TUTORIALS OFFERED 2008-2009

The Tutorial Program offers Williams students a distinctive opportunity to take a heightened form of responsibility for their own intellectual development. No student is required to take a tutorial course, but any student with the appropriate qualifications and interests is invited to do so.

Tutorials at the 100/200 level are designed primarily for first-year students and sophomores; they are usually given enrollment preference for such courses, though interested juniors and seniors are often welcome. Tutorials at the 300/400 level are designed primarily for juniors and seniors (and, often, for majors in the discipline); first-year students and sophomores are welcome to apply, but are urged to consult the instructor before registering.

Tutorials place much greater weight than do regular courses-or even small seminars-on student participation. They aim to teach students how to develop and present arguments; listen carefully, and then refine their positions in the context of a challenging discussion; and respond quickly and cogently to critiques of their work. Tutorials place particular emphasis on developing analytical skills, writing abilities, and the talents of engaging in rigorous conversation and oral debate.

The ways in which particular tutorials are conducted vary across the disciplines, but here is a description of how most tutorials at Williams are organized. Tutorials are usually limited to ten students. At the start of term, the instructor divides the students into pairs. Each pair meets weekly with the instructor for roughly one hour. Many tutorial courses begin and end the term with a group seminar, and in a few departments, instructors hold weekly group meetings of all tutorial members to provide background information designed to facilitate the students' independent work. But the heart of every tutorial course is the weekly meeting of the two students with the instructor.

At these weekly meetings, one student delivers a prepared essay or presentation (e.g., an analysis of a text or work of art, a discussion of a problem set, a report on laboratory exercises, etc.) pertaining to the assignment for that week, while the other student-and then the instructor-offer a critique. In the following week, students switch roles. Typically, students write five or six essays (usually in the range of 4-7 pages) during the term, and offer five or six critiques of their partners' work.

Since the program's inception in 1988, students have ranked tutorials among the most demanding-and rewarding-courses they have taken at Williams. While not designed to be more difficult than other courses, tutorials are nonetheless challenging, with frequent writing assignments and the expectation that students will be well prepared to participate actively and effectively in weekly discussions. At the same time, students have consistently placed tutorials among the most enriching and consequential courses they have taken. They have appreciated the close attention to their writing and argumentation skills; the opportunity to be held accountable, in a detailed way, for the extended implications of their ideas; the chance to develop their oral abilities as they engage in debate; and the close intellectual bonds tutorials build between teachers and students, and students with each other. Many students have formed important advising and mentoring relationships with their tutorial teachers.

Registration information: Students register for tutorials as they would for any other course (but should first check the description for prerequisites and to see if permission of the instructor is required). Because of limited enrollments and the special arrangements involved in organizing tutorials, students are encouraged to determine, as early as possible, their interest in and commitment to the course. Students may not drop or add a tutorial after the first week of class. Tutorials may not be taken on a pass/fail basis.

Students may obtain detailed information about particular tutorials from the course descriptions and the instructors. (All tutorials have a "T" after the course number.) For general information, advice, or suggestions about the program, please contact Professor Stephen Fix, Tutorial Program Director for 2008-2009, in Stetson.

Tutorials offered in 2008-2009:

AFR 330T(S) Non-Profit Organization and Community Change (Same as Political Science 331T) (W)

AMST 465T(F) Two American Public Intellectuals: Noam Chomsky and Edward Said (Same as English 367T) (W)

ANTH 328T(S) Emotions and the Self (W)

SOC 214T(F) Exploring the American Culture Wars (W)

ARTH 300T(F) Rembrandt Tutorial: Case Studies of Individual Works and Controversial Issues (W)

ARTH 305T(S) Art, Life, Death: Studies in the Italian Renaissance (W)

ARTH 461T(F) Writing about Bodies (Same as INTR 461 and Women's and Gender Studies 461) (W)

ARTS 300T(F) Narrative Spaces

ARTS 304T(S) Video Post-Production

ARTS 310T(S) Appearance/Disappearance

ARTS 364T(F) Artists' Books

CHIN 251T(S) Crises and Critiques: The Literature and Intellectual History of Early 20th Century China (Same as Comparative Literature 256T and History 215T) (W) (D)

ASTR 207T(F) Extraterrestrial Life in the Galaxy: A Sure Thing, or a Snowball's Chance? (W)

BIOL 206T(S) Genomes, Transcriptomes, and Proteomes (W)

BIOL 209T(F) Animal Communication (W)

BIOL 218T(S) DNA, Life, and Everything (W)

BIOL 425T(S) Coevolution (W)

COMP 230T(F) Violent States, Violent Subjects: Nation-Building and Atrocity in 19th-Century Latin America (Same as Spanish 230T) (W) (D)

COMP 231T(S) Postmodernism (Same as English 266T) (W) (D)

COMP 256T(S) Crises and Critiques: The Literature and Intellectual History of Early 20th Century China (Same as Chinese 251T and History 215T) (W) (D)

COMP 259T(F) Adultery in the Nineteenth-Century Novel (Same as English 261T and Women's and Gender Studies 259T) (W)

COMP 309T(S) Exile, Homecoming and the Promised Land (Same as Jewish Studies 491T and Religion 289T) (W) (D)

CSCI 336T(F) Computer Networks (Q)

CSCI 356T(S) Advanced Algorithms (Q)

ECON 219T(F) Global Economic History (W)

ECON 357T(F) The Strange Economics of College (W)

ECON 371T(S) Economic Justice

ECON 467T(S) Development Successes (Same as Economics 518T) (W)

ECON 516T(S) International Financial Institutions

ECON 518T(S) Development Successes (Same as Economics 467T) (W)

ECON 520T(S) Inclusive Growth: The Role of Social Safety Nets

ENGL 207T(F) Hollywood Directors: Hawks, Lubitsch, and Sturges (W)

ENGL 208T(F) Poetry (W)

ENGL 231T(F,S) Literature of the Sea (Same as Maritime Studies 231T) (W) (Offered only at Mystic Seaport.)

ENGL 253T(F) Women and Theatre: Gender, Sexuality and the Stage (Same as Theatre 250T and Women and Gender Studies 250T) (W)

ENGL 261T(F) Adultery in the Nineteenth-Century Novel (Same as Comparative Literature 259T and Women's and Gender Studies 259T) (W)

ENGL 266T(S) Postmodernism (Same as Comparative Literature 231T) (W) (D)

ENGL 320T(S) Marlowe and Shakespeare (W)

ENGL 322T(S) Novel Arguments (W)

ENGL 325T(S) Thinking Through Middlemarch (W)

ENGL 326T(S) Inscrutable Evil, or the Transformative Horror Film (W)

ENGL 343T(F) Whitman and Dickinson in Context (W)

ENGL 355T(F) Fanaticism (W)

ENGL 367T(F) Two American Public Intellectuals: Noam Chomsky and Edward Said (Same as American Studies 465T)

ENVI 218T(F) The Carbon Cycle and Climate (Same as Geosciences 218T) (W)

GEOS 110T(S) Galapagos Islands Field Geology and Biology (W)

GEOS 218T(F) The Carbon Cycle and Climate (Same as Environmental Studies 218T) (W)

GERM 301T(S) German Studies, 1770-1830 (W)

GERM 303T(F) German Studies, 1900-1938 (W)

HIST 128T(S) Conquistadors in the New World (W)

HIST 215T(S) Crises and Critiques: The Literature and Intellectual History of Early 20th Century China (Same as Chinese 251T and Comparative Literature 256T) (W) (D)

HIST 481T(S) The American Revolution, 1763-1798: Meanings and Interpretations (W)

HIST 482T(S) Fictions of African-American History (W)

HIST 487T(F) The Second World War: Origins, Course, Outcomes, and Meaning (W)

HIST 489T(F) The Rise and Fall of the Ottomans and the Emergence of Modern Turkey (W)

HIST 491T(S) Political Islam: Past, Present, Future (D) (W)

HIST 492T(S) Revolutionary Thought in Latin America (W) (D)

INTR 461T(F) Writing about Bodies (Same as ArtH 461 and Women's and Gender Studies 461) (W)

JWST 491T(S) Exile, Homecoming and the Promised Land (Same as Comparative Literature 309T and Religion 289T) (W) (D)

MAST 231T(F,S) Literature of the Sea (Same as English 231T) (Offered only at Mystic Seaport.) (W)

MATH 101T(F) Mathematical Analysis with Descriptive Statistics

MATH 324T(S) Topology (Q)

MATH 370T(F) Mathematics and Politics: Social Choice and Fair Division (Q)

MUS 203T(F), 204T(S) Composition I and II

MUS 245T(S) Music Analysis: Music with Text (W)

PHIL 213T(F) Biomedical Ethics (W)

PHIL 220T(S) Immortality and the Soul in Ancient and Medieval Thought (Same as Religion 282T) (W)

PHIL 235T(F) Morality and Partiality: Loyalty, Friendship, Patriotism (W)

PHIL 272T(F) Free Will and Responsibility (W)

PHIL 304T(S) Authenticity: From Rousseau to Poststructuralism (W)

PHIL 350T(S) Beauty (W)

PHYS 402T(S) Applications of Quantum Mechanics (Q)

PHYS 411T(F) Classical Mechanics (Q)

PSCI 248T(F) The USA in Comparative Perspective (W)

PSCI 323T(F) Henry Kissinger and the American Century (W)

PSCI 331T(S) Non-Profit Organization and Community Change (Same as Africana Studies 330T) (W)

PSCI 352T(S) Comparative Political Economy (W)

PSYC 324T(S) Great Debates in Cognition

PSYC 331T(F) Risk and Resilience in Early Development

REL 282T(S) Immortality and the Soul in Ancient and Medieval Thought (Same as Philosophy 220T) (W)

REL 289T(S) (formerly 309) Exile, Homecoming and the Promised Land (Same as Comparative Literature 309T and Jewish Studies 491T) (W) (D)

REL 290T(F) Explorations of the Afterlife (W)

RLSP 230T(F) Violent States, Violent Subjects: Nation-Building and Atrocity in 19th-Century Latin America (Same as Comparative Literature 230T) (W) (D)

THEA 250T(F) Women and Theatre: Gender, Sexuality and the Stage (Same as English 253T and Women and Gender Studies 250T) (W)

WGST 250T(F) Women and Theatre: Gender, Sexuality and the Stage (Same as English 253T and Theatre 250T) (W)

WGST 259T(F) Adultery in the Nineteenth-Century Novel (Same as Comparative Literature 259T and English 261T) (W)

WGST 461T(F) Writing about Bodies (Same as ArtH 461 and INTR 461) (W)

The College acknowledges with deepest gratitude those classes and individuals who have created generous endowments to support tutorials at Williams:

The Class of 1953

The Class of 1954

The Class of 1979

Hugh Germanetti 1954

David A. Gray 1954

Robert L. Guyett 1958

John D. Mabie 1954

John H. Simpson 1979

Tutorial Honoring Williams Health Center Nurses