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Addendum to the
Williams College Courses of Instruction 2016-2017

Last updated: 2/2/17 12:38 PM

10/17/16
No longer available for pass/fail or fifth course option

AFR 200 Intro to Africana Studies

10/11/16
No longer available for pass/fail or fifth course option; no longer EDI

AFR 211  Race and the Environment  (Same as ENVI/SOC/AMST 211)

10/12/16
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis

AFR 221 Giving God a Backbeat: Rap Music, Religion & Spirituality 

10/12/16
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis

AFR 302 Complexion Complexities: Colorism in Literature, Lyrics & Everyday Life

10/12/16
New cross listings Spring 2017

AFR 329 The Digital Caribbean (Same as GBST 329, ENGL 330, AMST 324, COMP 324)

8/12/16
Newly Cross Listed with HIST

AMST 256 Social Justice Traditions: 1960s to #BLM 


5/27/16
New Course offered Fall 2016:
AMST 256 Social Justice Traditions: 1960s to #BLM
(Same as AFR 257 and HIST 256)

We live in a time of renewed social justice activism, as people from all walks of life confront economic inequality, police violence, discrimination against transgender individuals, and other forms of oppression. This course is designed to clarify where recent initiatives like Black Lives Matter and Occupy Wall Street came from, and to evaluate how they might shape American life in the near future. Movements have histories, as today’s activists draw on the “freedom dreams,” tactics, and styles of rhetoric crafted by their predecessors, while making use of new technologies, such as Twitter, and evolving understandings of “justice.” Taking a historical approach, we will begin by studying the civil rights, Black Power, anti-war, counter-culture, and feminist initiatives of the 1960s. We will then explore how progressive and radical activists adjusted their theories and strategies as the country became more conservative in the 1970s and 1980s. Making use of movement documents, documentary films, and scholarly accounts, we will study the development of LGBTQ, ecological, and economic justice initiatives up to the present day. Throughout, we will seek to understand how movements in the United States are shaped by global events and how activists balance their political work with other desires and commitments. 
Evaluation: attendance and class participation; four 2 page reading response papers; discussion of films via GLOW forums; and a final 7-8 page analytical essay.
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 35;  expected enrollment: 25. Preference if the course is overenrolled: First years, sophomores, and American Studies majors.
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the fifth course option
MR 2:35-3:50
Cornell

New Course offered Spring 2017:
AMST352 Grassroots Organizing and Civil Resistance
Course description: This course examines the ways that ordinary people exercise collective power to influence elites, access resources, and even topple authoritarian governments. We will explore a variety of case studies – from the U.S. labor movement and urban community organizing, to recent direct action campaigns to prevent climate catastrophe – in order to gain insight into the art and science of grassroots mobilization. The class will make use of scholarship from the fields of history, sociology, and peace studies to probe the nature of political consent and the efficacy of forms of nonviolent action, such as boycotts, strikes, and blockades. Most importantly, however, we will draw from the personal expertise, tool kits, and training manuals of on-the-ground organizers to develop practical skill sets that can be applied in a variety of settings. Students will gain hands-on experience with important organizing techniques, such as power-mapping, 1-on-1 conversations, and action scenario planning. We will also consider the importance of expressive cultures and artistic practices to social change efforts, and delve into abiding challenges, such as building coalitions across race and class differences. The course will prove useful for those considering careers in social work, the labor movement, international NGOs, the law, public education, or political journalism. Format: seminar. Evaluation: attendance and participation; in-person skills assessments; group project; short essay-style final exam.
Prerequisites: None. Enrollment limit?: 15
Preference if the course is overenrolled: American Studies majors.
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the fifth course option
Departmental attributes: AMST Arts in Context; Comp Studies in Race, Ethnicity, Diaspora; Critical and Cultural Theory
Hour: MR 2:35-3:50
Cornell


5/27/16
New Course offered Spring 2017:
AMST 440/AFR342 Racial Capitalism

This class will interrogate the ways in which capitalist economies have “always and everywhere” relied upon forms of racist domination and exclusion. Although the United States will be in the foreground, the subject requires an international perspective by its very nature. We will consider the ways in which the violent expropriation of land from the indigenous peoples of the Americas, paired with chattel slavery and other coercive forms of labor, made possible the rise of a capitalist world economy centered in Europe during the early modern period. We will then explore ways racial divisions have undermined the potential for unified movements of poor and working people to challenge the prerogatives of wealthy citizens, and served to excuse imperial violence waged in the name of securing resources and “opening markets.” Ideas about gender and sexuality always undergird racial imaginaries, so we will study, for instance, the ways rhetoric about “welfare queens” has impacted public assistance programs, and claims about the embodiment of Asian women play into the international division of labor. We will also be attentive to the means – from interracial unionism to national liberation struggles – by which subjects of racial capitalism have resisted its dehumanizing effects. This is a reading intensive course that will challenge students to synthesize historical knowledge with concepts drawn from scholars working in the traditions of Marxist, decolonial, and materialist feminist thought, including: Angela Davis, Cedric Robinson, Anibal Quijano, Chandra Mohanty, David Roediger, Stuart Hall, Ruth Wilson Gilmore, and Silvia Federici
Course Format: seminar
Method of evaluation: attendance and participation; a written mid-term exam; one in-class presentation; research paper proposal; 12-16 page research paper.
Prerequisites (if there aren't any put "none"): Previous coursework in race and ethnicity, critical studies in neoliberalism or political economy, or permission of the instructor.Enrollment limit:: 16 Expected enrollment: 14 Preference if the course is overenrolled: American Studies majors.
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the fifth course option
Hour Tuesday 1:10-3:50 (by prior arrangement with Calendar and Scheduling)
Departmental attributes:: AMST Senior Seminar; Comp Studies in Race, Ethnicity, Diaspora; Space and Place
Cornell

10/24/16
Available on pass/fail basis

ANTH 262
Language and Power

8/12/16
New Course Description Fall 2016:

ARAB 221(F) Humor in Classical Arabic Literature (Same as COMP 291)   
Party-crashers, misers, fools, and so-called ignoramuses inspired littérateurs in medieval Arabo-Islamic society to compose various texts that detail the antisocial habits and roguish behaviors of such figures. These  littérateurs employed humor and satire in these texts that depict a pluralistic, egalitarian society antithetical to prevailing contemporary depictions of “medieval Islam” and compel us to rethink the image of the uptight Muslim and the discourse of civilizational clash.This course will be devoted to a close reading of a selection of humorous classical Arabic texts that treat such figures. We will consider how stories of these figures might be received, their effect on the audience, and their possible functions in a cosmopolitan society that placed a premium on hospitality and generosity. All readings in English, although those with Arabic language competency are invited to make comparisons with the original where possible.
Class Format: seminar
Requirements/Evaluation: class participation (40%), weekly responses (30%), final paper (30%) Extra Info: may not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the fifth course optionPrerequisites: none
Enrollment Preferences: Comparative Literature and Arabic Studies Students
Enrollment Limit: 20
Expected Class Size: 15
Distribution Notes: meets Division 1 requirement if registration is under ARAB

4/21/16
New Course Offered Spring 2017:

ARTH 245 Visual Arts and Natural History
Scientists and artists of the early modern period were faced with a natural world in expansion, which they endeavored to describe in detail. While scientific publication projects challenged existing ideas about classification, visual expertise, and collecting and display, new fields of study, such as ornithology, were forming into distinct scientific disciplines. From the emergence of cabinets of curiosity in the Renaissance to the creation of museums of natural history at the end of the Enlightenment, this course will examine the relation between visual arts and natural history in the early modern world. Topics such as women artists and collectors, the representation of life versus death, geographic exploration, teratology, taxonomy, imperialism, and fetishism will be studied. Students are expected to engage critically with the literature on the history of art and of natural history, to study thoroughly a set of primary sources, and to think creatively about questions of epistemology by observing the natural world around them.
Method of evaluation: Three field assignments (e.g., herbal, snowflake observation), three response papers, 6- to 8-page research paper, midterm exam, final exam
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit?: 30
Expected enrollment?: 20
HOUR: TBA
C. GIRARD

8/10/16
New Course Offered Spring 2017:

ARTH 263 Introduction to Contemporary Art: Institutions and Upsetters

 This course is an introduction to some of the central artists, themes, works, and debates informing and comprising the history of contemporary art, roughly 1945 to today. In the decades following the second World War, artists became instrumental in creating the conditions for widespread cultural re-orientation and evolution of perspectives on the world, its problems and its possibilities. The ways in which artists have approached, contested, and reflected on the role of various institutions––be they social, governmental, academic, political, commercial, media-based, or the art world itself––is a key aspect of late 20th-early 21st century cultural and aesthetic histories. This course will therefore address major movements in contemporary art (such as abstract expressionism, pop art, happenings, conceptual art, performance, earthworks, street art etc.) through the interpretive lens of various institutions and the ways in which these have been challenged, reconfigured, emulated, and critiqued by notable artistic upsetters. Keeping in mind the tendency of art’s categories and practices to cross-pollinate and mutually construct as well as disrupt the various worlds in which they move, we will consider contemporary art in relation to the past as well as the present, looking to the historical avant-garde on which contemporary art builds (such as Dada and Surrealism), as well as the context of current events, from which the concept of ‘the contemporary’ itself is inextricable.

No prior knowledge of art history or contemporary art is required to take this course.

Learning Objectives

Students in can expect to become adept at evaluating and analyzing textual and visual materials, and to identify, discuss, and critique art objects and scholarly claims about them. By the end of the course, students will be able to:

• Effectively write and talk about visual material across a wide range of media: painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, film, performance, installation
• Paraphrase and explain aspects of interrelationship between art practice and institutional politics in select art historical case studies
• Produce an original final project utilizing works of art and interdisciplinary bibliographic sources which interprets, contextualizes, and engages with the themes of the course in a meaningful way

Evaluation Guidelines

Mid-term: 15%
Final Exam: 15%
Final Project: 50%
Participation: 20%
{You must pass each of the graded requirements in order to pass the course}

Final Project

The final project, which accounts for 50% of the total grade, will make use of local institutions to facilitate interaction with works of art currently on view or held in permanent collections, and will put these in critical dialogue with key works we encounter in lectures and readings over the course of the semester. The resulting final project is designed to represent a culmination of prolonged engagement with a problem, evidence your critical thinking and applied writing craft, and allow you to produce a substantial and genuinely useful document modeled on various of types of writing you might be employed to produce in number of art world professions.

The project: Curate an imaginary exhibition based on a combination of works on view in local museums plus key works covered in class. Develop a convincing exhibition proposal, write a curatorial statement, produce a catalogue essay focusing on 1-2 core objects, and write succinct, accompanying wall text for the core objects in your exhibition. This project requires you to think beyond strictly formal or factual information in assessing and analyzing works of art, to group them together with purpose and vision, and to develop and sustain an argument via a series of written components with different aims and audiences in mind.
Course Format:lecture
Requirements/Evaluation: Mid-term: 15%
Final Exam: 15%
Final Project (curate imaginary exhibition comprised of works on view locally + key works covered in class) : 50%
Participation: 20%
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment Preference: no preference
Enrollment Limit: none
Expected Enrollment:25
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis
HOUR: TBA
HATTON

9/1/16
Class Cancelled Fall 2016:

ARTH 268 Chinese Art and Culture: From Imperial Treasures to Contemporary Visions (D) (Same as ASST 268)

9/1/16
Class Cancelled Fall 2016:

ARTH 274 Chinese Calligraphy: Theory and Practice (Same as ASST 274 & ARTS 274)

6/3/16
New Course Offered Spring 2017:

ARTH 300 Rembrandt Tutorial: Case Studies of Individual Works and Controversial Issues (W)
Currently Rembrandt ranks as the best known but also the most controversial Dutch artist of the 17th century. Dispute surrounds his character as well as the quantity, quality, and significance of his art. At each meeting we will focus on a specific painting, print, or drawing by Rembrandt or on an issue concerning him and his work in order to compare the strengths and weaknesses of the various approaches.
Class Formattutorial; the semester will begin and end with a group meeting of everyone taking the tutorial
Requirements/Evaluation: each week write a short paper or respond to your tutorial partner's paper
Additional Info: may not be taken on a pass/fail basis
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment Preference: no preference
Enrollment Limit: 10
Expected Enrollment: 10
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis
HOUR: T 11:20-12:35
FILIPCZAK

8/10/16
New Description and Course for Spring 2017:

ARTH 301 Methods of Art History

 This course on methods is designed to offer art history majors a foundational review of how art history is thought through today, focusing on developments in the discipline since the beginning of the twentieth century. Weekly readings are grouped around a particular art historical problem, approach, methodology, or disciplinary “turn” which has significantly impacted the way scholars think and write about art. Since art history is a field that acknowledges conclusions in scholarship are always reflective of how inquiry is organized and structured, my expectation for the course is that students will acquire a detailed grasp of the internal arguments of methodological texts, and also be able to ground the historical significance of these arguments in context, above and beyond the words on the page. 

Broad Course Objectives
1. Cultivate visual and historical analysis, ekphrastic and critical writing skills
2. Critically engage with the intersection of history, theory, interpretation, and methodology in the practice of reading and writing about art
3. Ground analysis, argument, and interpretation in critical thinking

Discussion sections

Throughout the semester, one day a week will be devoted to lecture, and one day a week to student-led discussions of the assigned readings. 

Weekly lectures are primarily intended to support, contextualize and clarify the readings, not vice versa. To get the most out of the weekly lectures and discussions, it is imperative that you do all of the week’s readings before the lecture.

At some point in the semester, each student will be assigned the task of leading the weekly discussion section on the topic of at least one of the week’s readings. This task entails organizing a short (~10 min) presentation of the essential argument(s) of the assigned reading(s), preparing 2-3 discussion questions to raise to the entire class, and arranging for visual presentation of art works pertinent to the discussion.

Required Writing
In order to foster your understanding of the readings and objectives, and to promote an engaged, focused, and productive discussion, each student is required to complete six short writing assignments, not to exceed 900 words each. Five of these assignments will be devoted to analyzing the assigned reading, and one will be an exercise is deep visual analysis or ekphrasis. Instructions for each paper will be posted on GLOW. In addition to the six short writing assignments and preparing discussions, each student will submit a final paper between 10-15 pages.

Grade Computation
Your final grade in the course will be calculated as follows: 

Six short writing assignments: 40%
Discussion Leading: 20%
Participation: 15%
Final Paper: 25%

Every element must be completed in order for you to receive a passing grade in the course. Attendance and participation in class discussions are required, not optional. Poor attendance and failure to participate will adversely affect your final grade. 
Format: lecture
Method of evaluation:  6 Short writing assignments (<900 words): 40%
1 Final Paper (10-15 pages): 25%
Leading Discussion Section (1 time/semester): 20%
Class Participation: 15%
Prerequisites: declared major in art history or written permission from professor
Department Notes: for spring: open to undergraduate Art majors only; graduate students may not enroll without permission of the department chair
Enrollment limit
: none
Expected enrollment: 15
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis
HOUR:TR 11:20-12:35
HATTON

8/5/16
Class Moves from Fall 2016 to Spring 2017:

ARTH 376 Zen Buddhist Visual Culture: The Path to Nirvana (W) (Same as REL 252 and ASST 376)

10/12/16
Course Offered Spring 2017:
ARTH 404 The Enemies of Impressionism, 1870-1900

This class explores French and European painting and sculpture of the last quarter of the nineteenth-century, particularly the work of artists once famous in their day but whose reputations collapsed with the rise of Impressionism and Modernism. Attention to aesthetic theory, pictorial narrative, and the formation of artistic taste. Artists include Gerome, Bouguereau, and Alma-Tadema.
Format: seminar
Method of evaluation: readings and research paper
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 14
Expected enrollment:12
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the fifth course option
Hour:
T 10-12:50pm
GOTLIEB

11/01/16
Newly Cross-Listed with REL Spring 2017:

ARTH 428 Icons (Same as ARTH 528 and REL 319)

4/21/16
New Course Offered Fall 2016:

ARTH 436 The Violence in/of Art, 1500-1815 (W)

In this seminar, we will critically examine the violence in and of art, from the Protestant Reformation to the Napoleonic Wars. Why did iconoclasts destroy images? What was at stake in early modern depictions of acts of cruelty? How were the effects of violent images on spectators theorized? Our discussions will focus on cases in European art, which we will study in conjunction with contemporary texts on iconographical and structural violence by thinkers such as Dominick LaCapra, Susan Sontag, René Girard, Slavoj Žižek, and Jean-Luc Nancy. The topics debated will include the representation of human and animal suffering and death, formlessness, sexual violence, iconoclasm, the power of images, and trauma.
Method of evaluation: Class participation, three response papers, one class presentation, 20-page research paper
Prerequisites: ARTH 101-102 or permission of the instructor
Enrollment limit?: 14
Expected enrollment?: 14
Preference if the course is overenrolled: None
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the fifth course option
HOUR: TBA
C. GIRARD

6/3/16
Course Cancelled Spring 2017:

ARTH 449 Body Language in Baroque Art

8/22/16
New Course Fall 2016:

ARTH 505 The Artist and the Studio: Imitation, Education, Desire

This course explores the image of the artist and the studio from a diverse range of interpretive perspectives. Artists turned to so-called representations of representation in an effort reflexively to grapple with the nature and terms of their enterprise. We will explore such studio scenes as less a real than an imagined space – as home to the most urgent and intimate concerns of the artist’s vocation, in short, the artist in the modern age. Such representations have attracted a substantial body of ambitious art historical writing. Accordingly, and even as much of the class will center on 19th-century-art, we will also consider key examples from other periods, including works by Vermeer, Velasquez, and others. Student projects may focus on any period of the history of art.
Format: seminar
Evaluation: based on class participation, weekly discussions, presentation of research, and a term paper of 20-25 pages
Preference: given to Graduate Program students and then to senior Art History majors
Enrollment limit: 16
Satisfies the seminar requirement for the undergraduate Art History major.
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the fifth course option
HOUR: W 1:30-3:45
GOTLIEB

6/9/16
Course Cancelled Fall 2016 and Spring 2017:

ARTH 507 Object Workshop

11/30/16
Course Cancelled Spring 2017

ARTH 508Art and Conservation: An Inquiry into History, Methods, and Materials

10/19/16
New Course Spring 2017

ARTH 511 Art and the British Empire
Taking as a starting point the recent Tate Britain exhibition Artist and Empire, this unit of study will critically analyse the role of the visual arts in Britain’s imperial project across its vast global Empire in the nineteenth century. Our inquiry will range from the imperial capital London to Britain’s colonial peripheries in Africa, the Americas, India and Australasia. We will address diverse ways Britain imagined its empire through visual and material culture ranging from high art to popular culture; from the academy to the avant-garde. Our study will encompass panoramas, imperial pageantry, cartography, ethnographic and natural history displays. Themes addressed will include: art and violence; art and independence movements; temporal and historical consciousness in the art of empire. Creative impulses in the metropol will be compared with vibrant forms of visual culture emerging from the colonies, as we assess the aesthetics of imperial nostalgia, dissent, resistance and appropriation. We will also consider the ways in which contemporary artists in Britain and in former colonial territories have engaged with this imperial and colonial legacy.
Class Format: Seminar
Requirements/Evaluation: each student will write one short midterm paper and a longer concluding essay, as well as present a couple of readings to the class.
Enrollment Preferences: places for 8 undergraduates and 8 graduate students assured Enrollment limit: 16
Hour: T 10:00 am – 12:40 pm
ROBERTS

8/22/16
Course Cancelled Fall 2016:

ARTH 555Ottoman and Orientalist Visual Culture (Same as ARTH 455)

4/15/16
New Course Offered Fall 2016

ARTH 565 Aesthetics of Dissent in the Global Contemporary

What is protest art, and what are its aesthetic and conceptual strategies, visual markers, modalities, and effects? How does protest art correlate with a genealogy of modern and contemporary visual practice more generally, and how do we situate protest art in the larger narrative of the history of art? (Or should we?) In order to address the question of what constitutes an art of protest, this MA-level course will engage with two disciplinary sub-fields not often put in direct dialogue: social art history and social movement mobilization theory; two disciplinary offshoots of the “cultural turn” in the humanities and political sciences developed in the 1970s and relevant today. Of central importance to art’s salience in contemporary social politics is the ability of a self-contained expression to transmit information in excess of itself: to generate meaningful correspondence between singular and collective experience.What marks certain political struggles as singular and unique to specific groups and experiences, and what images or ideas link disparate conflicts productively together? What artistic practices can be demonstrated as instrumental to the creation and/or dismantling of political opportunities and social change? Art’s status as an extra-political (as in “outside politics”) force in human society will be both challenged and substantiated in these investigations, as we examine the interrelationship of culture, representation, interpretation, visibility, space, and power in select global case studies, e.g.: the aesthetics of the Black Panther Party, the global anti-Vietnam War movement, women’s spaces in revolutionary Iran, Tahrir Square circa 2011, Occupy Wall Street, and #BlackLivesMatter.
Method of evaluation: based on classroom discussion, several short (3-5 page) writing assignments, and an original research paper (15-20 pages) utilizing interdisciplinary bibliographic sources to interpret and evaluate the artistic properties and political products of a contemporary social movement.
1:10-3:50 F
 B. HATTON

10/12/16
Course Available for 5th Course option:

ARTS 100 Drawing I

Jackson

10/12/16
Course Available for 5th Course option:

ARTS 100 Drawing I

Glier

7/21/16
Course Cancelled Fall 2016:

ARTS 106 Photography: Drawing with Light

7/21/16
Course Cancelled Spring 2017:

ARTS 253 Film Photograph
y

11/4/16
New Course Offered Spring 2017

ARTS 266 Low Tech Printmaking

This course will cover a variety of easy techniques to make multiple images, including xeroxing, linoleum plates, stenciling, collagraphs, and monotyping. Students will be encouraged to hand-color or add to the prints, incorporating drawing, painting, photography, bookmaking and collage. With less emphasis on complicated techniques, the focus of the course will be more upon form and content, investigating how the reproduction and serial nature of printmaking has an impact upon artmaking. There will be a minimum of five assignments during the semester and students are expected to work substantial hours outside of class.
Class Format: studio
Requirements/Evaluation: evaluation will be based primarily on the quality of the finished work, as well as attendance in class and participation in critiques
Prerequisites: ARTS 100
Enrollment Preference: Art majors
Enrollment Limit: 12
Expected Enrollment: 12
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis
Hour: R 1:10-3:50pm
AMOS

10/31/16
Course Cancelled Sping 2017

10/13/16
No longer available for pass/fail or fifth course option
ARTS 275 Introduction to Sculpture


4/19/16
New Course Offered Spring 2017:

ARTS 350 Subjective Documentary

This documentary film course proposes to look at how even the most seemingly objective films are shaped by a subjective eye. An eye which is molded by gender, race, culture, class and the social structures of our societies. Just as these influence our economics and politics, they also influence the entire filmmaking process from decisions about how something is framed to how it is edited as well as how the viewer experiences and interprets what’s on the screen. How we look at something, for how long we look at it and how it is contextualized carries as much meaning as the content of our films. Similarly, the subjective eye of the viewer shapes how he or she understands and relates to the film. So then, what are we really talking about when we talk about documentary films? What makes a documentary a documentary? Why is such a categorization valuable? necessary? useful?
The course will consist of a series of documentary exercises to put into practice these concepts on subjectivity. Students will refine their filmmaking skills (shooting and editing) so that they can make more precise decisions about form to most effectively tell the stories they want to tell. Students will also develop critique skills by reviewing each other’s projects as part of the creative process, with the goal of creating a supportive and constructive critique environment. The production aspect of the course will be supplemented with screenings and readings.
Format: studio.
Method of evaluation: Class participation and engagement Documentary filmmaking assignments: craft, risk and commitment
Prerequisites: Intended for students with prior video production and editing skills.
Enrollment limit?: 10
Expected enrollment?: 10
Preference if the course is overenrolled: Art majors and seniors
HOURS: TBA
ALMADA

11/09/16
Course Cancelled Spring 2017

CHEM 368T(S) Computational Chemistry and Molecular Spectroscopy

10/17/16
New Course Spring 2017:
CHIN 224 Chinese Science Fiction: Origins and Promise (Same as COMP 249)
 What is Chinese Science Fiction? What makes it Chinese? What is science when it is fictionalized? Where does it stand in the Chinese literary tradition and in the arena of contemporary world literature? This course offers an introduction to Chinese science fiction, ranging from the grotesque to the sublime, from the apocalyptic to the transcendent, from the human to the posthuman. It is organized as a historical survey of the genre from its inception at the beginning of the 20th century to the present-day boom with the Hugo Award winners. Centering on utopia and dystopia, it approaches Chinese science fiction as a genre that provides reflection on reality and conveys hope or despair for the future. It examines how “China Dreams” are reconsidered and reconstructed under different socio-political and techno-scientific contexts. It questions China’s century-long program of national development, social revolution, and cultural reform. Readings in Chinese science fiction are juxtaposed with classical Chinese tales of fantasy, science fiction in the Anglo-Saxon tradition, and science fiction in Asian American literature, in order to map out the origins and promise of the genre. No prerequisite. All readings in English.
Format: lecture
Method of evaluation: Evaluation is based on attendance and participation, essays, and a final project.
Prerequisites: None
Enrollment limit: 20
Expected enrollment: 10
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis
HOURS: MR 2:35-3:50
LIU

5/20/16
Course Cancelled Fall 2016:

COMP 110 Introduction to Comparative Literature (Same as ENGL 241)

5/20/16
New Course Offered Fall 2016:

COMP 111 Nature of Narrative (Same as ENGL 120) (W)

This course examines the nature and workings of narrative using texts drawn from a wide range of literary traditions, media, and genres. Readings will include Greek and Chinese classics (Homer and others), 19th-century French, German, and Russian fiction (Zola, Kleist, Lermontov), Latin American magic realism (Marquez), and visual literature from stage drama to film and graphic memoir (Oscar Wilde, Sam Mendes, Alison Bechdel). We will also read some short works of literary theory from around the world to help us broaden our idea of what literature can be and do. All readings in English.
Class Format: seminar
Requirements/Evaluation: regular attendance and participation, ungraded creative project, several short response assignments, two 4- to 5-page papers, and one paper rewrite Prerequisites: none
Enrollment Preference: students considering a major in Comparative Literature Divisional Enrollment Limit: 19
Expected Enrollment: 19
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis
HOUR: TF 1:10-2:25
BOLTON

10/14/16
No longer available for pass/fail or fifth course option
COMP 245 Bloody Vampires: From Fiction to Film and Fashion (W) (Same as ENGL 287)

1/30/17
Course Cancelled Spring 2017

COMP 301 Sublime Confusion: A Survey of Literary and Critical Theory (Same as ENGL 301)

10-11-16
Not available for the pass/fail option

CSCI/ARTS 107 Creating Games

4/22/16
Cancelled course Fall 2016

CSCI 434 Compiler Design (Q) 

8/9/16
Course may now be taken Pass/Fail

CSCI 373 Artificial Intelligence (Q)

8/2/16
Course Cancelled Fall 2016:

DANC 208 Dance and Diaspora (D)

10/19/16
Newly Cross Listed Spring 2017:

DANC 214 Global Approaches to Dance: Asian-American Identities in Motion (D) (Same as GBST 215 and AMST 214)

11/14/16
Course Cancelled Spring 2017:

ECON 209 Labor Economics


1/11/17
Cancelled Course Spring 2017:
ECON 357
The Economics of Higher Education 

8/8/16
Course Cancelled Fall 2016:

ECON 391T Economic Analysis of Housing Markets (W)

4/25/16
Cancelled course Fall 2016

ECON 451 Topics in Macroeconomics 

4/25/16
Cancelled course Fall 2016

ECON 394 European Economic History

10/12/16
No longer available for pass/fail or fifth course option

ECON 516 International Trade & Development (Same as ECON 366)

6/6/2016
Course Moving from Spring 2017 to Fall 2016:

ENGL 211 English Literature from 1000 to1600

HOUR: MR 1:10-2:25
KLEINER

10/14/16
Now Available for pass/fail or fifth course option
ENGL 228 The Renaissance in England and the European Continent: Self and World (D) (W) (Same as COMP 230)

4/20/16
New Course Offered Fall 2016:

ENGL 267 "Ain't I a Woman?": An Introduction to Black Women's Writing in America (D)(W) (Same as AFR 267, AMST 267 and WGSS 267)
This Gateway course offers a survey of African American women's writing from the nineteenth century to the present day with an equal emphasis on primary literary texts and feminist criticism. We will trace the development of a black womanist/feminist tradition across various genres and disciplines, beginning with the work of abolitionists such as Frances Ellen Watkins Harper and Sojourner Truth and working our way through key texts of the Harlem Renaissance, the civil rights movement, and post-60s Black Feminist writing. Our discussions will focus on the black feminist tradition's engagement with race, gender, class, and sexuality as intersecting axes of difference. Writers that we will read include: Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, Suzan-Lori Parks, bell hooks, Audre Lorde, Hortense Spillers, Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw. This course fulfills the EDI requirement by examining the intersection of different minoritizing processes in the experiences and writing of African American women in the US.
Class format: seminar
Requirements/Evaluation: 3 short response papers (approx. 4 pages each) and one final 7-8-page paper; in class presentations, participation in class discussions.
Prerequisites: a 100-level ENGL course, or a score of 5 on the AP English Literature exam, or a score of 6 or 7 on the Higher Level IB English exam
Enrollment limit: 19
Expected enrollment: 19
Enrollment preference: sophomores and first-year students who have not yet taken an ENGL Gateway course
Distribution Notes: meets Division 1 requirement if registration is under ENGL; meets Division 2 requirement if registration is under AFR, AMST or WGSS
Departmental attributes:
ENGL Criticism Courses, ENGL Gateway
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis
HOUR: MW 8:30-9:45
BILBIJA

4/20/16
New Course Spring 2017:

ENGL 268 American Law, Race, and Narrative (W) (D) (Same as AFR 268 and AMST 268)

This course examines how American and African American writers engaged with legal definitions of race, personhood, and citizenship in the nineteenth and twentieth century. The key junctures in the formation of these narratives were the Declaration of Independence, the Fugitive Slave Act, Dred Scott v. Sandford in the ante-bellum period, Ferguson v Plessy in the late nineteenth century and Brown v Board of Education in the mid-twentieth century. Authors we will read include: Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, Martin Delany, Mark Twain, Charles Chesnutt, Jean Toomer, Bebe Moore Campbell, Ntozake Shange, and Natasha Trethaway. As a course that focuses on the legal and literary constructions of race in the US, this course fulfills the EDI requirement.
Class format: seminar
Requirements/Evaluation: 3 short response papers (approx. 4 pages each) and one final 7-8-page paper; in-class presentations and participation in class discussions
Prerequisites: a 100-level ENGL course, or a score of 5 on the AP English Literature exam, or a score of 6 or 7 on the Higher Level IB English exam
Enrollment limit: 19
Expected enrollment: 19
Enrollment preference: sophomores and first-year students who have not yet taken an ENGL Gateway course
Distribution Notes: meets Division 1 requirement if registration is under ENGL; meets Division 2 requirement if registration is under AFR or AMST
Departmental attributes: ENGL Literary History B, ENGL Gateway
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis
HOUR:
TR 8:30-9:45
BILBIJA

12/19/16
Newly Cross-Listed ARTS 302 Spring 2017

ENGL 302 Landscape and Language (Same as ARTS 302)

6/8/16
Newly Cross-listed with THEA Spring 2017:

ENGL 308 Tragic Stages (Same as THEA 310)

4/20/16
Number Changed from ENGL 382 to ENGL 313 Fall 2016:

ENGL 313 Description: A Craft Course for Writers of Poetry and Prose 
  

4/26/16
Course Moves from Fall 2016 to Spring 2017:

ENGL 316  Blackness, Theater, Theatricality (D) (Same as AFR 336)

4/22/16
Crosslisted with PSCI 234 Fall 2016:

ENGL 322 Political Romanticism (Same as COMP 329 and PSCI 234)

1/11/17
Course Cancelled Spring 2017:

ENGL 331 Romantic Culture

7/18/16
Course Cancelled Spring 2017:

ENGL 329 Spring 2017 Sexuality and US Literatures of the 19th Century (D) (Same as AMST 349 & WGSS 329)

4/20/16
New Course Offered Spring 2017:

ENGL 334 When Harlem was in Vogue (D)
(Same as AFR 335 and AMST 344)
This course will examine the aesthetics and politics of the first modern African American cultural movement, known today as the Harlem Renaissance. In our readings of key literary texts by authors such as Alain Locke, Jessie Fauset, Zora Neale Hurston, Eric Walrond, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Nella Larsen, and Jean Toomer, we will discuss both the national and global contexts of so-called "New Negro Writing." Furthermore, we will trace the heated debates between Harlem's leading intellectuals and artists on the definitions of Black art, the themes and language most appropriate to "race literature" (as well as those seen as least appropriate to it), the responsibilities of the Black artist and his or her position vis-à-vis American and world literature. This course fulfills the EDI requirement by examining the relationship between race and canon-making in the early twentieth century.
Class format: seminar
Requirements/Evaluation: 3 response papers (4-5, 5-6 and 6-7 pages) during the course of the semester;students will also prepare in-class presentations and participate in discussion
Prerequisites: a 100-level ENGL course, or a score of 5 on the AP English Literature exam, or a score of 6 or 7 on the Higher Level IB English exam
Enrollment limit: 25
Expected enrollment: 19
Enrollment preference: English Majors
Distribution Notes: meets Division 1 requirement if registration is under ENGL; meets Division 2 requirement if registration is under AFR or AMST
Departmental attributes: Exploring Diversity, Literary History C
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis
HOUR:
TR 9:55-11:10
BILBIJA

4/20/16
New Course Offerred Fall 2016:

ENGL 336 The Black Protest Tradition in America from Prince Hall to Black Lives Matter (D) (Same as AFR 337 and AMST 337)
This course examines the development of various overlapping African American and Afro-Caribbean protest traditions in the past two hundred years, such as Abolitionism, early reparations movements, the civil rights movements, the Black Panthers, black feminism, and Black Lives Matter. We will read a variety of speeches, essays, poems, songs, sermons, and pamphlets by writers, activists, and artists such as David Walker, Robert Wedderburn, Anna Julia Cooper, Ella Baker, Martin Luther King Jr, Malcolm X, Amiri Baraka, Angela Davis, George Jackson, and the Combahee River Collective. We will also examine the documents and online-syllabi of the Black Lives Matter movement. This course fulfills the EDI requirement as its points of focus are race formation in the US and the black liberation tradition that developed in opposition to racist legal and social norms both at home and abroad.
Class format: seminar
Requirements/Evaluation: 3 response papers (4-5, 5-6 and 6-7 pages) during the course of the semester. Students will also prepare in-class presentations and participate in discussion
Prerequisites: a 100-level ENGL course, or a score of 5 on the AP English Literature exam, or a score of 6 or 7 on the Higher Level IB English exam
Enrollment limit: 25
Expected enrollment: 19
Enrollment preference: English Majors
Distribution Notes: meets Division 1 requirement if registration is under ENGL; meets Division 2 requirement if registration is under AFR or AMST
Departmental attributes: Literary History Requirement-C
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis
HOUR: MW 11:00am-12:15pm
BILBIJA

1/18/17
COurse Cancelled Spring 2017:

ENGL 341 American Genders, American Sexualites (D) (Same as AMST 341 & WGSS 342)

10/17/16
No Longer Writing Intensive Spring 2017:

ENGL 377 Advanced Memoir Workshop

4/20/16
Course to be Offerred Spring 2017:

ENGL 382 Advanced Workshop in Poetry
This workshop will include readings in modern and contemporary poetry, weekly writing assignments, frequent improvisations and collaborations, and the attendance of several arts events.
Class Format: seminar/ workshop
Requirements/Evaluation: quality of work, improvement, commitment, and participation in class
Prerequisites: ENGL 281 and permission of instructor
Enrollment Preference: if over-enrolled, admission will be decided via a writing sample
Other Attributes: ENGL Creative Writing Courses
Enrollment Limit: 12
Expected Enrollment: 12
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis
HOUR: W 1:10-3:50
KLINK

10/31/16
Cancelled course Spring 2017:

ENVI 248
 "Our response will define our future": Climate Change Policy Analysis (W) 

10/31/16
New course description; new hour; new instructor:

ENVI 402:  Spring 2017 Senior Seminar: Perspectives on Environmental Studies

Cross Listed as MAST 402
The Environmental Studies and Maritime Studies programs provide students with an opportunity to explore the myriad ways that humans interact with diverse environments at scales ranging from local to global. The capstone course for Environmental Studies and Maritime Studies, this seminar brings together students who have specialized in the humanities, social studies and/or the sciences to exchange ideas across these disciplines. Over the course of the seminar, students will develop a sustained independent research project on a topic of their choice. 
Class Format: seminar
Requirements/Evaluation: evaluation is based on active participation, discussion, assignments and capstone project
Additional Info:
Additional Info2:
Prerequisites: ENVI 302 or MAST 351 Maritime Policy or permission of instructor
Enrollment Preference: limited to senior Environmental Policy and Environmental Science majors and Environmental Studies and Maritime Studies concentrators
Department Notes: required course for students wishing to complete the Environmental Policy & Environmental Science majors and the Environmental Studies or the Maritime Studies concentrations
Material and Lab Fees:
Distribution Notes: no division 1, 2 or 3 credit
Divisional Attributes: Non-Divisional
Other Attributes: ENVI Core Courses, MAST core courses, ENVP Core Courses, ENVS Core Courses, SCST Elective Courses
Enrollment Limit: 20
Expected Enrollment: 19
Hour: M 7-9:40 pm
Sarah Gardner

8/25/16
Cancelled course Fall 2016

ENVI 303  Cultures of Climate Change (W) (Same as SOC 303)

8/25/16
Offered Spring 2016:

ENVI 303  Cultures of Climate Change (W) (Same as SOC 303)
This course asks why people think and talk about climate change in such very different ways. Climate change is a physical phenomenon that can be observed, quantified, and measured. But it is also an idea, and as such it is subject to the vagaries of cultural interpretation. Despite scientific agreement about its existence and its causes, many people do not see climate change as a serious problem, or as a problem at all. Many others see it as the most serious problem our species has ever faced. What are the sources of this disparity? Why can't we agree about climate change? How does something as complex and confusing as climate change become a "problem" in the first place? This course will explore a broad array of factors, from religion to race, class to colonialism. It will focus especially closely on the communication of scientific knowledge, risk perception, and environmental ethics, and it will apply a range of theories from the social sciences and humanities to a set of concrete case studies.Class Format: seminar Requirements/Evaluation: a 15- to 18-page research paper and several shorter writing assignments Prerequisites: ENVI 101 or permission of instructor
Division II, Writing Intensive
Other Attributes: ENVI Humanities, Arts + Social Science Electives,ENVP PTL Theory/Method Courses,ENVP SC-A Group Electives,ENVP SC-B Group Electives,SCST Related Courses
Enrollment Limit: 19
Expected Enrollment: 19

8/26/16
Cancelled course Fall 2016:
ENVI 309 Environmental Politic & Policy (W)
(Same as HSCI, SCST 309 & PSCI 301)

10/18/16
New Course description Spring 2017:

GBST 368 End of Apartheid

In February 1990, the last apartheid President, F W de Klerk, in a major policy speech in Parliament, announced changes to the apartheid system.   Until then, South Africa was locally and globally known for its racist, repressive and authoritarian political system.  Four years later, the former white minority system was replaced by a democratic system in which, for the first time, the black majority could participate in a free and fair elections and enjoy rights taken for granted in many democracies.  The end of apartheid and the emergency of universal franchise has been described by some commentators as a “South African miracle”.
This course initially explores the negotiation process as well as the legacy of apartheid and the liberation struggle for the post-apartheid society.   The course’s focus, however, remains the immediate challenges facing Mandela’s democratic South Africa, namely, Political Legitimacy, Stability, Economic Growth and Social Justice Constitute the underlying themes.
This advanced course is open to those who have some basic knowledge of South Africa or have taken the course entitled:   GBST 252 Pillars of Apartheid-Race and Ethnicity in South Africa.
MAPHAI

1/12/17
Newly Cross-Listed with COMP

GEOS 108(S) Observing Writing (W) (Same as ENVI 112 and COMP 109)

10/11/16
No longer available for pass/fail or fifth course option:

GERM 120 Turbodeutsch: Accelerated Elementary German

10/14/16
No longer available for pass/fail
GERM 202 German Comics (W)

9/12/16
New Course Offered Fall 2016

GERM 321 Lust, Liebe und Gewalt (W)

In this course, we will reflect on the intimate relationship between love, lust, and violence, examining how love and lust do not exclude violence, but rather include—if not provoke—it. In order to gain a better understanding of the dynamics formed by this fascinating triangle, we will read novels by Goethe and Schnitzler, short stories by Kleist, Hoffmann, Mann, plays by Büchner, Hauptmann and Wedekind, and watch films by Faßbinder, Haneke and Muskala. Conducted in German.
Class Format: Seminar
Requirements/Evaluation: Papers and oral presentations
Prerequisites: GERM 201 or the equivalent
Enrollment Preferences: German majors
Enrollment Limit: 10
Expected Class Size: 10
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis
HOUR: MR 2:35-3:50
KONE

9/12/16
Cancelled Course Fall 2016:

GERM 317 The New Woman in Weimar Culture (W) (Same as WGSS 317)

6/22/16
New Course Spring 2017:

HIST 152 The Fourteenth Amendment and the Meanings of Equality (D) (W)(Same as WGSS 152)

For more than a century, the 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution has served as the principal touchstone for legal debates over the meaning of equality and freedom in the United States. This course explores the origins of the 14th Amendment in the years immediately following the Civil War, and examines the evolution of that amendment's meaning in the century that followed. Central themes in this course include the contested interpretations of "due process," "privileges and immunities," "equal protection," and "life, liberty or property"; the rise, fall, and rebirth of substantive due process; and the battles over incorporating the Bill of Rights into the 14th Amendment. We will pay particular attention to how debates over the 14th Amendment have shaped and been shaped by the changing meanings of racial and gender equality, and how the 14th Amendment has transformed the promise and experience of American citizenship.
Class Format: discussion
Requirements/Evaluation: evaluation will be based on class discussion, three short analytical papers, and a final research paper
Prerequisites: first-year or sophomore standing; juniors or seniors with permission of instructor
Enrollment Preference: first-year students, and then sophomores who have not previously taken a 100-level seminar
Other Attributes: AMST Comp Studies in Race, Ethnicity, Diaspora,HIST Group F Electives - U.S. + Canada,JLST Enactment/Applications in Institutions
Enrollment Limit: 19
Expected: 15-19
not available for the fifth course option
HOUR: W 7:00pm-9:40 pm
DUBOW

6/22/16
Course Cancelled Spring 2017:

HIST 153T Establishment & Exercise: Religion and the Constitution in the United States (W)

8/15/16
Course cancelled Spring 2017:

HIST 166  Politics and Prose: Invisible Man in Historical Context (D) (W) (Same as AFR 166 & AMST 166)

1/23/17
Course Cancelled Spring 2017

HIST 213 Modern China, 1600-Present (D) (Same as ASST 213)

6/20/16
Cancelled Course Fall 2016:

HIST 281 frican-American History, 1619-1865 (D) (Same as AFR 281)

10-11-16
New course description Spring 2017:

HIST 301-C1 Approaching the Past: Practices of Modern History

What is history? What is it that historians do? In this course, students will explore how and why we historians practice our craft. The first section of the course will examine how historians come to know, think about, and understand the past. Topics include: the nature of historical truth, objectivity and bias, different types of sources, scale in history, and uses of theory. The second section of the course will explore the purposes and uses of history. We will consider questions raised by public history, history education, historical film, and the construction of memory. The class will meet once a week, and each session will focus on some theoretical material as well as readings on a broad range of topics that concretely illustrate the methodological issues at stake.

6/28/16
Cancelled course Fall 2016:
HIST 335  Weimar Germany 

10/5/16
Cancelled course Spring 2017:

HIST 336 National-Socialist Germany

1/26/17
Course Cancelled Spring 2017:

HIST 367  American Political Manifestos

8/15/16
Course cancelled Spring 2017:

HIST 379 Black Women in the United States (D) (Same as AFR 379 & WGSS 379)

6/20/16
Cancelled Course Fall 2016:

HIST 381 From Civil Rights to Black Power (D) (Same as AFR 381)

1/23/17
Course Cancelled Spring 2017

HIST 413 History of Taiwan (W) (Same as ASST 413)

10/17/16
New Course Offered Spring 2017

JAPN 223 Japanese Food Culture in a Global Context (D) (Same as COMP 223)

he bourgeoning popularity of Japanese food on a global scale has resulted in a surge of new research, literature, and films. Conversely, the effects of globalization have transformed the dining experience within Japan to be ever more multiethnic. This interdisciplinary course explores the complex relationship between food and culture in Japan, and the emergence of Japanese cuisine as a global phenomenon, referring to a variety of materials and practices. Topics to be addressed include modernization, nation-building, militarization, globalization, the environment, and popular culture. This is an EDI course, as this course explores issues of diversity in socio-cultural, historical, and political contexts.
Format: seminar
Method of evaluation: Active class participation, Three response papers, Two small projects (including descriptions & class presentations), and One research paper & presentation. Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 12
Expected enrollment: 12
HOUR: MR 1:10-2:25
KAGAYA

10/17/16
Course Cancelled Spring 2017:

JAPN 267 Premodern Japanese Literature and Performance (Same as COMP 278)

10/18/16
No longer available for pass/fail or fifth course option
LATS 312Chicago (Same as AMST 312 and ENVI 313)

5/5/16
Newly Cross-listed with AMST
5/4/16
Newly Designated EDI

4/29/16
New Course Fall 2016:
LATS 234 Religion and Migration (Same as REL 234 and AMST 234)(D)

This course is concerned with the ways in which migrants groups have altered the religious landscape of the U.S. and how they innovatively reproduce practices from their places of origin. Crossing into the U.S. from the eastern seaboard, the Pacific Rim, and the southern border with Mexico, migrants bring their new ways of creating sacred space and negotiated religious life.
We will seek to understand the multifaceted relationships between religion and migration. How have migrants negotiated the role of religion in their private and public lives? What have been the social consequences pertaining to gender, praxis, respectability? The course take into account earlier iterations of migration from the nineteenth century but case studies in this course will draw heavily from the third wave of American immigration, characterized by twentieth-century "internal migrations" of African Americans, Latinas/os, Native Americans, and rural dwellers into the urban environment. We will conclude by examining the ways in which forces of modern globalization have changed the nature of religious diversity in the U.S. In this EDI course, we will extensively compare migrant cultures as we interrogate power and privilege pertaining to race and religion. The cultural production of these migrant groups that we will examine will offer students an empathetic understanding of diverse cultures and their form of belonging.
Class Format: seminar
Requirements: Student participation, weekly reflection papers (up to half page), midterm primary source write up (up to 5 pages), and a final project on “Representing Religious Migrations” (includes 8-10 page paper based on primary and secondary sources and interactive component: video, map, photographs, material cultures exhibit plan, etc). Course may require a field trip.
Enrollment: 25
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the fifth course option
HOUR: TF 1:10-2:25
BARBA

8/9/16
New Course Offered Spring 2017:

LEAD 293 Leadership and Political Change (Same as PSCI 293)

This course will examine the foundations of effective political leadership –- both transformational and evolutionary. It will balance theory and practice, case studies and student exploration to better understand how political change and policy reform is enacted in a representative democracy. The course begins with a framework to evaluate leadership, transitions to examining the importance of vision in effecting political change, moves to an in-depth look at effective communicative strategies and mobilization techniques required to realize that change, and concludes with an assessment of the prospects for leadership in the current political landscape. We will cover presidential, congressional, and military leadership and include prominent guest speakers from the world of American politics.
Class Format: lecture
Requirements: two 5-7 page analytic essays, final exam, and class participation
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment Preference: LEAD concentrators and PSCI majors
Enrollment: 20
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the fifth course option
HOUR: TR 11:20 -12:35
GIBSON

11/29/2016
Course Cancelled Spring 2017:

MUS 104 Jazz Theory and Improvisation I (Same as AFR 212)

11/29/16
Course to be Offered Spring 2017:
MUS 204 Jazz Theory and Improvisation II (Same as AFR 214)

HJOUR:TR 1:10-2:25
ALLEN

8/11/16
No Longer Writing Intensive Spring 2017:

MUS 471 Timbre

5/31/16
Course Cancelled Spring 2017:

PHIL 115 Personal Identity (W)


5/30/16
Course Cancelled Fall 2016 Will be Offered Spring 2017:

PHIL 123 Objectivity in Ethics

TR 11:20-12:35

10/14/16
No longer available for pass/fail or fifth course option
PHIL 207 Contemporary Philosophy of Mind (W)

10/14/16
No longer available for pass/fail
PHIL 236 Contemporary Ethical Theory (W)

8/9/16
Fall Course Newly Cross-Listed with RLFR

PHIL 336 Renegotiating Subjectivity with Foucault and Deleuze: Power, Resistance, Becoming (W)(Same as RLFR 336)

10/12/16
Course Cancelled Spring 2017:

PSCI 131 Global Queer Politics and Theory (Same as WGSS 131)

4/25/16
New PSCI Attribute Fall 2016:

PSCI 206 Dangerous Leadership in American Politics (W) (Same as LEAD 206)
Other Attributes: LEAD Facets or Domains of Leadership; PSCI American Politics Courses

10/4/16
New Course Offered Spring 2017:

PSCI 237 Masculinity and Politics

What is masculinity? How does it relate to men and the male body? Why are debates about masculinity in our culture so fiercely partisan and hyper-political? Motivated by such questions, this course investigates how the concept of masculinity has been, and continues to be, shaped by struggles over political power. We have three primary aims. First, to learn how influential political thinkers—especially Plato, Machiavelli, and Foucault—thought about masculinity and politics in relation to ancient Greece, Rome, and the modern world. Second, to analyze through the lens of masculinity several case studies of statesmen, citizens, and political issues in times of crisis and change—ranging from the Spartan lawgiver Lycurgus, to American soldiers in Vietnam, to contemporary debates over pornography and censorship. Third, to develop proficiency working with key theories and analytical tools used in the political study of men and masculinity today.
Course Format: seminar
Method of evaluation: Engaged class participation, discussion responses, midterm and final papers.
Prerequisites: None.
Enrollment limit?: None.
Expected enrollment?: 15
Departmental attributes: Political Theory
HOUR: W 1:10-3:50
VANDIVER

4/25/16:
No Longer Cross-Listed with WGSS Fall 2016:

PSCI 332 Sex and Politics

7/11/16
Course Moved from Fall 2016 to Spring 2017:
PSCI 327 Leadership and Strategy (W) (Same as LEAD 327)

8/9/16
New Course Offered Spring 2017:

PSCI 367 The Politics of American National Security (Same as LEAD 367)

 Liberal democracies face the challenge of establishing effective civil-military relations in order to protect and promote their cherished way of life while preserving civilian control of the armed forces. A lot is at stake in getting it right – everything from national survival to the preservation of liberty. In the process, countries must decide on policies for the armed forces: should they be forced to adopt the values of the society they protect, and should the military be used to drive social change in the country? This course provides an extensive examination of American civil-military relations from the Founding era to the current day. The constitutional, legal, and theoretical frameworks for civil-military relations are explored to set the conditions for students to assess contemporary US grand strategy and the merits and consequences (including moral-ethical) of using military force to achieve political ends. The course concludes with a section on the future of American civil-military relations.
Class Format: seminar
Requirements:  two 5-7 page analytic essays, one 12-15 page analytic essay, and class participation
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment Preference:PSCI majors and LEAD concentrators
Enrollment: 18
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the fifth course option
HOUR: TR 9:55-11:10
GIBSON

7/11/16
Course Cancelled Fall 2016:

PSYC 322 Concepts: Mind, Brain, and Culture

10/13/16
No longer available for pass/fail or fifth course option
PSYC 324

6/29/16
Newly Cross Listed with WGSS Fall 2016:

REL 243 Islamic Law: Past and Present (Same as HIST 302, ARAB 243 and WGSS 243)

5/18/16
New Course Spring 2017:

REL 247 Religion, Environment, and the American West (Same as LATS 247, AMST 247, ENVI 247) (D)

From the “Land of Enchantment” of New Mexico in the far reaches of the desert to the sacred temples on the West Coast that overlook Pacific Ocean, this course examines the peoples and the “sacroscapes” of the American West. Historian Patricia Limerick regards this region as an extraordinary site of convergence and one of “the greatest meeting places on the planet.” The region is a site of cultural complexity where Penitentes maintained a sacred order, Pentecostals attracted a global audience, Native Americans forged legal/protected definitions of “religion,” and Asian immigrants built the first Buddhist and Sikh temples. Until recently, standard surveys of religious history in North America have devoted minimal attention to the distinctive role of religion in the American West. They have focused on religious history in the flow of events westward from the Plymouth Rock landing and Puritan establishment while generally overlooking the Pueblo Revolt in modern-day New Mexico which occurred in that same century and marked the temporary suspension of Spanish encroachment. How do scholars of religion and history account for these renditions between the past and present? Most mainstream religious histories treat religious experience and identity in the U.S. West as additive rather than complementary to or constitutive of its mainstream narratives. Contemporary historians of religion note the need for new “sights,” “cites,” and “sites” in order to deconstruct and reconstruct this incomplete meta-narrative, taking into account such factors as migration, gender, region, and the environment. In this EDI course we will use tools of critical theory and historicism to examine this region, compare religious cultures, and interrogate ways in which religious practices (de)construct notions of race.
Class Fortmat: lecture/discussion
Requirements: Requirements/Evaluation: Student participation, weekly reflection papers (up to half page), midterm primary source paper (up to 5 pages), and a final research paper on Religion and the Environment (8-10 page paper with a media/visual component).
Prerequisites: none
Preference: none
Enrollment: 25
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis; not available for the fifth course option
HOUR: TBA
BARBA

11/09/16
Newly Cross Listed with AFR

10/11/16
New Course Spring 2017:

REL 305 The Black Atlantic as Scriptural Formation
(Same as AFR 355)
"…I don’t read such small stuff as letters, I read men and nations..." The unpacking of this provocative and unsettling statement ascribed to Sojourner Truth can be taken as a springboard for this seminar that explores the politics of the scriptural (or writing) as analytical window onto the complex formation of the circum-Black Atlantic (and its complex relationships to colonial and post-colonial Atlantic worlds). The isolation of selected Black Atlantic "readings" as cultural sites, rituals, performances, institutions, as different and conflicting types of politics and social orientation—from first contacts through slavery to the contemporary irruptions of protest and fundamentalist movements--will structure the seminar.
Class Fortmat: seminar/discussion
Requirements: consistent seminar participation (informed by engagement of selected readings); and submission of mid-term prospectus (1-2pp) and end-of-term research paper (15-20pp).
Prerequisites: none
Preference: religion; African American (and other American ethnic groups); cultural studies; history; literature; social sciences
Enrollment: 19
Expected: 15
Hour: W 1:10-3:50
WIMBUSH

9/19/16
New Course Offered Spring 2017:

RLSP 215 The Other Caribbean: Identity, Subalternity, and Resistance (19th-21st Centuries)
The Hispanic Caribbean has been viewed as an exotic place since colonial times. This perception was exploited in the Golden age of Hollywood and has been revived in contemporary times through a neo-exotic lens focused on touristic consumption. In this way, region is reproduced in the imaginary as a place of enjoyment and pleasure. This course critically analyzes this imaginary and focuses on the cultural complexity of the Hispanic Caribbean in order to highlight the traces of traumatic experiences that have marked the region: colonization, slavery, the processes of creolization and transculturation, the political conflicts of the 20th century (Rafael Trujillo’s dictatorship, the Cuban Revolution and the disagreement Cuba/USA, the relationship between Puerto Rico and the United States), emigration and exile. We also explore together the quest for and critique of national and ethnic identities through the analysis of literary works and other artistic expressions (painting, cinema, music) from the 19th century to the present. We will examine the early modern imagining of the uncivilized island savage (emblematized by the figures of Prospero and Caliban), and then we will approach the voice of the slave Francisco Manzano ({Autobiografía}) and the romantic representations of 19th century antislavery narrative (Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda’s {Sab}). We will study the {mulata} myth and the imaginary of the monster (in Cirilo Villaverde’s {Cecilia Valdés}). The course will also delve into the symbol of the “stain” (“{mancha}”) in relation to the consolidation of Creole identity (Luis Lloréns’s {La mancha de plátano}) and the representation of guilt as a negative mark: the complicity of intellectuals with power (Juan Bosch’s “La mancha indeleble”). We will study important Caribbean authors such as Luis Palés Matos, Nicolas Guillén, René Marqués, Rosario Ferré, Luis Rafael Sánchez, Ana Lydia Vega, Reinaldo Arenas, Heberto Padilla, among others. Conducted in Spanish.
Course Format: seminar
Method of evaluation: Evaluation will be based on lively class participation, an oral report, short written assignments, and two papers.
Prerequisites: RLSP 105, or placement exam, or Department recommendation.
Enrollment limit: 19
Expected: 15
Preference : Majors in Spanish, Certificate Students in Spanish, Latino/Latina Studies students
not available for the fifth course option
Hour: TF 1:10-2:25
SUQUET

4/20/16
New Writing Intensive Designation Fall 2016

RLSP 225 Subalternity, Dictatorship, and the Dream of Emancipation: Paraguay, 1811-Present (W)

11/7/16
Course Offered Spring 2017

RLSP 306T Latino Writing: Literature by U.S. Hispanics (Same as COMP 302) (W)

10/12/16
No longer available for pass/fail or fifth course option:
RLSP 402 Senior Seminar Madrid: 1939-2004
10/12/16
Course Changed to Graded Spring 2017

RLSP 402 Senior Seminar Madrid: 1939-2004

2/2/17
New Course Description Spring 2017:

RUSS 220 World War II in Russian Culture (Same as COMP 285 & GBST 220)

This course traces the development of state-sponsored collective memory of the Great Patriotic War, as the Eastern front of World War II is called in Russia, and its counter-narratives. The veritable cult of the war, as it was shaped by the late Soviet period, took decades to coalesce and went through multiple stages. The relative disregard in the immediate post-war years under Stalin was followed by the striking re-enactments in literature and film of the period of Khruschev’s Thaw. The memory of the war for new generations was further defined in state-sponsored memorials, museums and public events under Brezhnev. While Soviet ideology was discredited in the wake of the USSR’s collapse, ordinary Russians and politicians alike continue to this day to see Russia’s victory over Nazi Germany with pride and as part of their national identity. This course explores the contradictory elements that make up the images and narratives of the war – in novels, short stories, feature films, and oral histories - which bring together state violence and individual freedom, patriotism and oppression, remembrance and forgetting. After an initial acquaintance with the colossal human cost of the war, we will examine the artistic, cultural and political traditions of addressing the national trauma that have evolved in the official and unofficial discourses of the war. The search for a “usable past” of the war continues in contemporary Russia, breaching previously suppressed topics yet also obfuscating public attempts to critically examine people’s experiences of the war beyond the inherited Soviet myths.

10/11/16
No longer Writing Intensive
SOC 244 What They Saw in America (Same as AMST 244 & HIST 366)

11/18/16
$50 Lab Fee Added Spring 2017:

THEA 244 Introduction to Theatre Technology

6/22/16
Course Cancelled Fall 2016:

WGSS 231 Sexuality and Imperialism (D)(Same as COMP 234)

6/22/16
Course Cancelled Spring 2017:

WGSS 244T Actually Existing Alternative Economies (D) (W)

6/27/16
Course Cancelled Spring 2017:

WGSS 410 Jr./Sr. Sem: Discipline & Dissent

10/11/16
No longer available fifth course option
6/27/16
New Course Offered Spring 2017:

WGSS 411  Junior/Senior Seminar: Advanced Readings and Research

This capstone readings and research seminar for WGSS majors will culminate in a substantial independent research project. In the first half of the semester, we will examine the disciplinary and interdisciplinary development of the field(s) of WGSS; read classic texts and examples of more recent scholarship representing a range of WGSS theories and methods; and explore a variety of methods and strategies for crafting research within the field of WGSS. In the second half of the semester, students will design and conduct their own WGSS-related research projects. Class Format: Seminar
Requirements/Evaluation: weekly discussion questions; research proposal; substantial final research project; and oral presentation
Enrollment Preference: Junior & Senior WGSS Majors D
Prerequisites: WGSS 101
Enrollment: 15
May not be taken on a pass/fail basis
HOUR: W 1:10-3:50
DUBOW


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