Office of the Registrar

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Winter Study Course Offerings 2015

WINTER STUDY PROGRAM

REMINDERS ABOUT WSP REGISTRATION

All students who will be on campus during the 2014-2015 academic year must register for WSP. Registration will take place in the early part of fall semester. If you are registered for a senior thesis in the fall which must be continued through Winter Study by departmental rules, you will be registered for your Winter Study Project automatically. In every other case, you must complete registration. First-year students are required to participate in a Winter Study that will take place on campus; they are not allowed to do 99's.

Even if you plan to take a 99, or the instructor of your first choice accepts you during the registration period, there are many things that can happen between registration and the beginning of Winter Study to upset your first choice, so you must list five choices. You should try to make one of your choices a project with a larger enrollment, not that it will guarantee you a project, but it will increase your chances.

If you think your time may be restricted in any way (ski meets, interviews, etc.), clear these restrictions with the instructor before signing up for his/her project. Remember, for cross-listed projects, you should sign up for the subject you want to appear on your record. For many beginning language courses, you are required to take the WSP Sustaining Program in addition to your regular project. You will be automatically enrolled in this Sustaining Program, so no one should list this as a choice. The grade of honors is reserved for outstanding or exceptional work. Individual instructors may specify minimum standards for the grade, but normally, fewer than one out of ten students will qualify. A grade of pass means the student has performed satisfactorily. A grade of perfunctory pass signifies that a student's work has been significantly lacking but is just adequate to deserve a pass. If you have any questions about a project, see the instructor before you register. Finally, all work for WSP must be completed and submitted to the instructor no later than January 29, 2015. Only the Dean can grant an extension beyond this date.

WINTER STUDY 99'S

Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible to propose "99's," independent projects arranged with faculty sponsors, conducted in lieu of regular Winter Study courses. Perhaps you have encountered an interesting idea in one of your courses which you would like to study in more depth, or you may have an interest not covered in the regular curriculum. In recent years students have undertaken in-depth studies of particular literary works, interned in government offices, assisted in foreign and domestic medical clinics, conducted field work in economics in developing countries, and given performances illustrating the history of American dance. Although some 99's involve travel away from campus, there are many opportunities to pursue intellectual or artistic goals here in Williamstown.

99 forms are available online: http://www.williams.edu/Registrar/winterstudy/99direct.html

The deadline for submitting the proposals to faculty sponsors is September 25, 2014.

AFR 10  Black Radical Film  CROSSLISTING: HIST 12

AFR 11  Heroes/Anti-Heroes in Contemporary TV and Cinema  CROSSLISTING: PSCI 11

AFR 25  Touring Black Religion in the “New” South  CROSSLISTING: ENVI 26/REL 26

AFR 30  Senior Project

AMST 13  The Great Asian American Novel  CROSSLISTING: ENGL 13

AMST 15  Contemporary American Songwriting  CROSSLISTING: MUS 15/SPEC 15

AMST 18  Chasin’ the Blues: A Journey through American Music  CROSSLISTING: HIST 18

AMST 30  Senior Honors Project

ANSO 11  Berkshire Farm Residential Program for Adolescent Males Externship

ANSO 12  Children and the Courts

ANSO 19  Conducting Social Science Research at the American Institute for Economic Research CROSSLISTING: ECON 19

ANTH 14  The Role of Epidemiology in Public Health and Evidence-Based Medicine  CROSSLISTING: CHEM 12

ANTH 19  “The Feather’d Hook”: An Introduction to Streamside Entomology and Fly-Tying  CROSSLISTING: ENVI 19

ANTH 31  Senior Thesis

SOC 10  Intentional Communities and the American College

SOC 11  Wendell Berry and the Agrarian Tradition

SOC 31  Senior Thesis

ARAB SP  Sustaining Language Program for Arabic 101-102

ARAB 25  Transnational Itineraries  CROSSLISTING: COMP 25/RLSP 25

ARAB 31  Senior Thesis

ARTH 14  The other Greek Mythology: The ”Great God Pan” and other Small-Fry

ARTH 18  Hidden Treasures and the Amber Room: Impressionist Art Held Hostage  CROSSLISTING: ASTR19/HIST 19

ARTH 31  Senior Thesis

ARTH 33  Honors Independent Study

ARTS 10  Observational  Drawing  CROSSLISTING: BIOL 10

ARTS 14  Contemporary Treehouse Design

ARTS 15  Large-Format Photography

ARTS 16  Glass and Glassblowing  CROSSLISTING: CHEM 16

ARTS 17  Printmaking: Experiments and Chance Processes

ARTS 18  Stories and Pictures  CROSSLISTING: ENGL 18

ARTS 19  Design School  CROSSLISTING: MATH 19

ARTS 31  Senior Studio: Independent Project Art Studio

ASST 15  Spice Routes: The History and Practice of Indian Food  CROSSLISTING: HIST 15

CHIN SP  Sustaining Language Program for CHIN 101-102

CHIN 31  Senior Thesis

JAPN SP  Sustaining Language Program for JAPN 101-102

JAPN 11  The Samurai in Japanese Film

JAPN 31  Senior Thesis

ASTR 19  Hidden Treasures and the Amber Room: Impressionist Art Held Hostage  CROSSLISTING: ARTH11/HIST 11

ASTR 31  Senior Research

ASPH 31  Senior Research

BIOL 10  Observational  Drawing  CROSSLISTING: ARTS 10

BIOL 11  Project BioEYES: Teaching 4th Grade about Zebrafish

BIOL 12  New Orleans-Style Jazz and Street Performance

BIOL 13  Introduction to Animal Tracking

BIOL 14  Biology and Psychology of Food Intake and Taste  CROSSLISTING: PSYC 16

BIOL 26  Opportunities and Challenges: Living and Working with Immigrants and Refugees in Portland, ME  CROSSLISTING: SPEC 26

BIOL 31  Senior Thesis

CHEM 11  Science for Kids  CROSSLISTING: SPEC 11

CHEM 12  The Role of Epidemiology in Public Health and Evidence-Based Medicine  CROSSLISTING: ANTH 14

CHEM 13  Ultimate Wellness: Concepts For a Happy Healthy Life

CHEM 14  Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships  CROSSLISTING: PSYC 14/SPEC 14

CHEM 16  Glass and Glassblowing  CROSSLISTING: ARTS 16

CHEM 18  Introduction to Research in Biochemistry

CHEM 20  Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry

CHEM 24  Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry

CHEM 31  Senior Research and Thesis

CLAS 11  Alexander the Great   CROSSLISTING: HIST 11

CLAS 14  Plato’s Symposium and Its Afterlife  CROSSLISTING: COMP 14/PHIL 14/WGSS 14

CLAS 31  Senior Thesis

COMP 11  Historical Book Binding

COMP 12  Film Propaganda  CROSSLISTING: RUSS 12

COMP 14  Plato’s Symposium and Its Afterlife  CROSSLISTING: CLAS 14/PHIL 14/WGSS 14

COMP 23  Adorno’s Aesthetic Theory  CROSSLISTING: ENGL 23

COMP 25  Transnational Itineraries  CROSSLISTING: ARAB 25/RLSP 25

cOMP 31  Senior Thesis

CSCI 12  Stained Glass Tiling

CSCI 13  Designing for People  CROSSLISTING: PSYC 13

CSCI 23  Introduction to Research and Development in Computing

CSCI 31  Senior Honors Thesis

DANC 12  Intermediate/Advanced Ballet Technique and Rehearsal

ECON 10  Introduction to Financial Reporting and Statement Analysis

ECON 11  Public Speaking

ECON 12  Introduction to For Profit and Nonprofit Organizations

ECON 13  Tools for Evaluating New Business Ideas

ECON 14  Hospitality Real Estate Development/ Business Methodology for Entrepreneurs

ECON 15  Introduction to Indian Cinema

ECON 16  Mechanisms of Arbitrage

ECON 17  Viewing U.S. Economic History through the Visual Arts

ECON 18  The Practice and Empirics of Monetary Policy in Emerging and Developing Economies

ECON 19  Conducting Social Science Research at the American Institute for Economic Research  CROSSLISTING: ANSO 19

ECON 22  Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)  CROSSLISTING: POEC 22/WGSS 22

ECON 23  Introduction to the Economics, Geography and Appreciation of Wine

ECON 25  Socio-economic Impact of 20 Years of Democracy in South Africa  CROSSLISTING: POEC25/PSCI 25

ECON 27  Sustainable Business Strategies  CROSSLISTING: ENVI 18

ECON 31  Honors Thesis

ECON 51  Practical Tools for Development Economists

ECON 52  Micro-Simulation Modeling for Ex Ante Policy Analysis

ENGL 10  Proust: The Guermantes Way and Sodom and Gomorrah

ENGL 11  How to Write for Magazines (and Why Anybody Would Want To)

ENGL 12  Listening to Strangers

ENGL 13  The Great Asian American Novel  CROSSLISTING: AMST 13

ENGL 14  Hurston, Black Folk, and the Literati

ENGL 15  Media Battlegrounds: A Workshop in Media Criticism  CROSSLISTING: PSCI 15

ENGL 16  Henry James’ The Golden Bowl

ENGL 17  The Winter Naturalist’s Journal  CROSSLISTING: ENVI 17

ENGL 18  Stories and Pictures  CROSSLISTING: ARTS 18

ENGL 20  Humor Writing  CROSSLISTING: MATH 20

ENGL 22  Twenty-First Century Jewish American Fiction  CROSSLISTING: JWST 22/REL 22

ENGL 23  Adorno’s Aesthetic Theory  CROSSLISTING: COMP 23

ENGL 25  Journalism Today

ENGL 27  Shakespeare on Film  CROSSLISTING: THEA 12

ENGL 30  Honors Project: Specialization Route

ENGL 31  Honors Project: Thesis

ENVI 10  Accepting the Challenge: Pursuing Living Building Challenge Certification for the New Environmental Center

ENVI 11  The Winter Woods

ENVI 12  Landscape Photography  CROSSLISTING: GEOS 12

ENVI 13  United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Past, Its Uncertain Future     CROSSLISTING: JLST 13

ENVI 14  Animal Consciousness  CROSSLISTING: RLSP 14

ENVI 17  The Winter Naturalist’s Journal  CROSSLISTING: ENGL 17

ENVI 18  Sustainable Business Strategies  CROSSLISTING: ECON 27

ENVI 19  “The Feather’d Hook”: An Introduction to Streamside Entomology and Fly-Tying  CROSSLISTING: ANTH 19

ENVI 20  Politics after the Apocalypse  CROSSLISTING: PSCI 20

ENVI 25  A New Paradigm for Eleutheran Agriculture: Building a Sustainable Indigenous FoodSystem

ENVI 26  Touring Black Religion in the “New” South  CROSSLISTING: AFR 25/REL 26

ENVI 31  Senior Research and Thesis

GEOS 10  Coastal Destruction: Were People Meant to Live Along the Coast?

GEOS 12  Landscape Photography  CROSSLISTING: ENVI 12

GEOS 31  Senior Thesis

GERM SP  Sustaining Language Program for GERM 101-102

GERM 14  The Life and Death of a Vanished Nation: East Germany, 1949-1990  CROSSLISTING: HIST 14

GERM 30  Honors Project

GERM 31  Senior Thesis

HIST 11  Alexander the Great   CROSSLISTING: CLAS 11

HIST 12  Black Radical Film  CROSSLISTING: AFR 10

HIST 14  The Life and Death of a Vanished Nation: East Germany, 1949-1990  CROSSLISTING: GERM 14

HIST 15  Spice Routes: The History and Practice of Indian Food  CROSSLISTING: ASST 15

HIST 16  American Wars:  Directed Independent Reading and Research

HIST 17  Russia, Ukraine, Crimea  CROSSLISTING:  LEAD 17

HIST 18  Chasin’ the Blues: A Journey through American Music  CROSSLISTING: AMST 18

HIST 19  Hidden Treasures and the Amber Room: Impressionist Art Held Hostage  CROSSLISTING: ARTH18/ASTR 19

HIST 30  Workshop in Independent Research

HIST 31  Senior Thesis

INST 30  Senior Honors Project

JWST 22  Twenty-First Century Jewish American Fiction CROSSLISTING: ENGL 22/REL 22

JWST 31  Senior Thesis

JLST 13  United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Past, Its Uncertain Future     CROSSLISTING: ENVI 13

JLST 14  Mock Trial

LATS 31  Latina/0 Honors Thesis Seminar

LEAD 10  Institutional Leadership and Social Responsibility

LEAD 17  Russia, Ukraine, Crimea  CROSSLISTING:  HIST 17

LEAD 18  Wilderness Trip Leadership & Leadership in Wilderness Emergency Care

LEAD 20  Student Leadership Development  CROSSLIST: SPEC 20

MATH 10  Pilates:  Physiology and Wellness

MATH 11  History of Deaf Culture in America

MATH 12  The Mathematics of LEGO Bricks

MATH 13  Calculus Preparation

MATH 14  Introductory Photography:  People and Places  CROSSLISTING: SPEC 10

MATH 16  The National Parks: America’s Best Idea

MATH 17  The History, Geography and Economics of the Wines of France

MATH 19  Design School  CROSSLISTING: ARTS 19

MATH 20  Humor Writing  CROSSLISTING: ENGL 20

MATH 30  Senior Project

MATH 31  Senior Thesis

STAT 10  Data Visualization

STAT 30  Senior Project

STAT 31  Senior Thesis

MUS 10  Chamber Orchestra of Williams (COW)

MUS 11  Hildegard of Bingen: Medieval Mysticism and Music  CROSSLISTING: REL 11

MUS 12  Performing the Ramayana

MUS 13  Introduction to Klezmer Music

MUS 15  Contemporary American Songwriting  CROSSLISTING: AMST 15/SPEC 15

MUS 31  Senior Thesis

NSCI 31  Senior Thesis

PHIL 10  What Should We Do With Our Brain?/Reading Catherine Malabou

PHIL 12  Ethics in Public Health

PHIL 13  Boxing

PHIL 14  Plato’s Symposium and Its Afterlife  CROSSLISTING: CLAS 14/COMP 14/WGSS 14

PHIL 15  Deleuze: Philosophy, Literature and the Arts

PHIL 25  Eye Care and Culture in Nicaragua

PHIL 31  Senior Thesis

PHLH 23  Uncomfortable Learning: Gaudino Fellowship

PHYS 10  Holography

PHYS 11  The Making of the Atomic Bomb

PHYS 12  Drawing as a Learnable Skill

PHYS 13  Loop d’ Loop d’ Loop d’ Loop d’ Loop d’ Loop...

PHYS 14  Electronics

PHYS 16  3D Design and Fabrication for Rapid Prototyping and Advanced Manufacturing

PHYS22  Research Participation

PHYS 31  Senior Thesis

POEC 17  Social Entrepreneurship: Impact in the Social Sector

POEC 21  Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits  CROSSLISTING: PSCI 21

POEC 22  Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)  CROSSLISTING: ECON 22/WGSS 22

POEC 23  Institutional Investment

POEC 25  Socio-economic Impact of 20 Years of Democracy in South Africa  CROSSLISTING: ECON25/PSCI 25

POEC 31  Honors Thesis

PSCI 11  Heroes/Anti-Heroes in Contemporary TV and Cinema  CROSSLISTING: AFR 11

PSCI 12  The Art of War

PSCI 13  Race, Politics, and Scandal

PSCI 14  The CIA and the Politics of Intelligence

PSCI 15  Media Battlegrounds: A Workshop in Media Criticism  CROSSLISTING: ENGL 15

PSCI 16  Political Aikido: How to Form the More Perfect Union

PSCI 17  The Third World City

PSCI 18  Girl meets World: Films from 5 Continents  CROSSLISTING: WGSS 18

PSCI 19  Law as a Tool for Social Justice

PSCI 20  Politics after the Apocalypse  CROSSLISTING: ENVI 20

PSCI 21  Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits  CROSSLISTING: POEC 21

PSCI 22  Learning Intervention for Troubled Teens (LIFFT)

PSCI 25  Socio-economic Impact of 20 Years of Democracy in South Africa  CROSSLISTING: ECON 25/POEC 25

PSCI 31  Senior Thesis

PSCI 32  Individual Project

PSYC 12  Alcohol 101: Examining and Navigating the College Drinking Scene

PSYC 13  Designing for People  CROSSLISTING: CSCI 13

PSYC 14  Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships  CROSSLISTING: CHEM 14/SPEC 14

PSYC 15  Ephquilts: An Introduction to Traditional Quilting

PSYC 16  Biology and Psychology of Food Intake and Taste  CROSSLISTING: BIOL 14

PSYC 18  Knocking on Heaven’s Door: Thanatology 101

PSYC 19  Psychology Internships

PSYC 22  Introduction to Research in Psychology

PSYC 31  Senior Thesis

REL 11  Hildegard of Bingen: Medieval Mysticism and Music  CROSSLISTING: MUS 11

REL 14  Yoga: A Practical and Theoretical Exploration in Three Phases

REL 22  Twenty-First Century Jewish American Fiction  CROSSLISTING: ENGL 22/JWST 22

REL 25  Jerusalem: One City, Two Cultures, Three Religions, Many Narratives

REL 26  Touring Black Religion in the “New” South  CROSSLISTING: AFR 25/ENVI 26

REL 30  Senior Projects

RLFR SP  Sustaining Language Program for RLFR 101-102

RLFR 12  Audible Imagination: Exploring Sound Across the Arts

RLFR 30  Honors Essay

RLFR 31  Senior Thesis

RLIT SP  Sustaining Language Program for RLIT 101-102

RLSP SP  Sustaining Language Program for RLSP 101-102

RLSP 14  Animal Consciousness  CROSSLISTING: ENVI 14

RLSP 16  The Poetics of Southern Spain

RLSP 25  Transnational Itineraries  CROSSLISTING: ARAB 25/COMP 25

RLSP 30  Honors Essay

RLSP 31  Senior Thesis

RUSS SP  Sustaining Language Program for RUSS 101-102

RUSS 12  Film Propaganda  CROSSLISTING: COMP 12

RUSS 25  Republic of Georgia  CROSSLISTING: SPEC 24

RLFR 30  Honors Essay

RUSS 30  Honors Project

RUSS 31  Senior Thesis

SPEC 10  Introductory Photography:  People and Places  CROSSLISTING: MATH 14

SPEC 11  Science for Kids  CROSSLISTING: CHEM 11

SPEC 14  Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships  CROSSLISTING: CHEM 14/PSYC 14

SPEC 15  Contemporary American Songwriting  CROSSLISTING: AMST 15/MUS 15

SPEC 17  Addiction Studies and Diagnosis

SPEC 18  Live! from Studio 275

SPEC 19  Medical Apprenticeship

SPEC 20  Student Leadership Development  CROSSLISTING: LEAD 20

SPEC 21  Experience the Workplace; an Internship with Williams Alumni/Parents

SPEC 24  Republic of Georgia  CROSSLISTING: RUSS 25

SPEC 25  Digging Deep into Winter Food: Farm-to-Plate Living in Vermont

SPEC 26  Opportunities and Challenges: Living and Working with Immigrants and Refugees in Portland, ME  CROSSLISTING: BIOL 26

SPEC 28  Class of 1959 Teach NYC Urban Education Program

SPEC 35  Making Pottery on the Potter’s Wheel 

SPEC 39  ”Composing A Life:” Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams

THEA 12  Shakespeare on Film  CROSSLISTING: ENGL 27

THEA 13  Comic Theory

THEA 14  American Theatre Festivals in New York City and Beyond

THEA 15  Plays For The Festival And Beyond

THEA 32  Senior Honors Thesis

RLFR 31  Senior Thesis

WGSS 14  Plato’s Symposium and Its Afterlife  CROSSLISTING: CLAS 14/COMP 14/PHIL 14

WGSS 18  Girl meets World: Films from 5 Continents  CROSSLISTING: PSCI 18

WGSS 22  Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)  CROSSLISTING: ECON 22/POEC 22

WGSS 25  Creating Social Enterprises with Marginalized Ugandan Youth

WGSS 30  Honors Project

 

AFRICANA STUDIES

AFR 10 Black Radical Film CROSSLISTING: HIST 12
COURSE DESCRIPTION: We will watch, discuss and analyze several films from two of the foremost voices of Black radicalism in film today, Raoul Peck and Euzhan Palcy, both from the French/Haitian West Indies. Their films range from depicting radical movements for decolonization (Lumumba, Aime Cesaire), to the struggle against apartheid (Dry White Season), to the Civil Rights movement (Ruby Bridges) and the Attica prison riot in the U.S. (The Killing Yard), to the travesties of Western `aid' in post-earthquake Haiti (Fatal Assistance).
METHOD OF EVALUATION: 2 short papers (5 pages) or class presentation
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 30
METHOD OF SELECTION: Africana concentrators; History majors, order of preference
COST: None
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: Shanti Singham

AFR 11 Heroes/Anti-Heroes in Contemporary TV and Cinema CROSSLISTING: PSCI 11
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Who are heroes and anti-heroes? What do these two terms mean? This course explores competing representations of the philosophies and politics surrounding heroes and anti-heroes through exploration of contemporary television and cinema. In order to accomplish our analytical objectives, we will screen and examine three series from among the following possibilities: Game of Thrones, Luther, Breaking Bad, Scandal, House of Cards, Homeland, Heroes, 30 for 30, and the Dark Knight trilogy.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: class participation, a weekly screening e-response post, and 10-page final paper.
PREREQUISITES: none.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference: Africana Studies concentrators and Political Science majors.
COST: $50
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Neil Roberts

AFR 25 Touring Black Religion in the "New" South CROSSLISTING: ENVI 26/REL 26
COURSE DESCRIPTION: In February of 1927 anthropologist Franz Boas asked folklorist Zora Neale Hurston to identify an ideal location in which to study and collect data about "Negro culture in the South" Hurston's reply, without hesitation, was the central and gulf coast of Florida because she believed there, "it was possible for [her] to get a cross section of the Negro South in one state" Hurston traveled directly to Eatonville, the town she eventually claimed as her birth home, and for over a decade, utilized the information she collected as the backdrop to her fiction as well as her nonfiction explorations of Black religion.
Taking Hurston's lead, this course (the first team-taught travel winter study offered solely by Africana Studies faculty) will utilize Florida's gulf coast as the backdrop to exploring the diverse manifestations of modern black religious expression. Because of its diverse geographical, political structures, populations, and economy, Florida has historically been characterized as a "new South" with distinctive cultural expressions. With this history in mind, this course will address four critical questions: (1) What is Black religion?; (2) What are the distinctive aspects of southern expressions of Black Protestant religion; (3) How do Black communities see themselves in relation to broader social concerns? and (4) How, if at all, is religious expression in Florida unique?
To answer these questions, we will travel to Florida's west coast and visit three different church communities to understand Black Protestant religion as currently expressed in the "New South" This includes Bryant Chapel Christian Methodist Episcopal Church (CME), a small mainstream denominational church in Talleveast Florida; Old Landmark Cathedral Church of God in Christ (COGIC), a Pentecostal-Holiness church in St. Petersburg, Florida; and Revealing Truth Ministries, a mega-church in Tampa, Florida. As participant-observers we will take part in worship services, and when possible, interview local residents about the role each church plays in its respective community. In addition to learning about Black religion along the western coast of Florida through participant observation, students will visit and tour local historical sites significant to Black religious experiences, and will meet with local academics, archivists, and leaders. These will include: touring the Zora Neale Hurston National Museum of the Fine Arts in Eatonville; visiting the Public Archaeology Lab at New College of Florida with Professor Uzi Baram; holding conversations about doing ethnograhic work with author and scholar Robert Hayden; and touring the Family Heritage Museum at the State College of Florida with Freddie Brown and Kathie F. Marsh. Surveying Black history archives was especially important in the previous iteration of the course because they enlivened the historical and ethnographic literatures the students read.
In addition to their roles as participant observers, students will have access to an electronic reading packet that will ground them briefly, though comprehensively, on Florida's history, ethnographic methods, and Black religious expressions. We will also use sources that contextualize church responses to current social concerns such as environmental racism, homelessness, and health care. A completed draft of the course reading packet is provided in the itinerary below.
PREREQUISITES: No previous experience or religious affiliation is necessary, and we especially invite students who are interested in experiential learning.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on an electronic field journal, participation in weekly colloquies, and an oral presentation.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 8
METHOD OF SELECTION: We will review application essays and hold interviews with the top 10 applicants. Preference will be given to majors and concentrators in Africana Studies, Religion, and Environmental Studies. Priority will also be given to students with a background in ethnographic methods.
COST: $3,000.
INSTRUCTORS: James Manigault-Bryant and Rhon Manigault-Bryant

AFR 30 Senior Project
To be taken by students registered for Africana Studies 491 who are candidates for honors.

AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 13 The Great Asian American Novel CROSSLISTING: ENGL 13
See under ENGL for full description

AMST 15 Contemporary American Songwriting CROSSLISTING: MUS 15/SPEC 15
See under SPEC for full description

AMST 18 Chasin' the Blues: A Journey through American Music CROSSLISTING: HIST 18
See under HIST for full description

AMST 30 Senior Honors Project
To be taken by students registered for American Studies 491 or 492.

ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

ANSO 11 Berkshire Farm Residential Program for Adolescent Males Externship
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The Winter study class at Berkshire Farm Center provides on site opportunities for students to directly observe interventions working with traumatized adolescent males. Students can chose observing and providing support in a classroom setting, participating in adventure based counseling experiences teaching though activities, or providing support in the workforce development sites teaching youth workforce readiness skills. Berkshire's mission is to help strengthen youth and families to live safely, productively and independently within their home communities. The residential program provides evidence based practices to assists families heal from past traumas, be reunified and get on a path for success. Williams students will be placed in the various sites 12-15 hours a week and participate in seminar learning for 2 hours a week. Berkshire is 30 minutes from Williams so transportation arrangements are required. Reading, journaling and a final give back project are additional components for learning.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Journaling, reading, final project
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: class standing and major
COST: $20
MEETING TIME: TBA
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Donelle Hauser

ADJUNCT BIO: Donelle Hauser, LMSW has been in the child welfare field for over 20 years. She is currently the Vice President of the Residential program overseeing the Substance Abuse program, clinical services, medical services, cottage living, therapeutic recreation and food services.

ANSO 12 Children and the Courts
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is an interdisciplinary course that offers students an opportunity to observe the Juvenile Court in Western Massachusetts. Students will accompany Judge Locke and or Attorney Chenail to court, meet with lawyers, probation officers, social workers and other professionals working in juvenile justice. There is a weekly dinner at the instructor's home to discuss the observations. Requirements: a weekly journal, a final project and participation in a mock trial.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: journal entries, final project and participation in mock trial
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 10
METHOD OF SELECTION: Seniors will receive consideration if overenrolled, compelling reason from other students
COST: $0
MEETING TIME: other; see description
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Judith Locke

ADJUNCT BIO: Judge Judith Locke has been a Juvenile Judge for 15 years, prior she worked for DCF, the District Attorney's office and was in private practice. Much of the previous employment was centered on families and children.

ANSO 19 Conducting Social Science Research at the American Institute for Economic Research CROSSLISTING: ECON 19
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students in this course will have the opportunity to conduct original social science research at the American Institute for Economic Research, a nationally-renowned think tank based in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. With me, students will develop a content area of interest to explore during the four weeks. Then students will be matched with a supervisor at AIER. The projects at AIER range from the Affordable Care Act and financialization to immigration, labor, and retirement policy. Students will also have myriad opportunities to learn different research methodologies, such as time series analysis, survey project design and qualitative analysis, census data collection, and Stata analysis. Students will have regular meetings with me to ensure they grow in their own areas of interest as well as regular progress report meetings with their one-on-one supervisors at AIER.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Supervisor evaluations and students' original research contributions
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 8
METHOD OF SELECTION: Telephone Interview
COST: $0
MEETING TIME: 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., two-three days a week; students will be responsible for arranging transportation to and from AIER.
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Anna N. Kreisberg

ADJUNCT BIO: Nicole Kreisberg is a Senior Research Analyst at AIER. She has her MA from the University of Chicago, and her research areas are demography, survey research, immigration, labor, and poverty.

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 14 The Role of Epidemiology in Public Health and Evidence-Based Medicine CROSSLISTING: CHEM 12
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Clinical decisions are increasingly being made on evidence from the medical literature rather than "solely" from the clinical experience of the physician. What kinds of questions (hypotheses) are being asked and how are they answered, and answered reliably? How does a conscientious physician keep up with this evidence and evaluate it both critically and efficiently?
After an introduction to the methods of epidemiology, as developed in real time epidemic investigations, and as employed in answering some of the important questions involving the etiology of disease, treatment, management, and prognosis (natural history), the course will turn to the medical literature, and discuss individual papers, or groups of papers bearing on important public health and clinical issues. We will operate as a journal club, with groups of students responsible for presenting and critiquing the design, conduct and analysis of the paper(s) of the day.
It is expected that some students will suggest issues perceived to be important to them, perhaps from their own private reading, their personal or family health experience, or from actively shadowing a physician in the WS Course offered annually by Ms. Jane Cary. While both courses cannot be taken at the same time, students shadowing a physician may wish to review the literature to delve more deeply into a problem they have seen. They will be welcome to suggest a topic and join this course on an ad hoc basis to discuss it more thoroughly than may be possible in the hospital or outpatient setting. Since these student are occupied during the day, we may add evening sessions on reasonable notice to accommodate their more complicated schedules.
It is hoped that this model will continue into the Spring Term as an informal Williams Journal Club activity for those interested in both public health and clinical decision making.
This WS Course is designed to be a serious academic experience. Students will be expected to read and present, and also participate actively in the discussion that follows.
We will meet at least three times a week for a total of 6 class hours. Preparation for class, which will be organized in groups of 3 or 4 is expected to take at least 12 hours per week. Applicants will be interviewed by the instructor.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Preparation and quality of presentation. Honors requires a special paper arranged with instructor
PREREQUISITES: A course in basic statistics is helpful but not required
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12
METHOD OF SELECTION: By interview
COST: $200 for materials
MEETING TIME: mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Nicholas Wright

ADJUNCT BIO: Nicholas Wright '57, MD, MPH, is a retired medical epidemiologist living in Williamstown. Most recently, he was on the faculty of Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in NJ, but also spent over 30 years in international public health work, 7 of them living in Sri Lanka and Thailand.

ANTH 19 "The Feather'd Hook": An Introduction to Streamside Entomology and Fly-Tying CROSSLISTING: ENVI 19
COURSE DESCRIPTION: For over a thousand years anglers have imitated the insects upon which fish feed - most notably trout and salmon - by tying bits of feather, fur, and other materials to their hooks. Over time the practice has developed into a minor art, with its own tools, techniques, aesthetics, and competing theories of animal behavior. In this course students will learn the gentle art of fly-tying, concentrating on imitations of the various distinctive stages in the life cycles of the four main insect orders on which trout feed: Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, Diptera, and Plecoptera (mayflies, caddis flies, midges, and stoneflies). We will in particular focus on the imitation of species most likely to be encountered in New England trout streams.
Course Requirements: Attendance at all classes is mandatory. As their principal project for the course students will prepare the presentation of a fly pattern (or series of patterns) to be given before the class in the last week of classes. A presentation should consist of
· a description of the historical context of the fly
· of the insect and stage of development imitated by the fly (as appropriate)
· of the materials and techniques used to make the fly
· of the preferred presentation of the fly
· of the theory of attraction according to which the fly was designed
· and a demonstration of how the fly is tied
A number of books will be placed on reserve in Sawyer Library and students will be assigned readings (on-line or handouts) from various non-fiction literary works on flies, fly-tying, and river ecology. They will also have available the Chapin Library's collection of classic piscatoriana for research purposes.
The course will meet on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays, from 10:00-12:30. We will have one mandatory field trip to the American Museum of Fly Fishing in Manchester, VT.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Final project and presentation
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 24
METHOD OF SELECTION: Interview
COST: $80 for a basic fly-tying kit. Incidental field trip costs.
MEETING TIME: mornings; 10-12:30
INSTRUCTORS: Nicolas Howe and Peter Just

ANTH 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Anthropology 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 10 Intentional Communities and the American College
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The exponential growth of opportunities for higher education in a low cost on line environment has presented an existential question to residential colleges and universities. What additional value does a traditional collegiate experience provide given the enormous cost of such an education? President Falk partially answered that question when he spoke about the unique pedagogic value of human to human interaction in didactic learning. What Falk did not address, but is of equal importance, is the role of a college as an intentional community that teaches its members how to live in community. While this has always been important, the need for such an education is greater now than it ever has been. As Robert Putnam has written, many of the mediating institutions of society have disappeared from the contemporary culture. More students than ever before never have experienced a neighborhood, their families are not members of civic organizations and if they attend a house of worship, frequently even that institution no longer acts as much of a locus for community life. The last, and often the only opportunity for young people to live in community is when they live in a residential institution of higher learning.
In this course, we will look briefly at the history of higher education from its monastic beginnings through the development of the research university model to the present. We will examine the need for teaching how to live in community and different models of intentional communities that may have saliency in their adaptation to the collegiate environment. Finally, we will look at what changes within the institutions would be required to implement such an educational goal.
Last year's syllabus included readings from Robert Putnam, Eva Brann, Richard De Millo, Victor Farrell, Charles Vest, Frank Donohue, Henry Rosovsky, Clark Kerr, Andrew Del Blanco, Alan Duesterhaus, Benjamin Ginsberg, Robert Birnbaum, Francis Wayland, Ernst Boyer, Richard Brodhead, A. Bartlett Giamatti and me. Last year our guests speakers included, the Provost, Dean of Faculty and Director of Athletics at Williams College as well as Matthew Derr, the President of Sterling College.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: In addition to class participation, students will write a reaction paper on the readings for each class that will be posted on line and will be encouraged to comment upon classmates postings. Students will be responsible for leading class discussions on particular readings each class.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: An email to the instructor as to reasons why s/he wishes to enroll.
COST: 150 (whatever the cost of the packet will be from the copy center.)
MEETING TIME: other
EXPLANATION OF MEETING TIME: Mondays and Fridays, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., break for lunch, and then return for an afternoon session from 1:30-3:30 p.m.
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: James Nuzzo

ADJUNCT BIO: Dr Nuzzo taught this course last Winter Term and is a research psychoanalyst. He is writing a book on this subject: "Modern Monasteries: Intentional Communities and American Higher Education."

SOC 11 Wendell Berry and the Agrarian Tradition
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Wendell Berry-Kentucky farmer, poet, novelist, and cultural critic-has for decades been writing about topics that have in recent years become matters of growing public concern. The importance of local economy, the impact of new technologies on community and agriculture, sustainability, environmental stewardship, citizenship, and the value of place are among the themes in Berry's work that will be considered in the course. Students will read both Berry's fiction as well as a variety of his non-fiction essays, which address related subject matters. Among those deeply influenced by Berry's writings are such popular environmentalists as Michael Pollan and Bill McKibben, some of whose work will also be explored in the course. Students will have the opportunity to visit a local Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) farm and will be required to write two short essays.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Two short essays
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 18
METHOD OF SELECTION:
COST: $75
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: James Nolan

SOC 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Sociology 493-494.

ARABIC STUDIES

ARAB S.P. Sustaining Program for Arabic 101-102
Students registered for Arabic 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Arabic Sustaining Program.
Prerequisite: Arabic 101.
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation.
Meeting time: mornings, 9:00-9:50.

ARAB 25 Transnational Itineraries CROSSLISTING: COMP 25/RLSP 25
COURSE DESCRIPTION: For this course, we will travel to Spain and Morocco in order to study transnational migration from an interdisciplinary perspective. We will analyze this often sensitive aspect of a long, complex relationship that is often framed in problematic contrasts such as East/West, North/South, Europe/Africa and Christianity/Islam. We will visit different NGO's, government organizations and academic institutions to "consider how human mobility is shaped by religion, security, youth culture, desertification, poverty, and other pressing issues and how mobility engenders transnational art and multilayered identities" (CCCL, Rabat). In addition, we will examine the legal and political response to the human drama of migration, as well as social attitudes towards migrants. This program includes weekend home stays with families in both Morocco and Spain and community service.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: There will be preliminary readings and screenings of documentaries and films (posted online) on the historical relationship between Spain and Morocco, as well as the topic of migration between them. Students are expected to keep an experiential journal with daily entries and a final 10-page self-assessment that will integrate their formal studies and personal experiences.
PREREQUISITES: None. This course is aimed towards students wishing to better understand international migration and who have transnational and multi-cultural interests.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 10
METHOD OF SELECTION: Interested students will be asked to write a 500-word essay describing their interest in this course, relevant experiences and general disposition in multicultural environments. If necessary, finalists will have a personal interview.
COST: $4,000.00
MEETING TIME: international travel
INSTRUCTOR: Armando Vargas and Jane Canova

ARAB 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for ARAB 493-494.

ART

ART HISTORY

ARTH 14 The other Greek Mythology: The "Great God Pan" and other Small-Fry
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Waiting in the wings of Greek mythology, outside the limelight occupied by Herakles, Venus, and other celebrities, is a misfit cast of minor characters. This scruffy chorus is made up of nature's "extras." Horse-men, goat-men, bull-men, cat-women, tree-women, fish-girls, snake-people, and so forth. The recipe is simple: take one human, take one animal, blend thoroughly. Individual specimens occasionally interact with gods or heroes, and end up in the pages of a book. But animal-human hybrids are usually envisioned en masse and exist primarily in pictorial or sculptural art, where they thrive, to this day. The conceptual or cognitive value of these half-breeds has changed over time, keeping up with developments in ethical anxieties and hierarchies of genre and taste. The small-fry of Greek mythology have been subordinated to the status of decoration, if not banished altogether. But they are hardly ornamental. Embodied in satyrs, nymphs, Pan, and the others is a collective vision of an alternate evolutionary trajectory and cultural history. In this parallel world, humans and animals not only talk to each other, they live similar lives, intermarry, and create new species. The distinction between nature and culture is not meaningful. Male and female are more or less equal. The industrial revolution never happens.
In this course, we will explore the alternate world of mythological hybrids by examining works of ancient art, including sculpture and painted vases, and reading ancient texts, such as Hesiod's Theogony and Ovid's Metamorphoses. We will contextualize the representations within ancient intellectual history via texts that range from Old Comedy and political theory to religious history, philosophy, and ethics (e. g., Aristophanes, Demokritos, Polybios, and Lucretius). We will also investigate the survival of the ancient myth of evolutionary alterity. This will include consideration of the imagery of fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Italian painters such as Piero di Cosimo, Nietzsches' first book, The Birth of Tragedy, and several twentieth-century artists, such as Picasso and Matthew Barney.
The goals of the course will be to chart the obscure history of the mythological underclass from its origins in antiquity until today, and to explore the relationships between the mythology and philosophies of the environment.
The requirements of the course will include: attendance; preparing and answering questions for discussion; at least one illustrated presentation to the class; one short paper or equivalent offering based on the presentation; one day-long field trip to New York to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and perhaps the Museum of Modern Art. Student participation will be key: while I know the ancient material very well, much modern material will be as new to me as it may be to you.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Presentation plus 10-page paper or equivalent project
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: priority will be given to students with prior coursework in art history, classics, or environmental studies
COST: $25
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Guy Hedreen

ARTH 18 Hidden Treasures and the Amber Room: Impressionist Art Held Hostage CROSSLISTING: ASTR 19/HIST 19
See under ASTR for full description

ARTH 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for ArtH 494. For requirements of entry into the course, please see "The Degree with Honors in Art, Art History" in the catalogue or on the Art Department's webpage.
Enrollment limited to 8.
Students need permission of the department to register for this course.
FILIPCZAK

ARTH 33 Honors Independent Study
To be taken by candidates for honors by the independent study route.

ART STUDIO

ARTS 10 Observational Drawing CROSSLISTING: BIOL 10
See under BIOL for full description

ARTS 14 Contemporary Treehouse Design
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will provide an introduction to the creative and technical aspects of contemporary treehouse design. Students will identify a site and design a treehouse based on measurements taken in the field. An array of design strategies and construction techniques will be studied through lectures, videos, and assignments. Regular desk critiques will help guide the investigation, and each project will culminate in a final presentation and exhibition of work. Evaluation will be based on completion of assignments, design development, and the quality of the final project. Attendance and participation will also be taken into account. We will meet twice a week for three hour sessions, with most of the design work completed outside of class.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Final project and presentation.
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: Seniority and familiarity with architectural drafting.
COST: $50
MEETING TIME: mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Christopher Yorke
SPONSOR: Ben Benedict

ADJUNCT BIO: Christopher Yorke (Williams '06) holds an MArch from Princeton and currently runs an architectural design studio in Palau. He has also designed and built treehouses for the past seven years, including two years with Pete Nelson, the star of Treehouse Masters.

ARTS 15 Large-Format Photography
COURSE DESCRIPTION: An introduction to studio/view cameras, processing sheet film and making contact prints from large negatives. Studio exercises will deal with the use of camera movements to alter shape and increase depth of field, and with basic lighting techniques; darkroom exercises will include the tray development of sheet film, determination of effective film speed and control of contrast through development time.
The subject matter of the photographs produced in the course will not be prescribed; it is limited only by the participants' imagination and the weather in January. Working with subjects of their own choosing, students will have the opportunity to learn the principles of traditional photographic image making by producing large-format negatives and translating them into effective black-and-white prints, principally in 4x5 formats but perhaps as well in 5x7 and 8x10.
Each student will be expected to make a few exhibition-quality prints, which may be enlargements or contact prints from 4x5 negatives, or contract prints from larger ones. The prints will be exhibited in a group show at the end of Winter Study.
Class will meet as a group for a minimum of ten hours a week for demonstrations in the studio and dark room, and later for discussion and criticism of work. In addition to this time, students will be expected to spend at least 20 hours a week in the studio and darkroom working individually, under the supervision of the course instructor and the photography technician.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: based on commitment to the course, measured by participation in discussion sessions, work in the studio and darkroom and the quality of the prints.
PREREQUISITES: none, although some dark room experience would be an advantage
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 10
METHOD OF SELECTION: majors first, then in descending class order
COST: lab fee of $225 lab fee will be charged to cover the cost of film, paper and chemicals
MEETING TIME: M-F (everyday), 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Ralph Lieberman
SPONSOR: Aida Laleian
ADJUNCT BIO: Ralph Lieberman is an art historian and photographer who lives in Williamstown. He holds a PhD from the Institute of Fine Arts. His photo-graphs have appeared in many publications and are to be found in major American and European art-historical study collections. A large exhibition of his work was on show at the Williams College Museum for several months in 2009.

ARTS 16 Glass and Glassblowing CROSSLISTING: CHEM 16
See under CHEM for full description

ARTS 17 Printmaking: Experiments and Chance Processes
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Typically, printmaking processes are intended to produce multiple impressions of the same image. This requires the artist to exert precision and control at every step, from drawing the image, prepping the plate, to printing. However, because of its many technical and chemical variables, printmaking is also a medium that can yield unintended and surprising outcomes. This course will take printmaking's fortuitous disposition as its starting point and will introduce students to the diverse and radical roles chance can play in an artistic practice. Students will investigate chance processes and experimental printmaking methods with a focus on the creation of monoprints and collagraphs, two mediums that are flexible in form and technique. Alongside making prints, students will explore and consider the various roles chance has played in the work of Modernist avant-gardes and artists including, Jean Arp, Marcel Duchamp, Francis Alÿs, Lygia Clark, John Cage, Andy Warhol, Yoko Ono, and John Baldessari. In addition to studio projects, in class time will include brief slide lectures, group discussions, and critiques. We will visit WCMA and take one class trip to New York City. Outside-of-class work will include some short readings and additional studio time to complete projects.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on class participation, assignments and a final project/exhibition.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference will be given to students who have taken ARTS 100.
COST: $75
MEETING TIME: MTR, 10am-12:50pm
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Beverly Acha
SPONSOR: Barbara Takenaga

ADJUNCT BIO: Beverly Acha ('09) has an MFA in Painting and Printmaking from Yale University and a BA in Studio Art and American Studies from Williams College. She currently lives and works in New York City and teaches at Dia: Beacon and El Museo del Barrio.

ARTS 18 Stories and Pictures CROSSLISTING: ENGL 18
See under ENGL for full description

ARTS 19 Design School CROSSLISTING: MATH 19
See under MATH for full description

ARTS 31 Senior Studio: Independent Project Art Studio
Independent project to be taken by candidates for honors in Art Studio.
TAKENAGA

ASIAN STUDIES

ASST 15 Spice Routes: The History and Practice of Indian Food CROSSLISTING: HIST 15
See under HIST for full description

CHINESE

CHIN S.P. Sustaining Program for Chinese
Students registered for Chinese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Chinese Sustaining Program.
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation.
Prerequisite: Chinese 101.
Meeting time: MTR 9:00-9:50.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.
LANGUAGE FELLOWS

CHIN 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Chinese.

JAPANESE

JAPN S.P. Sustaining Program for Japanese
Students registered for Japanese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Japanese Sustaining Program.
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation.
Prerequisite: Japanese 101.
Meeting time: MTR 9:00-9:50.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.
JINHWA CHANG

JAPN 11 The Samurai in Japanese Film
Some of the finest films ever crafted and celebrated in cinematic history have projected the lives and legends of the samurai. Like the gunfighter and cowboy of the American West, the samurai is an extraordinarily iconic figure, if not, an enduring expression of a distinct Japanese ethos. This course will examine the samurai genre, the formulation of the samurai character, the code of Bushido he lived by, and the multiple roles he has assumed in Japanese filmmaking. Whether as a warrior or loyal retainer to his lord, a symbol of purity of purpose or tragic sacrifice, the samurai has usually been apotheosized as a noble, revered hero. Why? Notwithstanding this image, the films in this course will trace the rise and fall of the samurai class, the tangled legacies of its demise, and ultimate disappearance at the end of the Shogunate era, when Samurai cut their top knots before the turn of the twentieth century, and put up their swords for good.
The focus of this class will be on the films of Kurosawa, Gosha, Kobayashi, Okamoto and Inagaki.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Class attendance and participation. Short papers after completion of films. Final 5-6 page paper.
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 30
METHOD OF SELECTION: Upper classmen will be given priority.
COST PER STUDENT: $25
MEETING TIME: MWF, 1-3 p.m. with additional film screenings to be announced.
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Frank Stewart
SPONSOR: K. Yamamoto

ADJUNCT BIO: From 1990-2004 Frank Stewart was an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law at Hiroshima Shudo University in Hiroshima, Japan. He lived a short distance from Heiwa Koen, the Peace Park, the epi-center of where the A-bomb was detonated.

JAPN 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Japanese.

ASTRONOMY/ASTROPHYSICS

ASTR 19 Hidden Treasures and the Amber Room: Impressionist Art Held Hostage CROSSLISTING: ARTH 18/HIST 19
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course looks at Impressionist art as a route into cultural history, beginning with an in-depth discussion of the Impressionists in Paris at the time of the Franco-Prussian War and after; the initial failure of the movement in France; foreign avant-garde collectors who bought the art, and the art's dislocation during World Wars I and II; and finally, a description of the pillaging of art treasures by the warring nations and the efforts of Allied art professionals such as the Monuments Men to restore the art to their original owners, despite controversy about restitution and the right of return.
Lecture format with weekly reading and class participation expected. Independent research for final paper/presentation. Guided visit to the Clark Art Institute to study Impressionist and Academic art in the collection.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Ten-page paper and class presentation
PREREQUISITES: None, though exposure to art history or modern European history would be useful
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 30
METHOD OF SELECTION: brief essay on reasons for wanting to take the course
COST: under $10 for course packet
MEETING TIME: mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Margo Bowden

ADJUNCT BIO: Margo Bowden is a former independent school history and politics teacher in New York as well as a NYC Teaching Fellow and an adjunct professor at Queens College. She served as a docent at the Guggenheim Museum before becoming a docent at the Clark Art Institute.

ASTR 31 Senior Research
To be taken by students registered for Astronomy 493, 494.

ASPH 31 Senior Research
To be taken by students registered for ASPH 493, 494.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 10 Observational Drawing CROSSLISTING: ARTS 10
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is a drawing and watercolor course for students interested in developing their skills in observing and drawing from nature. Much of the class work will deal with drawing directly from plant forms and specimens from the animal world and to this end we will be using an interesting collection of stuffed mounts and skeletons that belong to the Williams Biology department. We will also spend time in the Morley greenhouse. There will also be an emphasis on the use of watercolor. Beyond the subject matter at hand, assignments will also address and analyze the more formal aspects of drawing and two-dimensional design with outside assignments including mandatory and scheduled visits to the Clark, the WCMA study collection and the Chapin Library of Rare Books.
Evaluation will be based on both the completion of in-class work and outside assignments, with a focus on the depiction of content, level of effort, and development of the work. Evidence of technical and skill development as well as attendance and participation will also be taken into consideration. There will be a considerable amount of scheduled time outside of regular class meetings for additional assignments so be prepared to commit to the necessary amount of time. Exhibition and review of work at the final class meeting is required.
Requirements: ongoing review of work and final exhibition.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Method of selection: seniority and concentration.
Cost: $110.
Meeting time: Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday afternoons--some mornings.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Review of work, attendance and final exhibition
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: Seniority and concentration
COST: $110
MEETING TIME: afternoons
EXPLANATION OF MEETING TIME: Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday afternoons, some mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: John Recco

ADJUNCT BIO: John Recco lives and works in Hoosick, NY and holds an MFA from Columbia University. He has taught at a variety of institutions including Bennington College and Williams. He is the recipient of numerous awards including a Fulbright, fellowships at Yaddo, The Millay Colony, The European Cultural Centre of Delphi, Greece and a NYSCA Individual Artist Grant. His work is included in two recent publications; 100 Boston Painters published by Schiffer Publishing and Galvanized Truth: A Tribute to George Nick, By: Kimberlee C. Alemian.

BIOL 11 Project BioEYES: Teaching 4th Grade about Zebrafish
COURSE DESCRIPTION: BioEYES brings tropical fish to 4th grade classrooms in Williamstown and Greylock Elementary schools, in a science teaching workshop. Elementary school students will breed fish in the classroom, then study their development and pigmentation during one week. Williams students will adapt BioEYES lesson plans to the science curriculum for the schools we visit, work with classroom teachers to introduce concepts in genetics and development, help the 4th grade students in the classroom, and assess elementary student learning. A final eight-page paper describing the goals and outcomes for each grade level is required. No zebrafish experience is necessary; during the first week students will learn to set up fish matings, and learn about embryonic development and the genetics of fish pigmentation as well as practice teaching the 4th grade BioEYES lesson plans with hands-on experiments using living animals. In the subsequent two weeks we will work at the schools, and in the final week, students will write up the assessment data.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: 8 page paper
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12
METHOD OF SELECTION: preference to seniors
COST: $0
MEETING TIME: other; varies depending on needs of schools and laboratory requirements; occasional morning meetings to collect zebrafish
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Jennifer Swoap

ADJUNCT BIO: Jennifer Swoap, an elementary school teacher, currently coordinates Williams Elementary Outreach, where Williams students teach hands-on science lessons at area elementary schools.

BIOL 12 New Orleans-Style Jazz and Street Performance
This course has a focus on making music based on the principles of improvisation and street performance embodied by New Orleans-Style jazz. Typically composed of brass instruments, this course welcomes musicians and performers of all types, from the classically trained to those with no experience who are willing to play washboards, kazoos, and experiment with other forms of sound-making. For when you travel the world after Williams, this course will prepare you to "busk," or make money playing music on the street, where some of the most dynamic forms of jazz and improvisation have been created. The course will include various street performances and culminate in a "gig" at a local music venue.
PREREQUISITES: none
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on class attendance and participation in the final project which will be in the form of a performance.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20.
MEETING TIME: We will meet twice a week for three-hour sessions, with extra band practices to be scheduled in accordance to our needs.
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: ANDY KELLY (akelly21@berkshire.rr.com)
SPONSOR: SWOAP

Andy Kelly, a local Jazz musician and former busker, Williams College Class of '80, now travels the world bridging cultures with music, using American jazz to make peace in the world.

BIOL 13  Introduction to Animal Tracking
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is an introduction to the ancient art and science of animal tracking, and its use for ecological inventory. Participants will deepen their skills as naturalists, their awareness of the natural world, and discover that even the greens at Williams College are abundant with wildlife. Students will have field time in class at Hopkins Forest as well as through independent study at a convenient outdoor location of each student's choosing. Basic concepts of animal tracking, its history and use by indigenous people throughout the world will be discussed through video and slide show. Students are required to create journals and site maps of Hopkins and their personal study areas, including all major features of the landscape, flora and fauna activity. There will be required reading assignments in the field guides for this class as well as a thousand word final research paper on one of the mammals present in their study area.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation a final presentation of their maps and journals, with attention to detail and content and the research paper.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
COST: $75; students are expected to have appropriate outdoor gear for winter conditions.
MEETING TIME: 10 a.m.-2 p.m., twice a week for four hour sessions, primarily in the field. Students are also required to do extensive independent field study, demonstrating observations through journals and site maps.
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: DAN YACOBELLIS (miye_yelo@yahoo.com)
Sponsor: SWOAP

Dan Yacobellis is a local naturalist and wildlife tracker who has explored forest and field for the last 20 years. He teaches courses on wilderness skills and tracking at nature education centers in Massachusetts and New York.

BIOL 14 Biology and Psychology of Food Intake and Taste CROSSLISTING: PSYC 16
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will examine the biological and psychological factors that influence how we consume and experience food. Topics covered will include: sensory experience of various tastes, the role of olfaction, hunger and cravings, and developmental or environmental influences. We will combine class lectures & discussions with kitchen- or lab-based activities that allow students to experience or experiment with tastants and ingredients.
Class will meet for 6 hours a week, split into at least one lab / kitchen session and lectures / discussions. Students will be expected to complete outside readings as well as research and cook or bake for a final project.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on in-class participation, completion of labs, and a final project.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 30
METHOD OF SELECTION: seniority, priority given to biology / psychology / neuroscience majors or concentrators
COST: 20
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: Matt Carter and Mariko Moher

BIOL 26 Opportunities and Challenges: Living and Working with Immigrants and Refugees in Portland, ME CROSSLISTING: SPEC 26
See under SPEC for full description

BIOL 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Biology 493, 494.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 11 Science for Kids CROSSLISTING: SPEC 11
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Are you interested in teaching? Do you enjoy working with kids? Do you like to experiment with new things? Here is a chance for you to do all three! The aim of this Winter Study Project is to design a series of hands-on science workshops for elementary school children and their parents. Working in teams of 2-4, students spend the first two and a half weeks of Winter Study planning the workshops. This involves deciding on a focus for each workshop (based on the interests of the students involved) followed by choosing and designing experiments and presentations that will be suitable for fourth-grade children. On the third weekend of Winter Study (January 24, 25) we bring elementary school kids with their parents to Williams to participate in the workshops.
You get a chance to see what goes into planning classroom demonstrations as well as a sense of what it's like to actually give a presentation. You find that kids at this age are great fun to work with because they are interested in just about everything and their enthusiasm is infectious. You also give the kids and their parents a chance to actually do some fun hands-on science experiments that they may not have seen before, and you are able to explain simple scientific concepts to them in a manner that won't be intimidating. It is a rewarding experience for all involved.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation is based on participation in planning and running the workshops. Each group is expected to prepare a handout with descriptions of the experiments for the kids, parents, and teachers.
PREREQUISITES: No prerequisites; you need not be a science major; all that is needed is enthusiasm.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 25
METHOD OF SELECTION: seniors, juniors, sophomores
COST: None
MEETING TIME: other; classes meet three times a week for approximately three hours each session. The workshop is run on the third weekend of Winter Study (January 24, 25) and attendance from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. is mandatory that weekend. There are also one or two brief meetings held in the fall term for preliminary planning.
INSTRUCTOR: Jimmy Blair

CHEM 12 The Role of Epidemiology in Public Health and Evidence-Based Medicine CROSSLISTING: ANTH 14
See under ANTH for full description

CHEM 13 Ultimate Wellness: Concepts For a Happy Healthy Life
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course provides an opportunity to drastically improve your life by introducing concepts that can start making a difference in the way you feel today! We will approach nutrition, lifestyle, and happiness from a holistic perspective. Students will learn how to tune out mixed media messages and look within to find ultimate health and wellness.
TOPICS INCLUDE:
Ayurveda
Cleansing
Preventative medicine
Yoga and meditation
Food intolerance awareness
Healthy eating and meal planning
Deconstructing cravings and overcoming sugar addiction
Finding your happiness
Evaluation will be based on completion of assignments, class participation, reflective 10-page paper or equivalent creative project, and final presentation that demonstrates a level of personal growth. After signing up for this course please email Nicole at nicole@zentreewellness.com with a brief statement describing your interest in the course and what you hope to achieve in it. In the event of over-subscription, these statements will be used in the selection process.
We will meet twice a week for three-hour sessions as a group.
There will be several books and a DVD required for this class
*Course will include three individual sessions. An initial health assessment and two additional sessions designed to personalize the course and assist the student in applying the learned techniques.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Final project and presentation
PREREQUISITES: No
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: After signing up for this course please email Nicole at nicole@zentreewellness.com with a brief statement describing your interest in the course and what you hope to achieve in it. In the event of over-subscription, these statements will be used in the selection process.
COST: $100 or less
MEETING TIME: mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Nicole Anagnos

ADJUNCT BIO: Nicole Anagnos is a health & nutrition coach and founder and director of Zen Tree Wellness in Williamstown. She also holds a masters degree in education.

The WSP Committee has asked that you provide a reading list and also more details in the course description. They also ask that you require students to do some written work in addition to the final project.

CHEM 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships CROSSLISTING: PSYC 14/SPEC 14
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Looking back on past loves and crushes, have you ever wondered "What on earth was I thinking?!" or "Why do I keep picking the wrong guys/girls for me?" While intense sexual attraction or urges may first call the shots, people who take the time to carefully choose and build caring, mutual relationships tend to be happier, healthier and more successful in their lives than those who don't. So how do we get there from here and make sense of all this? Well, no matter where you are on the dating spectrum, this self-exploration and relationship-skill-building course is for you if you are ready to learn how to follow your heart AND your mind to co-create a fulfilling relationship within the vortex of the "hook up" culture. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, "How to Avoid Falling In Love with A Jerk," and "Keeping the Love You Find" curricula will guide this introspective, interactive relationship mastery course through meaningful discussions and exercises that explore the common issues, dirty fighting tactics, subconscious directives and emotional allergies that often sabotage relationships. Experiential exercises, personal experiences and journaling will also give you the opportunity to practice effective communication and conflict resolution skills that honor the constructive use of differences and promote intimacy.
Evaluation is based on 8 hours of attendance per week, class participation, MBTI inventory completion, 20-hours per week of assigned readings, journaling, assignments, 1:1 consultations, and final 10-page reflective paper/event proposal and project. Email your statement of interest to ssmith@williams.edu if you are curious about relationships, ready and willing to BE the change, delve into personal growth and take your relationships to the next level.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Requirements: attendance, class participation, reading, journaling, 1:1 meetings with instructor, assignments and 10-page final paper/project.
PREREQUISITES: statement of interest. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference will be based on meaningful statement of interest.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: meaningful statement of interest
COST: $100
MEETING TIME: TBA
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Rachelle Smith

ADJUNCT BIO: Rachelle Smith, MSW, is a holistic, strengths-based clinical social worker, consultant, educator, and mentor bridging relationships, wellness and energy psychology.

CHEM 16 Glass and Glassblowing CROSSLISTING: ARTS 16
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course provides an introduction to both a theoretical consideration of the glassy state of matter and the practical manipulation of glass. We do flameworking with hand torches for at least 12 hours per week. While no previous experience is required, students with patience, good hand-eye coordination, and creative imagination will find the course most rewarding. The class is open to both artistically and scientifically oriented students.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation is based on class participation, exhibition of glass projects, a 10-page paper, and a presentation to the class.
PREREQUISITES: No prerequisites
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 10
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference is given to juniors, sophomores, and those who express the most and earliest interest and enthusiasm by e-mail to Professor Thoman.
COST: $75 for supplies
MEETING TIME: other
EXPLANATION OF MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m. to noon, M-F.
INSTRUCTOR: Jay Thoman

CHEM 18 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry
COURSE DESCRIPTION: An independent experimental project in biochemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in biochemistry. Biochemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the molecular details of living systems including the interaction of biologically important molecules. In the Chemistry Department, studies are underway to investigate the structure/function relationship of proteins, the interaction between proteins and RNA and DNA, and the molecular basis of bacterial gene regulation.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: A 10-page written report is required.
PREREQUISITES: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
METHOD OF SELECTION:
COST: None
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Amy Gehring, Becky Taurog

CHEM 20 Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry
COURSE DESCRIPTION: An independent experimental project in inorganic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in inorganic chemistry. Opportunities for research in inorganic chemistry at Williams include (I) the design and development of biorenewable material-based sensors and adsorbents for environmental imaging of pollutants and (2) luminescent lanthanide ion (Ln(III)) complexes incorporating gemini surfactants for highly penetrating and efficient cellular imaging. Students will be guided through the fundamentals of project planning, record keeping, scientific writing, and presentation. The interdisciplinary nature of the research will expose students to a variety of areas including synthetic inorganic and organic chemistry for preparing Ln(III) complexes, analytical chemistry and spectroscopy in the characterization of all new materials, physical chemistry in the rationalization of the photophysical properties of the Ln(III) complexes, and applied chemistry through the development of a biorenewable platform for the prepared molecular sensors.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: A 10-page written report is required.
PREREQUISITES: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
METHOD OF SELECTION:
COST: None
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Patrick Barber

CHEM 24 Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry
COURSE DESCRIPTION: An independent experimental project in physical chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in physical chemistry. Current research projects in the Department include computer modeling of non-linear, chaotic chemical and biochemical systems, molecular modeling of water clusters, laser spectroscopy of chlorofluorocarbon substitutes, and observing the dynamics in glasses using single molecule spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: A 10-page written report is required.
PREREQUISITES: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
METHOD OF SELECTION:
COST: None
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Enrique Peacock-Lopez and Jay Thoman

CHEM 31 Senior Research and Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Chemistry 493, 494.

CLASSICS

CLAS 11 Alexander the Great CROSSLISTING: HIST 11
COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this course we will be exploring the many different Alexanders that have existed in literature, myth, art for over two millennia, and in film and popular culture more recently. In different places and ages Alexander the Great has been the ideal warrior-king; the pious leader whose exploits serve God; the brilliant but vulnerable boy-king corrupted by sudden wealth and power; the philosopher-king who debated the sages of India or lived a life of Stoic virtues; the isolated, out-of-touch mad leader; the liberator of the oppressed; the lonely romantic seeker; the tyrannical despot. Ancient accounts of his life evolved into mythologies for the new world he had created with his conquests. These tales circulated throughout Greece, North Africa, the Near East and India, and later by way of Rome throughout the western world, growing into separate and distinct traditions as each culture made Alexander its own.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Two 2-page analyses of selected course materials, an oral presentation, and a final 5-7-page paper, in addition to preparation for and participation in class.
PREREQUISITES: No prerequisites other than an interest in Alexander and his multiform legacy.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT:
METHOD OF SELECTION: If the course is oversubscribed, preference will be given to majors in Classics, History, Comparative Literature, and Art History.
COST: $75
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: Kerry Christensen

CLAS 14 Plato's Symposium and Its Afterlife CROSSLISTING: COMP 14/PHIL 14/WGSS 14
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Plato's Symposium ostensibly commemorates a gathering held at the home of the tragic poet Agathon of Athens, in 416 BCE, whose participants dedicate their evening to delivering speeches in praise of love (eros). This dialogue is among Plato's most widely read, and its influence has ranged far beyond philosophy. We will read the Symposium in translation, with close attention to is dramatic setting, its remarkable narrative structure, and the content of each character's speech, as well as the conversations that come between. Our examination of Plato's text will be interwoven with consideration of selected receptions of and reactions to the Symposium. These may include texts from later antiquity to the Renaissance to modernity (e.g., Philo, Plotinus, Ficino, Shelley, Woolf, Mann, Forster, Eliot, Mishima) as well as visual and cinematic takes on aspects of Plato's work, ranging from Rubens to Hedwig and the Angry Inch. We will also consider a recent evocation of the Symposium in the American courts (Romer v. Evans, 882 P. 2d 1335 Colorado Supreme Court, 1994).
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on contributions to class discussion including oral reports, several very short essays, and a final paper or project.
PREREQUISITES: No prerequisites.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 10
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference given to majors and intended majors in Classics, Comparative Literature, Philosophy, and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies.
COST: $30.00 (books + coursepack)
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Amanda Wilcox

CLAS 31 Senior Thesis
May be taken by students registered for Classics 493, 494.

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

COMP 11 Historical Book Binding
COURSE DESCRIPTION: As part of the Book Unbound Initiative, this course will explore the craft, practice, and history of bookbinding through the making of three historic models. In addition to outside readings and in-class discussion, we will visit Chapin Library to examine relevant objects in their collection.
We will start with one of the earliest examples of the codex structure from the Nag Hammadi Library, which was uncovered in Egypt and dates to 350 AD. Then we'll move to a wooden board Ethiopian-style binding, an ancient account book structure still in use in Ethiopia today. And finally, we'll make a limp long stitch binding, which was commonly used as a type of temporary structure for manuscripts as they moved from printer to binder. While the course will focus on the mastery of techniques and refinement of hand-skills, we will discuss how these historic practices can be applied today in conjunction with experimental materials and content. Through making, we will gain insight into the materiality of the book and its place in history and society.
Students should be willing to work in the studio a minimum of twenty hours a week.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Students will be evaluated by the care and quality of their craftsmanship and their effort in the studio.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12
METHOD OF SELECTION: Relevance to other studies and work
COST: $115
MEETING TIME: TBA; probably evenings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Kate Barber
SPONSOR: Christopher Nugent

ADJUNCT BIO: Kate Barber has an MFA in Book Arts from the University of Alabama. Her work spans from making historical full leather bindings to creating unique artist's books.

COMP 12 Film Propaganda CROSSLISTING: RUSS 12
See under RUSS for full description

COMP 14 Plato's Symposium and Its Afterlife CROSSLISTING: CLAS 14/PHIL 14/WGSS 14
See under CLAS for full description

COMP 23 Adorno's Aesthetic Theory CROSSLISTING: ENGL 23
See under ENGL for full description

COMP 25 Transnational Itineraries CROSSLISTING: ARAB 25/RLSP 25
See under ARAB for full description

COMP 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Comparative Literature 493, 494.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CSCI 12 Stained Glass Tiling
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course combines medieval craftsmanship with contemporary geometry. Each student will build a piece of stained glass using colored glass tiles that fit together to form two or three-dimensional tiling patterns. Students will learn how to cut glass; to paint and print on glass with kiln-fired enamels; and to assemble and solder a stained glass window. Assignments require both artistic decision-making and practical problem-solving in figuring out ways to support, connect and assemble the tiles into a unique work of art. Instructional sessions on the use of tools and safe handling of materials are included where necessary.
Time commitment: Instruction and supervised workshop sessions from 10am - 1pm Monday to Friday. Students will be required to work approximately fifteen additional hours per week on their own time.
The course includes a field trip to see hand-painted stained glass in North Adams and southern Vermont (mandatory). Exhibition of projects on the last day of Winter Study is mandatory.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on final project plus a 10 page written paper on some aspect of stained glass or tiling patterns. Overall attendance, effort, creativity and teamwork whilst mounting final exhibition will also be taken into account.
PREREQUISITES: No prerequisites. Previous experience in art or geometry is not necessary, however, ideal applicants will have an interest in art or mathematics, patience and good hand skills.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 10
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference to seniors and those who express an early or specific interest.
COST: $250 for materials, kiln firings, tools and art supplies.
MEETING TIME: Monday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Debora Coombs

ADJUNCT BIO: Debora Coombs' stained glass windows are exhibited and commissioned internationally. She is a Fellow of the British Society of Master Glass Painters with a Masters degree from London's Royal College of Art and 35 years of experience in the design, fabrication and teaching of stained glass. Contact: (802) 423-5640 debora@coombscriddle.com. Photos: http://www.coombscriddle.com and http://coombscriddle.wordpress.com

CSCI 13 Designing for People CROSSLISTING: PSYC 13
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Many technologically-innovative and aesthetically-beautiful products fail because they are not sensitive to the attitudes and behaviors of the humans who interact with them. The field of Human Factors combines aspects of psychology and sociology with information technology, education, architecture, and physiology, to design objects and information that are easy for people to learn and easy for people to use. The course will provide students with a theoretical framework for analyzing ease-of-learning and ease-of-use, as well as practical knowledge of a variety of human factors testing methodologies. The course will examine usability of a wide variety of designed objects, including buildings, publications, websites, software applications, and consumer electronics gadgets. Students will demonstrate their understanding of human factors theory through a short paper and participation in class discussion. Students identify a usability problem and design a solution which they will evaluate by heuristic analysis and a usability test with 8-10 human test subjects. Findings will be presented to the class. Books to be purchased: The Design of Everyday Things by Donald Norman and The Inmates are Running the Asylum by Alan Cooper. Students will also be assigned additional readings.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Five-page paper on usability theory, and presentation of usability design and testing project.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: Instructor seeks a diverse group of students with interests in design, psychology, and human-computer interaction
COST: $36
MEETING TIME: afternoons
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Rich Cohen `82

ADJUNCT BIO: Rich Cohen `82 has designed communications, social networking and education applications used by over 100 million people and has conducted usability research on four continents.

CSCI 23 Introduction to Research and Development in Computing
COURSE DESCRIPTION: An independent project is completed in collaboration with a member of the Computer Science Department. The projects undertaken will either involve the exploration of a research topic related to the faculty member's work or the implementation of a software system that will extend the students design and implementation skills. It is expected that the student will spend 20 hours per week working on the project. At the completion of the project, each student will submit a 10-page written report or the software developed together with appropriate documentation of its behavior and design. In addition, students will be expected to give a short presentation or demonstration of their work. Students must consult with the instructor before the beginning of the Winter Study registration period to determine details of projects that might be undertaken.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Final paper and presentation/demonstration
PREREQUISITES: Permission of instructor
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: none
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference given to sophomores and juniors
COST: $0
MEETING TIME: TBA
EXPLANATION OF MEETING TIME: TBD
INSTRUCTOR: Williams Lenhart

CSCI 31 Senior Honor Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Computer Science 493-494.

CONTRACT MAJOR

DANCE

DANC 12 Intermediate/Advanced Ballet Technique and Rehearsal
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Intermediate/Advanced level ballet students will have a ballet technique class that will include pointe work for women and extra work on jumps and turns for men. A rehearsal will follow in which an original short ballet will be created on eligible, participating students. The class will meet in the studio three times per week, for three hours each meeting. Students will be expected to review and rehearse material on their own in preparation for the next meeting. The resulting work will be shown in the Dance Department's informal Winter Study showing during the last week of Winter Study.
Students who wish to take course for PE credit only must take the technique portion of the class (one-and-a-half hours) a minimum of two times per week.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation is based on quality of participation and progress, and final performance.
PREREQUISITES: At least three years of prior ballet training. Students must contact instructor prior to signing up for permission to join.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: Students currently enrolled in dance department ensembles or classes will be given priority.
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: Janine Parker

ECONOMICS

ECON 10 Introduction to Financial Reporting and Statement Analysis
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course covers the concepts and methods underlying financial statements and the tools to analyze financial statements effectively as part of the process of evaluating a company's strategic and operating decisions in the context of its industry. This process is neither superficial nor one-dimensional, as it requires a thorough understanding of accounting principles and frameworks and the ability to identify the effects of management decisions on financial statements and ratios. Using topical exercises and problems based on current corporate annual reports, we will walk through the fundamentals of financial accounting and financial statements first and then examine the methods and disclosure requirements for specific transactions that most companies undertake. For example, what are the consequences of Facebook's acquisition of WhatsApp? Or of Verizon's decision to issue up to $50 billion in bonds? In pairs, students will complete a project analyzing the current financial statements and ratios of a public company and assess its profitability and risk, focusing on the connections between the company's strategic choices and its financial results.
We will meet as a group for 6 hours a week for the first three weeks, and I will meet with project pairs separately. The last week will be devoted to completion of the projects.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on the two-person project culminating in a presentation and short paper, as well as participation in class discussions.
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 30
METHOD OF SELECTION: Lottery
COST: $150 (estimated) for textbook
MEETING TIME: mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Virginia Soybel '11

ADJUNCT BIO: Ginny Soybel teaches financial accounting and financial statement analysis in the graduate, undergraduate and executive education programs at Babson College. She earned her BA at Williams in 2011 where she majored in History and American Civilization, and an MBA and PhD at Columbia University. Before joining the Babson College faculty, she taught at the Amos Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College.

ECON 11 Public Speaking
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will help students become effective and organized public speakers, whether public speaking means giving a class presentation, participating in a debate, or giving a formal speech before a large audience. We will primarily use extemporaneous and prepared class presentations as a means of learning this skill, but we will also study the great American speeches and presidential debates of the twentieth century for further insights into persuasive public speaking techniques. The class will provide a supportive environment to help each student create his or her own public speaking style that is comfortable, confident, and conversational. We will also focus on organizational techniques, handling visual aids effectively, eye contact and body language. Finally, receiving feedback and providing constructive criticism to other students in the class will be an important part of the course.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on in-class presentations, class participation, and a 10-page written critique of the student's own videotaped presentations.
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 10
METHOD OF SELECTION: Priority will be based on written statement of interest.
COST: $25
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: David Love

ECON 12 Introduction to For Profit and Nonprofit Organizations
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course uses case study method to expose students to concepts and techniques of business management. Topics include marketing, strategy, finance, operations, organizational structure, and human relations. Most of the cases taught are published by Harvard Business School and include:
Marketing:
Organic Growth at Walmart
Fisher Price Toys
Strategic Planning:
Marvel Enterprises
Nantucket Nectars
Strategy and Public Relations:
Drug Testing in Nigeria -- Pfizer
LiveStrong
Operations:
Oakland A's
Logistics and HR:
Dabbawalla
Language and Globalization: Rakuten
Finance:
Manning Electronics
A 2-3 page summary of each case is required no later than one week after discussion of the case.
We will meet 3 times a week for 2 hours each session.
Enrollment is limited to 15.
Meeting times: afternoons
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on case summary grades (50%) and class participation (50%).
PREREQUISITES: n/a
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: lottery
COST: $15. All case materials will be provided.
MEETING TIME: afternoons
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Elizabeth Gilbert-Bono

ADJUNCT BIO: Elizabeth Gilbert-Bono, a Lecturer at Brown University and Marketing Consultant for Too Faced, Inc, has a BA from Brown University and MBA from Harvard Business School. She has held VP -- Marketing positions at Houghton Mifflin Co. and LEGO Inc. She lives in Wellesley, MA and has three children (the second, Bryson, is a sophomore at Williams).

ECON 13 Tools for Evaluating New Business Ideas
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Tools for Evaluating a New Business Idea is based on the fact that start-up businesses are temporary organizations in search of a scalable, profitable business model. Start-ups have to continually pivot as they discover what customers really want. This course teaches the Business Model Canvas which is a structured approach to defining and continually testing the assumptions behind the business idea. Class participants will work in groups around a business idea and work with real customers and others to test their hypotheses. Business owners will present their own experiences starting their businesses and adapting to the market as they discovered their own assumptions about their customers and the market were wrong. The aim is to understand the market and the customer and determine whether a market opportunity exists and, if it does, what the company needs to do and be to meet the needs of customers.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation is based on class participation, written assignments, and the final group presentation
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 16
METHOD OF SELECTION: The first ones to choose will have preference, in later rounds, more senior students have preference
COST: $40
MEETING TIME: afternoons
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Steven Fogel

ADJUNCT BIO: I have worked with start-up businesses for over 30 years and have helped over 1,000 people start businesses. I work with students competing in the business plan competition.

ECON 14 Hospitality Real Estate Development/ Business Methodology for Entrepreneurs
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the methodology required to successfully develop a new business in the hospitality /commercial real estate sector. By utilizing a real world scenario the students will be encouraged to act as entrepreneurs who will take advantage of the opportunity to create a new hotel. The class will be divided into two teams whose task will be to develop a business plan for either a new hotel project, or the redevelopment of an existing hotel. The simulation will use Williamstown as the locale for the new businesses. The objective of the two teams (or 4 teams depending on class size) will be to create a concept and business plan for their assigned hotel project. The plans will be presented in a final wrap session and discussion. As a final result the class will decide on which plan they would consider as the best project to pursue.
Course instruction will include discussion and application of important business principles including, due diligence practices, pro forma development, market share evaluations, project financing, branding decisions, business positioning, competition analysis, franchising structures, profit and loss analysis, marketing techniques( public relations, advertising, direct sales, social media etc.) and management skills.
It is expected that the class will meet in 3 sessions per week that will be 2 hours in length. The students will be required to work as teams outside the classroom to work on the development of their plan and presentation. They will also need to conduct research into market conditions and analysis of competition factors.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Presentation of a business plan that will be created by each of the student development teams
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 30
METHOD OF SELECTION: Econ majors will be given priority
COST: Minimal if any
MEETING TIME: mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Bernie English

ADJUNCT BIO: My background experience is based about 35 years of experience in hotel management and hospitality real estate development projects. Working with partners we created new hotel projects of all varieties in cities including Washington DC, Philadelphia, Chicago, Denver, Atlanta and several other smaller locales. The Rittenhouse Hotel, Hotel George, Hotel Derek and the Sheraton Atlanta represent a few of the most notable projects developed by my partners and me. My wife and I are Berkshire County natives and we currently reside in Williamstown having returned home after living in a variety of different major metropolitan areas of the country.

ECON 15 Introduction to Indian Cinema
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Though the Indian film industry is the world's most prolific, American audiences have little exposure to it. This course provides an introduction, focusing on Hindi cinema, and showing how its themes have evolved in response to changes in Indian society. In particular, we will examine ways in which Hindi films reflect the threats perceived by the nation, and the resolutions attempted. We will also compare Hindi cinema's norms and conventions to those used by Hollywood.
We will meet twice a week to watch the films (a total of seven) and once a week for discussion. Students will write a 2 page response to each film. Reading will consist of articles from film journals like Screen and Jump Cut.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Students will write a two-page response paper to each film.
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 10
COST: $25 for readings
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: Anand Swamy

ECON 16 Mechanisms of Arbitrage
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Arbitrage is a central concept of economics. This course is an introduction to mechanisms in markets which cause arbitrage to occur, as well as a discussion of factors which limit arbitrage, particularly when mechanisms counteract others. The emphasis will be on markets in public instruments and the firms which issue them, as well as on markets e.g. commodities, which overlap with those in public securities. Emphasis will be on distortions caused by agency issues, regulations, venues and intellectual "bucketing". The processes by which these issues are at least partially resolved in current markets will be emphasized, although there will be historical readings and backgrounds in market mechanisms.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: There will be an average of 100 pages of reading per class provided by the instructor and there will be an expectation of 10-12 pages of papers, typically as 1- to 2-page papers for class.
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 25
METHOD OF SELECTION: Priority in inverse order of years remaining to graduation
COST: $0
MEETING TIME: afternoons
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Paul Isaac

ADJUNCT BIO: Paul Isaac '72 is manager of Arbiter Partners Capital Management LLC, a money management firm based in New York City. He was formerly Chief Investment Officer at Cadogan Management LLCC, a hedge fund of funds firm, and a partner at Mabon Securities and its predecessor firm Mabon Nugent & Co. He has 40 years of investment management experience. He currently serves on the Visiting Committee of the Center for Development Economics. An extended interview for background purposes can be found at: http://www4.gsb.columbia.edu/filemgr?&file_id=7222906 .

ECON 17 Viewing U.S. Economic History through the Visual Arts
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will explore topics and events in U.S. economic history through their portrayals in various visual artistic media such as photography, painting, and film. Each session will be dedicated to a particular media and a specific topic in American economic history. Topics may include early industrial development, slavery, organized labor, prohibition, the Great Depression, the post-war golden era, the Reagan era, and the tech boom of the 1990s. Assigned readings for each class session will motivate our discussion of visual artwork related to that day's topic. For example, one session will confront readings on living conditions under slavery and then watch the film 12 Years A Slave to compare and contrast the academic studies with the visual depiction of the institution. In another session, we will read about the New Deal as a response to the Great Depression, and then, in class, we will study the WPA photography held by WCMA. The class will meet three times per week for approximately 2 hours each. In small groups, the students will be required to initiate each class's discussion of a particular visual media and economic historical topic. The final paper assignment will ask students to study how a specific piece of visual artwork sheds light on our understanding of American economic history.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: 6-8 page paper; in-class presentation; participation in class discussions.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 25
METHOD OF SELECTION: If overenrolled, preference will be given to actual or potential economics, history, or political economy majors.
COST: 40 (reading packet)
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Steven Nafziger

ECON 18 The Practice and Empirics of Monetary Policy in Emerging and Developing Economies
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is an introduction to the empirical analysis of practical macroeconomic policy issues, particularly those having to do with monetary policy. One objective is to provide an exposure to a few of the relevant econometric techniques. A second is to supply the background necessary for the critical evaluation of applied macroeconomic research. Third, with a final paper as the main requirement, the course will furnish an opportunity to practice writing about economic issues.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: 12-page paper
PREREQUISITES: Econ 505
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 10
METHOD OF SELECTION: Recommendation of Econ 505 instructor
COST: $0
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Kenneth Kuttner

ECON 19 Conducting Social Science Research at the American Institute for Economic Research CROSSLISTING: ANSO 19
See under ANSO for full description

ECON 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) CROSSLISTING: POEC 22/WGSS 22
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course examines tax policy towards low-income families in the United States, and has the following three objectives: 1) For students to understand the shift of redistributive policy in the United States from income support through the transfer system (Aid to Families with Dependent Children/Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) towards support of working individuals through the tax system (primarily the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC); 2) For students to understand the challenges that low income individuals have "making ends meet" and to understand the role that the EITC has played in increasing the standard of living of the working poor; and 3) To enable students to understand the tax code well enough to prepare simple income tax returns, including those for filers claiming the EITC. Students will be trained by the IRS to prepare income tax returns for low-income individuals and families. At the end of the term, students will use their newly acquired expertise to help individuals and families in Berkshire County prepare and file their returns. Class meetings will involve a mixture of discussion of assigned readings, and exercises that help develop tax preparation skills and understanding of poverty. Assignments outside of class include: a variety of short readings on tax policy, the challenges of living in poverty in the U.S., and public policies that address these challenges; completion of an online course in IRS VITA training; and staffing approximately six hours of tax preparation assistance during the final week of winter term. The volunteer tax preparation sessions take place in North Adams and are usually Wednesday and Thursday evenings during the final week of Winter Study, and then Thursday evenings and Saturday mornings after that.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation is based on the results of the IRS certification test, students' work as tax preparers, and a ten-page analytical and reflective essay.
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 14
METHOD OF SELECTION: If overenrolled, students will be selected based on a written statement of interest.
COST: Cost: $100 for texts and coursepack.
MEETING TIME: mornings, with possible occasional afternoon sessions to accommodate visiting speakers, plus the volunteer tax preparation sessions discussed in the course description.
INSTRUCTOR: Lucie Schmidt

ECON 23 Introduction to the Economics, Geography and Appreciation of Wine
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course provides an introduction to the economics, geography and appreciation of wine. We will be studying the economics and geography of wine production, and will also learn to identify, understand and appreciate the major wine types of the world. The course will involve lectures, outside readings, and in-class wine tastings. We will focus primarily on the Old World wine styles and regions of France, Italy, Germany, Austria, Spain and Portugal. The course has been expanded to also cover some New World wine regions, including California, Oregon, Chile, Argentina, South Africa, New Zealand and Australia.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluations will be based on short quizzes, including blind tastings, and either an oral presentation or 10-page paper at the conclusion of the course.
PREREQUISITES: Students must be 21 years old on or before January 5, 2015.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 10
METHOD OF SELECTION: If overenrolled, selection will be on the basis of a mix of academic record and diversity of backgrounds and interests.
COST: approximately $275.00 in the form of a course fee, to be used for the cost of wine purchases for the course
MEETING TIME: evenings, two nights a week
INSTRUCTOR: Peter Pedroni

ECON 25 Socio-economic Impact of 20 Years of Democracy in South Africa CROSSLISTING: POEC 25/PSCI 25
COURSE DESCRIPTION: South Africa remains a country of contrasts: international polls rank Cape Town as one of the world's three most pleasant cities, yet minutes from the central business district vast informal settlements house some of Africa's poorest people. This travel course will examine the impact of twenty years of democracy on the social and economic lives of South Africans. The newly elected government in 1994 inherited a challenging legacy of historical deprivation and inequity. Twenty years later, remarkable progress in many socio-economic areas contrasts with persistent challenges--particularly youth unemployment. This course will explore the impact of government policies and programs tackling poverty and unemployment and investigate how such a skewed distribution of resources has persisted, and what government policies have succeeded in redressing. Meetings -with policy-makers and community activists, with teachers and labor leaders, with economic researchers and social workers, with public health advocates and bankers-will provide insight into the historical and structural causes of the extreme inequality that still characterizes South Africa's society, and the government interventions that have succeeded in redressing past imbalances and inequities while promoting pro-poor economic growth and inclusive development. The itinerary will focus on Cape Town and rural areas within the Western Cape province. First-hand experience combined with educational presentations and discussions will illuminate the challenges and opportunities policy-makers have faced and document the progress achieved during South Africa's first twenty years tackling the persistent legacy of apartheid. Students will receive a reading package to provide background and analysis of South Africa's socio-economic context and will write a ten-page paper analyzing the impact of one of South Africa's social or economic policies. Students will present the results of their work back at Williams in the final week of the WSP.
PREREQUISITES: none
METHOD OF EVALUATION: 10 page paper and final presentation
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12 (or other as recommended)
METHOD OF SELECTION: by essay based on expressed student interest
COST: $3485
ITINERARY: Introductory sessions: January 5-7 Depart USA: January 8 Arrive Cape Town, in-country orientation: January 9
Meetings: January 10-11
Departure to rural Western Cape: January 12 Meetings in Mossel Bay and Knysna: January 13 Rural Western Cape visits: January 14-15 Return to Cape Town: January 16 Meetings in Cape Town: January 17-19 Depart for USA: January 20 Arrival USA: January 21 Student presentations: January 26-28

ECON 27 Sustainable Business Strategies CROSSLISTING: ENVI 18
See under ENVI for full description

ECON 51 Practical Tools for Development Economists
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This class is designed to fill the gaps between real world constraints and the research frontier. Often government economists need answers to policy questions in a matter of hours or days instead of the months or years necessary to build a cutting edge research model. This class will stay away from complex econometrics. All of the techniques will be implemented in Excel. This class is aimed at improving your job performance immediately. The curriculum is based on suggestions from CDE alumni. The class has three main parts: advanced Excel/data techniques, IMF FPP Analysis, and a writing component. Undergraduates taking this class do not need to complete the first half of the writing component.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Two 10-page papers, 12 homework assignments
PREREQUISITES: ECON 110 and ECON 120
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: The professor will select if overenrolled: Priority given to CDE students, then ECON majors, and then others.
COST PER STUDENT: 0
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: Michael Rolleigh

ECON 52 Micro-Simulation Modeling for Ex Ante Policy Analysis
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Micro-simulation modeling provides one of the most powerful tools for ex ante evidence-based analysis of economic and social policy interventions. Rooted in representative household surveys of a country's population, the models provide a picture of poverty, employment, consumption and income levels throughout the country. A micro-simulation model enables researchers to investigate the impact of existing economic and social policy interventions (such as tax and public benefit interventions) on income levels, poverty, inequality and other outcomes. In addition, researchers are able to simulate the impact and estimate the cost of new policy interventions.
During this course, students will learn to apply these methods to analyze public policies and interpret the findings. The course examines measurement issues, analytical tools and their application to household survey data for a range of developing countries. The course also links the outcomes of the analysis with the challenges of policy implementation, exploring how the political environment and/or institutional setting may result in the implementation of second-best options. This is a hands-on modeling course, and students will build a micro-simulation model for a country of their choice and use this model in completing the course requirements. The course will employ Excel, Stata and advanced micro-simulation packages. The final requirement for the course is a policy paper that provides students with an opportunity to write accessible prose that communicates the methodology adopted and the key lessons of the analysis.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: exercises, presentation, policy papers
PREREQUISITES:
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION:
COST: $0
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Michael Samson

ECON 30 Honors Project
The "Specialization Route" to the degree with Honors in Economics requires that each candidate take an Honors Winter Study Project in January of their senior year. Students who wish to begin their honors work in January should submit a detailed proposal. Decisions on admission to the Honors WSP will be made in the fall. Information on the procedures will be mailed to senior majors in economics early in the fall semester.
Seniors who wish to apply for admission to the Honors WSP and thereby to the Honors Program should register for this WSP as their first choice.
Some seniors will have begun honors work in the fall and wish to complete it in the WSP. They will be admitted to the WSP if they have made satisfactory progress. They should register for this WSP as their first choice.

ECON 31 Honors Thesis
To be taken by students participating in year-long thesis research (ECON 493-W31-494).

ENGLISH

ENGL 10 Proust: The Guermantes Way and Sodom and Gomorrah
COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this course we will read the two central novels from Marcel Proust's sequence In Search of Lost Time: The Guermantes Way (1920-21) and Sodom and Gomorrah (1921-22). Proust's fiction is usually encountered through Swann's Way, the meditative portrait of the artist's childhood and early adolescence, which scrutinizes the nature of memory, art, and desire. But in these two novels, the young adult narrator enters the more dazzling world of the artistic and aristocratic salons of turn-of-the-century Paris, which he anatomizes with avid and satirical eye. We will discuss social maneuvering; monetary and cultural wealth; the anti-Semitic schisms in high society and the French military precipitated by the Dreyfus crisis; disruptions of class and social mores at the advent of a modern technological age; and the losses, scandals, and disorienting fulfillments that attend obsessional love and multiple forms of sexual desire. Three class meetings, reading assignments, and writing will amount to about 20 hours per week.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Three 3- to 4-page class reports.
PREREQUISITES: None.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference to students with a literary-studies major (e.g., English, COMP, French).
COST: $35
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: Stephen Tifft

ENGL 11 How to Write for Magazines (and Why Anybody Would Want To)
COURSE DESCRIPTION: A course about the nature of magazine feature writing. The course will begin with readings that survey the history of feature writing in the 20th century, starting with the work of investigative journalists for McClure's in the early 1900's, continuing through the glory days of The New Yorker and Esquire in mid-century, and ending with contemporary writers at a variety of print and online venues. The main focus of the course, however, will be a practical guide to reporting and writing for print magazines, and a discussion of how and why print magazine journalism still matters in an increasingly virtual media world. Students will learn about the process of making contacts with editors, pitching stories, reporting them, and editing them for publication, in four main genres: personal essays, profiles, reported features, and investigative stories. (Weekly readings in all four genres will be assigned.) As final projects, each student will complete a full story, and those who wish to pitch a story to an actual magazine will receive guidance through that process.
Requirements: class participation, at least two one-on-one meetings outside of class, and one story of a minimum of 15 pages. Attendance at a handful of film screenings may also be required.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: 15-page paper
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: letter describing reasons for wanting to take the course, and one writing sample
COST: $150
MEETING TIME: afternoons
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Michael Joseph Gross

ADJUNCT BIO: Michael Joseph Gross (Williams '93) is a contributing editor at Vanity Fair, where he writes about topics including politics, crime, technology, and national security. After attending Princeton Theological Seminary and working as a political speech writer, he began writing freelance for The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic, The Nation, Elle, GQ, Out, and many other magazines and newspapers. Starstruck: When a Fan Gets Close to Fame, his book about relationships between celebrities and their admirers, was published by Bloomsbury USA.

ENGL 12 Listening to Strangers
This is a workshop in making audio documentaries. Students will learn basic interview, audio recording, and editing techniques. Our focus will be in learning how to capture one or two of the manifold stories circulating invisibly around us, through the process of interviewing strangers about their lives.
Course requirements include five hours of class meetings, three technical workshops, and four hours of outside listening and reading per week. Investigating stories, interviewing subjects, and editing stories will also require ten to twelve hours weekly. Students will be required to participate in a final listening session in which we will share finished projects.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Class performance, submission of a 5-10 minute final audio documentary, participation in final listening session
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: ten
METHOD OF SELECTION: on the basis of short written expressions of interest and experience in related fields (creative writing, video production, journalism
COST: $75
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: Shawn Rosenheim

ENGL 13 The Great Asian American Novel CROSSLISTING: AMST 13
COURSE DESCRIPTION: For those in the know, Asian American literature has no shortage of excellent novels, yet these have mostly always seemed to be more appropriately classified in ethnic terms-as Chinese American novels, Filipino American novels, and so on. The genre best suited to narrating the peculiar specificity of that pan-ethnic political identification has always been the anthology. Then, in 2010, Karen Tei Yamashita published I Hotel, a playful, brainy, rollicking, carefully researched, and formally virtuosic account of the Asian American Movement, quite possibly the first and the only example of a truly Asian American novel. Not surprisingly, it's a doorstopper-essentially a single-authored anthology of ten novellas-and doing it justice may require the coordinated effort of a team of readers with some time on their hands and an interest in digging up lost histories of Asian American radicalism. We'll see what we can do.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Active participation and numerous, informal but research-based writing assignments
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
COST: $50
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Vince Schleitwiler

ENGL 14 Hurston, Black Folk, and the Literati
Zora Neale Hurston was one of the most brilliant, charismatic, and provocative figures of the Harlem Renaissance. She grew up in an all-black town in Florida and studied at Columbia with the great anthropologist, Franz Boas. She became a preeminent collector of African American and Afro-Caribbean folklore and a one of the most accomplished fiction writers of her era. A dazzling and controversial writer and personality, Zora remains an indispensable and challenging presence in our cultural history.
This course will examine her works of folklore, fiction, autobiography, and cultural and political commentary. We will also read at least one biography and various other materials, ranging from book reviews to personal letters by her contemporaries, in order to assess her accomplishments as a folklorist and writer and the reactions she has continued to provoke from her enthusiasts and detractors.
The final writing assignment for the course will be a paper of twelve to fifteen pages.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: a final 12-15 page paper
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: preference to English majors & Africana Studies concentrators
COST: $100
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: David L Smith

ENGL 15 Media Battlegrounds: A Workshop in Media Criticism CROSSLISTING: PSCI 15
See under PSCI for full description

ENGL 16 Henry James' The Golden Bowl
COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this course we will read Henry James' late novel, The Golden Bowl, which dramatizes many of James' crucial preoccupations. Centered on a wealthy American collector living in England at the turn of the twentieth century, the novel examines the personal and cultural costs of an American obsession with amassing relics of a collapsing European empire, as well as the potentially ruinous effects of wealth and refined sensibility on tangled love relations. The novel's ethical and perceptual intricacies are conveyed in an ingeniously demanding style that presses syntax to its limits. We will read critical essays on the novel, and draw on Walter Benjamin's work on collecting and on the Arcades of 19th century Paris. 

METHOD OF EVALUATION: 10-page paper
PREREQUISITES: 100 or 200-level English course
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference based on major and seniority
COST: $20.
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: Anita Sokolsky

ENGL 17 The Winter Naturalist's Journal CROSSLISTING: ENVI 17
See under ENVI for full description

ENGL 18 Stories and Pictures CROSSLISTING: ARTS 18
COURSE DESCRIPTION: What would you do if Vladimir Nabokov suddenly appeared and said: "Read this thing I wrote, and then make a twenty second stop-motion animation that captures what it feels like to long for a country that doesn't exist anymore. You have a week."? What if Etgar Keret demanded you made a drawing which offered a realistic solution to a magical problem? You don't even want to know what Kurt Vonnegut would want from you.
Stories and Pictures can help you prepare for these kinds of situations. In this class, we will read short stories and produce visual responses to them. We will design movie posters for movies that don't exist and create the work of imaginary artists. We will talk about the different ways in which the written word can provide fuel for image-making, and figure out how to make good art fast. In our meetings we will look at how other visual artists have used narrative to inform their work and try out various art-making techniques such as drawing, collage, digital photography and video. We will meet 3 times weekly for 2-hour sessions and go on at least one field-trip.
Students of all intellectual and creative persuasions are welcome.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Students are required to complete four artworks and vigorously participate in all class discussions.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12
METHOD OF SELECTION: If over-enrolled, preference will be given to students who write the instructor a short email explaining their interest in the class.
COST: $50
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Gabriela Vainsencher

ADJUNCT BIO: Gabriela Vainsencher is a visual artist living and working in Brooklyn, NY. She was Williams College's Levitt fellow in 2009 when she taught this class for the first time. Since then she has taught it as a winter study class in January 2012, 2013, and 2014. Her recent exhibitions include a two-person show at the Musée d'art Moderne André Malraux in Le Havre, France and a solo show at Recession Art gallery in New York.

ENGL 20 Humor Writing CROSSLISTING: MATH 20
See under MATH for full description

ENGL 22 Twenty-First Century Jewish American Fiction CROSSLISTING: JWST 22/REL 22
See under REL for full description

ENGL 23 Adorno's Aesthetic Theory CROSSLISTING: COMP 23
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Theodor Adorno was one of the twentieth century's most challenging thinkers -- a German Jewish refugee who loathed the United States but ended up in Los Angeles, who had no hope for Germany but returned there after the war. His intellectual contributions are too extensive to list: He produced groundbreaking work in philosophy, musicology, literary criticism, sociology, and political theory. The last book he ever wrote was called Aesthetic Theory and summed up a lifetime of thinking about what had happened to art in the twentieth century. Its questions will be our questions: What is the responsibility of art in the face of suffering? What kind of art is possible in a world reduced to rubble? Is it possible to produce a form of art that does not dominate others, that cannot be put in the service of their domination? The book is almost impossible to read cold, so we'll meet every weekday for a couple of hours to read it together.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: 10-page paper
PREREQUISITES: Coursework in continental philosophy or critical theory is strongly recommended, but not strictly necessary.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: priority given to seniors and juniors
COST: $30
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: Christian Thorne

ENGL 25 Journalism Today
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will give students an in-depth, personal view of the inner workings of various facets of journalism. It will feature the perspectives of several distinguished Williams alumni who work in a broad spectrum of today's media universe, including print, broadcast, and new media. In previous years, visitors have represented such outlets as the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, the New Yorker, ABC News and Bloomberg News. Each guest lecturer will discuss specific skills and experiences in his or her background (students should be aware that our precise meeting schedule week by week may vary, to accommodate the schedules and availability of our guests). In addition to readings of work by guests, there will be one required text about reporting and writing. Students will be expected to complete several reporting and writing exercises, and complete one feature-length news story on a topic to be assigned at the beginning of the course. There will be a week-long trip to New York for field work and to visit various newsrooms. In previous years, organizations visited have included CNN, the New York Times, the Columbia School of Journalism, Good Morning America and Morning Joe, Pro Publica, the Wall Street Journal and more.
PREREQUISITES: none; not open to first-year students.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Participation in class discussions and reporting and writing exercises, and the completion of one fully-reported, original, feature-length news story about a topic to be assigned at the beginning of the course.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 16
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference will be given to students with a demonstrated interest in journalism or media (as explained in a statement of interest), with a priority given to upperclassmen/
resources: We will need access to one seminar meeting room on a daily basis to account for the scheduling flexibility we'll need for our guests.
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Christopher Marcisz

ENGL 27 Shakespeare on Film CROSSLISTING: THEA 12
See under THEA for full description

ENGL 30 Honors Project: Specialization Route
Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the specialization route.

ENGL 31 Honors Project: Thesis
Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the thesis route.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

ENVI 10 - Accepting the Challenge: Pursuing Living Building Challenge Certification for the New Environmental Center
The new Environmental Center at Williams - opening in the early winter of 2014/2015 - has been designed and constructed to achieve Living Building Challenge certification. Living Building Challenge is a sustainable building certification system that aims to raise the bar for the way in which we define sustainability. It defines the most advanced measure of sustainability in the built environment possible today and acts to diminish the gap between current limits and ideal solutions. Living Building Challenge requires that a building not just be designed and built to be sustainable in principle, but to be sustainable in practice and to do so under a very demanding interpretation of sustainability- to be net zero energy, net zero water, and to have agriculturally productive land as part of the building site. These goals can only be met with enthusiastic participation from the campus community.
Students taking this course will learn the basics of the Living Building Challenge certification system. They will become familiar with the innovative systems that are integral to Williams' new environmental center: rain water capture, composting toilets, constructed wetlands and rain gardens, solar photovoltaic arrays and air-to-air heat exchangers. Students will then design and implement projects that elucidate and interpret the goals, technologies, and progress of the building, Projects could include posters, tours, art projects, digital displays, apps, workshops, presentations and more. Workshops and readings will introduce students to several different models for behavior change and cultural shift, giving them additional tools for the projects.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on participation and a final project. In-class meeting time is expected to be approximately six hours per week, with the possibility of one full day workshop and one full day field trip.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT:15.
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference will be given to Sophomores and Juniors.
COST: approximately $50 for textbooks and reading packets
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Amy Johns, Zilkha Center

ENVI 11 The Winter Woods
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will focus on the winter season and its effect in molding the natural landscapes of New England. We will take a hands-on approach toward investigating how plants and animals are adapted to enduring the winter conditions of our region. We will make frequent field trips to Hopkins Forest and other regional sites to explore topics ranging from micro-climate and snow pack to physiological, morphological, behavioral adaptation, winter plant identification, wildlife tracking and observation and personal acclimation to the cold. We will also consider the effects of climate change and human impacts upon the winter landscape. In addition students will be expected to spend time out of class making and recording their individual observations. Field activities will be supplemented by readings and class discussions. Students should be prepared to spend many hours out in the elements and be able to hike several miles in winter conditions. Some field trips will necessitate that students be away from campus beyond normal class hours.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: 10-page paper or equivalent
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 10
METHOD OF SELECTION: seniority
COST: 150
MEETING TIME: mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Drew Jones

PREFIX: ADJUNCT BIO: Drew Jones has been the Manager of Hopkins Memorial Forest for fifteen years. He has a Masters Degree in Forestry and has worked as a Wildlife Biologist and Naturalist from the Southern Appalachians to the North Woods.

ENVI 12 Landscape Photography CROSSLISTING: GEOS 12
See under GEOS for full description

ENVI 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Past, Its Uncertain Future CROSSLISTING: JLST 13
See under JLST for full description

ENVI 14 Animal Consciousness CROSSLISTING: RLSP 14
See under RLSP for full description

ENVI 17 The Winter Naturalist's Journal CROSSLISTING: ENGL 17
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will engage with the natural world though writing, drawing, and personal observation, supported by reading and discussion. Students will spend time out of doors exploring the ecosystem of the Williamstown area, and indoors practicing reflective writing (both
poetry and prose), and observational drawing. Everyone will be required to keep a nature journal, to be shared and displayed as part of the final project. The writing component of the course will be equivalent of a 10-page paper. This course is designed for students who are interested in environmental
studies, creative writing and drawing.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Writing component is the equivalent of a 10 page paper.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12
METHOD OF SELECTION: If overenrolled, students will be chosen based on seniority and the need to create a group that is diverse in majors and interests.
COST: $60 for books and art supplies.
MEETING TIME: mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Christian McEwen

ADJUNCT BIO: Christian McEwen (instructor) Christian McEwen is the author of "World Enough & Time: On Creativity and Slowing Down," and the editor of "Jo's Girls: Tomboy Tales of High Adventure" (1997) and "The Alphabet of the Trees: A Guide to Nature Writing" (2000). She lives in Northampton, MA.

ENVI 18 Sustainable Business Strategies CROSSLISTING: ECON 27
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course explores case studies of "sustainable business strategies," as that concept continues to evolve. We will develop our own definition of "sustainability" that encompasses both financially success as well as long run impact on climate and the environment. Topics include:
· What are the criteria for sustainability? Does (only) renewable energy qualify?
· How does the concept of externalities relate to sustainability? Must all external costs and benefits be "internalized" in order for a business to be truly sustainable?
· Can sustainable business models coexist with traditional shareholder value maximization models? Evaluate the role of "B" companies allowing directors to take into account the interest of all stakeholders including workers, consumers, the society at large, and the environment.
· How does sustainability reconcile with the priority of economic growth, particularly in the developing world?
· What is the relationship to fair labor standards and environmental regulation?
· What is the proper role and purpose of governmental subsidies? When should subsidies sunset and leave industries to succeed (or fail) on their own?
Students will read two books: Encounters with the Archdruid and Breakthrough, plus a collection of 4-5 substantial articles.
We are likely to make two mandatory off-campus trips: a day with at least one sustainable company (Ecovative Design in Troy) and travel to NYC for an intensive day long seminar with professional investors in this sector.
Teams of 2-3 students will target a company of their choice and present a critical evaluation of that company's progress, challenges, and prospects for success both financially and in terms of their sustainability goals.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Team presentations on target companies; active class participation.
PREREQUISITES: None, though some background in economics is very helpful
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 24
METHOD OF SELECTION: By letter describing their interest.
COST: $90 (books and some travel meals)
MEETING TIME: afternoons
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Don Carlson
EMAIL: don.carlson@me.com

ADJUNCT BIO: Don Carlson is a serial entrepreneur, board member and investor in dozens of growth stage companies. Don has been a Williams faculty member (CES and chair of political economy, 1990-92); an executive at Goldman Sachs; a business leader at Axiom, CEB, and BIA; a trial lawyer at Williams & Connolly, and legislative director for Congressman Kennedy. He graduated from Williams as a poli ec major in 1983 and Harvard Law School in 1986. Don lives in Greenwich, CT, with his wife and three teenage children.

ENVI 19 "The Feather'd Hook": An Introduction to Streamside Entomology and Fly-Tying CROSSLISTING: ANTH 19
See under ANTH for full description

ENVI 20 Politics after the Apocalypse CROSSLISTING: PSCI 20
See under PSCI for full description

ENVI 25 A New Paradigm for Eleutheran Agriculture: Building a Sustainable Indigenous Food System
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course is a hands-on group research and community development project in collaboration with two island organizations: One Eleuthera Foundation and the Cape Eleuthera Institute. The Cape Eleuthera Institute is a scientific research institution focused on marine biology and place based academic research. One Eleuthera is a non-governmental organization working to improve public health on the island. They raised funds to build, equip and staff emergency response centers, built the only women's health clinic on the island, and raise awareness about nutrition and fitness on an island where obesity and heart disease rates are significantly higher than they are in the US. One Eleuthera has recently turned their attention to creating a stronger island food system. Their goal is to improve food security and increase the supply of local healthy food by promoting organic farming, preserving the traditional farms for future food production, and focusing public attention on the benefits of fresh fruits and vegetables.
One Eleuthera's multi-pronged food system initiative also includes expanding the garden programs at the local high schools to train future farmers, purchasing land to create an incubator farm, building a canning plant, buying a mobile processing unit, establishing a seed bank, working with the existing farmers on transitioning to a less chemical intensive agriculture and connecting growers to buyers. This class will work as a team to conduct fieldwork to further these projects, focusing on connecting growers to buyers. Class work will include interviewing the established traditional farmers about their operations and discuss the possibility of converting their farm to sustainable agriculture, assessing demand for local produce by interviewing purchasers at stores, restaurants and hotels, as well as interviewing high school about their interest in farming and government officials and other stakeholders in the food system. Research on sustainable tropical farming methods, agricultural economics, and Bahamian politics and government will also be involved. The work will culminate in a presentation to the local organizations as well as a written report of findings and recommendations.
PREREQUISITES: Some environmental studies coursework recommended; not open to first-year students.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on students' participation in the group research project, degree of commitment to project and to being part of a research team, effort and quality of work, professionalism in working with community partners, final report (each student will write a section), and final presentation (each student will present a section).
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 10
METHOD OF SELECTION: Priority to environmental studies concentrators and majors and public health concentrators; priority to students with coursework in environmental studies/agriculture/food systems/public health or work experience in these fields; consideration of students who have had little or no opportunity to travel.
COST: student fees will be covered by the Class of 1963 Sustainability Fund.
INSTRUCTOR: Sarah Gardner

ENVI 26 Touring Black Religion in the "New" South CROSSLISTING: AFR 25/REL 26
See under AFR for full description

ENVI 31 Senior Research and Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Environmental Studies 493-494.

GEOSCIENCES

GEOS 10 Coastal Destruction: Were People Meant to Live Along the Coast?
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Can people live safely and permanently along the coast? The answer depends on who you ask, and where along the coast you are standing. Yet, regardless of the actual answer, people continue to flock to the coast even as the shoreline recedes and destructive storms and tsunamis occur with alarming regularity. The fact is there are underlying social, political and economic factors that draw people toward the coast, and thus amplify the destruction caused by natural processes and events. For example, the magnitude of destruction caused by a hurricane that blows across a deserted island is very different from that of a hurricane that hits New York City. Rising sea levels associated with climate change and rapidly growing coastal cities will only exacerbate the situation. During this class, students will first gain a basic understanding of the physical processes (e.g., coastal erosion) and events (e.g., storms, tsunamis) that dominate changes in and destruction to the coastal environment. Students will then delve into how the effects of these physical processes and events can be amplified (or mitigated) by social, political and economic realities, especially those that promote continued coastal development. By the end of this class students will have a greater appreciation for the complex processes that dominate the coastal-human environment, as well as how science can inform policy decisions.
Students can expect to meet in class for approximately 8 hours per week. Outside of class, students should expect to read a variety of different materials (e.g., book chapters, journal papers, newspaper articles) and research specific topics related to the class.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Class participation, individual research outside of class, weekly memos, and either a final oral presentation or written paper
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 16
METHOD OF SELECTION: in case of over-enrollment, preference will be given based on a short statement of interest emailed to the professor and to ensure a wide range of academic backgrounds are represented
COST: $0
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Alex Apotsos

GEOS 12 Landscape Photography CROSSLISTING: ENVI 12
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This class will broaden students' appreciation for the appearance and history of the landscape and teach the skills of making a successful photograph. Williamstown, situated in a valley between the Green and Taconic Mountains and bisected by the Green and Hoosic Rivers, is a place of great natural beauty. The local landscape is a subject that inspires both professional and amateur photographers alike. While Williamstown will be the subject of most of our work, we will use it to learn principles of universal application. Students will discover the importance of light in making a photograph. They will also learn camera skills and the mechanics of digital photography, which will be reviewed at biweekly class meetings. In addition to photographing and critiquing images, the class will visit collections at the Clark Art Institute and WCMA to see original work and examine and discuss books on reserve at Sawyer Library. An overview of the history of landscape photography will be provided with an emphasis on American workers such as Carlton Watkins, Eadweard Muybridge, Alfred Stieglitz, Eliot Porter and Ansel Adams. We will also demonstrate examples of different cameras such as a large format. Students will produce a body of successful photographs that will be projected at the Winter Study presentation day and on display at http://drm.williams.edu/projects/, http://nicholaswhitmanphoto.com/winterstudy2014/.
Students will submit short written explanations with each of their photographic assignments.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on attendance, the student's photography, and their presentation.
PREREQUISITES: Prerequisites: students will need a digital single lens reflex camera (DSLR) or a new generation electronic viewfinder (DSL) camera such as those by Sony or Olympus. See http://digital-photography-school.com/blog/how-to-buy-a-dslr-camera/. Also a laptop pc, with Adobe Lightroom 5 and a 1T external hard drive.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference given to first-year students and sophomores.
COST: $100-
MEETING TIME: mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Nicholas Whitman
EMAIL: nwhitman@roadrunner.com

ADJUNCT BIO: : Nicholas Whitman is a professional photographer and the former Curator of Photography at the New Bedford Whaling Museum. A 1977 graduate of the Rochester Institute of Technology, he has honed his craft to make landscape photographs of power and depth. See more at www.nwphoto.com.

GEOS 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Geology 493-494.

GERMAN

GERM S.P. Sustaining Program for German 101-102
Something new and different for students enrolled in German 101-102. Practice in the use of German for everyday purposes; creation and performance of short dramatic sketches through group collaboration; games; songs; storytelling; reading. No homework.
Requirements: active participation and regular attendance earn a "Pass" grade.
Prerequisites: German 101 or equivalent. Limited to German 101-102 students.
Cost: approximately $5 for photocopied materials.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week 9-9:50 a.m.

GERM 14 The Life and Death of a Vanished Nation: East Germany, 1949-1990 CROSSLISTING: HIST 14
See under HIST for full description

GERM 30 Honors Project
To be taken by honors candidates following other than the normal thesis route.

GERM 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for German 493-494.

HISTORY

HIST 11 Alexander the Great CROSSLISTING: CLAS 11
See under CLAS for full description

HIST 12 Black Radical Film CROSSLISTING: AFR 10
See under AFR for full description

HIST 14 The Life and Death of a Vanished Nation: East Germany, 1949-1990 CROSSLISTING: GERM 14
COURSE DESCRIPTION: In 1989, in the wake of the rapid crumbling of their power in the face of massive popular resistance, the authorities in the German Democratic Republic (Deutsche Demokratische Republik, or DDR) opened the Berlin Wall. Within a year the wall had been torn down and the East German state voted itself out of existence, absorbed wholly into the belly of its larger and more powerful neighbor to the West. Suddenly, the nation born of the promise to create a genuine people's democracy and claiming the moral high ground as an anti-Fascist state had vanished, its political culture and social institutions suddenly erased. What were the promises of the regime and what happened to those promises? What were the contradictions in East German society and why and where did resistance slowly build to the point where the entire edifice came crashing down? This course will briefly chart the short history of the DDR, from the founding of the Socialist Unity Party in the Soviet occupation zone of a defeated Germany at the end of the Second World War to the total collapse of the regime in 1989/90. The course will explore key moments in the political history of the DDR, including the uprisings of 1953 and the building of the Berlin Wall in 1961. It will also focus on the social and cultural practices of East German society, exploring the nature of everyday life under the Communist regime. The course will meet three times per week for the four weeks of Winter Study and part of the evidence for our discussions will come from the viewing and analysis of seven films, the majority of which were made in the DDR during its short existence. A textual history of the DDR will also be accompanied by a packet of additional reading materials that will be discussed in class.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Final ten-page paper
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference given to History and German majors
COST: $75
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Chris Waters

HIST 15 Spice Routes: The History and Practice of Indian Food CROSSLISTING: ASST 15
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course aims to introduce students to the history of Indian food alongside its practice: preparing and cooking select dishes that emerged through the historical encounters they will read about. The course will focus on three key historical frameworks: the Mughal Empire, India and the Indian Ocean world, and India's colonial links with Britain. We will think about notions of power, culture and identity, and the way in which such forces shaped the most basic of activities, preparing and consuming food. Readings will include books, articles, cookbooks and historical primary sources. The dishes students will learn to cook will give them a different window onto the global spice trade, multiple forms of empire, religion and caste, gender, and other issues raised by the readings and crucial to the understanding of Indian history as a whole.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: 3-4 page weekly papers and short final presentation
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 10
METHOD OF SELECTION: Students will be selected on the basis of a short paragraph on their favorite Indian dish and why it is their favorite. Email the paragraph as a word document or pdf to Professor Kapadia (ak16@williams.edu)
COST: approximately $75. This includes groceries required for the cooking during the course, books and course packet. Any purchases made at the Indian grocery store, other than what is required for the course, including snacks/meals eaten at the restaurant (which is in the Indian grocery store), will have to be paid for by the students themselves.
MEETING TIME: mornings; two 3-hour morning classes, divided between discussions of readings and practical cooking sessions ending with lunch (that we cooked in class) and cleaning up. We will also make one trip to the Indian grocery store in Albany at the beginning of the course (most likely on January 8).
INSTRUCTOR: Aparna Kapadia and Aruna D'Souza

NOTE: We will be cooking both vegetarian and non---vegetarian dishes. However, it will not be possible to accommodate strict dietary restrictions. Contact instructors before signing up if you have concerns about this.

ADJUNCT BIO: Aruna D'Souza is a writer who focuses primarily on issues of food, colonialism, and diasporic experience. She writes a blog, Kitchen Flânerie, and is completing a book manuscript of the same name. She has also published widely on the subject of modern and contemporary art, feminism, and globalization.

HIST 16 American Wars: Directed Independent Reading and Research
COURSE DESCRIPTION: An independent reading and research course on American wars from colonial times to the present. All participants will share a few common readings, but there will be no formal classes. Instead, each participant will meet individually with the instructor to develop a unique reading list on a topic of their choice. Once their topic is decided, they will spend the rest of the Winter Study researching and writing a substantial paper (at least 25 pages) on their topic.78
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Requirements: a research paper of at least 25 pages in length.
PREREQUISITES: No prerequisites except interest in American military history.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference will be given to History majors and those students who have demonstrated an interest in the history of warfare.
COST: $40
MEETING TIME: other
EXPLANATION OF MEETING TIME: Individual meetings; no formal classes
INSTRUCTOR: James Wood

HIST 17 Russia, Ukraine, Crimea CROSSLISTING: LEAD 17
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Responding to the "Maidan Revolution" in Ukraine, in March 2014 the Russian Federation annexed the Crimean peninsula, an action condemned as illegal by the new Ukrainian government and most of the international community but hailed by most of the Russian population. Ukrainian and Western critics denounced Russian President Vladimir Putin for acting aggressively and irrationally and claimed that he sought to resurrect the former Soviet Union or Russian Empire, while Putin's Russian supporters praised him for righting what they considered "an historic wrong" and for returning Crimea to its Russian homeland and Russia to its rightful place in the world. While Putin was vilified by much of the international press, his popularity in Russia soared. In eastern Ukraine, encouraged by the Crimean example shadowy groups of Russian nationalist Ukrainians and "volunteers" from Russia seized control of several cities and, by means of force and questionable referenda, asserted regional independence, hoping to provoke Russian annexation but instead inciting violent civil unrest. Though sparked and shaped mainly by events in Ukraine between the winter of 2013 and the early summer of 2014, this still on-going international tension and turmoil in Ukraine also have roots in the past, reflecting both the complicated history of Ukrainian national identity and statehood and Russia's imperial heritage. This course will explore how the past and historical memory shape the present and how knowledge of the past can help us understand the present by examining the current conflict within Ukraine and between Ukraine and Russia, particularly with regard to Crimea. Hence the first two weeks of the course will be devoted to a consideration of such historical questions as the development of Ukrainian culture, national identity, and statehood, the experiences of Ukrainians and Crimean Tatars within the Russian Empire and its Soviet successor, and the nature of Russian and Soviet imperialism and colonialism and their impact on Russian national identity and "territorialism." The final week will focus on recent events and how they might be understood from an historical perspective.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Final 10-page paper
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference to students with some background in European/Russian history/Studies, International Studies, and/or Political Science
COST: $75
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: William Wagner

HIST 18 Chasin' the Blues: A Journey through American Music CROSSLISTING: AMST 18
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Before Eric Clapton and Janis Joplin, there was Rev. Gary Davis and Memphis Minnie. This course will examine the lives and times of the early American blues musicians who recorded in the late Twenties and Thirties, and then "rediscovered" in the Sixties. We will explore this genre of American music through its connections to African music, its development in the American rural south, and its later transformation into the urban blues of the 1940s-1960s. We will trace this journey through readings, audio recordings, and video footage. In addition to regular class attendance, students will be required to write a 10-page research paper and offer their findings in an oral presentation to the class.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: 10-page research paper and an oral presentation
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: demonstrated interest in the subject by contacting the professor
COST: $25.00
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Scott Wong

HIST 19 Hidden Treasures and the Amber Room: Impressionist Art Held Hostage CROSSLISTING: ARTH 18/ASTR 19
See under ASTR for full description

HIST 30: Workshop in Independent Research
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is intended for both junior History majors and sophomores intending on majoring in history who think they might like to do a senior thesis, but who would like to gain more experience in independent research. Students who are interested in exploring a possible topic for a senior thesis are especially encouraged to sign up. This workshop will help familiarize students with methods for doing historical research, including how historians define good research questions; become familiar with the historiography; strategize doing primary research; and identify their sources. Students will also be introduced to doing archival work. Students will pursue their own research on any topic of their own choosing for a 10-page final paper, and we'll use a workshop format to discuss the research and writing of that paper.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Class participation and final paper
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: Interest in course subject
COST: $200 (gas + lunch money for one field trip to an archive nearby)
MEETING TIME: Tuesdays and Thurdays
INSTRUCTOR: Karen Merrill

HIST 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by all senior honors students who are registered for HIST 493 (Fall) and HIST 494 (Spring), HIST 31 allows thesis writers to complete their research and prepare a draft chapter, due at the end of WSP.
SINIAWER

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

INST 30 Senior Honors Project
To be taken by candidates for honors in International Studies.

JEWISH STUDIES

JWST 22 Twenty-First Century Jewish American Fiction CROSSLISTING: ENGL 22/REL 22
See under REL for full description

JWST 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for JWST 493 or 494.

JUSTICE AND LAW

JLST 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Past, Its Uncertain Future CROSSLISTING: ENVI 13
Taught from the perspective of an experienced trial attorney, this course will examine the role environmental law plays in the United States today in light of how that role has developed during the nearly fifty years since the modern era of environmental law began. We will also consider the reasons why the law's early application in the first half of the 20th century almost exclusively to the conservation and preservation of natural resources took on in the second half a markedly different approach, one emphasizing pollution control and all but ignoring resource conservation.
The course will begin by tracing the development of an American consciousness towards the environment through an examination of our law and our literature, using over fifty slides of paintings and sculptures to help tell the story. We will examine the historical and legal choices we as Americans have made which have put our environment on trial. Our journey begins with the Puritans of New England and the planters of Virginia and their predecessors in the New World and then moves swiftly to the beginning of the modern era in environmental law and to its now uncertain future.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: ?
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: ?
METHOD OF SELECTION: ?
COST: $0
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Philip McKnight

Philip R. McKnight '65 is a trial and appellate attorney. At Williams he completed the honors program for both American History and Literature and European History. He earned his law degree from The University of Chicago Law School and then practiced in the state and federal courts of New York and Connecticut, as well as in Europe.

JLST 14 Mock Trial
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course was offered in 2012 and 2013 and provides students an opportunity to learn how a trial lawyer goes about preparing and trying a case. The instructors have secured course materials from the American Mock Trial Association, and this year's case likely will be a defamation case brought by a political candidate against a reporter. Two teams will be formed and the individual teams will work together to present two trials, one as plaintiff and one as defendant. The students will play the roles as both witnesses and attorneys to present the case. The initial lecture is called "Anatomy of a Trial," and introduces the students to the basic elements of a civil trial, including selection of witnesses, creation of an overall theme, use of evidence, direct and cross examination and trial tactics. Subsequent classes will involve the teams working with the lecturers to select effective trial witnesses from a pool of potential witnesses and to prepare opening statements, direct and cross examinations, and closing arguments. The final two days will be devoted to the trial of the case, with the teams switching sides on the second day. In the past, we have been able to secure local attorneys to play the role of judge and local residents to serve as jurors.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Two trials are presented in the last two days, one as plaintiff and one as defendant so students have to learn both sides of the case. Students will be evaluated on their work preparing and presenting the case.
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: Hope for 12 minimum and 24 maximum, 8 minimum
METHOD OF SELECTION: has never happened
COST: costs for duplication of materials is minimal
MEETING TIME: Mondays and Tuesdays -- 12:00 to 4:00 on Mondays and 10:00 to 2:00 on Tuesdays
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: David Olson '71 and Gene Bauer `71

ADJUNCT BIO: Dave Olson and Gene Bauer, both Williams '71, are attorneys with many years experience as civil trial attorneys working for law firms and corporations to conduct trials and supervise major pieces of civil litigation. They have taught this same course, using different cases, on two prior occasions, 2012 and 2013.

LATINA/O STUDIES

LATS 31 Latina/o Honors Thesis Seminar
Students must register for this course to complete an honors project begun in the fall or begin one to be finished in the spring.
Prerequisite: approval of program chair.
Enrollment limited to senior honors candidates.

LEADERSHIP STUDIES

LEAD 10 Institutional Leadership and Social Responsibility
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will examine a wide variety of issues related to leadership and responsibility in both public- and private- sector settings. We will explore these issues through the experiences of men and women who have held leadership roles in these contexts. The majority of class sessions will be led by guest speakers, most, though not all, of whom are distinguished alumni of the college. Students will be expected to take an active role in introducing and helping to lead discussions involving the guest speakers.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: attendance, preparation, participation in class discussion, a final 10-page paper
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 18
METHOD OF SELECTION:
COST: $0
MEETING TIME: mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Earl Dudley and Peter Berek

ADJUNCT BIO: Earl Dudley-Professor of Law, University of Virginia School of Law, 1989-2008; Private law practice, Washington, DC 1968-1975, 1977-1989; General Counsel, Judiciary Committee, U.S. House of Representatives 1975-1977. Peter Berek-Professor of English, Williams College, 1967-1990; Dean of the College, Williams, 1975-78; Special Assistant to the President, Williams 1987-90; Dean of Faculty and Provost, Mt. Holyoke College, 1990-1998 (interim president, fall 1995); Professor of English, Mt. Holyoke, 1990-2011; Visiting Professor of English, Amherst College, 2009-present.

LEAD 17 Russia, Ukraine, Crimea CROSSLISTING: HIST 17
See under HIST for full description

LEAD 18 Wilderness Trip Leadership & Leadership in Wilderness Emergency Care
This Winter Study project is for students who would like to participate in an off-campus experiential education opportunity. Students will be required to research an appropriate accredited program i.e., National Outdoor Leadership School, Outward Bound etc., that will provide a suitable learning environment and be at least 14 days in length. The Director of the Williams Outing Club will assist students in their search if necessary. Upon choosing a program and being accepted, students will meet with the Director in a pre-program meeting in December to create a framework for observing group dynamics and studying a variety of leadership styles. A required 10-page paper based on their journals will be required immediately after their return to campus for the start of third quarter. There will also be a follow up class to debrief the experience in the first week of February. All programs must meet with the approval of the Outing Club Director. In addition to off-campus opportunities, there will be a Wilderness First Responder Emergency Care course that will take place on campus which is open to all class years. Contact Scott Lewis for details.
Requirements: course approval by WOC Director, daily journal writing with focus on leadership and group dynamics, 10-page paper and 2 class meetings pre and post trip. Student assessment will be based on ten page paper and class discussions.
No prerequisites. Off-campus opportunities are not open to first-year students. Interested students must consult with WOC Director before registration.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student will vary depending on the program selected-range is generally from $1,500-3,000.
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: SCOTT LEWIS, Director of the Outing Club
Sponsor: MELLOW

LEAD 20 Student Leadership Development CROSSLIST: SPEC 20
See under SPEC for full description

MARITIME STUDIES

MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS

MATHEMATICS

MATH 10 Pilates: Physiology and Wellness
COURSE DESCRIPTION: General Description: During the first half of the twentieth century, Joseph Pilates developed a series of exercises he called Contrology designed to strengthen core muscles and improve overall health. Now known as Pilates, these exercises are meant to increase flexibility, strength, endurance, and spinal health. In this course, we will study the physiology and origins of the Pilates exercises as well as how Pilates can be incorporated into an overall wellness plan. Class time will include both Pilates routines, discussion, and guest lecture. There will be weekly quizzes, readings, and a final project. We will meet 3 mornings per week.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: class participation, quizzes, and final project
PREREQUISITES: None.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 10
METHOD OF SELECTION: Selection will be based on student responses to a course survey.
COST: 125 for books and equipment
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Allison Pacelli

MATH 11 History of Deaf Culture in America
COURSE DESCRIPTION: 1817 was a critical point in American deaf history: the American School for the Deaf (ASD) opened. Prior to this event, deaf individuals developed ways of communicating through various forms of sign language but a common nationwide language was absent. However, this changed after Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet spent time in France learning the manual method of teaching deaf students (i.e. through sign language). Upon returning to the United States Gallaudet helped open the ASD, which implemented manualism. These methods were introduced into other schools and ultimately led to the development of what is now known as American Sign Language (ASL). In this course, we will learn about the history of deaf culture beginning with the work of Gallaudet and continuing through today. We will discuss controversies surrounding the introduction of manualism and the push by some individuals to use oralism instead (i.e. teaching through spoken language). Further, we will learn about modern deaf culture. For example, we will examine life as a deaf person in a hearing family and vice versa, cochlear implants, and the evolution of society's perception of the deaf community.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on attendance and class participation. There will also be a final 10-page paper or final project and in-class presentation.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 30
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference will be given to students with expressed interest in deaf culture based on a short description of why they are taking the course.
COST: approximately $60
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Julie Blackwood

MATH 12 The Mathematics of LEGO Bricks
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Since their introduction in 1949, LEGO bricks have challenged and entertained millions. In this course we'll explore some of the connections between LEGO bricks, mathematics and popular culture. Topics include the following:

Given a collection of LEGO bricks, how many different structures may be built using only the standard snapping? The analysis requires us to develop some of the theory of combinatorics, and deal with the issue of two configurations that look different but are the same after standard moves (such as rotation, flipping about a line, and so on). We will use this problem as a springboard to study related issues in mathematics, especially in game theory.

Given a collection of LEGO bricks, how can you build desired objects? This ranges from building miniature replicas to functional items (which can now be done through `special' pieces).

The business model of the LEGO Group has changed greatly since the '40s and '50s. While they still hold their products to the highest standard, the generic themes (such as city and space) are now greatly supplemented by various alliances (Superheros, Star Wars, Harry Potter, Lord of The Rings, ...). We will examine some business cases involving LEGO in order to get a sense of how companies determine priorities, including a discussion of the recent LEGO Friends line and gender issues.

One of the greatest computational advances is the ability to parallelize certain computations. Some programs must be run in order, where Step N cannot be done until Step N-1 is completed. Other problems, however, are such that multiple steps can be done simultaneously; examples include GIMPS (the Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search), SETI, mapping the human genome, factorizing numbers, and checking the Riemann Hypothesis. We will discuss the general theory of such computations and its effect on attacking important problems. We will implement our skills by parallelizing the building of the LEGO Star Wars Superstar Destroyer; as it is 3152 pieces, we see the need of having a good, efficient strategy if we are to complete it during the course! We tried to do it in under 10 minutes last year and just failed at 10:21; save me from doing this course three years in a row!

Last year's homepage here: http://web.williams.edu/Mathematics/sjmiller/public_html/legos/
METHOD FOR EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on class participation, the completion of problem sets involving the mathematical concepts, a final report on one of the topics, and adherence to `Leg Godt'.
PREREQUISITES: None.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 100
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference will be determined if needed by an application essay, interview and/or meeting.
COST: $25.00
MEETING TIME:
EXPLANATION OF MEETING TIME: TBD
INSTRUCTOR: Steven Miller

MATH 13 Calculus Preparation
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Taking Calculus in the Spring? Want to beef up you math skills? This course will help students prepare for a Spring Semester Calculus course by reviewing algebra, pre-calculus, and introductory calculus material, and covering topics that may be missing from a student's background.
Students will meet with the instructor to discuss their background and plan a course of study. Coursework will be done independently and working in small groups with the instructor.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on participation and homework.
PREREQUISITES: None. Have to be enrolled in calculus in the spring
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference will be given to QS students and those going into Math 130 or Math 140
COST: $25.00
MEETING TIME: mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Lori Pedersen

ADJUNCT BIO: Lori Pedersen has taught many regular semester courses at Williams including precalculus, calculus and discrete mathematics.

MATH 14 Introductory Photography: People and Places CROSSLISTING: SPEC 10
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is an introductory course in photography, both on color and black & white photography and using the digital camera. The main themes will be portraiture and the landscape. No previous knowledge is assumed, but students are expected to have access to a 35 mm (or equivalent) digital camera, with manual override or aperture priority. The topics covered will include composition, exposure, camera use, direction and properties of light, and digital imaging. Students will develop their eye through the study of the work of well-known photographers and the critical analysis of their own work. We will discuss the work of contemporary photographers such as Mary Ellen Mark, Joel Meyerowitz, Constantine Manos, and Eugene Richards. Students will be expected to spend a considerable amount of time practicing their own photography outside of class. There will be one required local half-day field trip. Students will also be introduced to Photoshop and Lightroom, and will work on their own images with these programs.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on class participation, an in-class quiz and a final project.
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12
METHOD OF SELECTION: Email questionnaire
COST: $60.00
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Cesar Silva

MATH 16 The National Parks: America's Best Idea
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Inspired by Ken Burns' documentary which gave the title of this course, we will talk about the history, development, geography, ecology, environmental issues, as well as other challenges faced by the US National Parks. We will go in order and talk about each of the 59 National Parks and select a few to discuss in detail. Each student will choose one National Park and will become the "local expert" in that park. The students will be asked to prepare a Final Project on a National Park of their choice and give an in-class presentation.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on attendance and class participation. There will also be a 10-page Final Project and an in-class presentation.
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference will be given to students with expressed interest in the course based on a short description of why they want to be in the class.
COST: 25
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Mihai Stoiciu

MATH 17 The History, Geography and Economics of the Wines of France
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The history of wine making in France is long, dating back to the Greeks and later the Romans. Of course, geography and climate play an essential and important role in grape growing The first areas to be planted were the areas around present day Marseille, (Massalia in Ancient Greece) in Provence, and the areas just north farther up the Rhône river valley. We will briefly survey the history of wine in France from the Romans through the middle ages, the influence of monasteries on wine production, the impact of the French revolution and the evolution of the modern classification system in the 19th century, which is still in place today. We will look at temperature data and study the relationship between temperature change and quality. We will discuss the impact of wine \"scorers\" such as Robert Parker as his influence on the economics of the French wine market. Finally, we will discuss the role of wine in French cuisine and the importance of wine to French culture.
We will read about the history of wine production, study the geography of France and perform various statistical analyses relating to quality, temperature and production. In particular we will study the relationship between price and quality. We will sample wines during much of the course, so students will need to be of legal age to take part in the course.
[1] Climate, hydrology, land use, and environmental degradation in the lower Rhone Valley during the Roman period, SE Van der Leeuw - Comptes Rendu, Geosciences, 2005, Elsevier [2] The red and the white : a history of wine in France and Italy in the nineteenth century / by Leo A. Loubère ; drawings by Mark Blanton and Philip Loubère Albany : State University of New York Press, 1978 [3] Climate Change and Global Wine Quality, Jones, G. V. White, M. A. Cooper, O. R. Storchmann, K.,Climatic Change, 2005, VOL 73; NUMBER 3, pages 319-343.
[4] Wine Growers'Syndicalism in the Languedoc: Continuity and Change, Jean Phillpe Martin, Sociologia Ruralis, 36,3,1996.
[5] The Table Comes First: Family, France, and the Meaning of Food, Adam Gopnik, Knopf, 2011 (Possible required book).
[6] Wine and War: The French, the Nazis, and the Battle for France\'s Greatest Treasure, D. Kladstrup and P. Kaldstrup , Broadway Books, 2002.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: There will be several short papers on various topics that we discuss as well as an individual research topic paper of 10-15 pages that will be due and presented at the end of the course.
PREREQUISITES: None, but students must be 21 years of age at the time of the course.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12
METHOD OF SELECTION: By short essay
COST PER STUDENT: $150.00 for wines
MEETING TIME: afternoons, Monday and Wednesday, 2 - 5 pm
INSTRUCTOR:: Richard De Veaux

MATH 19 Design School CROSSLISTING: ARTS 19
Stanford has a world-renowned school of design, a synthesis between classical academics, silicon valley technology, and a startup culture. Our class brings this approach to the purple mountains, using design thinking in order to tackle big-scale projects at Williams, such as dorm-room and class-room space reallocation, online database interfaces, the future of collegiate athletics, the role of physical versus online learning, or any other ventures the class find exciting. After a week of learning to quickly prototype models and fostering teamwork between diverse disciplines, the majority of the course will focus on collaborative attempts in sketching, creating, and presenting visual thinking solutions to these big problems. And in this spirit, the course is jointly taught by mathematics and WCMA, bringing together art, design, space, and theory.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Primarily on attendance and participation, including a final project that consists of written materials about the process, a design video, and a physical prototype.
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: Priority for those with experience in or intense curiosity for visual design, or those who are involved in large-scale projects at Williams.
COST: about $40 for books
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Satyan Devadoss (Mathematics) and ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Tina Olsen (Director of WCMA)

MATH 20 Humor Writing CROSSLISTING: ENGL 20
COURSE DESCRIPTION: What is humor? The dichotomy inherent in the pursuit of comedic intent while confronting the transient nature of adversity can ratchet up the devolving psyche's penchant for explication to a catastrophic threshold, thwarting the existential impulse and pushing the natural proclivity for causative norms beyond the possibility of pre-situational adaptation.
Do you know what that means? If so, this is not the course for you. No, we will write funny stuff, day in and day out. Or at the very least, we will think it's funny. Stories, essays, plays, fiction, nonfiction, we'll try a little of each. And we'll read some humor, too.
Is laughter the body's attempt to eject excess phlegm? Why did Plato write dialogues instead of monologues? Who backed into my car in the Bronfman parking lot on the afternoon of March 2, 2014? These are just a few of the questions we will not explore in this course. No, we won't have time because we will be busy writing. (But if you know the answer to the third question, there's a $10 reward.)
Plan to meet 6 hours a week, and to spend at least 20 hours a week on the course. No slackers need apply. Produce or become produce. Everyone will submit at least one piece for publication.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Completion of writing assignments, which will include at least 20 pages of writing.
PREREQUISITES: Sense of humor(broadly interpreted.)
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: They will submit writing to the instructor for evaluation.
COST: $40
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Colin Adams

MATH 30 Senior Project
To be taken by candidates for honors in Mathematics other than by thesis route.

MATH 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Mathematics 493-494.

STATISTICS

STAT 10 Data Visualization
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Through modern technology, our world is becoming increasingly quantifiable, and it is now easier than ever to collect accurate and timely data from sources of myriad variety. Data visualization provides one means to detect patterns and structure in "big data" which can translate into accessible information to further scientific knowledge and improve decision making.
In this course, we will study techniques for creating effective visualizations based on principles from graphic design, visual art, perceptual psychology, and neuroscience. The class will meet about 8 hours a week for lecture and discussion. In addition to participating in class discussions, students will be expected to keep a daily journal, complete short programming and data analysis exercises as well as a final data visualization project. Students will be expected to write up their process and present their final visualization to the class.
There are no prerequisites for the class; however, basic knowledge of statistics and an eagerness to learn some computer programming will be useful.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Active participation, programming exercises, journals, and a final project and presentation.
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference will be given to students writing to the instructor with a short paragraph about why they want to be in this class.
COST: 60
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: Brianna Heggeseth

STAT 30 Senior Project
To be taken by candidates for honors in Statistics other than by thesis route.

STAT 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Statistics 493-494.

MUSIC

MUS 10 Chamber Orchestra of Williams (COW)
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The Chamber Orchestra of Williams will be a dual purpose ensemble. COW will offer an opportunity for students interested in conducting to work in front of a live orchestra. The students will learn to address the many issues involved in the craft of conducting; ensemble, intonation, balance, rhythm, tempo, beat patterns, etc. A primary focus will be the development of leadership skills associated with directing an orchestra. In addition to working with student conductors the orchestra will perform as a chamber group without a conductor. Under my guidance every student in the orchestra will have an opportunity during rehearsals to comment on, and make suggestions about rehearsal issues. Discussions about how to fix problems involves careful diplomacy, as the fixes often involve small groups or individuals. I will work with the conductors and oversee the process of the conductorless orchestra. COW will rehearse 6 hours per week with me. I'll meet with the conductors separately 3 to 6 hours each week. Additional rehearsals can be scheduled by the members of the orchestra. Students will be required to practice their parts before scheduled rehearsals. A final performance will be take place at the end of Winter Study.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: The students will be expected to practice their parts in order to be prepared for every rehearsal.
PREREQUISITES: Clearly a student must be able to read music and play an orchestral instrument. Pianists and singers would be eligible to conduct.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 30
METHOD OF SELECTION: by audition, or if there is a need for a specific instrument to fill out the orchestra
COST: $0
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: Ronald Feldman

MUS 11 Hildegard of Bingen: Medieval Mysticism and Music CROSSLISTING: REL 11
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The 12th-century German abbess Hildegard of Bingen was one of the most remarkable people of her age. She was a mystical theologian and reformer, poet, composer, dramatist, artist, and author of treatises on natural science and medicine; she corresponded with royalty and popes as well as monastics and laity. Yet she lived most her long life in a remote cloister on the banks of the river Rhine, and was virtually lost to history until her recent rediscovery 900 years after her birth. This discussion course draws on recent recordings, films, and scholarship to explore the life and times of this extraordinary woman, using her music as the window into her spirituality, her thought, and her world. If possible, we will take a field trip to visit the Abbey of Regina Laudis in Bethlehem, CT.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on class participation, two short class presentations, and a final project with presentation. Students who wish to incorporate musical performance or other artistic aspects into their presentations and final project are encouraged to do so. Attendance is mandatory.
PREREQUISITES: No prerequisites. An ability to read music is not required.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference given to freshmen and sophomores, and to students with a demonstrated interest in music, religion, medieval history, or medieval art.
COST: no more than $100
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: M. Jennifer Bloxam

MUS 12 Performing the Ramayana
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The Hindu epic, the Ramayana, has captivated the interest and imagination of both religious and secular audiences; the story has served as the inspiration for artists in every imaginable discipline. This course has two major parts: in the first we will survey a range of genres and works that tell or interpret the Ramayana in some way. We will explore interpretations of the story and its characters through imagery and iconography, written material, movies and performance art. In the process, students will be introduced to a number of art forms, and religious and cultural practices, from throughout the Hindu world. Sources range from classical concert pieces to comic books, tourist shows to heavy metal concerts. In the second part of the course, students will create their own performed interpretation of a selected segment of the Ramayana, to be completed by individuals and/or small groups. The course will culminate in a retelling of selections of the Ramayana through the students' original works.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: In addition to regular attendance and completing a final performance piece, students will be expected to keep a journal and contribute discussion points to class meetings.
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference to Seniors
COST: $50
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Corinna Campbell

MUS 13 Introduction to Klezmer Music
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course provides an introduction to Klezmer music. Students will focus on different types of Klezmer tunes, including Bulgars, Hurras, Doinas, Shers and Chosidls. Sephardic tunes and Yiddish Theater tunes from the United States will also be studied. The various melodic and harmonic modes of Klezmer music will be studied, including Major, Minor, Ahava Raba, Misheberakh and Adonai Molokh. Emphasis will be placed on learning to phrase in the Klezmer style, the functions of the different instruments in a Klezmer group, harmonic phrase structure, melodic and rhythmic interpretation, and the role of embellishment and improvisation in Klezmer music. Coachings and performance critiques will provide feedback on student work.
In addition, the course material will include discussion of the history and development of Klezmer music, both in Europa and the United States. Reading assignments will be given from books such as The Essential Klezmer by Seth Rogovoy, Discovering Jewish Music by Marsha Bryan Edelman, The Compleat Klezmer by Henry Sapoznik and Stempenyu by Sholom Aleichem. The film "A Tickle in the Heart," about the Epstein brothers and their role in Klezmer music in the United States will be shown and discussed during one of the classes. If feasible, a field trip to the National Yiddish Book Center at Hampshire College will be planned.
The class will meet twice a week for three hour sessions. Outside of class, it is expected that the students will practice and rehearse the music individually and with the group, and complete the assigned reading.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation based on participation in the musical coachings and class discussions about the the assigned materials. On the last day of class there will be a performance by the student klezmer group and individual oral presentations on a klezmer music topic relating to the readings and/or the music studied. The performance and oral presentations will be evaluated. Attendance and class participation will also be taken into account.
PREREQUISITES: facility on a musical instrument
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 8
METHOD OF SELECTION: Audition on the instrument of the student's choice
COST: $0. Students must supply their own musical instruments, except for piano and drum set.
MEETING TIME: afternoons
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Paul Green
SPONSOR: W. Anthony Sheppard

ADJUNCT BIO: Paul Green, a professional clarinetist in the Berkshires, has a B.A in Theory and Composition of Music from Yale College, an M.S. in Performance from the Juilliard School and an M.M. in Jazz Performance from Florida International University. He has taught music at a variety of Institutions, including the Lynn University Conservatory of Music, Florida International University, Florida Atlantic University, the Hotchkiss School and the Berkshire Music School.

MUS 15 Contemporary American Songwriting CROSSLISTING: AMST 15/SPEC 15
See under SPEC for full description

MUS 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Music 493, 494.

NEUROSCIENCE

NSCI 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Neuroscience 493-494.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 10 What Should We Do With Our Brain?/Reading Catherine Malabou
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Is the mind a mirror? A computer? A projector? How might a Hegelian talk about neuroscience? Are there interesting and meaningful parallels between the ways in which we talk about brain structures and social and economic structures? Why, if at all, should we be interested in the metaphors we use to talk about the brain? How might the concept of "plasticity" help us rethink "destruction," "loss," and "death"? In this Winter Study tutorial we read short works by the French philosopher Catherine Malabou to begin to answer these questions. Readings may include: What Should We Do With Our Brains? (2008), Ontology of the Accident (2009) and The New Wounded: From Neurosis to Brain Damage (2012).
METHOD OF EVALUATION: 2 5-page tutorial papers
PREREQUISITES: One upper level course in Philosophy, Political Theory, or Critical Theory
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 10
METHOD OF SELECTION: Student petitions containing background information and reasons for choosing the course.
COST: $60
MEETING TIME: other
EXPLANATION OF MEETING TIME: Tutorial meetings and one or two seminar meetings.
INSTRUCTOR: Jana Sawicki

PHIL 12 Ethics in Public Health
COURSE DESCRIPTION: It is the beginning of Winter Study on the Williams campus. Students are just arriving after their semester break, and along with them, a novel and highly transmissible strain of avian flu. It is a fictional scenario, but not unimaginable. Over the course of the winter study period we will watch it unfold, and use it as a launch pad for investigating ethics in public health. In particular, the various stages of the epidemic will give us the opportunity to explore the ethics of disease surveillance, research, resource allocation, and compulsion within the public health context (e.g., mandated reporting of disease, isolation and quarantine, compulsory vaccination and treatment), among other topics. Students will be expected to complete background readings in public health ethics taken from the philosophical, bioethics, and professional public health literature, and to participate actively in class discussions. In addition, students are responsible to give in-class presentations in which they propose public health measures at various stages of the fictional epidemic, and defend the ethical dimensions of the measures they propose. (These may be team presentations, depending on class enrollment.) Each student will submit a brief (e.g., 2-3 page) written response to at least three other presentations.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: One in-class presentation, three short (2-3 page) response papers, and participation
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12
METHOD OF SELECTION: public health concentrators and philosophy majors will receive enrollment priority
COST: $20 for reading packet
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: Julia Pedroni

PHIL 13 Boxing
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Boxing is one of the world's oldest sports, and there are 3000 year old artistic representations of boxing from ancient Egypt. The history of boxing in the United States during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries reflects the history of the nation. Issues of class, ethnicity, race, and gender have played a central role in the sport. Stories about boxing also play a central role in the popular culture. In this course we will look at some treatments of boxing by social historians, examine some depictions of boxing in documentary and dramatic films, and watch some classic fights.
We will also learn some of the fundamental skills involved in boxing. Training as a boxer will give men and women a better appreciation of the physical demands involved. Four days a week we will engage in an intensive training regimen working on basic punching technique, footwork, defense and conditioning. The workouts will involve minimal contact, but will be physically demanding. Students will need to purchase boxing gloves, handwraps, and a jump rope.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation, and a 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: $150.
Meeting time: mornings workouts; movies, discussions and seminars in the afternoon and evening
INSTRUCTOR: Keith McPartland

PHIL 14 Plato's Symposium and Its Afterlife CROSSLISTING: CLAS 14/COMP 14/WGSS 14
See under CLAS for full description

PHIL 15 Deleuze: Philosophy, Literature and the Arts
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The French philosopher Gilles Deleuze (1925-1995) is considered one of the most important thinkers of the 20th century by many people interested in continental philosophy, post-structuralism and post-modernism. He has had a huge influence not only within philosophy itself, but also in as varied disciplines as literature, art theory, cinema, architectural theory and contemporary dance, to name a few. His multi-faceted work spans from remarkable re-readings of classical philosophers (Spinoza, Nietzsche, Hume, Bergson, Kant and Leibniz) to the development of his own philosophy centered on becoming and affirmation via works on literature, art, cinema, political and psychoanalytical theory.
This course will offer an introduction to different aspects of Deleuzian thought, starting out with his re-definition of philosophy, art and science as creating activities. We will subsequently address some of Deleuze's core themes: the nature of philosophy and the image of thought, the body and its affectivity, the nature of time through concepts like becoming, event and lines of flight, the relationship between philosophy and literature (in particular, American), and what it means to have an idea in cinema. Through a reading of a selection of texts and chapters from his different books, we will aim to develop an overarching understanding of one of the key figures in contemporary philosophy, as well as to see how philosophy as such is intimately connected to literature, art and cinema - to see how it is possible to think philosophically not only within philosophy, but with, and from out of, other creative disciplines.
Format: seminar (introduction to the texts given by the professor, followed by discussion).
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Attendance, participation in discussions, 10 pgs final paper
PREREQUISITES: None. Basic knowledge of the history of philosophy is recommended but not required.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: In case of overenrollment, preference will be given to students interested in philosophy, literature, film and political theory.
COST: Books and course package: 30 $
MEETING TIME: afternoons; 3x2 hour meetings per week + film viewing.
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Fredrika Spindler

ADJUNCT BIO: Fredrika Spindler, PhD, Associate professor of philosophy at Södertörn University, Stockholm, Sweden; STINT Fellow and Richmond Visiting Professor at Williams College 2013-2014; Visiting Professor at PUC University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil regularly since 2006. Areas of specialization: Continental philosophy, Spinoza, Nietzsche, Deleuze.

PHIL 25 Eye Care and Culture in Nicaragua
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students will be divided into two groups. One group will read extensive excerpts from Steven Kinzer's Blood of Brothers, which will introduce them to Nicaragua's complex history. A second group will read excerpts from Gioconda Belli's The Country Under My Skin, a memoir focusing on its author's involvement in the Sandinista revolution, and several documents specifically concerning the Atlantic Coast Autonomous Regions of Nicaragua. The groups will make presentations to each other (this a practice first used in 2014, when it was a great success).
The eye-care work the students will do in Nicaragua is described in this proposal's account of the intellectual substance of the course.
PREREQUISITES: None, although it is helpful to include at least three students who are fluent in Spanish.
method of evaluation: Presentations and journals as described above, along with on-site observation of the students' participation in the eye clinics.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12
METHOD FOR SELECTION: Students will submit applications indicating why they want to take the course. In 2014, we were able to include (1) all seniors who applied, and (2) all students who had applied for inclusion in the course in earlier years but been excluded. Others were selected on the basis of their applications. Those who were excluded were informed that if they reapplied in later years, we would attempt to accommodate them. We hope to be able to continue to do so. As indicated above, it is important to have some students who are fluent in Spanish, so that may be a factor in some cases.
resources: Classroom space for three mornings prior to the trip to Nicaragua, and one following our return to Williamstown; classroom space for somewhat longer on the day on which students are trained in giving eye exams. Perhaps photocopies of reading materials (although these may instead be posted on Glow). Health Services provides students with information, innoculations, and some medications.
budget: Spreadsheet sent to Barbara Casey
COST: 3100
INSTRUCTOR: Alan White, Robert Peck and Elise Harb

PHIL 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Philosophy 493-494.

PHYSICS

PHYS 10 Holography
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will examine the art and science of holography. It will introduce modern optics at a level appropriate for a non-science major, giving the necessary theoretical background in lectures and discussion. Demonstrations will be presented and students will make several kinds of holograms in the lab. Thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation, we have 7 well-equipped holography darkrooms available for student use. At the beginning of WSP, the class will meet for lecture and discussion three mornings a week and for lab 2 afternoons a week. The later part of the month will be mainly open laboratory time during which students, working in small groups, will conduct an independent project in holography approved by the instructor. Attendance at lectures and laboratory is required. Requirements: students will be expected to attend and participate in all class sessions as well as mandatory study sessions in museums once a week. They will also be required to keep a sketchbook recording their progress and complete a final project. Evaluations will be based on participation, effort, and development. All class sessions are mandatory as well as one session per week at the Clark and Williams College Museums.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on regular attendance, completion of 4 laboratory exercises, and a holography laboratory project with either a poster presentation to the class at the end of WSP or a 10-page paper approved by the instructor.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 30
METHOD OF SELECTION: if overenrolled, selection will be based on seniority.
COST: $50
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Ward Lopes

PHYS 11 The Making of the Atomic Bomb
COURSE DESCRIPTION: We will delve into the science and technological impact of the atomic bomb. Richard Rhodes' Pulitzer Prize winning account of the Manhattan Project, Michael Frayn's Tony Award winning play Copenhagen, and some movies will form the basis for explosive discussions. There will be 1000+ pages to read thoughtfully and one hands-on laboratory.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: 20 chapter summaries, discussion participation and leadership, participation in the lab
PREREQUISITES: high school physics
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: passion, or alphabetical
COST: $30
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: Daniel Aalberts

PHYS 12 Drawing as a Learnable Skill
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Representational drawing is not merely a gift, but a learnable skill. If you wanted to draw, but have never had the time to learn; or you enjoy drawing and wish to deepen your understanding and abilities, then this course is for you. This intensive course utilizes traditional drawing exercises to teach representational drawing. By using simple techniques and extensive exercises you will learn to see more accurately and realistically represent the physical world. You will learn to draw a convincing portrait, interior, and still life. This course is designed to develop your powers of observation and enhance your innate creative problem solving abilities, which are applicable in any field. Students need no previous artistic experience, just the willingness and desire to learn a new skill. Students will be expected to attend and participate in all class sessions as well as mandatory study sessions in museums once a week. They will also be required to keep a sketchbook recording their progress and complete a final project. All class sessions are mandatory as well as one session per week at the Clark and Williams College Museums.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluations will be based on participation, effort, and development.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 18
METHOD OF SELECTION: Selection will be based on seniority if over enrolled
COST: textbook and $5 for materials
MEETING TIME: mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Stella Ehrich

ADJUNCT BIO: Stella Ehrich lived in Italy for sixteen years, where she spent seven years studying figurative realism in the Studio Simi in Florence. She holds an MFA in painting from Bennington College. Stella is a professional painter whose work includes portraits, landscapes and still life subjects.

PHYS 13 Loop d' Loop d' Loop d' Loop d' Loop d' Loop...
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This class is about music, but you don't have to be a musician to take it. It is about recursion, but you don't have to be a computer scientist to get it. We will play with the subjective and social meanings of sound-art, but you don't have to be an artist to play along.
Imagine that you record yourself speaking in a room; You record the sound of that recording as it plays back in that same room; You record the recording of the recording; You sit back and let this loop repeat and repeat. Eventually your words are smoothed out by the resonances of the room into a rich melody.
In this class we will explore the world of sound-art. We will transmute audio samples by harnessing the resonances of architectural spaces in Williamstown, from dorm room to theater. Emphasizing hands-on projects, students will create, listen, read, and field trip their way to a new understanding of sound and recursion.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: A final project that could range from creating a new piece of sound-art, to an acoustical experiment, to an essay. Students are welcome to work in groups.
PREREQUISITES: NONE
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: If overenrolled, selection will be based on seniority.
COST: $0
MEETING TIME: 10AM-12PM MTR
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Daniel Fox

ADJUNCT BIO: Daniel Fox is a composer and a mathematician interested in the sense of space that one can create using music and sound.

PHYS 14 Electronics
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Electronic circuits and instruments are indispensable parts of modern laboratory work throughout the sciences. This course will cover the basics of analog electronic circuits, including transistors and operational amplifiers, and will briefly introduce digital circuits. Class will include a mixture of lab, lecture, and discussion, providing ample opportunity for hands-on experience. Students will build and test a variety of circuits chosen to illustrate the kinds of electronic devices and design problems a scientist is apt to encounter. In the last week, students will design and build a final project, or will write a 10-page paper.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Participation, completion of both laboratory work and occasional homework, and quality of final project or paper
PREREQUISITES: Mathematics 140 or equivalent calculus
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 16
METHOD OF SELECTION: Priority given to seniors first, first-years last
COST: $50
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: Jefferson Strait

PHYS 16 3D Design and Fabrication for Rapid Prototyping and Advanced Manufacturing
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Advances in 3D design and fabrication technology are fundamentally changing the landscape of product development and manufacturing. Sophisticated tools for design and analysis are widely available and lower in cost. Concept to prototype design cycles have shrunk from months to days or even hours. Advanced manufacturing technology is creating more complex and intricate components with higher throughput, producing better products but creating fewer jobs. In this course, we will engage in hands-on exploration of the technology that is driving the change in products that affect our lives, but also in our economy and society.
Utilizing state-of the-art 3D CAD (computer-aided design) tools, we will model a variety of objects using both parametric and non-parametric methods. We will create dynamic simulations of mechanisms and perform stress analysis. We will use a 3-D printer to create rapid-prototypes. After verifying the design through prototypes, we will use CAM (computer-aided manufacturing) to create a program for a state-of-the-art 5-axis CNC milling machine. This CNC system will produce metal objects of virtually any shape or complexity at high-speed.
To gain further understanding of the impact of advanced manufacturing on jobs and the economy, we will visit several manufacturing companies in New England that use both traditional and highly advanced manufacturing technologies to create parts for industries such as aerospace and medical devices. In the last week, students will create a final project fabricated from their own design. At the conclusion of the class students will display and discuss the projects in a public poster display and reception.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Final project and poster form public display and reception
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 10
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference based on one-paragraph explanation of student's interest in the course.
COST: 75
MEETING TIME: afternoons
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Michael Taylor

ADJUNCT BIO: Michael Taylor is an engineer and inventor with 30 years of experience in product development and manufacturing. Broad-based hands-on mechanical and electrical fabrication skills. Experienced in 3D CAD and rapid proto-typing. Owns and operates a product development and consumer products company. Full-time college employee in the Bronfman Science Shop. B.S./M.S in Engineering Sciences (Univ. of Florida)

PHYS 22 Research Participation
Several members of the department will have student projects available dealing with their own research or that of current senior thesis students. Approximately 35 hours per week of study and actual research participation will be expected from each student.
Students will be required to keep a notebook and write a 5-page paper summarizing their work. Those interested should consult with members of the department as early as possible in the registration period or before to determine details of projects then expected to be available.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor.
Enrollment limit: 1 or 2 per project.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: to be arranged with instructor.
TUCKER-SMITH and members of the department

PHYS 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Physics 493, 494.

POLITICAL ECONOMY

POEC 17 Social Entrepreneurship: Impact in the Social Sector
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Operating as consultants, students will work in small teams to develop solutions to challenges faced by leading social enterprises ("clients") working in areas such as economic development, education, and health care. Projects will focus on current, actual challenges, e.g. how best to evaluate a program's impact, how best to engage a target constituency, or how to achieve financial sustainability. Student teams will develop project plans, collect and analyze relevant information, and seek input from a variety of experts. They will present their final recommendations to client organizations' leadership teams. The course will feature several guest speakers who will address developments and trends in the field of social entrepreneurship. The class will travel to New York City to meet with leading social enterprises and impact investors.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: class participation, project contributions, quality of final written and oral presentations, and the value of the input that students provide to clients.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: If oversubscribed, selection will be based on a statement of student interest in the course.
COST: $250
MEETING TIME: mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Jeffrey D. Thomas

ADJUNCT BIO: Jeffrey Thomas is the Executive Director of Lever, a center for entrepreneurship and social innovation based in North Adams, Massachusetts.

POEC 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as PSCI 21)
See under PSCI for full description

POEC 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) CROSSLISTING: ECON 22/WGSS 22
See under ECON for full description

POEC 23 Institutional Investment
The Williams College Investment Office, based in Boston, is seeking three sophomores or
juniors to join the Investment Office for four weeks in January 2015. The Investment Office manages the investments of the College's $2.0 billion endowment. The endowment plays a major role in supporting the operations of the College and the role of the Investment Office is to develop critical understanding of markets and investment managers to provide the best financial support possible to the College.
What is it?
This unique opportunity is a structured program designed to give students an overview of
endowment and investment management. Through formal training and project work, Winter Study Analysts will gain a better understanding of how an institutional investment portfolio is managed and how investment managers are selected and monitored. Students will learn about global equities, hedge funds, venture capital, buyouts, commodities, real estate and fixed income. Exposure will cut across U.S. and non-U.S. markets, both developed and emerging. Winter Study Analysts will sharpen their professional skills and have the opportunity to meet investment professionals from across the investment industry.
Students are expected to work at the office for a minimum of 32 hours a week (four days/week), complete a set of relevant readings, keep a journal, and present a final project. No prerequisites are required.
When is it?
The Winter Study Analyst program will be based in Boston and will run for four weeks
during Winter Study (January 5 - January 29).
Where is it?
The Winter Study Analyst program will be based in the Investment Office in Boston, MA
and housing will be provided for the Analysts.
How do I apply?
To apply for enrollment, please select this course (WS POEC 23) as your first choice when
registering for Winter Study. Additionally, please send an email with your resume and a cover letter discussing why you are interested in this course and what you hope to gain from it to: investmentoffice@williams.edu by 11:59 PM ET on Sunday, October 12, 2014. Enrollment limit: 3. If oversubscribed, students will be selected via interviews.
What does it cost?
Low/no-cost housing and class related materials (i.e. books and articles) will be provided by
the Investment Office. Students are responsible for the cost of food, incidentals and transportation to and from Boston at the beginning and end of the month.

Instructors?
This Winter Study Class is taught by the investment team that staffs the Williams College
Investment Office. The three lead instructors for the program for January 2015 are Collette Chilton (Chief Investment Officer), Abigail Wattley (Director), and Caitlyn Clark (Investment Analyst). The entire Investment Office staff is integrally involved and supportive of the program and students will interact regularly with all team members.

Collette Chilton, Chief Investment Officer - Collette joined Williams College in October 2006. Prior to joining Williams, Collette was President and Chief Investment Officer at Lucent Asset Management Corporation from 1998 to 2006. While at Lucent, Collette was responsible for the investment and oversight of approximately $40 billion in pension and retirement savings assets for the company. Collette received a Bachelor of Science degree in Political Economy of Natural Resources from the University of California, Berkeley in 1981 and a Masters of Business Administration from the Amos Tuck Graduate School of Business at Dartmouth College in 1986.

Abigail Wattley, Director - Abigail rejoined Williams College in September 2010 as an Investment Associate. From 2007 to 2008 Abigail worked in the Williams Investment Office in the role of Investment Analyst. Prior to working for Williams, Abigail worked as a Senior Consulting Associate at Cambridge Associates. Abigail received a B.A. in Economics from Williams College in 2005 and a Masters of Business Administration from the Harvard Business School in 2010.

Caitlyn Clark, Investment Analyst - Caitlyn joined Williams College in July 2013.
Caitlyn received a B.A. in Chemistry from Williams College in 2013. During her time at Williams, Caitlyn was captain of the women's varsity soccer team.

What if I have questions?
If you would like to learn more about the endowment you can find our investment report at:
http://investment.williams.edu
If you have questions you can email us at Investmentoffice@williams.edu

POEC 25 Socio-economic Impact of 20 Years of Democracy in South Africa CROSSLISTING: ECON 25/ PSCI 25
See under ECON for full description

POEC 31 Honors Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Political Economy 493.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

PSCI 11 Heroes/Anti-Heroes in Contemporary TV and Cinema CROSSLISTING: AFR 11
See under AFR for full description

PSCI 12 The Art of War
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will examine the meaning and uses of the classical Chinese text, The Art of War, by Sun Tzu. Students will consider Sun Tzu's insights both in the context of ancient Chinese philosophy and in terms of their contemporary relevance. The first half of the course will concentrate on placing Sun Tzu in historical and philosophical context; the second half will examine how The Art of War has been used in a variety of modern fields.
Evaluation will include mandatory class attendance and participation, and a 10-page paper.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will include mandatory class attendance and participation, and a 10-page paper.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: Seniors and juniors will have priority
COST: 75
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Sam Crane

PSCI 13 Race, Politics, and Scandal
COURSE DESCRIPTION: "Scandal," a popular television series and political thriller, has caught the attention of many Americans. While the show's plot is largely focused on Olivia Pope's efforts to manage the images of America's political elite, its audience is largely fascinated by the show's sub-plots. Here, we are presented questions of morality, depictions of familial relationships, illustrations of power and gender dynamics, and challenges concerning the meaning and processes of democracy. What's more, while the lead character is a Black woman and the cast is racially and ethnically diverse, the extent to which race is factor in the lives the characters is up for debate. "Race, Politics, and Scandal" is a course aimed to delve into the conversations in which creator Shonda Rhimes encourages her audience to engage. We will use the show to explore issues around race, gender, democracy and political scandal. Students should have some familiarity with the show; we will view select scenes during class but discussion will mainly focus on how the readings around the course's central themes are portrayed in this popular television series.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: class participation, short reflection papers, presentation
PREREQUISITES: None.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 18
METHOD OF SELECTION: First and second year students will get preference
COST: $0
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: Candis Smith

PSCI 14 The CIA and the Politics of Intelligence
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will trace the evolution of CIA from an organization largely focused, in its early days, on coups and regime change under the Dulles brothers, to its present role in the war on terror and beyond. Students will consider how intelligence is and ought to be gathered, and the political issues that emerge from those activities. Some of the Agency's signal successes and failures will be examined, and some of its directors will be evaluated. The fluctuating relationship between CIA and the FBI will also be discussed. Stress will be placed on the personal experiences of those who have served in the Agency.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will include class attendance and participation, and a 10-page paper.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 18
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference to Political Science majors and Leadership Studies concentrators.
COST: 50$
MEETING TIME: afternoons
ADJUNCT BIO: Donald Gregg served in CIA from 1951-82, worked in the White House from 1979-89, and was US Ambassador to South Korea from 1989-93. He is now chairman emeritus of The Korea Society. 1980-89, taught a second-year graduate level course at the Master of Science in Foreign Service Program of Georgetown University. He is now chairman of the Pacific Century Institute in Los Angeles.
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Donald Gregg

PSCI 15 Media Battlegrounds: A Workshop in Media Criticism CROSSLISTING: ENGL 15
COURSE DESCRIPTION: More than ever, people are unhappy with journalism and reporting in the US. And there is a lot to complain about. But what do these complaints tell us about the larger battle to control and shape news media, and politics, in the US?
This course is a hands-on critical inquiry and discussion experience. We will compare the methods, arguments, and conclusions of groups contesting - and influencing - news and media production. Readings will introduce students to different styles of criticizing journalism and mass media by intellectuals, politicians, think tanks, activists, media professionals, and others. Students will also discover and discuss examples of media criticism from the worlds of political satire, everyday life, or elsewhere. In class discussions, we will collaborate to pin down the standards are arguments used by various media critics to challenge and legitimize media practices and connect media criticism with broader intellectual movements and relations of power.
Students will be challenged to define their own standards for "good" media and develop their own method of criticism, employing it to analyze media texts of their choosing -- everything from articles, videos, radio stories, films, and more. The course will culminate in presentations of each student's findings.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Participation in class, regular short analytical writing, and final project/presentation
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 16
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference to juniors, seniors, and students with demonstrated interest in the field
COST: 30
MEETING TIME: mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: James Owens

ADJUNCT BIO: James Owens is an independent media researcher and activist whose studies of journalism and politics appear in scholarly and movement-based publications alike. He is a co-founder of Chicago Media Action and holds an MA in Communication from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

PSCI 16 Political Aikido: How to Form the More Perfect Union
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Preamble: For over 50 years, Williams has helped shape the world by training students at the Center for Developmental Economics to become finance ministers and policy advisors to their respective governments and central banks. This Winter Study course, which might also be summarized as "Aikido and Adolescent Democracies", is dedicated to the proposition that a sister program, perhaps known as the Center for Developmental Politics, could in a similar way help shape the world by training students to conduct themselves as politicians and policy advocates in a way that seeks harmony rather than division, that relies on hope rather than fear, and that insists on justice for all. Students in this course will take on the pioneering task of demonstrating exactly what such a sister program might accomplish.
Premise: Hyper-Partisanship necessarily steers the ship of state back and forth from one ideological direction to the other as the political power of opposing parties rises and falls. Much of the political energy is spent destructively, and therefore is not available to implement positive change. More progress would be made if the ship of state sailed in one more consistent direction without so much of the side to side, and if political capital could be spent on progress rather than persecution.
The Course: Strategies for finding a common direction forward in the midst of opposing political energies will emerge from the student's embodied study of martial arts, specifically Aikido, which is sometimes called "The Art of Peace". Aikido is a Japanese martial tradition that combines the samurai arts of sword and grappling with the philosophical desire to manifest harmony in the face of conflict. As such, Aikido addresses situations of conflict that manifest themselves physically, but also offers insight into how to prevent or redirect the energies - social, political, or psychological - that might otherwise become conflict in one or another aspect of our lives. The physical training (2 hours each weekday morning in Currier Ballroom) will improve each student's strength, balance, posture, and flexibility. Everyone will also learn how to throw their friends across the room. About 25% of training time will be devoted to sword, staff, and dagger techniques.
Students will focus their academic work on researching the political landscape within one particular country, developing Aikido-inspired recommendations to improve the imperfect democratic systems and circumstances they find there, and articulating why those recommendations are implementable and would have the desired effects. Students will perform this work in groups of approximately five. Potentially interesting choices for academic focus include such imperfect democracies as the US, China, the Dominican Republic, the European Union, and the hypothetical Palestinian State.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Students will be evaluated on the quality of their participation in both physical and intellectual course components (class discussions, final project) Students are encouraged to correspond with the instructor (rkent-at-williams.edu) before registration begins if they have questions.
PREREQUISITES: Same physician's approval on file as the school requires to participate on sports teams. Students do not have to be especially athletic, and in Aikido women train as equals with men.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: should the course oversubscribe, selection will be via a short survey.
COST: $150 (for which you get an aikido uniform and training weapons)
MEETING TIME: mornings (daily aikido training), and over lunch (academic discussions in smaller groups 1-2 times/ week)
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Robert Kent

ADJUNCT BIO: Robert Kent '84 spent 3 years in Kyoto, Japan earning his Sho Dan (first degree black belt), directly after majoring in both Philosophy and Religion at Williams. He currently holds a Yon Dan rank (Fourth degree black belt) and serves as President of Aiki Extensions, Inc., a nonprofit that supports programs that bring the strategic insights and practical wisdom of Aikido into non-traditional settings. He is also founder of The PeaceCamp Initiative (a scholarship program that seeks to use Aikido principles to heal the Israeli/Palestinian conflict a few kids at a time) for which he won Ben & Jerry's 2008 Peace Pioneer Prize. He earned a Masters degree in Philosophy at Claremont Graduate School in 1993, writing his thesis on the Ethics of Authenticity. This will be the 9th time he has offered an Aikido-based Winter Study course.

PSCI 17 The Third World City
COURSE DESCRIPTION: In 2007, the world became majority urban. But most of these urbanites live not in places like New York or Tokyo but rather in places like Lagos or Mumbai, dwelling in shantytowns and working in petty commerce. Their cities' path of urbanization diverges from the "normal" one accompanying industrialization in the West and in East Asia. About this phenomenon, arguably the most important social fact in today's world, observers have adopted wildly divergent normative and theoretical stances, from the romantically optimistic to the apocalyptic. We read a few of these, including Mike Davis, Rem Koolhaas, Hernando De Soto, and Robert Neuwirth, and watch some films and videos on the subject.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: 10-page paper
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference to Political Science majors
COST: small course packet and books (about $70)
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: James Mahon

PSCI 18 Girl meets World: Films from 5 Continents CROSSLISTING: WGSS 18
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course brings together a selection of films that challenge the narrative of girl-meets-boy as the privileged formula for representing the growth and development of young women around the world. Sometimes girl does meet boy, but the challenge that these films put to us is to re-imagine the path to womanhood as mediated by other factors as well: girls' own curiosity and ambition, their resourcefulness in the face of poverty and exploitation, resistance against being gendered in conventional ways, their friendships and romantic ties with one another, and their many creative ways of defining how one becomes a woman. To support our analysis of the films, we will also consider how some transnational feminist movements have responded to the challenges and creative energies of girlhood. Special attention will be given to the difficulty of securing girls' rights through international conventions that implicitly treat all children (ages 0-18) as male, and all women as adults. Films and film-makers will likely be selected from the following countries: Korea, India, Great Britain, Belgium, Senegal, France, Australia, Colombia, Argentina, and the United States.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Active class participation and either 3 policy memos (3 pages each) or one 10-page final paper
PREREQUISITES:
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference to Political Science and WGSS majors
COST: $50 for reading materials
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: Nimu Njoya

PSCI 19 Law as a Tool for Social Justice
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The law is a powerful tool to attain goals of social justice. It may be deployed in two ways: through the enactment of legislation, and by use of the judicial system. Racial justice and justice for the impoverished are the two goals dealt with by this course; however, the class will focus more on the legal process and courses of action to achieve them. While the materials impart knowledge of the legal system and courtroom practice, the course always will view the law and its evolution in the context of the larger political, social and economic settings of the time. While at times the law will have a heroic cast, the course also will examine the limitations of its use as a tool for social justice due to overriding political, social and economic obstacles.
The class will focus on four engaging and highly praised books:
Gilbert King, Devil in the Grove; the story of a 1949 Florida interracial rape case involving horrific injustice that was taken to the Supreme Court by Thurgood Marshall. Winner, 2013 Pulitzer Prize nonfiction.
Anthony Lewis, Gideon's Trumpet; the setting, by the Supreme Court, of a new legal precedent providing impoverished persons with legal counsel in State felony cases. Winner, 1965 Edgar Prize nonfiction.
Adam Hochschild, Bury the Chains; the story of an ultimately successful grass-roots movement to enact anti-slavery legislation in Great Britain in the first half of the 19th century. Finalist, 2005 National Book Award nonfiction.
J. Anthony Lukas, Common Ground; the author follows 3 families (Black, Irish-Catholic, and Boston Brahmin) as a sharply divided Boston reacts to a Federal court busing order to achieve integration. Winner, 1985 Pulitzer Prize nonfiction.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will include class attendance and participation, and a 10-page paper.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: seniority
COST: $70
MEETING TIME: mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Richard Pollet

ADJUNCT BIO: Richard Pollet graduated from Williams in 1969, cum laude, with Honors in Political Science, and thereafter obtained a J.D. from Columbia Law. He spent 40 years practicing law, the last 26 as General Counsel of J.Walter Thompson (JWT), retiring from the company last June. He now does some legal consulting, which primarily consists of teaching/mentoring newly hired lawyers of WPP, the parent company of JWT.

PSCI 20 Politics after the Apocalypse CROSSLISTING: ENVI 20
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The zombies are coming! Climate change will destroy us all! Bird-flu pandemic! Contemporary film, journalism, pop culture, and science continually remind us that we live on the edge of cataclysm - reminders that are sometimes alarmist, sometimes fanciful, and sometimes all too realistic. What will happen if (when?) we slip over that edge? What shape will human life and society take after the apocalypse? Which aspects of political order (and disorder) will survive the fire, pestilence, war, or other ground-clearing disaster to give shape to the lives of survivors? What new political forms will emerge upon that cleared ground? Will humanity go backwards or forwards after the purge? Will we even be "human" at that point?
This class will ponder an eclectic array of sources from television, film, literature, social science, and critical theory that envision politics after the apocalypse. We will approach these sources as thought experiments akin to other theoretical devices in the cannon of political theory: most obviously, efforts to imagine politics after the apocalypse seem analogous to and in tension with classical accounts of the "state of nature" and its overcoming in social contract theory. What does it say about a particular dimension of politics to imagine either its erasure or its persistence after the end times? What kinds of aspirations for our contemporary, pre-apocalyptic moment are engendered by fantasies - be they dark, comic, or both - of bands of survivors scraping together an existence in fictive post-apocalyptic moments?
Course materials will include the films 28 Days Later and How to Survive a Plague, the climate-disaster novel Far North, the television drama The Walking Dead, selections from Locke and Hobbes' social contract theories, and contemporary academic works such as Daniel W. Drezner's Theories of International Politics and Zombies and Jacques Derrida's "Of an Apocalyptic Tone Recently Adopted in Philosophy." In addition to regular, brief analytic writings, students will develop and present a final project: either a traditional academic paper or a creative work of post-apocalyptic fiction (i.e. a short story or a video short).
METHOD OF EVALUATION: class participation, regular response pieces, final project and its presentation.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: preference to first years, sophomores and Poli Sci majors
COST: 30
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: Laura Ephraim

PSCI 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as POEC 21)
This course is a participant-observation experience in which students work full-time for a governmental or nongovernmental (including voluntary, activist, and grassroots) organization or for a political campaign. Students may find placements in government and nonprofit organizations in which their work involves significant involvement with public issues. Examples include: town government offices; state or federal administrative offices (e.g., environmental agencies, housing authorities); interest groups that lobby government (e.g., ACLU, NRA); nonprofit organizations such as service providers or think tanks (e.g., Habitat for Humanity, Cato Institute); and grassroots, activist or community development organizations (e.g., Greenpeace or neighborhood associations). The instructors will work with each student to arrange a placement; such arrangements must be made in advance of the Winter Term. Students should first make their own contracts with an institution or agency. The instructors and members of the Political Science Department are available to help students find placements, if necessary. Each student's fieldwork mentor shall send a confirmation letter to the instructor verifying the placement and describing the nature of the work to be performed by the instructor, and write a final paper summarizing and reflecting upon the experience. A group meeting of all students will occur after winter study to discuss the experience.
Requirements: 90 hours of fieldwork; satisfactory evaluation from the institutional sponsor; 10-page final paper or equivalent; participation in final meeting. At the time of preregistration, interested students should send a resume and letter of interest to Paula Consolini.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 30.
Selection will be based on a resume and letter of interest.
Cost: approximately $15 for readings, student covers transportation costs to and from internship site.
Meeting time: some meetings will take place prior to Winter Study and at the end, as students are off-site in internships during the term.
Instructors: C. JOHNSON (Cathy.M.Johnson@williams.edu) and PAULA CONSOLINI (Paula.M.Consolini@williams.edu)

Paula Consolini is the Director of the Center for Learning in Action.

PSCI 22 Learning Intervention for Troubled Teens (LIFFT)
The objective of this program and winter study course is to provide an alternative sentence for adolescents involved in the Juvenile Court system in Berkshire County. Many of these children cut school, are disruptive in the classroom, and do not find learning stimulating. The goal of this program is to teach these children, through experience, that learning can be fun, providing them with the motivation to succeed in school. These students, under the guidance of Williams College undergraduates, will select a topic of interest and learn how to research and present this topic to their peers in the program, with access to Williams College facilities. Williams undergraduate students will gain experience in teaching and motivating troubled teenagers and will also present a topic of their choosing to the students in the program, modeling a classroom setting. Furthermore, Williams students will be exposed to the Juvenile Court system, gaining insight into the causes of and solutions to the incidence of juvenile crime. Williams students will be expected to read relevant training materials, meet with their teenagers three times a week in the afternoon, give a final presentation, and keep a weekly journal detailing the meetings.
Evaluation will be based on the quality of the journal and the Williams students' own topic presentations.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 8.
Preference to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Students will be asked to write a paragraph describing why they want to take the course.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: students will meet on Mondays for a Group Discussion from 2-4 PM, Tuesdays-Thursdays with their teens from 3-5 PM, and on Fridays for field trips from 8 AM-12 PM. The estimated total required time per week is 12 hours.
Instructor: MICHAEL WYNN (mwynn@pittsfieldpd.org)
Sponsor: SHANKS

Mike Wynn is the Chief of the Pittsfield Police Department and graduated from Williams in 1993. s

PSCI 25 Socio-economic Impact of 20 Years of Democracy in South Africa CROSSLISTING: ECON 25/POEC 25
See under ECON for full description

PSCI 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Political Science 493-494.

PSCI 32 Individual Project
To be taken by students registered for Political Science 495 or 496.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 12 Alcohol 101: Examining and Navigating the College Drinking Scene
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Seventy-two percent of college students report that they used alcohol at least once within the past 30 days. Where is the line between fun and danger? This course will examine the realities of the role of alcohol in the social lives of college students. Students will engage in active discussions of outside readings, in-class videos, and myths vs. facts, as well as personal observations and opinions. Class structure will involve 3-hour classes that meet twice weekly. Participants will learn scientific facts about alcohol, including how it gets metabolized in the body differently in men and women, and how to recognize and respond to the signs of alcohol poisoning. Films will include evocative footage and interviews, such as "College Binge Drinking and Sober Reflections." We will hear from emergency personnel about alcohol-related medical emergencies and problem-solve strategies to stay safe when choosing to use alcohol. Statistical data from colleges here in the Northeast will be reviewed, including survey results from the Core Institute and the Harvard School of Public Health Alcohol study.
Requirements: outside readings, in-class participation and the final presentation of a project aimed at educating peers.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: In-class participation and the final presentation of a project aimed at educating peers.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: permission of instructor (if overenrolled)
COST: $25
MEETING TIME: afternoons
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Kathryn Niemeyer

ADJUNCT BIO: Kathy Niemeyer holds an M.A. in Counseling Psychology from Boston College and is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor with current private practices in Williamstown and Pittsfield. She has worked in the Fitchburg State and Stonehill College Counseling Centers and was also the AOD Prevention Program Coordinator at Stonehill. She taught the semester-long Alcohol and Other Drugs course at Boston College and has been a regular guest lecturer at Williams.

PSYC 13 Designing for People CROSSLISTING: CSCI 13
See under CSCI for full description

PSYC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships CROSSLISTING: CHEM 14/SPEC 14
See under CHEM for full description

PSYC 15 Ephquilts: An Introduction to Traditional Quilting
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This studio course will lead the student through various piecing, appliqué and quilting styles and techniques, with some non-traditional methods included. Samples will be made of techniques learned, culminating in the completion of a sizeable project of the student's choosing (wall quilt or lap-size quilt). There will be an exhibit of all work (ephquilts), at the end of winter study. "Woven" into the classes will be discussions of the history of quilting, the controversy of "art" quilts vs. "traditional" quilts, machine vs. hand-quilting and the growing quilting market. Reading list: Pieces of the Past by Nancy J. Martin; Stitching Memories: African-American Story Quilts by Eva Ungar Grudin; Sunshine and Shadow: The Amish and Their Quilts by Phyllis Haders; A People and Their Quilts by John Rice Irwin; Treasury of American Quilts by Cyril Nelson and Carter Houck; The Quilt: New Directions for an American Tradition, Nancy Roe, Editor. Requirements: attendance of all classes (including field trip), a love of fabric, design and color, an enthusiasm for handwork, participation in exhibit. Extensive time will be spent outside of class working on assigned projects.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: 2 projects: a techniques sampler quilt and a quilt of student's choosing (to be approved by instructor) and participation in exhibit
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: seniors, juniors, sophomores, first years
COST: $250.00
MEETING TIME: afternoons
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Debra Rogers-Gillig

ADJUNCT BIO: Debra Rogers-Gillig, one of the top quilters in New England, has been quilting for 30 years, and teaching classes and coordinating shows and exhibits for 25 years. She has received numerous prizes and awards from quilt shows in New York and New England and been published in quilt magazines.

PSYC 16 Biology and Psychology of Food Intake and Taste CROSSLISTING: BIOL 14
See under BIOL for full description

PSYC 18 Knocking on Heaven's Door: Thanatology 101
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Of the two great themes that peoples of all cultures have reflected upon since the dawn of time, love and death, the latter has only been recently addressed in undergraduate curricula. In this important and ground-breaking class, we will attend to central issues dealing with the experiences of dying people; decision-making at the end of life; challenges for the care-givers; manifestations of grief as a healing process; and, that which constitutes a "death system." Our sources and materials will be drawn from literature, film, psychology, philosophy, religion, ethics and the law. Some of our sessions will feature first-person narratives of individuals discussing real-world scenarios. Students will be expected to interview someone who has lost a loved one and to learn about his or her grief experience; or, to spend one-on-one time with a dying person, or a funeral director. We will have a field trip to a local funeral home. Your study of a death system will be an opportunity to explore your local area and learn what policies and resources are in place that effect the death and dying experiences in your community.
As we reflect upon the dying process, we will consider our reactions to our own mortality and to that of those close to us.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on class participation, one in-class presentation, and the final five to ten-page essay
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference will be given to students who have a special interest in, or experience with, death and dying.
COST: $30 - 40
MEETING TIME: We will meet two or three afternoons a week.
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS: Deborah Alecson and David Elpern
Deborah Golden Alecson, M.S. is a thanatologist and author who teaches, lectures, and writes about death, dying and bereavement. Her books include Lost Lullaby (University of California Press, 1995) and We Are So Lightly Here: A Story About Conscious Dying (Goldenwords, Ink, 2010). Her new book of poetry, Complicated Grief, will be available in the Fall 2014.
David J. Elpern, M.D is a Williamstown physician who has written and taught courses about the medical humanities for the past thirty years.

PSYC 19 Psychology Internships
Would you like to explore applications of psychology in the "real world?" This course gives students an opportunity to work full time during winter study in a mental health, business, education, law or other setting in which psychological theories and methods are applied to solve problems. Students are responsible for locating their own potential internships whether in the local area, their hometowns, or elsewhere, and are welcome to contact the course instructor for suggestions on how to do this. In any case, all students considering this course must consult with the instructor about the suitability of the internship being considered before the winter study registration period. Please prepare a brief description of the proposed placement, noting its relevance to psychology, and the name and contact information of the agency supervisor. Before Thanksgiving break, the student will provide a letter from the agency supervisor which describes the agency, and the student's role and responsibilities during Winter Study. Enrolled students will meet the instructor before Winter Study to discuss matters relating to ethics and their goals for the course, and after Winter Study to discuss their experiences and reflections.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page minimum final paper summarizing the student's experiences and reflections, a journal kept throughout the experience, and the supervisor's evaluation.
Prerequisites: approval of Professor Zaki is required.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost: travel expenses in some cases.
INSTRUCTOR: Jennifer Crosby

PSYC 22 Introduction to Research in Psychology
This course provides a research opportunity for students who want to understand how psychologists ask compelling questions and find answers about behavior. Several faculty members, whose subfields include behavioral neuroscience, cognitive psychology, social psychology, clinical psychology, developmental psychology, and the psychology of education, will have student projects available. Since projects involve faculty research, interested students must consult with members of the Psychology Department before electing this course.
Required activities: a minimum of 20 hours per week of research participation will be expected of each student.
Evaluation will be based on the quality of research participation, student's lab journal and either an oral presentation or a written 10-page report of the research project.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor.
Enrollment limit: space available in faculty research labs.
Selection will be based on evaluation of departmental application and number of faculty available as mentors.
Meeting time: other.
INSTRUCTOR: Laurie Heatherington

PSYC 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Psychology 493-494.
K. SAVITSKY

PUBLIC HEALTH

PHLH 23 Uncomfortable Learning: Gaudino Fellowship
The Gaudino Fund is offering Gaudino Fellowships for a group of 3 to 4 students during Winter Study 2014, based upon a proposed domestic or foreign collaborative project to be held in the same general location, reflecting values identified in the Gaudino Mission Statement, including separate home stays for each fellow, either joint or separate work/engagement internships, and a structure to facilitate collaborative action and learning. The team selected will be guided and overseen by the Gaudino Scholar who will help assure successful arrangements and will conduct appropriate preparatory discussions and follow-up sessions to optimize and help students articulate lessons learned from the overall experience.
Students should form teams of 3 or 4 and organize their projects around two main components: direct encounter with otherness and self-reflection. The Gaudino Board is particularly interested in projects that encourage students to confront their own personal beliefs, values or views regarding the subject and that also develop the "habits of mind" of applying conceptual thinking and intellectual analysis to a challenging experience. The Gaudino Board is looking for projects that address specific intellectual problems through direct experience, undertaken preferably in a social milieu that is previously unfamiliar or even uncomfortable to the applicant. For example, proposed projects could address issues of socioeconomic class, race, public health, environmental degradation, religion, sexuality, violence or migration.
N.B. Although this course is housed in PHLH, projects are not limited to public health.
Each team is expected to meet with the Gaudino Scholar in late September and submit their group application by October 4th. The Scholar along with a group of Gaudino Trustees will pick one project to award the Gaudino Fellowship. That team will then meet and consult with the Gaudino Board during their meeting on October 19th.
Projects will be evaluated on whether they do subject the students to "uncomfortable learning", i.e. having an experience that challenges and perhaps alters one's view of what it is to live a good life and the group's commitment to incorporate home stays as part of their project and overall experience. In fact, a home/family stay is required at the location. Simply encountering people or cultures that differ from those of the applicant is not sufficient. We are looking for something closer to total immersion, actually living and participating in an unfamiliar culture. The intent is to open the student to an understanding (of both the familiar and unfamiliar) that could not be achieved otherwise.
Each student is expected to write a short (3-4 page) self-reflection before leaving for the WSP, keep a journal of their experience, as well as write a 8-10 page paper by the end of the Winter Study period reflecting on the WSP experiences and what has possibly changed in the student's perceptions and beliefs from the opening essay. They will also meet the other members of the team on a weekly basis during Winter Study and regularly update the Gaudino Scholar by email and/or Skype calls. The team that receives the Gaudino Fellowship will give a brief presentation to the Board about their experience at the Board's spring meeting in April.
The team whose project is approved will receive the Gaudino Fellow designation. In addition, students on Financial Aid will receive Gaudino funding from a minimum of 50% to a maximum of 90% of the budget for the project up to $2,500, as determined by the Financial Aid office. No additional funding for students' projects will be provided by the College. Students selecting this course will register for PHLH 23.
INSTRUCTOR: Lois Banta

RELIGION

REL 11 Hildegard of Bingen: Medieval Mysticism and Music CROSSLISTING: MUS 11
See under MUS for full description


REL 14 Yoga: A Practical and Theoretical Exploration in Three Phases
Yoga has grown considerably in popularity in recent years, often as a form of exercise but increasingly as a way to reduce stress and increase well-being. Familiarity with key traditional ideas behind yoga is also increasing, along with considerable confusion. This course provides a framework to organize the main yogic ideas and practices into three phases which correlate to the historical development of both Hindu and Buddhist yoga in India, as well as with a path of personal development through yoga. Following traditional teachings, these three phases sequentially address 1. individual freedom 2. benefitting others 3. fully conscious embodiment. In addition to class meetings you are offered the tools and invited on a daily basis to practice meditation, yoga asana, and contemplation of philosophical texts. In the process you gain a foothold from which to unfold your yoga practice going forward. Understanding the theoretical underpinnings of yoga from both Buddhist and Hindu traditional sources, you are invited to formulate your view of the path of yoga in a way that supports your ongoing capacity to digest its various and deep offerings.
Required texts: The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, Barbara Stoler Miller tr, The Bhagavad Gita, Barbara Stoler Miller tr, The Secret of Self-Recognition, Jaideva Singh tr., The Path to Enlightenment, The Dalai Lama
Materials: Yoga mat (Yoga block and belt - recommended)
METHOD OF EVALUATION: ?r
PREREQUISITES: ?
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: ?
METHOD OF SELECTION: ?
COST: ?
MEETING TIME: ? ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Natasha Judson

Missing Judson bio.

REL 22 Twenty-First Century Jewish American Fiction CROSSLISTING: ENGL 22/JWST 22
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course offers an opportunity to read recently published novels and short stories that can fruitfully be classified as contributions to Jewish American fiction. How should we interpret the meanings of "Jewishness" and "Judaism" in these works? What do they suggest about the experiences, emotions, ideas, values and aspirations of contemporary Jewish Americans? How does Jewishness, in these works, relate to controversial social categories like race, religion, gender, secularism, ethnicity, class and sexuality? How do the narratives use humor, fantasy, and memory? How do they engage Jewish rituals and symbols, Jewish history and politics? What else is going on in these books? How might they resist classification as "Jewish American fiction"? The course will involve lively discussions prompted by these and any other questions that are provoked by the reading. Possible authors include: Dara Horn, Gary Shteyngart, Allegra Goodman, Michael Chabon, Rebecca Goldstein and Nathan Englander.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Class participation and a 10-page interpretive essay on any topic in one or more of the readings.
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: preference is given to students who have taken REL 259/ENG 259/JWST 259 or REL 209/JWST 209. Otherwise, short letters of interest sent to the instructor will determine selection.
COST: $45 for books.
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: Jeffrey Israel

REL 25 Jerusalem: One City, Two Cultures, Three Religions, Many Narratives
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students will be required to read JERUSALEM: ONE CITY, THREE FAIHS by Karen Armstrong and INNOCENTS ABROAD by Mark Twain prior to WS, as well as short films and articles that will be available on GLO.
Our class sessions will introduce Judaism, Christianity, and Islam and their relation to this particular place. We will look at religious, political, and cultural history, to prepare us for our experiences on-the-ground.
Prerequisites: open minds, open hearts, curiosity.
Method of evaluation: Following the trip, students will write a ten page reflection to try to capture the meaning of the experiences of the class. In late February, There will be a reunion of travelers from this class in February to reflect on the highlights, wonders, and confusions of the trip.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 10
METHOD FOR SELECTION: The instructor will conduct personal interviews and solicit application essays that will facilitate selection of a diverse group, representing (but not limited to) the three major religious faiths who claim a home in Jerusalem.
COST: $3500
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Robert Scherr

ADJUNCT BIO: Cantor BOB SCHERR, Jewish Chaplain for the College.

REL 26 Touring Black Religion in the "New" South CROSSLISTING: AFR 25/ENVI 26
See under AFR for full description

REL 30 Senior Projects
COURSE DESCRIPTION: An advanced course for Senior Religion majors (who are not writing theses) to further develop their senior seminar paper into a polished 25 page research paper (which will also be the focus of a brown-bag presentation during the Spring semester). The course will help the students with general research methods, workshopping, paper writing, and presentation practice.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: polished 25 page paper
PREREQUISITES: Senior Religion Majors only
ENROLLMENT LIMIT:
METHOD OF SELECTION:
INSTRUCTOR: Jason Josephson

ROMANCE LANGUAGES

FRENCH

RLFR S.P. Sustaining Program for French 101-102
Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study period. There are five 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.
TBA (Teaching Associates)

RLFR 12 Audible Imagination: Exploring Sound Across the Arts
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is a course about sound and its relationship to the visual arts, technology, and the environment. We focus on sound art, an interdisciplinary movement that emerged from the twentieth-century avant-garde. Our purpose will be to study and make sound art: artists and non-artists will be invited to test the boundaries between art and everyday life, between seeing and hearing, and between noise and music. The first two weeks cover the fundamentals of sound production: how to make your own microphones, how to record, and how to use basic production software. In the third week, you'll apply these production techniques in a project of your own design. In the fourth week, you'll share your final project with professional sound artists who will visit and perform in our classroom. Class meets twice a week for three hours. Work for the course includes readings (Cage, Oliveros, Schwitters, Westerkamp), weekly online postings to the course blog, two short projects, and final sound project.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Five online posts and final audio/visual project
PREREQUISITES: All are welcome
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference will be given to students majoring in Romance Languages, Art, Theater and Dance, English or Comp. Lit
COST: $0
MEETING TIME: afternoons
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Matthew Anderson

ADJUNCT BIO: Matt Anderson is a multimedia artist who has worked in sound, performance, and installation since 1993. He studied at the Studio for Interrelated Media at the Massachusetts College of Art and has exhibited and performed in venues including the Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow, UK; Kunstraum Michael Barthel, Leipzig, Germany; and Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions (LACE), Los Angeles, CA.

RLFR 30 Honors Essay
To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLFR 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for French 493-494.

ITALIAN

RLIT S.P. Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102
Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.
NICASTRO

SPANISH

RLSP S.P. Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102
Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.
TEACHING ASSOCIATES

RLSP 14 Animal Consciousness CROSSLISTING: ENVI 14
COURSE DESCRIPTION: If you've ever owned a cat or dog, you've probably found yourself looking into those well-loved eyes and asking, "What are you thinking?" This course explores literature and films that take that question as their point of departure. We will examine works by a very distinguished group of artists - Virginia Woolf, Leo Tolstoy, Horacio Quiroga, Franz Kafka, Robert Bresson, Verlyn Klinkenborg, and others - all of whom endeavor to imagine and represent the subjective experience of a nonhuman animal. Some focus on companion animals, while others explore the interior life of an insect, a reptile, a beast of burden, or a so-called "predator." These works are often humorous, but they are also surprisingly serious: they raise issues ranging from the mixed blessings of domestication to the role of instinct, the hierarchy of species, and the rights of non-human animals. Through them, we will explore questions about the limits of human nature and our ethical relationships with the nonhuman others who inhabit our lives and our planet. Requirements include regular response papers, oral presentations/discussion-leading, and a final paper. Enrollment limit: 12.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: 10 page paper, response papers, presentations, discussion-leading
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12
METHOD OF SELECTION: Students will be asked to submit a short statement describing their motivation for taking the course.
COST PER STUDENT: $100
MEETING TIME: mornings
INSTRUCTOR: Jennifer French

RLSP 16 The Poetics of Southern Spain
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will take an imaginary journey, geographical, temporal, literary and cultural, through Andalucía (the southern provinces of Spain). Starting with its first Phoenician settlements in the second millennium BCE and ending with the region's present day reality we will look at the terrain; its rivers, forests, mountains and fabled coast, through the eyes of writers, poets, musicians and filmmakers including: Abu l-Qasim al-Manishi (12th Century, Sevilla), Avienus (Roman, 4th Century CE), Richard Ford, Alexandre Dumas, Gustave Doré, Rainer Maria Rilke, Byron, Washington Irving, Federico García Lorca, Luis Cernuda, Gerald Brennan, Ernest Hemingway and Camarón de la Isla. Students will be required to read and discuss readings that will be provided for them and to interpret scenes from Lorca's 'Blood Wedding' and 'Doña Rosita the Spinster'. We will listen to flamenco music discussing its traditions and roots. We will view and discuss the films: `Guadalquivir' (Joaquín Gutiérrez Acha), 'Blood Wedding' (Carlos Saura, 1981), 'El Sur' (Víctor Erice, 1983), 'Federico García Lorca' (Healey, 1998), 'Solas' (Benito Zembrano, 1999) and `Camarón' (Jaime Chávarri, 2005). The course will be conducted in Spanish (with the exception of readings by authors whose original texts are not in Spanish).
METHOD OF EVALUATION: A 10-page paper will be assigned based on what each student most takes away from the class.
PREREQUISITES: Fluency in Spanish
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 10
METHOD OF SELECTION: Personal interviews
COST: $0
MEETING TIME: mornings; class will meet twice a week for three hour sessions.
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: John Healey

ADJUNCT BIO: The instructor lived in Southern Spain for over twenty years, is a published author, is fluent in Spanish and directed the feature length documentary film 'Federico García Lorca' (1998-RTVE/A.r.t.e.)

RLSP 25 Transnational Itineraries CROSSLISTING: ARAB 25/COMP 25
See under ARAB for full description

RLSP 30 Honors Essay
To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLSP 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Spanish 493-494.

RUSSIAN

RUSS S.P. Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102
Required of all students enrolled in Russian 101-102. Three meetings per week, 50 minutes per session. Practice in speaking and comprehension based on material already covered as well as some new vocabulary and constructions. Designed to maintain and enhance what was acquired during fall semester, using new approaches in a relaxed atmosphere. No homework.
Regular attendance and active participation required to earn a "Pass." Open to all.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.
TBA

RUSS 12 Film Propaganda CROSSLISTING: COMP 12
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Since its birth over a century ago, cinema has demonstrated a peculiar propensity for propaganda, with some of the twentieth century's greatest directors producing films that explicitly seek to alter spectators' beliefs and behavior. This course explores the curious relationship between film and propaganda by examining ten cinematic masterworks from the twentieth century, including D.W. Griffith's The Birth of Nation (1915), Dziga Vertov's Man With a Movie Camera (1929), Leni Riefenstahl's Triumph of the Will (1935), Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove (1964), and Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now (1979), among others. Our viewing will be accompanied by a variety of short critical texts that will help us to understand what propaganda is, why it lends itself so readily to film, and what it has to do with politics, entertainment, and art. In addition to watching ten of the greatest movies ever made, students will maintain a course blog that chronicles our viewing experience and create their own works of video propaganda by the end of winter study. We will meet 3-4 times per week for 90 minutes to discuss what we are watching and reading in the afternoons, as well as 3-4 evenings each week to watch the assigned films together.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Students' participation in the course blog and their works of video propaganda.
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: none
METHOD OF SELECTION: Preference given to students majoring or planning to major in Russian and Comparative Literature, as well as students with a demonstrated interest in film and/or video.
COST: $10.00
MEETING TIME: other
EXPLANATION OF MEETING TIME: 3-4 evening film screenings each week; 3-4 afternoon meetings (90 minutes each) per week
INSTRUCTOR: Julie Cassiday

RUSS 25 Republic of Georgia CROSSLISTING: SPEC 24
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Williams has a unique program in the Republic of Georgia, which offers students the opportunity to engage in three-week-long internships in any field. Our students have worked in the Georgian Parliament, helped in humanitarian relief organizations like Save the Children, interned in journalism at The Georgian Times, taught unemployed women computer skills at The Rustavi Project, documented wildlife, studied with a Georgian photographer, done rounds at the Institute of Cardiology, and learned about transitional economies at the Georgian National Bank. In addition to working in their chosen fields, students experience Georgian culture through museum visits, concerts, lectures, meetings with Georgian students, and excursions. Visit the sacred eleventh-century Cathedral of Sveti-tskhoveli and the twentieth-century Stalin Museum, take the ancient Georgian Military Highway to ski in the Caucasus Range, see the birthplace of the wine grape in Kakheti and the region where Jason sought the Golden Fleece. Participants are housed in pairs with English-speaking families in Tbilisi, Georgia's capital city. At the end of the course students will write a 10-page paper assessing their internship experience.
Knowledge of Russian or Georgian is not required.
PREREQUISITES: none; not open to first-year students
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 8.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: 10-page paper
METHOD FOR SELECTION: Through short essays describing why they want to participate, and through personal interviews, if necessary
COST: $2500
INSTRUCTOR: Darra Goldstein

RUSS 30 Honors Project
May be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RUSS 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Russian 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY-See under ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

THEATRE

THEA 12 Shakespeare on Film CROSSLISTING: ENGL 27
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The greatest English language playwright composed his dramas for a remarkably spare and simple theatrical setting. Yet that same playwright is undoubtedly the one whose work has spawned more film productions and adaptations than any other in history. (Wikipedia lists over 410 full-length film and TV versions of his works.) How do we reconcile Shakespeare's minimalist Elizabethan theatrical vision with his explosion onto the high-tech screens of the 20th and 21st centuries? What happens when the "unworthy scaffold" of the Globe Theater's "wooden O" morphs into wide angles, cross cuts, live action, and even digital animation. This Winter Study course will investigate these questions through reading and then viewing film versions of a selection of Shakespeare's major plays.
Requirements: Attendance at each session, participation in discussion. Completion/Presentation of final project where students imagine their own adaptations of a favorite Shakespeare play.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Completion/Presentation of final project where students imagine their own adaptations of a favorite Shakespeare play.
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: Theatre majors, English majors
COST:
MEETING TIME: mornings
EXPLANATION OF MEETING TIME: Prefer M/W/Th 10-12:50
INSTRUCTOR: Robert Baker-White

THEA 13 Comic Theory
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
What makes us laugh, and why? In this course, we'll examine why we find things funny and discuss the cornerstones of comedy criticism: the elements and conventions of Greek and Roman comedy (the happy idea, the confusion of realms, critiques of human intervention), Hobbes and Baudelaire on superiority, Bakhtin's theories of the grotesque and carnivalesque, Bergson's idea of the mechanical encrusted upon the living, Freud's economy of psychic expenditure, Frye's theory of archetypes and social transformation, and others. We'll also watch, read, and discuss great comedies, including "Ivona, Princess of Burgundia." You'll always have answers for that eternal question: what's so funny?
METHOD OF EVALUATION: 10-page paper, final project, or presentation
PREREQUISITES:
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 30
METHOD OF SELECTION:
COST: $0
MEETING TIME: mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Ilya Khodosh

ADJUNCT BIO: Ilya Khodosh '08 has an MFA in Dramaturgy and Dramatic Criticism from the Yale School of Drama.

THEA 14 American Theatre Festivals in New York City and Beyond
COURSE DESCRIPTION: "January is the Coolest Month Onstage" in NYC (NT Times - January 3, 2012). Theatre Festivals around the world showcase the talents and ideas of successive generations of writers, directors, designers and actors. Famously, festivals in Edinburgh, Avignon, Grahamstown in South Africa, and many, many others draw the attention of theatre people throughout the world. In this course we will look at the seasons of some of those festivals and try to gauge the forces that have inspired them. Not least indeed, amongst cities that host theatre festivals, is New York. We will pay particular attention to current festivals, and pay a visit to the city. During January, The Association of Performing Arts Presenters (APAP) has its annual "trade conference", which draws tens of thousands of artists and arts facilitators to buy and sell their wares. The class will pay a 3 to 4 day weekend visit to New York to attend some of the Theatre Festivals that occur during that time. We will go to Under The Radar; Coil; American Realness; CultureMart and others.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: A final ten minute presentation to the class, based on each students findings.
PREREQUISITES: NONE
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 10
METHOD OF SELECTION: Some theatre or theatre-going experience will be considered.
COST: $200
MEETING TIME: afternoons
INSTRUCTOR: David Eppel

THEA 15 Plays For The Festival And Beyond
COURSE DESCRIPTION: In 2014, Mandy Greenfield will assume the artistic directorship of WTF. With a strong background in developing and producing new plays, Mandy will develop several new works for the Festival in 2015. Actress and teacher Jessica Hecht will lead a developmental workshop of three of the scripts to be included at the Festival in Summer 2015. These developmental workshops will offer students the chance to act, direct and dramaturge in collaboration with the playwrights and will culminate in a trip to New York where they will have class with Mandy and do a final reading of all three plays. This project was initiated by Jessica at NYU where she teaches in the Experimental Theatre Wing and carried out on commissions for the Manhattan Theatre Club, The Public and the Vineyard with writers including Adam Rapp, Liz Flahive and Jenny Schwartz. Students will be expected to read each of the three WTF plays and at least one other play from all 3 writers in advance of the start date. Outside class, students will be required to rehearse scenes and read newly generated material. Acting in the final reading is not required but students must be open to reading in class. Jessica's work includes many Broadway plays , the new works of Sarah Ruhl, Richard Greenberg and Diana Son, and the tv series Breaking Bad and Friends. Mandy is the current Artistic Producer of The Manhattan Theatre Club and will take over the Festival this Fall. As mentioned, students will meet the writers and have the input of one or two other professional actors and or directors who have been working with Jessica in this developmental process over the past several years.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Final Presentation. Detailed script notes are required for all, If not performing, additional dramaturgical material is requested.
PREREQUISITES: 2 semesters of theatre - performance preferred but not required
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 20 is preferred-24 MAX
METHOD OF SELECTION: students screened through a letter of interest and/or resume
COST: $225 to cover cost of 2-day field trip to NYC.
MEETING TIME: other
EXPLANATION OF MEETING TIME: Class will likely be a Monday intensive (8hrs) with approximately 4 hours of rehearsal scheduled during the week and an additional meeting with the playwright/director or Jessica. Total: 14-15 hours
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Jessica Hecht

ADJUNCT BIO: Jessica Hecht is a Tony award nominated actress known for originating characters in several new plays on Broadway and off. She teaches at NYU Tisch School of the Arts and has done 8 seasons at the Williamstown Theatre Festival

THEA 32 Senior Honors Thesis
See description of Degree with Honors in Theatre.

WOMEN'S, GENDER and SEXUALITY STUDIES

WGSS 14 Plato's Symposium and Its Afterlife CROSSLISTING: CLAS 14/COMP 14/PHIL 14
See under CLAS for full description

WGSS 18 Girl meets World: Films from 5 Continents CROSSLISTING: PSCI 18
See under PSCI for full description

WGSS 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) CROSSLISTING: ECON 22/POEC 22
See under ECON for full description

WGSS25: Creating Social Enterprises with Marginalized Ugandan Youth
Teams of Williams students have been working for several years now in Uganda to empower groups of HIV+ youth there in their activism against the AIDS pandemic and the underlying issues of poverty, inequality and social marginalization. Over the last two years we have been focusing on building a network of training and support for the creation of social enterprises to be run by groups of marginalized youth. This year we will take the next step: a smaller group of Williams students will go to Uganda to learn and teach about worker-owned cooperatives and work with our Ugandan partners to open their own worker-owned business. 
This approach stems from the realization that grassroots activism is usually done most effectively by those who live inside the community in question and are themselves intimately affected by the issues. When it comes to HIV Uganda now has a generation of youth who have grown up with the virus, including many who were born HIV+ and have reached adulthood thanks to the availability of antiretroviral drugs. Now in their teens and twenties, these youth have become, or are becoming sexually active and often want to have children of their own. They are crucial actors in the future of the pandemic, whether it will become more deeply entrenched in intergenerational cycles of stigma, poverty and inequality or communities will be able to lift themselves out of those spirals. When supported and mobilized positive youth make extraordinary activists. Yet many of them find themselves isolated and stigmatized, unable to disclose their status to friends, colleagues or teachers, or find support from other youth in similar situations. Other groups of youth find themselves marginalized because of their sexual orientation or gender expression: these young people are often thrown out of families, schooling, and employment and left few alternatives to sex work and chaotic, unstable living situations, putting them at high risk for HIV.
When these affected actors become activists they can be very powerful, but given their marginal economic status they are usually extremely dependent on outside funding. Without that they lack the resources even to take public transport to attend meetings or go out into the community to do sensitization or advocacy. Their activist work becomes dependent on funding cycles and the whims and fashions of the donor community. The idea we have been working with, then, is to collaborate with them to create social enterprises that train the activists in income-generating skills, give them the opportunity to generate income as a group, and use some of that income to fund their own continuing activism.
Worker cooperatives are a model that has been used in Europe and the US since the 1800s, and is increasingly being used in Latin America. They are particularly appropriate for marginalized groups as a means of building solidarity and democratic practices,  jointly accessing capital, and building income and assets. The UN declared 2012 the ‘year of the co-op’, and it has been argued that it is a particularly appropriate form for African contexts. Uganda has more experience with farmers’ cooperatives than worker co-ops, but there is growing interest and expertise in the region.  
Week 1 of our trip will include a training program in Kampala, jointly taught by the Williams group and our Ugandan collaborators, including visits to existing co-ops and lectures from local experts on mentoring social enterprises. For week 2 we will divide into small groups to develop proposals and business plans for creating new co-ops. The entire team will then vote on a proposal to move forward with. During week 3 the groundwork for a particular co-op will begin, building the experience that, over the next two years, will help develop a Kampala co-op incubator with the capacity to create and mentor future co-ops as social enterprises for marginalized youth.  In our down time we will have a chance to view some of Uganda’s natural beauty and wildlife, as well as moving around Kampala, a vibrant East African hub.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Evaluation will be based on student journals and participation throughout the class.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 8
METHOD OF SELECTION: Students will be chosen through an application form and interview.
ESTIMATED COST: $3,650 including flights.
INSTRUCTOR: Kiaran Honderich

WGSS 30 Honors Project
To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

SPECIALS

SPEC 10 Introductory Photography: People and Places CROSSLISTING: MATH 14
See under MATH for full description

SPEC 11 Science for Kids CROSSLISTING: CHEM 11
See under CHEM for full description

SPEC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships CROSSLISTING: CHEM 14/PSYC 14
See under CHEM for full description

SPEC 15 Contemporary American Songwriting CROSSLISTING: AMST 15/MUS 15
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Contemporary American Songwriting
This course will focus on learning how to write and perform songs in a contemporary style. Topics addressed will include song structure, how to create a lyric that communicates, vocal and instrument presentation, performing techniques, publicity for events, and today's music industry. This class will culminate in a public performance of material written during the course. To successfully pass this course, students are required to create, edit, perform and possibly record two original songs. These songs must be conceived during the course period (previously written material is not usable). Students will be guided to create both music and lyrics. They may also be required to participate in a co-write session. At least one of these songs will be presented during the final performance, preferably by the student. Attendance at classes, feedback sessions, and all officially scheduled events is mandatory. A short writing assignment based on the assigned reading will be passed in on the last day of class.
No pre-requisites. Students with a musical background and the ability to play and instrument may be given preference, but anyone interested is encouraged to register. (Bernice.Lewis@williams.edu). Enrollment limit: 14.
Please be aware that this course meets four days a week.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Attendance, Final Performance, and writing assignment
PREREQUISITES: None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 14
METHOD OF SELECTION: 14 per section, upperclassmen may be given priority, also experience as musicians, and gender balancing,
COST: $35 class fee
MEETING TIME: mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Bernice Lewis

SPEC 17 Addiction Studies and Diagnosis
The goal of this class is to help students develop an effective understanding of the definition, impact, and treatment of addiction. Students will be familiarized with the DSM-5, the text used to diagnose mental illness in the US. Students will read a history of addiction in the US and the central text of Narcotics Anonymous to understand the structure of 12 Step recovery. Speakers will tell their stories in their journey from addiction to recovery. Students will be expected to accurately diagnose the speaker according to the criteria in the DSM-5. Finally, an extensive annotated bibliography and oral presentation will be presented in groups at the end of the course. The course will be capped at 15 students.
Calendar of Classes
Mon January 5 Introduction and Lecture on Chemical Dependency and 12 Step Counseling
Readings: Slaying the Dragon pages 1-78 Narcotics Anonymous - start reading
Wed January 7 "My Name is Bill W." 1st Quiz
Readings: Slaying the Dragon- pages 79-197 Narcotics Anonymous - continue reading
Mon January 12 Guest Speaker - 1st Presentations
Readings: Slaying the Dragon- pages 199-260 Narcotics Anonymous - continue reading
Wed January 14"Days of Wine and Roses" -2nd Quiz
Readings: Slaying the Dragon- pages 263- 341 -Narcotics Anonymous - continue reading
Mon January 19 Martin Luther King Jr. Day - Guest speaker -Narcotics Anonymous - continue reading Narcotics Anonymous
Wed January 21 Third Quiz -Readings Narcotics Anonymous - continue reading 3rd Quiz
Mon January 26 Guest Speaker -Readings Narcotics Anonymous - finish reading (stories optional)
Wed January 28 Group Presentations, evaluations and wrap up
Grading for the class
Annotated Bibliography and Oral Presentation(s) 30%
Journal entries - 1 page minimum each topic (@ 250 words) - Attend and comment on three 12 Step meetings. Reports on three people who took the CAGE, MAST and Johns Hopkins test - one person must `pass' one of the tests. Choices nearby are Al-Anon, OA, AA, and NA. Eight entries, 5% each, 40% total
Attendance - 15%
Quizzes- 15%
Texts - "Slaying the Dragon: The History of Addiction Treatment and Recovery" by William White and "Narcotics Anonymous, 6th Edition"
MEETING TIME: MW 12:30-3:30
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Rick Berger

SPEC 18 Live! from Studio 275
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is designed to explore roles, technology and workflows associated with writing, producing and directing a "live" studio-based video production.
Class time will consist of lecture mixed with hands-on instruction/participation learning the various tech systems (lighting, cameras, audio and tri-caster) installed in Video Studio 275 at the Center for Educational Technology. In tandem, we will explore the roles and responsibilities of a studio production crew through lecture, student research and class presentations.
Midway through the course, we will form groups to conceive of, write, produce and direct multiple 30-minute shows. Each student will take on the role of writer, producer or director for their show, assigning others from the class to production crew roles.
We will meet for 3, two-hour sessions each week (lecture and workshop) with an additional required research/sofware learning/production time (minimum of 6 hours/week, additional during the final production week)
Enrollment limited to 12
METHOD OF EVALUATION: Topic based research and class presentation, class participation, completion of shows (final project).
PREREQUISITES: interest in studio-based video production
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12
METHOD OF SELECTION: Short essay submission.
COST:
MEETING TIME: mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS: Tamra Hjermstad and Bruce Wheat

SPEC 19 Medical Apprenticeship
Firsthand experience is a critical component of the decision to enter the health professions. Through this apprenticeship, students can clarify their understanding of the rewards and challenges that accompany the practice of all types of medicine. Apprenticeships are arranged in two distinct ways: some students live on campus and are matched with a local practitioner, while others make independent arrangements to shadow a distant professional. The expectation is that each student will observe some aspect of medicine for the better part of the day, five days per week. In recent years, students have shadowed physicians, veterinarians, dentists, nurses, and public health experts.
A 5-page reflective paper is required, as is attendance (for those shadowing near campus) at three Tuesday evening programs. Students will meet from 6:30-8:30 p.m. over dinner to hear from invited speakers from the medical community as a stimulus to discussion about their apprenticeship experiences.
Prerequisites: interested students must attend an information meeting in early October. Local enrollment is limited by the number of available practitioners. Preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the health professions.
Cost: local apprenticeships: required vaccinations, local transportation and possibly lunches. Distant apprenticeships: costs will vary based upon location.
Instructors: Steven Anisman, M.D.; David Armet. P.T.; Childsy Art, M.D.; Deborah August, M.D.; Victoria Cavalli, M.D.; Jonathan Cluett, M.D.; Lee Delaney, D.V.M.; Marianne Demarco, M.D.; Michael Disiena. D.O.; Paul Donovan, D.O.; Simon Drew, M.D.; Stuart Dubuff, M.D.; William Duke, M.D.; Robert Fanelli, M.D.; Wade Gebera, M.D.; David Gorson, M.D.; Alison Hastings, D.O..; Deborah Henley, M.D.; Eric Holmgren, D..D.S./M.D.; Judith Holmgren, M.D.; Orion Howard, M.D.; Laura Jones, D.V.M.; Joshua Kleederman, D.M.D.; William Kober, M.D.; Jonathan Krant, M.D.; William Levy, M.D.; Rebecca Mattson, D.V.M.; Mark Mcdermott, M.D.; Ronald Mensh, M.D.; Graham Moore, M.D.; Boris Murillo, M.D.; Charles O'neill, M.D.; Judy Orton, M.D.; Daniel Perregaux, M.D.; Fernando Ponce, M.D.; Richard Provenzano, M.D.; Daniel Robbins, M.D.; Oscar Rodriguez, M.D.; Scott Rogge, M.D.; Paul Rosenthal, M.D.; Robert Sills, M.D.; Themarge Small, M.D.; Anthony Smeglin, M.D.; Anne Marie Swann, M.D.; Spyridon Triantos, M.D.; Elizabeth Warner, M.D.; Elizabeth Whatley, M.D.; James Whittum, M.D.; Katie Wolfgang, D.V.M.; Nicholas Wright, M.D.; Jeffrey Yucht, M.D.; Mark Zimpfer, M.D.; and others.
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: JANE CARY, Health Professions Advisor

SPEC 20 Student Leadership Development CROSSLIST: LEAD 20
COURSE DESCRIPTION: As students move through their time in college, many will opt to take on roles of leadership in the Williams community. This desire to be engaged and involved leads to the development of life skills and abilities that become highly marketable traits post-graduation. Student Leadership Development is focused on facilitating student awareness of their unique interests and abilities, their connection to their involvement at Williams College and within their communities, and how their extracurricular involvement interfaces with their career trajectory. This course will utilize student development theories as conceptual frameworks to analyze student leadership and involvement, and offer coursework involving career and personality assessments, case study analyses, class discussion, short-term experiential learning projects, and exposure to guest speakers who expose students to the breadth of opportunities on campus.
Through the duration of the course, students will engage in ongoing dialogue and will have the opportunity to create and share a small group presentation connected to one of the topics of focus as related to a selected case study. Students will leave the course with an enhanced awareness of their own leadership potential, the relationship between their leadership skills and career options, and insight into the factors and experiences that shape them as today's student leaders, and tomorrow's engaged citizens and community builders.
METHOD OF EVALUATION:
Students will be evaluated based on class participation, a weekly journal that must be kept, and 2 papers (mid-winter study, and final).
PREREQUISITS:
None
ENROLLMENT LIMIT:
20
HOW STUDENTS WILL BE SELECTED:
Preference will be given to first year and second year students
ESTIMATED COST TO STUDENT:
$50 - This will include the purchase of self-assessment tests, and a required text
MEETING TIMES:
Students will meet in a lecture/discussion format for 6 hours per week (M/W/F for two hours each) and will spend between 4-6 hours each Thursday doing experiential learning in the given weeks' focus area
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS: Benjamin Lamb and Mike O'Connor

INSTRUCTOR BIOS:
Benjamin Lamb -Assistant Director for Student Involvement - Student Organizations: Ben joined Williams in January 2010 as an intern in the Office of Student Life, in May 2010 he joined on as a full-time staff. In his role he works with student groups, leadership and identity development. With a background in the sciences, Ben has worked has worked as a wildland firefighter, salmon population researcher, chemist, ecotourism manager, career counselor, admissions councilor, high school guidance counselor, and also currently serves as a City Councilor in the City of North Adams.
Patricia Leahey-Hays - Assistant Director for Student Involvement - Residential Programs: Patricia has a degree in public policy and a MBA but has spent most of her professional career working in higher education administration in student development. She is currently working with a very talented group of Williams College students in her role focusing on residential life and leadership development.
Mike O'Connor - Director of the Career Discovery Program: Mike O'Connor joined Williams in September 2013 after spending three years as Director of Career Planning at the Sage Colleges in Albany and Troy, NY, where he oversaw two campus Career Service offices for a population of 3000 liberal arts, business, health science, and education students at the Bachelors, Masters, and Doctoral levels. Mike has been assisting students with all areas of Career Planning for over eight years, having also worked at Hiram College, Union College, and as a private tutor in Granada, Spain. Mike has a M.A. in Student Affairs & Diversity from Binghamton University and a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Connecticut.

SPEC 21 - Experience the Workplace; an Internship with Williams Alumni/Parents
II. Course description
: Field experience is a critical element in the decision to enter a profession. Through this internship, students can clarify their understanding of the rewards and challenges that accompany the practice of many different aspects within a profession, and understand the psychology of the workplace. Internship placements are arranged through the Career Center, with selected alumni and parent acting as on-site teaching associates. The expectation is that each student will observe some aspect of the profession for the better part of the day, five days per week. It is also expected that the teaching associate will assign a specific project to be completed within the three-to-four week duration of the course depending upon appropriateness.
Intellectual Merit: Participation in this winter study will require the student to quickly assess the work environment, make inferences about corporate culture, performance norms and expectations, and to take initiative not only to learn from this experience, but also to contribute where and when appropriate. Understanding the dynamics within a work environment is critical to success in any organization and this hands-on experience will illuminate lessons learned in the classroom. Upon completion of the winter study, it is expected that the student write a thorough report evaluating and interpreting the experience.
a. Method of evaluation: It is expected that students will complete assigned readings, keep a daily journal, and write a 5-10 page expository review and evaluation that will become public record as a resource for other students.
b. Required activities and meeting times: The expectation is that each student will be in the field to observe some aspect of the profession for the better part of the day, five days per week. In addition to observation there may be an opportunity to work on distinct projects generated by the instructor depending upon appropriateness.
c. Prerequisites: interested students must attend an information meeting in early October, and meet individually with Career Center staff to go over the details of their placements.
d. Enrollment: Enrollment is limited by the number of available teaching associates (instructors).
e. Student selection criteria: Placements will be determined by the individual alum or parent sponsor based on application and possible telephone interview.
f. Meeting Times: each student will be in the field to observe some aspect of the profession five days per week, at least 6 hours per day.
g. Cost to students: Local apprenticeships - local transportation. Distant apprenticeships - costs will vary based upon location, BUT ARE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT. The college has no extraordinary funding to support the internship.
h. Teaching Associates (instructors): Williams College alumni and parents of current Williams students will be recruited to become instructors for this course. A broad range of professions will be represented as the course develops. Alumni and parents will receive individual orientations with the course director in person or via telephone conference.
i. Sponsor's Name: John Noble, Director of the Career Center and Dawn Dellea, Manager of Alumni and Parent Engagement Programs
III. Budget: we would like to use the $500 maximum budget allocation to recognize the contribution of the instructors, in the form of an appropriate plaque or certificate.
IV. Bibliography: a bibliography of readings would be selected from such works as:
Ready or Not, Here Life Comes by Mel Levine, 2005.
What Should I do with My Life? by Po Bronson, 2003.
Working
by Studs Terkel, 1974.
Zen and the Art of Making a Living by Laurence Boldt, 1993.
V. Addendum: it is the intention of the course to offer a wide variety of traditional and non-traditional field placements for students that are not offered by other Winter Study courses. I'm happy to report that 100% of the students surveyed said they would recommend this course.

SPEC 24 Republic of Georgia CROSSLISTING: RUSS 25
See under RUSS for full description

SPEC 25 Digging Deep into Winter Food: Farm-to-Plate Living in Vermont
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Vermont is a leader in food sustainability. The state is rich in farms using sustainable agriculture techniques. Communities in Vermont often embrace locally grown food as a marker of identity. This one-week residency at Green Mountain Girls Farm in Northfield, Vermont offers students hands-on learning in the context of the farm as well as exposure to current food policy work in Vermont. Students will learn about ecological agricultural approaches such as permaculture, work with dairy goats and laying hens, and cook and process food from the farm. Visits to farms and organizations in the immediate area will frame the theme of sustainable food in the context of community. This includes hearing from government officials and nonprofit leaders in nearby Montpelier.
This course will meet twice prior to leaving campus and twice following return to campus. The residency at Green Mountain Girls Farm lasts one week, from Tuesday, January 13 to Tuesday, January 20. Students will write one two-page paper detailing their understanding of course themes and expectations for the course prior to departure. Readings for this course focus on food systems design and the impact of regional food systems on local Vermont economies, such as the 2011 Farm to Plate Strategic Plan from the Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund. While at the farm, students will research and present creative individual projects. Students will submit a second two-page paper reflecting on their experience upon returning to Williams.
Requirements: Vermont is cold in January, and many activities will take place outside. Students must bring layered cold-weather clothing, including sturdy insulated boots suitable for snowshoeing, insulated gloves, neck warmers or scarves, winter hats, and sunglasses. Students are welcome to bring cross-country skis for recreation. Snowshoes will be provided for forest outings.
Enrollment limit: 9. Students expressing convincing interest in the themes of the course will be preferred.
COST: $1000.00
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS: Brent Wasser and Mari Omland `89
SPONSOR: Zilkha Center

SPEC 26 Opportunities and Challenges: Living and Working with Immigrants and Refugees in Portland, ME CROSSLISTING: BIOL 26
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This Winter Study project will allow students to experientially explore questions of identity and privilege, as well as the current challenges and opportunities surrounding resettlement of diverse groups of immigrants and refugees. Students experience these questions through three weeks of living and working with host families in Portland, a city of 65,000 people which is home to approximately 13,000 resettled refugees. Each student will live as part of a culture within another dominant culture. In the spirit of past Gaudino programs in experiential education, this program encourages students to take an active role in the learning process. Students will learn from their experience through rigorous and critical dialogue, reflection, and activity. They will encounter first-hand the issues they have previously read or heard about and they will actively use those experiences both during the WSP, as well as back on campus through follow-up activities and discussions in and out of the classroom
Sponsored by the Gaudino Scholar and Gaudino Fund since 2008, this Winter Study course will allow a small group of students to have a cultural immersion experience in the U.S. Portland, Maine, a refugee resettlement city for over 30 years, has over 60 languages spoken by students in its schools, and residents from over 80 countries all over the world. Inspired by the transformative Williams-at-Home program, each student will live with a refugee or immigrant host family, and work either as a teacher or medical apprentice. Most students will work in one of the Portland school or adult education classrooms with students whose families are new to the United States. The Williams student will gain practical experience as a teacher, tutor, and mentor in multiple classrooms with many diverse students. Students will also have a chance to talk with senior teachers and administrators about the challenges facing 21st century schools in the United States in an increasingly diverse society and global economy. There will also be an opportunity for a student or two seeking medical or public health experience to shadow medical or mental health practitioners in several community clinics serving the refugee and immigrant populations. Students will be challenged to reflect upon their own identity, assumptions, privileges, and values.
In December students will receive articles and orientation materials to prepare for their experience, and must write a 5-page reflective essay due on arrival in Maine on their experience of their identity: ethnicity, national identity, race, and/or class, and its impact on their lives. Each student must also keep a journal during the program and at the end turn in a 5-page reflective essay addressing how her or his impressions, assumptions, or values were challenged or changed concerning those topics addressed in the opening essay. The student group will have a day-long orientation upon arrival in Maine, will meet weekly to share insights and challenges, and will have the opportunity for one on one reflection time
prerequisites: Open to sophomores, juniors, seniors
method of evaluation: 5-7 page final paper
enrollment limit: 6
method for selection: If the course is over-enrolled, the Instructor will give preference to those students who demonstrate, in a short conversation with and/or essay submitted to the instructor, their interest in experiential learning generally and the problems confronting recent immigrants to the U.S. specifically.
COST: Cost: $750 ($30/day) for room and board to host families, plus travel to and from Portland. Students on Financial Aid will receive Gaudino funding as determined by the Financial Aid office.
itinerary: January 5 - Students arrive in Maine, begin orientation January 6 - Student orientation January 7 - Students tour work placement sites, meet host families January 8 - Work placements begin January 13 - Group check-in January 17 - Group discussion/Activity January 21 - Individual check-ins January 24 - Host family potluck January 28 - Wrap-up, evaluation, closing January 29 - Last day of Winter Study
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Heather Foran `04

SPEC 28 Class of 1959 Teach NYC Urban Education Program
Students in this course learn about the front-line challenges of urban public education by working in one of New York City's public schools. Participants will be expected to pursue a full day's program of observing, teaching, tutoring and mentoring in their choice of more than 20 different school situations from elementary through high school. Each of the participating schools will have a resident supervisor who will meet with the January interns to arrange individual schedules and provide mentoring during the month. There will be weekly seminar meetings of all the interns who are expected to participate in group discussions, keep a journal and write a 5 page paper reflecting upon their experience. The course will conduct orientation meetings with students prior to January, matching each student's interest with appropriate teaching subject areas and a host school. Dormitory-style housing will be provided along with some assistance with transportation and food costs-estimated at $400 for the term. Further assistance is available for financial aid students.
Evaluation will be based on a journal and a 5-page paper.
Prerequisites: sophomore, junior or senior standing; not open to first-year students.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost: $400.
Meeting time: off-campus fieldwork: daily 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. and weekly seminar dinners.
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: TRACY FINNEGAN
Sponsor: WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE

Tracy Finnegan is a master's level teacher with training and teaching experience in a variety of approaches and settings.

SPEC 35 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel
Each class will begin with a lecture-demonstration, followed by practice on the potter's wheel. Each student will have the use of a potter's wheel for every class. Pottery making classes will be held in the mornings, 9 AM to 12:15 PM, at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery in Pownal, Vermont. We will work on mugs, bowls, pitchers, plates, jars, lids, vases, and bottles, and will finish these shapes as required by trimming and adding handles, lugs, lids, spouts, and knobs. We will also work on several different handbuilding projects. Early in the Winter Study Session there will be a 1.5-hour slide presentation held one afternoon at a location on Campus. After the tenth pottery making class meeting, all completed work will be biscuit-fired. The eleventh meeting will be devoted to glazing the biscuited pieces. Glazing techniques will include pouring, dipping, layering, brushing, and stamping, and using wax resist and other masking techniques to develop pattern and design. The completed work will then be glaze-fired. The last meeting, held at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery early in the new semester, will be devoted to a "final project" (positive-orientation) critique in the studio of your finished work. Woven into lecture-demonstrations will be presentations on various topics relating to the science and history of pottery making.
Requirements: attendance at all class sessions and enthusiasm for learning the craft of pottery making.
No prerequisites or potterymaking experience necessary. Enrollment limit: 9.
Cost: $335 lab fee, plus makeup class fees ($50.00 per class) if applicable. No makeup class fee charged for excused absence.
Meeting time: mornings, plus one afternoon slide presentation, and one final 1-hour critique session early in the spring semester at a time to be arranged.
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: RAY BUB

Ray Bub is a ceramic artist and teacher at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery in Pownal, Vermont, 10 minutes north of the Williams College campus. All class meetings except the slide show take place at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery. Learn more about Ray Bub at www.raybub.com

SPEC 39 "Composing A Life:" Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams
COURSE DESCRIPTION: To be at Williams you have learned to be a successful student, but how do you learn to be successful in life? How will you define success in both your career and in your personal life? How will you achieve balance between the two? In short, what will constitute the "good life" for you? We borrow the concept of "composing a life" from Mary Catherine Bateson, as an apt metaphor for the ongoing process of defining success and balance in life. This course is designed: (1) To offer college students an opportunity to examine and define their beliefs, values, and assumptions about their future personal and professional lives before entering the "real" world; (2) To encourage students to gain a better understanding of how culture, ideology, and opportunity affect their life choices; (3) To provide an opportunity for students to consider different models of success and balance through "living cases" (in the form of guests from various professions and lifestyles); and (4) To aid students in contemplating their own life/career options through individual advising and introducing various career and life planning resources. Using selected readings, cases, and guest speakers, we will explore both the public context of the workplace as well as the private context of individuals and their personal relationships in determining life choices.
Requirements: regular attendance, class participation, field interview, and a 10-page final paper, weekly assignments include cases and readings from a variety of related fields, and some self-reflection exercises.
No prerequisites. Questions about the course: please contact Michele Moeller Chandler at (413) 458-8106 or michele.chandler2@gmail.com
METHOD OF EVALUATION: 10-page paper
PREREQUISITES: none
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 15
METHOD OF SELECTION: preference to juniors and seniors
COST: approximately $35-40 for reading materials and cases
MEETING TIME: mornings
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR: Michele Moeller Chandler and Chip Chandler

ADJUNCT BIO: Michele Moeller Chandler (`73) and Chip Chandler (`72) have taught this Winter Study course for the past eighteen years. Michele, a former college administrator, has an M.A. from Columbia, and a Ph.D. from Northwestern. Chip, a retired McKinsey senior partner, has an M.B.A. from Harvard, and currently teaches in the Leadership Studies Program.


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