Television, Social Media, and Black Women ‘Unscripted’ (Same as WGSS 325)
Nene Leaks, Shonda Rhimes, Oprah Winfrey, Kerry Washington and now Lavern Cox and Melissa Harris-Perry have become common household names. Whether from the television shows they star in, the TV shows they have created, or the social media presence they have developed—these women continue to influence and shape popular culture. In this course we will situate Black women as creators and contributors to popular culture as a whole, but specifically through television (scripted and “unscripted”) and social media. We will begin by covering the history of Black women in television. This historical approach will then lead us to examine selected TV episodes, and investigate social media pages of Black actresses, television producers, and the fans of these shows. The aim of this course is to analyze the ways in which Black women continually shift the popular culture paradigm and how they serve as key players determining what is indeed popular.
HOUR: MR 2:35-3:50
FORD

8/24/15
Cancelled course Fall 2015

AFR 366(F) African American Urban History (Same as HIST 370)

6/9/15
New course Spring 2016:

AMST 342T Interior Lives: Ninteenth-Century American Literature and the  Idea of Home (W) (Same as ENGL 342 and COMP 348)
We often discuss US history in terms of leaving home: the escape from an old world and the discovery of a new one, the journey from a civilized east to a western frontier, the violent displacement of indigenous peoples and Africans from their native lands. In contrast to these narratives, this course is about staying home. It will explore houses as both actual structures and imaginary places in the work of several major nineteenth-century American writers. We will think about the home as a real space whose walls, windows, and doors organized domestic life— how and when individuals worked, ate, slept, had sex, were enslaved, raised children, cared for the sick, and died—and study the home’s functions as a metaphor for big, abstract ideas about privacy and politics, individualism and nationhood, escape and return, freedom and oppression. Through careful examination of fiction and personal narratives, as well as poetry, photographs, and domestic manuals, the class will consider what it meant to be “at home,” what it meant to be imprisoned there, and what it meant to run away.  The syllabus will include writing by J.H. Banka, Gustave de Beaumont and Alexis de Tocqueville, Emily Dickinson, Frederick Douglass, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Harriet Jacobs, Herman Melville, Florence Nightingale, Edgar Allan Poe, Jacob Riis, Henry David Thoreau, Mark Twain,  and Edith Wharton, as well as secondary materials by Gaston Bachelard, Russ Castronovo, Michel Foucault, Diana Fuss, Caleb Smith, and Wharton (on decorating).
Format: tutorial Requirements: Participation, 5-6 tutorial papers, and 5-6 responses. Prerequisites:: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior standing and at least one previous class in American Studies, English, or Comparative literature, {or} permission of the instructor.
Enrollment limit 10; expected enrollment 8.
Preference: AMST, ENGL, and COMP majors. <BR>
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the fifth course option
Departmental attributes: AMST Arts in Context
Instructor:  PARRA

6/5/15
New description/NO LONGER WRITING INTENSIVE:

ANTHROPOLOGY 299 THE BODY IN POWER (Same as REL 274)
The thesis of this course is that ritual plays a crucial role not only in legitimizing and mobilizing political power, but also in determining whether people decide to act in defense of or dissent against the status quo. In the first part of the semester, we focus on the ways in which different cultures construct categories of inclusion and exclusion, safe and dangerous, while also creating rituals for ensuring the preservation of the dominant social order against all that is transgressive and undermining to those in power. Of particular importance to our discussion will be consideration of how the body is ritually mobilized as an instrument of persuasion and control. On this foundation, we move to a examination of how political rituals are used to undermine established orthodoxies, mobilize popular dissent, and bring down those on top. Among the topics to be discussed are the role of martyrdom and beheadings in the rise of the Islamic State, the use of symbols and ritual interventions in framing both sides of the abortion debate, and the expanding importance of social media in protests movements around the world. The final unit of the course will consider a current controversy (e.g., police violence against African-American men) in light of the concepts discussed during the semester.
Class Format: Seminar
Requirements/Evaluation: Class participation, three short response papers, and one 10-12-page research paper.
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment Preferences: Open to First-Years
Divisional Attributes: Division II

8/7/15
New ASST cross listing Spring 2016

ANTH 346 Islam and Anthropology (Same as ARAB 280, ASST 346 & REL 346)
If anthropology has helped to define Islam in global thought, Islam has returned the favor, holding a critical mirror to the anthropological endeavor perhaps more than any other traditional "object" of study. This course examines anthropological studies of Islamic societies for what they teach us both about Islam and about anthropology. We begin with foundational social theorists whose studies of religious phenomena helped give rise to the field of anthropology of religion. We then survey influential efforts to construct "ideal-type" models of Muslim society based on anthropological and historical knowledge, alongside efforts to critique, historicize, and redirect the model-building project (notably by Talal Asad and Edward Said). The second half of the course is devoted to ethnographies that explore, from a variety of perspectives and in several regions (Morocco, India, Egypt, Syria), questions of human agency, hierarchy and resistance, and Islam as discursive resource, ethical project, and embodied community.Primary Class Format: seminar Requirements/Evaluation: weekly postings, one 5-page paper, one 10-page paper, discussion leading Prerequisites: none Enrollment Limit: 19 Expected Class Size: 19 Enrollment Preferences: juniors and seniors, Anthropology, Sociology or Religion majors Spring 2016 SEM Section: 01 W 01:10 03:50
LEE

8/5/15
Course Cancelled Fall 2015:

ARAB228 Modern Arabic Literature in Translation (D) (W) (Same as COMP 228)

9/1/15
Course Cancelled Fall 2015:

ARAB 401 Topics in Advanced Arabic

10/23/15
New course Spring 2016

ARTH 103 Asian Art Survey (Same as ASST 103)(D)

Moving chronologically and thematically, this course surveys the history of Asian art from the Bronze Age to the globalizing art worlds in the present day with particular emphasis on India, China, Japan, and Korea. We will analyze the developments in style, production technique, and subject matter in light of contemporary social and political factors. While each class session will explore unique and region-specific cultural formations, a strong emphasis will be also placed on broader, interregional connections through trade and the movement of objects, pilgrimage, diplomacy and war. Topics include architecture and urbanism, sculpture in various media, decorative arts, ceramics, illustrated manuscripts, scrolls and painting, ritual arts, colonialism and globalization, and contemporary art and artistic revivals. Students will have the opportunity to closely examine art objects through visits to the Williams College Museum of Art and the Clark Art Institute. No background in Asian art is necessary for the successful completion of this course.
Class Format: lecture Requirements/Evaluation: Two 3-4 page papers, one 6-8 page paper, two exams  Prerequisites: none Enrollment Limit: 30 Expected Class Size: 30 Enrollment Preferences: none, reccommended for fisrt years. May not be taken on a pass/fail basis.
TR 11:20-12:35
SHIN

1/6/16
New Course Spring 2016

ARTH 207 Spring 2016 

Introduction to Contemporary Art  This introduction to contemporary art looks at a selection of some of the key artists and seminal texts associated with major movements and themes in artistic practice over the past 50 years, with an emphasis on their impact on recent directions. We will consider the rise of installation art, as well as video, performance, participatory art, institutional critique, and social practice while examining the materials, forms, methods, means of production and display employed by a range of contemporary artists. The class will use MASS MoCA and its current and upcoming exhibitions and visiting artists as primary sources, with several classes to be held at the museum. We will start with Minimalism and Post-minimalism, focusing on the Richard Nonas project opening in February, and will hear directly from the artist about the early years of SoHo's influential 112 Greene Street. The Sol LeWitt Wall Drawing Retrospective will be a jumping off point for a consideration of conceptual art and its lingering legacy, while an upcoming James Turrell installation will provide an entry into the perceptual investigations of the Light and Space artists, and younger successors such as Spencer Finch. Other artists the class will look at include Bruce Nauman, Cindy Sherman, Felix Gonzalez Torres, and Kara walker, among others. The course will also take advantage of the Alex Da Corte exhibition taking over the museum's second floor to initiate discussions on appropriation, the legacy of Pop art, as well as influential artists who have inspired Da Corte, such as Mike Kelley and Robert Gober. A field trip to New York will give the class an added opportunity to see more art first hand.
Class Format: seminar
Requirements/Evaluation: class discussion and presentations, short response papers, longer research paper
Additional Info: may not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the fifth course option
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment Preference: sophomores and juniors / permission of the instructor; we hope that students may have taken ARTH 101 or 102 but it is not required
Divisional Attributes: Division I
Other Attributes: ARTH post-1600 Courses
Enrollment Limit: 15
Expected Enrollment: 15

7/27/15
New EDI Designation
7/15/15
New Course Fall 2015:

ARTH 251 The Arts of South Asia (Same as ASST 252)(D)

This course is an introduction to the history of art in the Indian subcontinent from ca. 300 B.C. to the present. We will explore the wide range of artistic production in South Asia, including painting, manuscripts, sculpture, and architecture, and examine the developments in their style, production technique, and subject matter within specific social, historical, and cultural contexts. The Indian subcontinent has been home to multiple artistic, religious, and philosophical traditions, including Buddhism, Jainism, Hinduism, and Islam, and a special emphasis will be placed on the ways in which artists, patrons, and audiences have negotiated their encounters with the diverse cultural practices within and beyond South Asia. Topics include ritual and temple space; architectural reuse and appropriation; art as dynastic propaganda; miniature painting and courtly culture; trade and circulation of art objects. Students will learn the skills of visual analysis and interpretation, and become familiar with the different approaches art historians have taken to understand the development of South Asian art. In addition to lectures, the class will make use of the collections at the Williams College Museum of Art to provide firsthand experiences with South Asian art objects. No background in Asian or South Asian art is necessary for the successful completion of this course. This course fulfills EDI requirements through its exploration of the intercultural dialogues in South Asian art through the transmission of ideas, objects, and people, and the economic and political dynamics that facilitated such movements.
COURSE FORMAT: lecture
REQUIREMENTS: midterm and final exams, two short papers (3 pages), final paper(6-8 pages)
PREREQUISITES: None
IS THERE AN ENROLLMENT LIMIT?: yes
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 30
EXPECTED ENROLLMENT: 30
PREFERENCE: juniors and sophomores
AVAILABLE FOR PASSFAIL?: yes
H. SHIN

5/5/15
No Longer Cross-Listed with WGSS 254 Fall 2015:
ARTH 254 Manet to Matisse

5/27/15
New EDI Designation
5/5/15:
Newly Cross-Listed Fall 2015 with COMP 272:
ARTH 271 The Brazilian Avant-garde of the 1960s (W)
(D)
Experimental practices happening worldwide in the 1960s had extensive effects, sparking debates still relevant in contemporary art. This course centers on the case study of Brazil to analyze its distinct contribution to postwar cultural developments and to the notion of the "avant-garde." Focusing on Brazilian artworks and films from the 1960s, we will go beyond the United States and Europe to complicate the canonical histories of the avant-garde and of contemporary art. We will begin with an introductory overview of the history of the notion of "avant-garde," to better understand what has been at stake, historically and politically, when artists and critics distinguished particular ideas and practices as being at the forefront of Art. We will then focus on the explosive moment that was Brazil in the 1960s--one of economic prosperity, cultural exuberance and increasing political repression, as a military dictatorship seized control of the country in 1964. This was a period of radical experimentation in the visual arts and in film, generating subversive works that remain touchstones for contemporary artists in Brazil and beyond. We will devote much of the course to close analyses of these works so as to
define the strategies of this avant-garde and the deep cultural rifts it unleashed. No previous knowledge of art history or Brazilian history is required, and we will incorporate readings and discussions to establish context. This course meets two categories of the Exploring Diversity Initiative: we will attend to Empathetic
Understanding by situating ourselves within the cultural and political events that defined the volatile period of the 1960s in Brazil, so as to map the unique maneuvers of its avant-garde as it sought aesthetic and social renovation. The course also addresses Critical Theorization, using the Brazilian case to challenge the "map" created by the established histories and theories of the avant-garde and of artistic innovation after 1945—for, it is crucial to look beyond
Europe and the United States to have a richer understanding of the drastic shifts that permanently altered artistic practice in the
postwar era.

1/15/16
Newly Cross-Listed with WGSS Spring 2016:

ARTH 417 Gender Construction in Chinese Art (D) (W) (Same as ASST 417 and WGSS 318)

10/23/15
New course Spring 2016

ARTH 424 Pilgrimage and Art in South Asia (Same as ASST 424)(D)

This seminar explores sacred places and pilgrimage practice in the diverse religious traditions of South Asia (Buddhism, Jainism, Hinduism, and Islam) and their intersection with artistic production. Pilgrimages to sacred sites are common practice in South Asia, understood as acts of devotion and piety – but how and why did the sites become sanctified in the first place? What roles did myth, landscape, and visual art play in creating or re-creating sacred sites? How was sacred space represented? Beginning with these questions, we will examine architecture, painted maps, portable sculptures, ritual vessels, and miniature models of sacred sites, and the ways in which they celebrate and commemorate the sanctity of holy sites, and in some cases, serve as surrogates of faraway pilgrimage places for those who cannot make the physical journey. We will explore diverse aspects of pilgrimage along the way, including pilgrimage and politics, pilgrimage and commerce, virtual pilgrimage, and contested pilgrimage. Visits to the Williams College Museum of Art and sites of worship near Williamstown will provide firsthand encounters with art objects and sacred spaces.
Class Format: seminar Requirements/Evaluation: One 4-5 page paper, One final research paper (12-15 pages), presentations  Prerequisites: Some coursework in ARTH and/or ASST would be useful; or permission of instructor Enrollment Limit: 12 Expected Class Size: 12 Enrollment Preferences: majors. May not be taken on a pass/fail basis.
M 1:10-3:50
SHIN

7/27/15
New EDI Designation
7/15/15
New Course Fall 2015:

ARTH 431 Visual Cultures of Colonial South Asia (Same as ASST 431)
(D)
This course explores the visual and material cultures – architecture, sculpture, painting, photography, craft, print culture, and film – that rose from the impact of British colonial activity in the Indian subcontinent since c.1650. We will trace how this encounter transformed art making in South Asia, from the development of new genres to the establishment of new artistic networks and institutions. Drawing from a range of theoretical positions and historical perspectives, we will also examine the dynamics of colonial encounters in both directions. How did the visual cultures of colonial South Asia articulate the ideologies of the British Empire on one hand, and provide strategies of resistance and identity formation for the indigenous groups on the other? How did the movement of objects from the colony transform British visual culture? Topics include representing the Indian landscape, the East India Company and trade, photography and ethnography, collecting and displaying Indian objects, indigenous modernity, and art and nationalism. This course fulfills EDI requirements through its exploration of the cross-cultural encounters between Britain and South Asia and the role of visual culture in reinforcing or disrupting difference and power relations. 
COURSE FORMAT: seminar
REQUIREMENTS: weekly response papers (1 page), one midterm paper (3-4 pages), final paper (12-15 pages) and presentation
PREREQUISITES: Some coursework in ARTH and/or ASST; or permission of instructor
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12
EXPECTED ENROLLMENT: 12
PREFERENCE: Majors
AVAILABLE FOR PASSFAIL?: no
H. SHIN
ARTH post-1600 courses

10/30/15
Course Cancelled Spring 2016:

ARTH 470 Image-making, Orientalism and Visual Culture

10/30/15
New Course Spring 2016:

ARTH 472 Timelines

Art is really time-consuming to make, to view, to use, to understand. We enshrine it, exhibit it, excavate it and, particularly since the 19th century, we have concocted increasingly elaborate narratives around revered artifacts. We even think we control these many fabled things, but then they have the temerity to outlive us and outsmart us, meddling in the spaces between self and other, human and divine, now and then. The experience can be traumatizing. This course is an opportunity to explore how images are tangled up with time. We will begin in the 19th century, when commonplace notions of past and present wobbled seriously with the invention of photography and the avid pursuit of archaeology. From that pivot point, we will operate transnationally and anachronistically, with particular reference to the Middle East, the birth-place of monotheism and idol anxiety. There will be no single timeline, but rather a series of case studies, ranging from iconic paintings and sacred spaces to calendar art and photojournalism. Ultimately, we must ask, can art ever be fixed in time or will it always be an unruly presence in our lives?
COURSE FORMAT: seminar
REQUIREMENTS: regular presentations and term project
PREREQUISITES: 100-level art history course
IS THERE AN ENROLLMENT LIMIT?: yes
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
PREFERENCE: majors, seniors 
EDWARDS
ARTH Middle East, Asia and Africa courses
R 1:10-3:25
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the fifth course option

4/30/15
New Course Fall 2015:
ARTH 537 Renaissance Matter

The imagined cleave between "scientific" and "theoretical" art history has never seemed plausible to even the most extreme of art historians.  In late medieval and Renaissance North Europe, artworks incorporated materials from all over the human and natural world – azurite, gold, paper, blood, ivory, ash, bone. This "stuff" – rather than any forms it might be fashioned into – held its own auratic charge. How are we to think about these various species of matter, about their various processes of transformation? How did changing philosophies and concepts of matter alter the concept of the artwork, particularly in globally-connected North Europe? What role (if any) was played by rediscovered antique texts about matter (Lucretius, etc.?) This seminar pivots on two questions: first, how did Renaissance artists and audiences understand the material constituents of their craft? And second, can we imagine an art-history of material today outside a rubric of blunt materialism?  Material art history shouldn’t mean shucking hermeneutics or criticality. After all, going back to Heraclitus, what could be more "philosophical" than matter itself? 
At the same time, the “scientific” scrutiny of artworks – using X-rays, infrared scanning, radiographic photography, chemical analyses, and dendrochronology – has long been a particular fetish of the study of Northern Renaissance art. The insights onto the artistic process these methods offer are indisputable. Yet aside from verifying (or undermining) claims to age, authorship, or condition of old artworks, it remains extremely unclear to many scholars what motives scientific examination - in many respects a solution without a clear problem – are addressing.  Worse, such investigations often seem like advocacy for inferences of artistic intention – a concept viewed with skepticism by many historians today.  Theory's "return to the object" turn in art history (a maneuver, since the 1980s, often rooted in Northern artworks) has showed possibilities, but also limitations. Durability – the reigning dictate of many early objects – poses specific challenges to narratives privileging stories of rupture. Topics include: alchemy, the studio, early atomistic theories, restoration, animation, authenticity, faktura, and "science." Requirements: active participation, short presentations; final paper. Enrollment: 14
HOUR: R 10:00am-12:40pm                                               
C.HEUER

4/29/15
New Course Spring 2016:
ARTS 207 Black and White Digital Photography
This course is concerned with the unique way that black and white photography informs an understanding of the formal underpinnings of photography. First debuting in 1975, digital photography is no longer a rupture in photographic technology; it is now a worldwide standard. By separating the tradition of black and white from the technology of the darkroom and bringing it into the digital lab, we can begin to explore what should be kept from photographic tradition as digital technology advances.
Students will create black and white photographs using digital cameras. Weekly assignments will guide the making of photographs that are unique to the SLR format while also exploring the benefits of digital technology on picture making. Regular critiques will discuss student work and progress. Technical topics such as camera operation, proper exposure, digital workflow (including Photoshop) and digital inkjet printing techniques will be discussed. Lectures will provide historical context and an overview of traditional and contemporary artists working in black and white such as Gary Winogrand, Diane Arbus, Claude Cahun, Katy Grannan, and Latoya Ruby Fraizer.
COURSE FORMAT: studio
SCHEDULED CONFERENCE: no
SCHEDULED LAB: no
REQUIREMENTS: Evaluation will be based on photographic assignments, regular critiques, and a final portfolio of prints.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12 .
EXPECTED ENROLLMENT: 12
PREFERENCE: Majors, seniors
AVAILABLE FOR PASSFAIL?: no
HOUR: MW 10:00am-12:50pm
PEREZ

10/26/15
New Course Spring 2016:
ARTS 210 Figure in Place Studio

Figure in Place is a studio that utilizes art and design tools to develop projects
considering the architectural subject, and the relationship of ones environmental conditions to spaces that have evolved into complex engines, advanced ‘machines for living’. Studio production in Figure in Place emphasizes visual research strategies that can be applied to an array of practices and objectives, compressing research, field work and representation into an active mode of artistic production. Students will use the studio as a laboratory for creative problem-solving experiments. Beginning by looking at Architectural Historian, Raynor Banham’s Architecture of the Well-Tempered Environment, as well as such projects as the interdisciplinary architectural research of Cedric Price’s Fun Palace, students will make projects while looking at many examples of art, architecture and other spatial practices that examine and respond to the state of being, in an apparatus of environmental technologies.
Format: Studio. REQUIREMENTS: participation in all weekly studio projects, midterm and final project critiques .
PREREQUISITES: At least one past studio arts course experience is recommended.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
EXPECTED ENROLLMENT: 12
PREFERENCE: Course is open to all, but preference to Concentrators 
HOUR: W 10:00am-12:50pm
GOLDFARB
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the fifth course option

4/28/15
To be offered Fall 2015:

ARTS 241 Paiting

This course will offer an introduction to the concepts, materials, and techniques of painting in oil. Primarily through observational study, students will develop essential technical skills with an emphasis on color, value, surface, and space. Various ways of image-making will be explored and we will begin to consider issues of content and representation. Museum visits, slide presentations, and occasional readings will give us access to the conceptual and historical issues central to the language of painting.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation in discussion and critiques, and the quality of work produced. 
Lab Fee.
Prerequisites: ARTS 100
Enrollment limit: 15
HOUR: W  10:00am-12:50pm
ACHA

4/28/15
To be offered Fall 2015:

ARTS 263(F) Printmaking: Intaglio and Relief

An introduction to printmaking through the process of intaglio and relief. Techniques will include drypoint, etching, and collagraphy. Monotypes, some color work, collage, and hand tinting will also be covered. Both technical skill and a strong conceptual basis will be emphasized in order to create finished fine art prints. Experimentation is encouraged. Class time will consist of studio work, demonstrations, lectures, critiques, and field trips.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation in class, and the quality of work produced. Lab fee.
Prerequisites: ArtS 100 or ArtS 103
Enrollment limit: 15
HOUR: T 9:55-12:35
ACHA

5/6/15:
To be offered Fall 2015:

ARTS 324 Fall 2015 The Documentary Photography Project (Same as INTR324)

While every image documents something, the field of documentary photography traditionally uses still images to relate a story about the events and people that shape our world. Students will learn skills required to produce an effective visual narrative. Technical aspects of image acquisition that are particularly useful in conveying information will be reviewed, including manipulation of exposure controls, wide angle composition, and location lighting. Conceptual topics will include myths about "truth" and "objectivity" in photography, and the responsibilities of the documentarian to his/her subjects. Students will practice different types of documentation, and consider techniques for approaching, photographing and interviewing subjects. The practical aspects of developing a story, gaining access, working in unfamiliar environments and editing both individual images and series will be examined. Students will work throughout the semester on planning and executing a documentary project, culminating in an exhibition of their work. Acceptance into the class requires a strong level of technical competence, and a demonstrated ability to work independently and to commit to a long-term project. Participants should expect to spend significant time working off campus.
Class Format: studio
Requirements/Evaluation: class attendance is mandatory; participation in class discussion and critiques 20 %; aesthetic and technical strengths of shooting exercises 20 %; aesthetic and technical strength of final project 60 %
Additional Info:
Additional Info2:
Prerequisites: ARTS 252 and permission
Enrollment Preference: See above
Department Notes:
Material and Lab Fees: $200.00
Distribution Notes:
Divisional Attributes: Division I
Other Attributes:
Enrollment Limit: 8
Expected Enrollment: 8
HOUR: M 7:40-9:00pm
B. GOLDSTEIN

10/14/15
Newly offered course Spring 2016

CHEM 115(F) AIDS: The Disease and Search for a Cure

Since the discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) in 1983, modern techniques of molecular biology have revealed much about its structure and life cycle. The intensity of the scientific investigation directed at HIV-1 is unprecedented in history. We now know more about this virus than any other known pathogen. However, the early optimism concerning the prospects for an effective AIDS vaccine has now waned and HIV strains that are resistant to drug therapies are common. We are now three decades into the AIDS pandemic and the World Health Organization estimates that there are more than 34 million HIV-infected persons worldwide. After an introduction to chemical structure, we examine the molecular biology of the HIV virus, the molecular targets of anti-HIV drugs, and the prospects for a cure. We look at how HIV-1 interacts with the human immune system and discuss prospects for developing an effective HIV vaccine. This course is designed for the non-science major who does not intend to pursue a career in the natural sciences. Format: lecture, three hours per week. Evaluation is based on problem sets, a midterm, quizzes, a final exam, and a paper/discussion. No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 60 (expected: 60). Hour: 11:00-12:15 MWF
TAUROG

9/17/15
Cancelled course Spring 2016:

CHEM 116(S) Chemistry and Physics of Cooking (Q)

Cooking is a creative and artistic process, but it is based on fundamental chemical and physical principles. In this course, which is intended for students who do not plan to major in the natural sciences, we explore these scientific principles and their application to the kitchen. We draw on edible examples such as chemical bonding and intermolecular forces (salting, emulsification, and spherification), acid-base chemistry (leavening, making jam, and macaroni and cheese), kinetics and thermodynamics (cooking styles and times), states of matter (carbonation, ices, 110 foams, and gels), types of chemical reactions (baking bread, grilling vegetables, tenderizing meat), and energy transfer (kitchen equipment and gadgets). The kitchen is a laboratory—in the classroom, we carry out experiments to demonstrate and to test these scientific concepts. This course also considers the science behind contemporary ideas in cooking known as "modernist cuisine" and/or "molecular gastronomy". Bon appetit! Class Format: lecture Requirements/Evaluation: weekly quizzes and problem sets, two exams, and a paper Prerequisites: none, but students who have not taken high school chemistry should consult the instructor Enrollment Limit: 50 Expected Class Size: 50 Enrollment Preferences: seniors and juniors; not appropriate for CHEM, BIOL, or PHYS majors, or for those for have taken CHEM 151, 153, or 155 Distributional Requirements: Division 3 Quantitative/Formal Reasoning Spring 2016 LEC Section: 01 MWF 11:00 12:15 Instructor: John Thoman

4/29/15
To be offered Spring 2016:

CHEM 324 Enzyme Kinetics and Reaction Mechanisms
Enzymes are complex biological molecules capable of catalyzing chemical reactions with very high efficiency, stereo-selectivity and specificity. The study of enzymatically-catalyzed reactions gives insight into the study of organic reaction mechanisms in general, and into the topic of catalysis especially. This course explores the methods and frameworks for determining enzymatic reaction mechanisms. These methods are based on a firm foundation of organic reaction mechanisms and chemical kinetics. We will investigate the major types of biochemical reactions, focusing on their catalytic mechanisms and how those mechanisms can be elucidated. We will lay the foundation for this mechanistic consideration with discussion of transition state theory, structure-reactivity relationships, steady state and pre-steady kinetics, use of isotopes, genetic modification, and other tools for probing enzymatic reactions. We will also examine the catalytic roles of a variety of vitamins and cofactors.
TR 9:55-11:10

5/22/15
To be offered Fall 2015:
CHEM 348  Polymer Chemistry   
From synthetic to natural macromolecules, we encounter polymers everywhere and everyday. This course explores the multitude of synthetic techniques available and discusses how structure defines function. Topics include condensation and chain (anionic, cationic, radical) polymerizations, dendrimers, controlling molecular weight, ring opening, and biopolymer syntheses. Fundamentals of composition and physical properties of polymers, and methods of characterization are also covered.
Class Format:  lecture, two meetings per week
Requirements/Evaluation:  evaluation is based on problem sets, participation, two exams, laboratory, and a final project
Prerequisites:  CHEM 251/255
Enrollment Limit:  36
Expected Class Size:  36
Enrollment Preferences:  Chemistry majors
Distributional Requirements:
Division 3
Other Attributes: 
BIMO Interdepartmental Electives
MTSC Related Courses
S. Goh   
TR 9:55-11:10            

Moved from Spring 2016 to Fall 2015:
CHEM 364  Instrumental Methods of Analysis (Same as ENVI 364)

Moved from Fall 2015 to Spring 2016:
CHEM 335  Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry

1/11/16
Newly Cross-Listed with THEA
Spring 2016:
CHIN 227 Made in China or Making "China"?: Twentieth-Century Chinese Performative Culture (Same as COMP 227 & THEA 227)

06/15/15
New Course Spring 2016:
COMP 216 Folk and Fairy Tales in Literature and Beyond (W)
From cannibalistic crones in sugary cottages to frogs who can be transformed with a kiss, the English term “folktale” covers a broad range of stories that been beloved and belittled, transmitted and transformed for hundreds of years in many cultures. This course will look broadly at folktales from different traditions, ranging from early China to medieval Europe and contemporary America. In this course we will approach the folktale from a number of perspectives, including typological approaches; moral notions embedded in such tales; and the often porous borders between the natural and the supernatural, the animal and the human, and living and dead. We will consider the way normative gender and ethnic roles are portrayed and sometimes undermined. We will also consider the complex literary histories of folktales, looking at sources, the interplay of oral and written traditions, folktales as alternative histories, notions of authorship, and the ways stories transform in the course of transmission.
COURSE FORMAT: seminar
REQUIREMENTS: Short response papers and two longer essays.
PREREQUISITES: None.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 19
EXPECTED ENROLLMENT: 12
PREFERENCE: Comparative Literature majors
HOUR: TF 2:35-3:50
SARAH ALLEN

6/22/15
New Course Spring 2016:

COMP 219 The Monkey King: Transformation of a Legend (Same as ASST 220)

The devious and irascible Monkey King, born of stone, defying all authority yet compelled to behave by a dubious Buddhist magic, is one of the most beloved figures in Chinese culture. This course will trace the transformation of the Monkey King legend from its origins in early representations of monkeys in folklore and a seventh-century Chinese monk’s arduous journey to India in search of Buddhist learning, through its maturation in the sixteenth century, and into works of the Asian diaspora in the U.S. We will examine textual and visual representations of the Monkey King in popular culture, folklore, and literature, to explore topics including ideas about conformity and individual autonomy, morality and law, and the cultural negotiations necessitated by travel and contact with people (or monkeys) of other civilizations.
COURSE FORMAT: seminar
REQUIREMENTS:5 short (1-2 page) papers, a mid-term paper (4-5 pages), and a take-home final
REQUIREMENTS2:
PREREQUISITES: None
IS THERE AN ENROLLMENT LIMIT?: yes
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 25
EXPLANATION OF LIMIT: More than 25 would make discussion unwieldy.
EXPECTED ENROLLMENT: 12
PREFERENCE: Comparative Literature majors, Asian Studies majors
AVAILABLE FOR PASSFAIL?: no
HOUR: TR 11:20-12:35
SARAH ALLEN

6/2/15
Course Cancelled Spring 2016:
COMP 259 Adultery in the Nineteenth-Century Novel (W)(Same as ENGL 261 and WGSS 259)

10/26/15
Course Cancelled Spring 2016:
COMP 346 Questioning the Cultural Self in Literature (Same as ARAB 346)

7/30/15
Course Cancelled Fall 2015:
CSCI 326 Software Methods

11/4/15
Course Offered Spring 2016:

DANC 203 Beginning/Intermediate Ballet: Technique, Variations and History

4/24/15
Course Cancelled Fall 2015:

DANC 205 Modern Masterworks

4/24/15
New Course Spring 2016:

DANC 208 Dance and Diaspora
(D)
Both dance and migration involve human bodies in motion, making dance a powerful lens through which to view the experience of diaspora. In this course, we will analyze both continuity and creative reinvention in dance traditions of the African, South Asian, and Latin American diasporas. We will analyze dance as a form of resistance to slavery, colonialism, and oppression; as an integral component of community formation; as a practice that shapes racial, gendered, and national identity; and as a commodity in the global capitalist marketplace. We will explore these topics through readings, film viewings, discussion, attendance at live performances, and movement workshops (no previous dance experience required). 
HOUR: TR 9:55-11:10
DEE DAS


11/4/15
Course Cancelled Spring 2016:

DANC 300 Ballet: Technique, Variations and History


8/31/15

Course Cancelled Fall 2015:
DANC 301 Creative Process in Dance


4/24/15
Moved from Spring 2016 to Fall 2015:

DANC 301 Creative Process in Dance

4/24/15
New Course Spring 2016:

DANC 305 Choreographies

By unpacking the idea of choreography, this course will be a laboratory for deepening a student’s thinking, writing and practice of performance. Choreography will be our flexible methodology for personalizing an approach to movement, text and objects as well as our lens for discussing cultural phenomena such as protests, public ceremonies and performance. Gleaning cues from these public spectacles, morning class exercises will focus on a skill or aspect of performance such as physicality, image, affect, duration, obstructions, objects, speech, timing and place. Afternoon sessions will be composition accompanied by a writing practice as each student navigates matters such as identity, representation and social space. How does choreography operate in society at large? What is the line between representing and doing something with one’s body? How might performance question or transgress notions of identity? How can writing further performance as an expanded field of thought and action? The semester will culminate in a series of choreographies installed on campus, in locations chosen by the students. 
We will consider the work of established and emerging artists including : Vito Acconci, Marina Abramovic, Banksy, luciana achugar, William Pope.L, David Hammons, Trisha Brown, Jen Rosenblit, Guerilla Girls, Stuart Sherman, Jerome Bel and Visual AIDS. We will also read texts by Andre Lepecki, Michel Foucault, Douglas Crimp, Jennifer Doyle, José Muñoz, Marten Spanberg, Fred Moten, Jenn Joy, Judith Butler, Adrienne Edwards and Gilles Deleuze. Evaluation will be based on class participation, 2 short response papers, a longer paper and a final choreography.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, 2 5-page short response papers, a longer 10-page paper and a final choreography.
Prerequisites: at least one course in creative writing, dance, voice, music, theater, studio art and prior experience with live performance. Contact instructor with further questions.
HOUR: W 10:00-10:50 and 1:10-3:50
RAWLS

New Course Fall 2015:
ECON 213 Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (Same as ENVI 213)

We'll use economics to learn why we harm the environment and overuse natural resources, and what we can do about it. We'll talk about whether and how we can put a dollar value on nature and ecosystem services. We'll study cost benefit analysis, pollution in general, climate change, natural resources (like fisheries, forests, and fossil fuels), and energy. We will take an economic approach to global sustainability, and study the relationship between the environment and economic growth and trade.
MANDELBAUM

7/28/15
Course Cancelled Spring 2016:

ECON 231 Financial Markets (Q)

7/28/15
Course Cancelled Spring 2016:

ECON 358 International Trade

6/5/15
To be offered Fall 2015:

ECON 362 Global Competitive Strategies 
This course maintains an IO perspective, acknowledging the centrality of large, multinational firms in determining the pattern and success of a nation's international economic activities (which include, but are not limited to, a wide range of licensing, trade, and diverse configurations of foreign direct investment activities, and their implications for employment, profitability, and social welfare at home and abroad.) In this sense, we depart from international economic approaches that focus foremost on the ways in which a country's factor endowments, domestic market characteristics, and government policies promote or impede such activities, although in our treatment we do not neglect these factors, but treat them as constraints upon, or resources supporting, the optimizing behaviors of large firms. During and following a case-based module in which we learn and simulate the strategic decision processes used by executives of multinationals, we examine the actual trade and investment decisions of those firms, compare them to the predictions of international trade and multinational IO theories, and seek to explain divergences where they are identified. Throughout, competitive strategies of domestic and foreign rivals in markets around the world are explored. As well, the types and efficacy of various government policies in promoting the competitiveness of industries in regional and global markets -- and how they are linked to recent work in growth theory -- are examined. Further, substantial recent shifts in the nature of globalized economic activity, including the changing relative mobility and power of capital and labor, are examined. Finally, welfare propositions and policy ideas for addressing welfare impacts are advanced and discussed. Written cases, class participation, a mid-term exam, and a final paper or exam are expected.
Class Format: lecture/discussion Requirements/Evaluation: written cases; class participation; a mid-term exam; and a final paper or exam
Prerequisites: ECON 251 Enrollment
Preference: senior Economics majors Divisional Attributes: 
Division II
Other Attributes: GBST Economic Development Studies Electives
Enrollment Limit: 25 Expected Enrollment: 25
FORTUNATO

6/5/15
Cancelled course Spring 2016:

ECON 384 Corporate Finance (Q) 

10/14/15
Cancelled course Spring 2016:

ECON 386(S) Environmental and Natural Resource Policy (Q) (Same as ENVI 386/ECON 518)

10/21/2015
New course Spring 2016:

ECON 387 Economics of Climate Change (Same as ENVI 387 and ECON 522)

This course introduces the economic view of climate change, including both theory and empirical evidence. Given the substantial changes implied by the current stock of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere, we will begin by looking at impacts on agriculture, health, income, and migration in both wealthy and poor countries. Next we will study adaptation, including capital investments and behavioral changes, and insurance. We will examine the sources of climate change, especially electricity generation and transportation, and think about optimal policies. What is the socially optimal amount of climate change? (Probably not zero.) Why have countries had such a hard time agreeing on GHG emissions reductions, and how might we overcome such difficulties? In considering policy, we will employ not only theoretical predictions, but also the growing body of evidence from attempts to regulate GHGs. Examples include China's pilot cap-and-trade programs, the EU ETS, and the US Clean Power Plan. We will pay particular attention to the political economy of regulation and ways in which policy results have departed from theoretical predictions. Finally, we will discuss the limits of the economic approach to climate change, pointing out questions on which economic theory provides little guidance.
COURSE TEASER: How bad will the economic impacts of climate change be, how can we adapt, and how can we stop things getting worse?
Class Format: lecture Requirements/Evaluation: Weekly problem sets, one or two midterms, final exam 
Prerequisites: ECON 251, familiarity with statistics
Preference: senior Economic majors and CDE fellows Divisional Attributes: 
Division II
Other Attributes: QFR, satisfies the Environmental Policy requirement for the Environmental Policy major and the Environmental studies concentration
Other attributes: ENVI Environmental Policy,ENVP PTL Theory/Method Courses,ENVP PE-A Group Electives,ENVP PTL-A Group Electives,ENVP SC-A Group Electives,MAST Interdepartmental Electives,POEC Comparative POEC/Public Policy Courses
Enrollment Limit: 30 Expected Enrollment: 25
Gibson

8/5/15
New cross listing with ASST

ECON 460 Economic Development of China (Same as ASST 460)
This course is an introduction to the economic development of China in the post-1978 period. It seeks to provide an overview of the process by which China grew from an economic backwater to the second largest economy in the world, with a particular focus on rural development and the growing gap between rural and urban incomes; human capital and education; and health and gender in the Chinese context. In addition, the course has the goal of familiarizing students with current economics research on Chinese topics and enabling them to be informed consumers of this research. Class Format: seminar Requirements/Evaluation: in-class quizzes, literature critique, individual project comprising a presentation and final paper Prerequisites: ECON 251 and 255 Enrollment Limit: 19 Expected Class Size: 19 Enrollment Preferences: senior Economics majors Spring 2016 SEM Section: 01 TR 08:30 09:45
LEIGHT

4/28/15
New Course Desctription Fall 2015:

ENGL 110 American Love Stories (W)

 It’s been argued that American writers don't know how to tell a happy love story. Instead of ending a tale with the payoff of a wedding, or writing about the joys of family life, they obsess over loneliness, death, and escape from civilization. In this class, we will collectively test and revamp that thesis, deliberately switching up the data set that constitutes “the American love story.” By the end, after encountering more than a century’s worth of imagined passions and attachments, you’ll develop your own working theory of the love story as a genre. Some of the big questions we’ll pursue are: How do these authors try to convey the nature of desire through their writing style? What makes an object of desire so desirable, and what forms does that desire take? How powerful a force is love supposed to be—what is it imagined capable of doing, and what are its limits? The texts with which we’ll construct some answers will likely include some familiar favorites (The Scarlet Letter, The Great Gatsby) as well as some lesser-known gems (Elizabeth Stoddard’s The Morgesons, Maria Ruiz de Burton’s Who Would Have Thought It?), a smattering of poetry (including work by that great American lover, Walt Whitman), and recent film (like Spike Jonze’s Her).

6/23/15
Newly EDI Listed Fall 2015:
ENGL 228 The Renaissance in England and the European Continent: Self and World (Same as COMP 230)

At the same time as the individual human being in possession of a distinctive personality was taking on enormous importance in politics, philosophy, literature, and the visual arts, early modern Europeans were encountering unprecedented levels of cultural diversity. In this interdisciplinary course, we will consider these two developments both separately and together. As Renaissance humanists were acquiring a sophisticated understanding of the distance between the present and various European pasts (the recent medieval past and the remote history of antiquity) they were also coming into contact with non-European cultures in Africa, the Americas, and Asia via trade and economic development, imperial expansion, and religious conversion. Always at stake in these encounters was the question of who counted as an individual; the self was not considered to be intrinsic to human nature but rather the product of historical and cultural developments. Themes will include religious pluralism, the sacred and the secular, vernacularity, exploration and empire, the relationship between mind and body, slavery, trade, wealth, gender, self-fashioning, and style. We will consider such English writers as the Pearl poet, More, Marlowe, Spenser, Shakespeare, Browne, and Milton; such continental intellectuals as Descartes, Erasmus, Las Casas, and Castiglione; and such continental artists as Michelangelo, Velázquez, Bruegel, and Rembrandt. The course will contribute to the College's Exploring Diversity Initiative by examining the role of historical and cultural difference within and beyond Europe at the very beginning of globalization.

1/15/16
Course Cancelled Spring 2016:

ENGL 240 The Novel in Theory (W) (Same as COMP 239)

12/21/15
Newly Listed as Gateway and Writing Intensive Spring 2016:
ENGL 246
The Love of Literature


5/12/15 Newly Cross-Listed with PSCI 234
4/28/15
Newly Cross-Listed with COMP 329 Spring 2016:

ENGL 322 Political Romanticism

Newly Criticism Course

10/14/15
New course Spring 2016:

Geos 254T – Gulf of California Tectonics and Coastal Ecosystems (Same as ENVI 254)

The coastal zone on Mexico’s Baja California peninsula extends more than 1,000 km from northwest to southeast within the Gulf of California, but the composite length including indented bays and the circumference of more than 40 islands amounts to almost 3,000 km.  The ecosystems developed along the shores of this tectonically active and expanding seaway include rocky shores, coastal sand dunes, coral reefs, clam beds, and huge banks of unattached coralline red algae known as rhodoliths.  Sequestration of calcium-carbonate (CaCO3) is one factor that all the ecosystems share in common.  The products of these limestone-producing systems are surprisingly monumental in physical scale, given the brief 5.5 Ma during which they evolved.  Why are these systems so prolific and what physical factors control their biogeography within the context of each island, embayment, or headland?  What role is played by changing climate, particularly with respect to patterns of atmospheric and marine circulation associated with El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycles traceable back through the Pleistocene and Pliocene?  These questions are holistic in scope, and the answers are deeply rooted in the wider region’s dynamic geological history.  The tools used to answer such questions range from the petrographic microscope in examination of tiny bioclastic grains to satellite images in the analysis of landscapes.  The object of this course is to demonstrate how a wide range of disciplines in physical geology, geomorphology, paleontology, and ecology combine to provide a broad but balanced picture of a complex region.  While not mandatory, all participants are eligible for a 10-day field excursion to the lower Gulf of California near Loreto in Baja California Sur (Mexico) during Spring Break.
Format: Weekly meetings for tutorials.  Evaluation will be based on five written papers and weekly participation in discussions.
Prerequisites: Any 100-level course in the Geosciences; Geos 201 (Geomorphology) or Geos 212 (Paleobiology) recommended as prerequisites.
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the fifth course option
Preference given to Sophomores and/or geosciences majors
Cost: Textbook approx. $25; excursion to Gulf of California at no cost to students.
M. Johnson

9/9/15
Cancelled course Spring 2016

GEOS 314(S) Sediment Records of Climate Change (Same as MAST 314 & ENVI 314)

9/9/15
Now Writing Intensive Fall 2016

HIST 240(F) Muscovy and the Russian Empire (W)

10/26/15
Newly offered course Spring 2016:

HIST 263: The United States and the World, 1914 to the Present
This course explores America's engagement with the world from 1914 to the present. The First World War ushered in a new era for U.S. foreign relations. The self-identified isolationist power became a principal player on the world stage and by the end of the Second World War emerged as one of the two global superpowers, poised to compete with the Soviet Union in a protracted Cold War. After the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, some spoke of the United States as a "hyperpower," but how it should exercise its unrivalled power was far from clear. Through a mixture of lecture and discussion, this course introduces students to the key events of America's most powerful century and to the new wave of scholarly literature being written about the United States and the World. Readings will reflect current trends in the sub-field, which focuses not only on high-level diplomacy, but also on a range of other factors that influence foreign relations, including ideology, race, gender, culture, domestic politics, and the roles of individual personalities.
Class Format: lecture/discussion
Requirements/Evaluation: evaluation will be based on class participation, short papers, a midterm exam, and a final exam
Additional Info:
Additional Info2:
Prerequisites: none; open to all
Enrollment Preference:
Department Notes:
Material and Lab Fees:
Distribution Notes:
Divisional Attributes: Division II
Other Attributes: HIST Group F Electives - U.S. + Canada
Enrollment Limit: 40
Expected Enrollment: 25-30
CHAMPMAN

11/2/15
Cancelled course Spring 2016:

 HIST 281 Spring 2016 African-American History, 1619-1865 (D) (Same as AFR 281)

11/2/15
New course Spring 2016:

HIST 371 Oral History: Theory, Methods and Practice

Oral history offers a powerful means to document history “from the bottom up,” filling gaps in the historical record and creating ways to make new community connections.  Using a variety of texts, including transcripts and recorded interviews, students will consider what oral history offers as a source of information; how oral history is produced and analyzed; some of the legal, ethical, and methodological implications that researchers must consider; the impact of digital technologies on oral history; and the ways that memory, context, and identity shape the interview.  The class will include a hands-on component and a group final project, giving students the chance to conduct, archive, and use interviews.  The final project will focus on a topic related to local history such as the impact of industry and deindustrialization on northern Berkshire County.  All students will be expected to complete several short research and writing assignments; travel off campus to conduct recorded interviews; submit written transcriptions; and participate in the final group project.
Class Format:seminar
Requirements/Evaluation: 2 transcribed interviews, 2 short papers, participation, final group project; Students must travel off campus to conduct two oral history interviews; interviews to be recorded, transcribed, and archived. Also short papers and final group project
Additional Info: may not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the fifth course option
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment Preference: history majors, juniors
Department Notes:
Enrollment Limit: 18
Expected Enrollment: 12-15
VALK

11/2/15
Cancelled course Spring 2016:

HIST 379 Spring 2016 Black Women in the United States (D) (Same as AFR 379 & WGSS 379)

10/26/15
Newly offered course Spring 2016:

HIST 464: The United States and the Vietnam War (Same as LEAD 464)
U.S. involvement in Vietnam affected nearly every aspect of American life, including the country's overall foreign policy, its military strategy, the relationship between various branches of government, the nation's political trajectory, the role of media in society, youth culture, race relations, and more. This seminar explores America's war in Vietnam and its dramatic ramifications at home and abroad. We will evaluate the Vietnam War era as a turning point in U.S. history--and in the role of the U.S. in the world--by reading and discussing a number of scholarly works on domestic and international aspects of the conflict. Students will develop an original research topic and research and write a 20- to 25- page paper, based in primary sources, on one aspect of America's Vietnam War.
Class Format: seminar
Requirements/Evaluation: evaluation will be based on class participation, several short papers, and a 20- to 25-page research paper
Additional Info:
Additional Info2:
Prerequisites:
Enrollment Preference: advanced History majors
Department Notes:
Material and Lab Fees:
Distribution Notes:
Divisional Attributes: Division II
Other Attributes: HIST Group F Electives - U.S. + Canada
Enrollment Limit: 15
Expected Enrollment: 10-15
CHAPMAN

8/5/15
New cross listing with Arab Fall 2015

HSCI 322 Medieval Islamic Medicine (Same as ARAB 281 & REL 283)
Medieval Islamic Medicine embodies both a medical tradition that deserves historical study in itself, and a relevant period of medical history with a deep impact on the development of the Western Medical Tradition. Paradoxically, while it is highly idealized, it has traditionally gained —and often still does today—a fleeting, superficial and outdated overview in the syllabi of history of medicine courses at medical schools, and only exceptionally has a well informed chapter been included in recent general works on history of medicine or Islamic studies. The aim of this course is to two-fold: first, to give students an overview of the Islamic medical tradition, outlining its origins and development both in the eastern and western lands of medieval Islamic civilization, and second, to develop students' critical skills in analyzing historical information as well as bibliography. Among other things, the course will consider the transmission and elaboration of Greco-Roman medical knowledge, the principles of medical theory and practice, the development of different genres of Islamic medical literature, their main authors, and their medical contributions.Primary Class Format: seminar Requirements/Evaluation: regular attendance and participation, two short papers, and a 10- to 15-page research paper Prerequisites: none Enrollment Limit: 20 Expected Class Size: 15 Enrollment Preferences: none TF 01:10 02:25 Instructor: Cristina Alvarez Millan

4/27/15
No Longer Cross-listed with AFR 231 Spring 2016:

LATS 231 Approaches to Media Studies: Analyzing Mediated Difference

4/27/15
Newly Cross-listed With AFR 326 Spring 2016:
LATS 313 Gender, Race, and the Power of Personal Aesthetic

Title change Fall 2015:
MATH 394 Galois Theory

6/2/15
Course Cancelled Fall 2015 but to be Offered in Spring 2016:
PSCI 141 Bandits and Warlords (Same as GBST 141 and LEAD 141)

6/2/15
Course Cancelled Spring 2016:
PSCI 243 Politics of Africa (Same as AFR 256)

4/29/15
New Course Spring 2015:

PSCI 245 Politics of the Middle East

This introductory course deals with both the domestic and regional politics of the Middle East. Focusing on Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, and Syria, it considers the forces that situate, define, and motivate politics inside these countries and between them.  It will examine the history of the region and how states came to be created and boundaries drawn between them, the formation of states and their bases of support and sources of resistance, religious and ethnic conflicts, and the political economy of the countries and the region.  It also will engage the on-going civil wars in several countries, state breakdown and the rise of ISIS, geopolitics and the rivalry between Saudi Arabia and Iran.
COURSE FORMAT: lecture
REQUIREMENTS: Two papers, with a total length of 20 pages
REQUIREMENTS2:
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 25
EXPECTED ENROLLMENT: 25
PREFERENCE: Political Science majors
Cannot be taken pass/fail but can be taken as 5th course option
DEPARTMENTAL ATTRIBUTES: PSCI Comparative Politics, PSCI International Relations
HOUR: TF 2:35-3:50
M. MACDONALD

6/2/15
New Course Spring 2015:
PSCI 374 Shadows of Plato’s Cave:  Image, Screen, and Spectacle (Same as COMP 374 and ARTH 505)

In Book VII of the Republic, Socrates famously asks his interlocutors to picture people living in a cave, bound in chains and able to see only shadows on the wall.  Thus begins the presentation of perhaps the most influential metaphor in the history of philosophy.  One might even claim that when Plato deployed the metaphor in an extended allegory, he constituted the fields of both philosophy and political theory.  In repeatedly examining the allegory over the centuries, later thinkers have elaborated their approaches not only to Plato but also to the nature of politics and the tasks of thinking.  This class begins with the Republic’s cave other key Platonic discussions of appearances, visual representation, and (literal and metaphoric) seeing, asking how Plato’s approaches to image, politics, and theory/philosophy shape each other.  Building on those inquiries, we next take up important twentieth and twenty-first century returns to the cave, engaging such figures as Heidegger, Strauss, Arendt, Derrida, Irigaray, Rancière, and Badiou.  Finally, we examine recent theories of screen and spectacle—read both for their resonances with and departures from debates over the Platonic legacy—and case studies in the politics of both military and racial spectacles in the U.S.  The question of what is an image and what images do will run from the beginning of course to the end.  Beyond the authors mentioned, readings may include such authors as Allen, Bruno, Clark, Debord, Friedberg, Goldsby, Joselit, Mitchell, Nightingale, Rodowick, Rogin, Silverman, and Virilio.  Insofar as it fits student interest, we will also explore the cave’s considerable presence in visual culture, ranging from Renaissance painting through such recent and contemporary artists as Kelley, Demand, Hirschhorn, Kapoor, Sugimoto, and Walker, to films such as The Matrix.
COURSE TEASER: We explore Plato’s cave, from the Republic, to 20th and 21st century philosophy and critical theory, to art, film, TV, and cyberculture now.
COURSE FORMAT: seminar
PREREQUISITES: One prior course in political theory, art history, cultural/literary theory, or philosophy or permission of the instructor.
IS THERE AN ENROLLMENT LIMIT?: yes
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 19
EXPLANATION OF LIMIT: Our 300 level seminars are capped at no more than 19.
EXPECTED ENROLLMENT: 12
PREFERENCE2: Majors in political science, comparative literature, and art history, as well as students (up to 4) in the graduate program in art history.
AVAILABLE FOR PASSFAIL?: no; no 5th course
Division 2 for PSCI and Division 1 for COMP and ARTH
HOUR: M 7pm-9:40pm
REINHARDT
DEPARTMENTAL ATTRIBUTES: PSCI Political Theory.

1/20/16
Course Cancelled Spring 2016:

PSYC 318 Image, Imaging, and Imagining: The Brain and Visual Arts (Same as NSCI 318 and INTR 223)

6/25/15
Course cancelled Spring 2016:
PSYC 328
 Understanding Attention and Distraction 

10/8/15
Cancelled Course Spring 2016:

REL 243 Islamic Law: Past and Present (Same as ARAB 243 & HIST 302)

11/23/15
New Course Description & Title Spring 2016:

RLSP 105 Advanced Spanish Grammar and Conversation

This course focuses on the development of Spanish linguistic accuracy and oral communication skills. Major emphasis is placed on increasing oral fluency through exposure to media, interaction with native speakers, and participation in a variety of communicative activities. In addition, students will perform regular exercises to improve writing and syntax skills. Throughout the course, they will read journalistic and literary texts in order to stimulate oral and written response and to analyze complex grammatical structures within authentic target language contexts.


4/24/15
Course Cancelled Fall 2015:

RLSP 199 Spanish in Action: Advanced Communication & Culture for Everyday Life

4/18/16
Newly EDI Designation

RLSP 214 "Ecologismo": Literature, Culture and the Environment in Latin America (Same as ENVI 218)
How have Latin American authors and artists responded to environmental concerns, from the logging and rubber booms that threatened the Amazon in the early 20th century to contemporary global warming? How do the realities of Latin American societies--including massive disparities of wealth and poverty; the cultural and political impacts of the region’s indigenous populations; and the complex histories of colonialism, dependency and neoliberalism--inform Latin American responses to environmental issues? How does Latin America's "environmental imaginary" differ from those of the US and Europe? In this course we will explore these issues and more through literature and other cultural texts from Latin America. We will consider short stories and novellas by authors including Horacio Quiroga (Uruguay), Luis Sepúlveda (Chile), Mempo Giardinelli (Argentina), and Ana Cristina Rossi (Costa Rica); poetry by Esthela Calderón (Nicaragua), Juan Carlos Galeano (Colombia), Homero Aridjis (Mexico); the paintings of Tomás Sánchez (Cuba); and feature films as well as shorter documentaries. In Spanish.  This course satisfies the EDI requirement because it is inspired by and organized around Arturo Escobar’s notion of “the political ecology of difference”: our work throughout the semester aims to understand the myriad ways in which “difference” – economic, ecological, and cultural – informs Latin American responses to environmental degradation.  We will also explore some of the ways that contemporary artists and intellectuals attempt to revise forms of subjectivity understood as characteristically Western and modern through creative cultural engagement with Amerindian knowledge and forms of expression.      


11/9/15

Newly Cross-listed with COMP; 1/8/16 Newly Cross-listed with PSCI
RUSS 214 Contemporary Russian Culture and Politics (Sames as GBST 214, COMP 220 and PSCI 294)

8/12/15
Course Cancelled Spring 216:

STAT 101 Elementary Statistics and Data Analysis (Q)

8/12/15
New Course Offered Spring 2016:

STAT 202 Introduction to Statistical Modeling (Q)
Data come from a variety of sources sometimes from planned experiments or designed surveys, but also arise by much less organized means. In this course we'll explore the kinds of models and predictions that we can make from both kinds of data as well as design aspects of collecting data. We'll focus on model building, especially multiple regression, and talk about its potential as well as its limits to answer questions about the world. We'll emphasize applications over theory and analyze real data sets throughout the course.
Class Format: lecture
Requirements/Evaluation: evaluation will be based on homework, exams and projects Prerequisites: STAT 201 or permission of instructor
Department Notes: Students wanting to take this course on a pass/fail basis will only be allowed to do so with the permission of the instructor
Enrollment Limit: 35
Expected Enrollment: 20
HOUR: MR 1:10-2:25
DE VEAUX

8/12/15
Course Cancelled Spring 2016:

STAT 340 An Introduction to Categorical Data Analysis (Q)

8/3/15
New Course Description Fall 2015:

THEA 205 The Actor's Instrument
Building on the Stanislavski-based imagination and characterization skills cultivated in Acting I, this course will focus on developing the actor's physical instrument, ensemble awareness and composition skills to stage scenes from plays that use highly poetic language. The physical regimen will combine the six core disciplines of the Suzuki Method of Actor Training with elements of Hatha Yoga, Barba's "Danza del Viento”,  rudimentary Viewpoints, vocal exercises based on the resonator work of Meredith Monk and Roy Hart, Alexander Technique and Skinner-based speech drills. As the poetic body and awareness of each other expands, students will work individually and in groups to apply their newfound physicality and perceptions to Shakespearean texts with progressively more time dedicated to composition work, monologues and scenes as the course progresses.

5/8/15:
Course to be Offered Spring 2016:
THEA 248 The Modern Theatre: Plays and Performance (Same as COMP 248 and ENGL 234)
This seminar will examine major trends in global theatre and performance from the turn of the nineteenth century through the postwar period. We will explore a variety of national traditions, comparing and positioning works in the context of revolutionary transformations of theatre practice. Artists to be considered may include: Strindberg, Ibsen, Wilde, Chekhov, Shaw, Pirandello, Treadwell, Artaud, O’Neill, Hughes, Stein, Williams, Hansberry, Al-Hakim, Brecht, Beckett, Abe, Genet, Soyinka, Pinter, Albee, Wilson, Gambaro, and Fornes. Although emphasis will be given to textual analysis and close reading, we will also consider trends in acting, directing, design, theatre architecture and the actor/audience relationship whenever possible.
Class Format: Seminar
Requirements/Evaluation: two five-page papers; two “deep-reading” responses; active participation in class discussion; attendance at selected Theatre Department and Center Series productions
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment Limit: 18
Expected Class Size: 10
Enrollment Preferences: Theatre majors, English majors, Comparative Literature majors
HOLZAPFEL

6/24/15
New crosslisting Spring 2016:
WGSS 110T
The Veil: History and Interpretations (Same as ARAB 215T and HIST 110T)(D) (W) 

4/24/15
Course Cancelled Fall 2015:

WGSS 244T Actually Existing Alternative Economies (D) (W)




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