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Winter Study 2017

WINTER STUDY PROGRAM

REMINDERS ABOUT WSP REGISTRATION

All students who will be on campus during the 2016-2017 academic year must register for WSP. Registration will take place in the early part of fall semester. If you are registered for a senior thesis in the fall which must be continued through Winter Study by departmental rules, you will be registered for your Winter Study Project automatically. In every other case, you must complete registration. First-year students are required to participate in a Winter Study that will take place on campus; they are not allowed to do 99's.

Even if you plan to take a 99, or the instructor of your first choice accepts you during the registration period, there are many things that can happen between registration and the beginning of Winter Study to upset your first choice, so you must list five choices. You should try to make one of your choices a project with a larger enrollment, not that it will guarantee you a project, but it will increase your chances.

If you think your time may be restricted in any way (ski meets, interviews, etc.), clear these restrictions with the instructor before signing up for his/her project. Remember, for cross-listed projects, you should sign up for the subject you want to appear on your record. For many beginning language courses, you are required to take the WSP Sustaining Program in addition to your regular project. You will be automatically enrolled in this Sustaining Program, so no one should list this as a choice. The grade of honors is reserved for outstanding or exceptional work. Individual instructors may specify minimum standards for the grade, but normally, fewer than one out of ten students will qualify. A grade of pass means the student has performed satisfactorily. A grade of perfunctory pass signifies that a student's work has been significantly lacking but is just adequate to deserve a pass. If you have any questions about a project, see the instructor before you register. Finally, all work for WSP must be completed and submitted to the instructor no later than January 26, 2017. Only the Dean can grant an extension beyond this date.

WINTER STUDY 99'S

Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible to propose "99's," independent projects arranged with faculty sponsors, conducted in lieu of regular Winter Study courses. Perhaps you have encountered an interesting idea in one of your courses which you would like to study in more depth, or you may have an interest not covered in the regular curriculum. In recent years students have undertaken in-depth studies of particular literary works, interned in government offices, assisted in foreign and domestic medical clinics, conducted field work in economics in developing countries, and given performances illustrating the history of American dance. Although some 99's involve travel away from campus, there are many opportunities to pursue intellectual or artistic goals here in Williamstown.

99 forms are available online: http://www.williams.edu/Registrar/winterstudy/99direct.html

The deadline for submitting the proposals to faculty sponsors is September 29, 2016.

AFR 15 Ishmael Reed, Multiculturalist and Satirist
AFR 17 Writing in the Margins: Playwriting as Plagiarism
AFR 24 Touring Black Religion in the 'New' South
AMST 10 North Adams, Massachusetts: Past, Present, and Future
AMST 11 Feminist Perspectives on Latinas in Popular Media
AMST 15 Contemporary Songwriting
AMST 30 Senior Honors Project
ANTH 31 Senior Thesis
SOC 13 Humanity 2.0: Humans, Transhumans, Posthumans
SOC 14 Epidemiology, Public Health, and Leadership in the Health Professions
SOC 15 Photographic Literacy and Practice
SOC 16 Humans of the Berkshires
SOC 31 Senior Thesis
ARAB S.P. Sustaining Program for Arabic
ARAB 31 Senior Thesis
ARTH 14 Basquiat and Defacement: Conceptualism, Black Lives Matter and Black Identity
ARTH 15 Public Art and Climate Change: Ghana ThinkTank and the Making of a Museum Installation
ARTH 16 Intro to Fashion Studies
ARTH 31 Senior Thesis
ARTH 33 Honors Independent Study
ARTS 11 Audible Imagination: Exploring Sound Across the Arts
ARTS 12 Narrating the Figure Through Drawing
ARTS 13 Creative Portraiture in the Darkroom
ARTS 15 Public Art and Climate Change: Ghana Think Tank and the Making of a Museum Installation (Same as ARTH 15)
ARTS 16 Glass and Glassblowing
ARTS 17 Intermediate Painting
ARTS 18 Wood and Woodturning
ARTS 31 Senior Studio: Independent Project Art Studio
ASST 12 The East is Red? — Socialism in Asia
CHIN S.P. Sustaining Program for Chinese
CHIN 13 Tai Chi
CHIN 16 Acting Out: Translation, Migration, and Transformation in Asian Theatres
CHIN 24 Taiwan Study Tour
CHIN 31 Senior Thesis
JAPN S.P. Sustaining Program for Japanese
JAPN 11 The Japanese POW camp in film
JAPN 25 Kyoto Artisans: Exploring 1200 years of cultural history of Kyoto through modern craftsmanship
JAPN 31 Senior Thesis
ASTR 12 A Passion for Planets: Exploring Mars and Pluto
ASTR 25 The Great American Eclipse of 2017
ASTR 31 Senior Research
ASPH 31 Senior Research
BIOL 11 BioEYES Teaching 4th Graders about Zebrafish
BIOL 12 New Orleans Style Jazz
BIOL 13 Intro to Animal tracking
BIOL 31 Senior Thesis
CHEM 10 Zymurgy
CHEM 11 Science for Kids
CHEM 13 Ultimate Wellness: Concepts for a Happy Healthy Life
CHEM 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships
CHEM 16 Glass and Glassblowing
CHEM 18 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry
CHEM 19 Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry
CHEM 20 Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry
CHEM 23 Introduction to Research in Organic Chemistry
CHEM 31 Senior Research and Thesis
CLAS 25 Where All Roads Go: Ancient Rome and Environs
CLAS 31 Senior Thesis
COGS 31 Senior Thesis
COMP 11 God in a Suffering World
COMP 12 Grand Hotel in Film and Fiction
COMP 13 The Literature and Cinema of Global Organized Crime
COMP 14 Formidable French Film: New Cinema from France and the Francophone World
COMP 15 The Spanish Civil War in English
COMP 16 Intro to Fashion Studies
COMP 17 Writing in the Margins: Playwriting as Plagiarism
COMP 31 Senior Thesis
CSCI 11 Developing Your Developer Toolbox
CSCI 12 Stained Glass Tiling
CSCI 13 Building Valuable Software Products
CSCI 14 Creating a Roguelike Game
CSCI 23 Introduction to Research and Development in Computing
CSCI 31 Senior Honor Thesis
DANC 12 Ballet Technique and Repertory
DANC 13 Introduction to Argentine Tango
DANC 15 Suzuki Method of Actor Training
ECON 10 Introduction to Financial Reporting and Statement Analysis
ECON 11 Financial Accounting and Financial Modeling for Private Equity and Investment Banking
ECON 13 Creating a Viable New Business Idea
ECON 14 Sports Economics
ECON 15 Introduction to Indian Cinema
ECON 16 Venture Capital Law
ECON 17 How to Start a Startup
ECON 18 Sustainable Business Strategies
ECON 19 Portrayal of housing markets and community in film
ECON 20 A Practitioner’s Overview of Securities Markets and Investment Banking
ECON 24 Introduction to the Economics, Geography, and Appreciation of Wine
ECON 30 Honors Project: Specialization Route
ECON 31 Honors Thesis
ECON 52 Micro-Simulation Modeling for Ex Ante Policy Analysis
ECON 54 Financial Crises
ECON 58 Growth Diagnostics
ENGL 11 Shakespeare's Henry IV
ENGL 12 Stand-up Comedy: Joke Writing and Performance
ENGL 13 Detection
ENGL 14 Humor Writing and Analysis
ENGL 15 Ishmael Reed, Multiculturalist and Satirist
ENGL 16 Adorno's Aesthetic Theory
ENGL 25 Journalism Today
ENGL 30 Honors Project: Specialization Route
ENGL 31 Honors Project: Thesis
ENVI 13 Intro to Animal Tracking
ENVI 14 Landscape Photography
ENVI 16 Confronting Climate Change: Reducing Emissions at Williams
ENVI 18 Sustainable Business Strategies
ENVI 24 Touring Black Religion in the ‘New’ South
ENVI 25 The Front Lines of Climate Change: Planning for Climate Change on Eleuthera
ENVI 26 Climate Policy in the New Presidency
ENVI 31 Senior Research and Thesis
GEOS 12 A Passion for Planets: Exploring Mars and Pluto
GEOS 14 Landscape Photography
GEOS 31 Senior Thesis
GERM S.P. Sustaining Program for German
GERM 11 DDR, The Life and Death of a Vanished Nation: East Germany, 1949-1990
GERM 12 Grand Hotel in Film and Fiction
GERM 13 The Literature and Cinema of Global Organized Crime
GERM 16 Intro to Fashion Studies
GERM 30 Honors Project
GERM 31 Senior Thesis
GBST 30 Senior Honors Project
HIST 10 North Adams, Massachusetts: Past, Present, and Future
HIST 11 DDR, The Life and Death of a Vanished Nation: East Germany, 1949-1990
HIST 12 The East is Red? — Socialism in Asia
HIST 13 Eyewitnesses to History: American Treasures in the Chapin Library
HIST 14 Game of Thrones, ca. 850 B.C.: Empire, Religion and Palace Intrigue in the Neo-Assyrian Reliefs at WCMA
HIST 15 The Spanish Civil War in English
HIST 16 The History of Panics
HIST 17 Eyewitness to the Civil Rights Movement: Mississippi 1964 - 1965
HIST 18 The Name of the Rose
HIST 25 Jerusalem: One City, Two Cultures, Three Faiths, Many Narratives
HIST 30 Workshop in Independent Research
HIST 31 Senior Thesis
JWST 31 Senior Thesis
JLST 11 So You Want to Be a Lawyer
JLST 22 Learning Intervention for Teens
LATS 11 Feminist Perspectives on Latinas in Popular Media
LATS 12 Death, Sex, and Money in Brazil
LATS 17 Writing in the Margins: Playwriting as Plagiarism
LATS 31 Latina/o Honors Thesis Seminar
LEAD 11 Our First Amendment
LEAD 12 Principles of Effective Leadership
LEAD 14 The CIA and the Politics of Intelligence
LEAD 18 Wilderness Leadership in Emergency Care
MATH 11 A Taste of Austria
MATH 12 The Mathematics of Lego Bricks
MATH 14 Math Review
MATH 15 Pilates: Physiology and Wellness
MATH 16 The Science of Star Trek
MATH 17 Modern Dance - Muller Technique
MATH 30 Senior Project
MATH 31 Senior Thesis
STAT 25 The History, Geography and Economics of the Wines of France
STAT 30 Senior Project
STAT 31 Senior Thesis
MUS 13 Introduction to Argentine Tango
MUS 14 Classic American and European Musical Theatre
MUS 15 Contemporary Songwriting
MUS 16 Zimbabwean Music Collaboration
MUS 17 Chamber Orchestra of Williams
MUS 18 Tuning and Temperament
MUS 19 The World and Wes Anderson
MUS 25 Creative Art Projects inspired by Southern Florida Native American Indian History and Culture
MUS 31 Senior Thesis
NSCI 31 Senior Thesis
PHIL 12 Ethics in Public Health
PHIL 14 Yoga and an Ethical Life
PHIL 25 Eye Care and Culture in Nicaragua
PHIL 26 Morocco
PHIL 31 Senior Thesis
PHYS 11 Science for Kids
PHYS 12 Drawing as a Learnable Skill
PHYS 13 Electronics
PHYS 14 Light and Holography
PHYS 16 The Science of Star Trek
PHYS 18 Wood and Woodturning
PHYS 20 Loop d' Loop d' Loop d' Loop d' Loop d' Loop...
PHYS 22 Research Participation
PHYS 31 Senior Thesis
POEC 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits
POEC 23 Endowment Investment Management
POEC 31 Honors Thesis
PSCI 10 All Politics Is Local-Or Is It?
PSCI 12 The East is Red? — Socialism in Asia
PSCI 13 Art of War
PSCI 14 The CIA and the Politics of Intelligence
PSCI 15 Heroic Enemies of World War II
PSCI 16 The Art of Persuasion: Aikido as both a Physical and Political Art
PSCI 17 American Films of the 1970s
PSCI 18 GUNS! The Politics and Law of the Second Amendment
PSCI 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits
PSCI 22 Learning Intervention for Teens
PSCI 25 Jerusalem: One City, Two Cultures, Three Faiths, Many
PSCI 31 Senior Thesis
PSCI 32 Individual Project
PSYC 11 Designing your Life and Career After Williams
PSYC 12 Alcohol 101: Examining and Navigating the College Drinking Scene
PSYC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful
PSYC 15 Ephquilts: an Intro to Traditional Quiltmaking
PSYC 16 Psychology of Eating
PSYC 18 Call In Walk In Training for Peer Health
PSYC 21 Psychology Internships
PSYC 22 Introduction to Research in Psychology
PSYC 25 Eye Care and Culture in Nicaragua
PSYC 31 Senior Thesis
PHLH 12 Ethics in Public Health
PHLH 13 Ethics in Clinical Medicine
PHLH 14 Epidemiology, Public Health, and Leadership in the Health Professions
PHLH 15 The Human Side of Medicine and Medical Practice
PHLH 16 Addiction Studies and Diagnostics
PHLH 23 Gaudino Fellowship: Immersive Engagement and Reflection
REL 11 God in a Suffering World
REL 12 Zen Buddhism Intensive
REL 13 Hangin' With Hakuin: A Zen Guide
REL 14 Yoga at the Intersection of Practice and Theory
REL 24 Touring Black Religion in the ‘New’ South
REL 25 Jerusalem: One City, Two Cultures, Three Faiths, Many Narratives
REL 30 Senior Projects
RLFR S.P. Sustaining Program for French
RLFR 11 Audible Imagination: Exploring Sound Across the Arts
RLFR 12 Introduction to Translation
RLFR 13 Creative Portraiture in the Darkroom
RLFR 14 Formidable French Film
RLFR 15 Grand Hotel in Film and Fiction
RLFR 30 Honors Essay
RLFR 31 Senior Thesis
RLIT S.P. Sustaining Program for Italian
RLSP S.P. Sustaining Program for Spanish
RLSP 15 The Spanish Civil War in English
RLSP 30 Honors Essay
RLSP 31 Senior Thesis
RUSS S.P. Sustaining Program for Russian
RUSS 25 Williams in Georgia
RUSS 30 Honors Project
RUSS 31 Senior Thesis
THEA 13 Anton Chekhov's Uncle Vanya
THEA 14 Classic American and European Musical Theatre
THEA 15 Suzuki Method of Actor Training
THEA 16 Acting Out: Translation, Migration, and Transformation in Asian Theatres
THEA 17 Writing in the Margins: Playwriting as Plagiarism
THEA 32 Senior Honors Thesis
WGSS 11 Feminist Perspectives on Latinas in Popular Media
WGSS 12 Death, Sex, and Money in Brazil
WGSS 17 Writing in the Margins: Playwriting as Plagiarism
WGSS 31 Honors Project
SPEC 12 Career Exploration and Developing a Career Narrative
SPEC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships
SPEC 15 Pilates: Physiology and Wellness
SPEC 16 Addiction Studies and Diagnostics
SPEC 18 Call In Walk In training for Peer Health
SPEC 19 Medical Apprenticeship
SPEC 20 Convicting Kafka
SPEC 21 Experience the Workplace; an Internship with Williams Alumni/Parents
SPEC 24 Community Development Health Service Work project in Liberia, W. Africa
SPEC 25 Williams in Georgia
SPEC 26 Climate Policy in the New Presidency
SPEC 28 Class of 1959 Teach NYC Urban Education Program
SPEC 35 Making Pottery on the Potter's Whee

AFRICANA STUDIES


AFR 15 Ishmael Reed, Multiculturalist and Satirist (Same as ENGL 15)
See under ENGL 15 for full description.

AFR 17 Writing in the Margins: Playwriting as Plagiarism (Same as COMP 17 and LATS 17 and THEA 17 and WGSS 17)
See under THEA 17 for full description.

AFR 24 Touring Black Religion in the 'New' South (Same as ENVI 24 and REL 24)
In February of 1927 anthropologist Franz Boas asked folklorist Zora Neale Hurston to identify an ideal location in which to study and collect data about “Negro culture in the South.” Hurston’s reply, without hesitation, was the central and gulf coast of Florida because she believed there, “it was possible for [her] to get a cross section of the Negro South in one state.” Hurston traveled directly to Eatonville, the town she eventually claimed as her birth home, and for over a decade, utilized the information she collected as the backdrop to her fiction as well as her nonfiction explorations of Black religion.
Taking Hurston’s lead, this course (the first team-taught travel winter study offered solely by Africana Studies faculty) will utilize Florida’s gulf coast as the backdrop to exploring the diverse manifestations of modern black religious expression. Because of its diverse geographical, political structures, populations, and economy, Florida has historically been characterized as a “new South” with distinctive cultural expressions. With this history in mind, this course will address four critical questions: (1) What is Black religion?; (2) What are the distinctive aspects of southern expressions of Black Protestant religion; (3) How do Black communities see themselves in relation to broader social concerns? and (4) How, if at all, is religious expression in Florida unique?
To answer these questions, we will travel to Florida’s west coast and visit three different church communities to understand Black Protestant religion as currently expressed in the ‘New South.’ This includes Bryant Chapel Christian Methodist Episcopal Church (CME), a small mainstream denominational church in Talleveast Florida; Old Landmark Cathedral Church of God in Christ (COGIC), a Pentecostal-Holiness church in St. Petersburg, Florida; and Revealing Truth Ministries, a mega-church in Tampa, Florida. As participant-observers we will take part in worship services, and when possible, interview local residents about the role each church plays in its respective community. In addition to learning about Black religion along the western coast of Florida through participant observation, students will visit and tour local historical sites significant to Black religious’ experiences, and will meet with local academics, archivists, and leaders. These will include: touring the Zora Neale Hurston National Museum of the Fine Arts in Eatonville; visiting the Public Archaeology Lab at New College of Florida with Professor Uzi Baram; holding conversations about doing ethnographic work with author and scholar Robert Hayden; and touring the Family Heritage Museum at the State College of Florida with Freddie Brown and Kathie F. Marsh. Surveying Black history archives was especially important in the previous iteration of the course because they enlivened the historical and ethnographic literatures the students read.
In addition to their roles as participant observers, students will have access to an electronic reading packet that will ground them briefly, though comprehensively, on Florida’s history, ethnographic methods, and Black religious expressions. We will also use sources that contextualize church responses to current social concerns such as environmental racism, homelessness, and health care. A completed draft of the course reading packet is provided in the itinerary below.
Method of evaluation: an electronic field journal, participation in weekly colloquies, and an oral presentation
Prerequisites: no previous experience or religious affiliation is necessary, and we especially invite students who are interested in experiential learning; not open to first-year students
Enrollment limit: 8
Method of selection: we will review application essays and hold interviews with the top 10 applicants; preference will be given to majors and concentrators in Africana Studies, Religion, and Environmental Studies; priority will also be given to students with a background in ethnographic methods
Cost per student: $3362
Instructors: James Manigault-Bryant and Rhon Manigault-Bryant

AMERICAN STUDIES


AMST 10 North Adams, Massachusetts: Past, Present, and Future (Same as HIST 10)
See under HIST 10 for full description.

AMST 11 Feminist Perspectives on Latinas in Popular Media (Same as LATS 11 and WGSS 11)
See under LATS 11 for full description.

AMST 15 Contemporary Songwriting (Same as MUS 15)
See under MUS 15 for full description.

AMST 30 Senior Honors Project
To be taken by students registered for American Studies 491 or 492.

ANTHROPOLOGY/SOCIOLOGY


ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Anthropology 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY
SOC 13 Humanity 2.0: Humans, Transhumans, Posthumans
This course will invite the students to explore the so-called "transhumanist movement" and its overriding aim: the realization, through highly speculative technoscientific means, of an enhanced or even postbiological existence; the so-called "posthuman condition," Humanity 2.0. Students will read primary transhumanist texts and critical scholarship on the movement, and will engage with related works of science-fiction film and literature. Considerable attention will be devoted to the figure of the cyborg, space exploration/colonization, the so-called "technological singularity," artificial intelligence, mind-uploading, nanotechnology, and cryonic suspension, all of which, like transhumanism broadly, suggest that science and technology have come to operate as powerful channeling agents for the very sorts of (magical) beliefs, practices, and forms of (apocalyptic) association and expectation that theorists of secularization expected modernity to displace.
Method of evaluation: one of the following: 10-page paper; 5-page paper and presentation or performance; 2-3 short papers
Prerequisites: an interest in science fiction and/or science and technology studies
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: priority will be given to first- and second-year students
Meeting times: 11am-1pm, TWR
Cost per student: $25
Instructor: Grant Shoffstall

SOC 14 Epidemiology, Public Health, and Leadership in the Health Professions (Same as PHLH 14)
After an introduction to the tools and research strategies of epidemiology — the study of disease and disability in human populations — in answering critical questions in etiology, prevention, public health and illness care/clinical medicine, the course will turn to a series of seminars on current epidemics to illustrate these activities in action. Some of the epidemics to be considered by analysis of current papers in the public health literature include C-section, Zika and microcephaly, sports injury, including concussion, toxic shock, and the spread of HIV. Interwoven into these classes will be aspects of leadership that differ from leadership in politics or business. The class will be exposed to unknown epidemic data sets to illustrate the formulation and testing of hypotheses that may reveal underlying causes, means of epidemic control, and effective primary prevention strategies. There will be assigned readings, active class discussions, unknown epidemic analyses and presentations, and background journal publications to read and present as part of the series of seminars at the end of the course.
Method of evaluation: class participation, quality of assigned presentations, and a 5- to 10-page paper on a public health topic of interest
Prerequisites: a completed course in biostatistics will be advantageous
Enrollment limit: 12
Method of selection: all interested students will be interviewed by the instructor
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $75
Instructor: Nicholas Wright

SOC 15 Photographic Literacy and Practice
When you look at a photograph, what is it really saying? How can you make photograph that says what you mean? This course will educate students on the concepts of photographic seeing and visual literacy, while also training students to apply these concepts to their own photography. The class will meet three times per week — I propose Mondays and Fridays from 10am-12pm and Wednesdays from 1pm-5pm. Outside of class, students will be expected to photograph on their own in the Williamstown area and access to a car may be helpful. Outside of class readings will consist of one book, "How to See the World," by Nicholas Mirzoeff and many shorter writings and videos which are available online. In class we will review photobooks from my own collection and discuss how a well-sequenced body of work can be greater than the sum of its parts. Students will learn to defend their work during in-class critiques, and at the end of the course the class will produce an exhibition of their photography. Students must own a digital camera. A DSLR with a 35mm lens is ideal, but compact cameras will also work.
Method of evaluation: final photographic essay
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 12
Method of selection: preference is given to seniors
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $70
Instructor: Benjamin Brody
Ben Brody is a Massachusetts-based photojournalist and exhibiting artist who has focused primarily on the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. For more than ten years he has photographed the American wars in Iraq and Afghanistan while pioneering a unique visual approach conveying the absurdity and unintended consequences of those wars.

SOC 16 Humans of the Berkshires
Staying in Williamstown but yearning to get outside the “Purple Bubble”? This course will involve students in constructing a website devoted to the “Humans of the Berkshires,” inspired by Brandon Stanton’s Humans of New York. The experience will be hands-on and student-driven as we venture beyond the Williams campus to conduct interviews, take photographs, and engage more deeply with the surrounding community. We’ll unify our efforts in accordance with common themes, beginning with “Williamstown Beyond the College,” “Deindustrialization in the Berkshires,” and “The Creative Economy,” and continuing with other issues that interest enrolled students. Along the way, we’ll reflect on the intellectual, emotional, and ethical dimensions of our work by examining existing digital storytelling projects and public responses to them. Why has Humans of New York had such resonance and inspired so many imitations? What critiques has it generated and why? What social and emotional connections does digital storytelling create (or fail to create)? What ethical considerations should inform digital storytelling? How does it differ from established academic approaches to social research (e.g., ethnography, in-depth interviewing, oral history) and from traditional journalism? Students should be prepared to participate vigorously in class discussions and to spend time outside of class engaging with existing digital storytelling projects and conducting interviews in the surrounding community.
Method of evaluation: contributions to class website (interviews and photographs), a final presentation, and a short reflective essay (3- to 4-pages)
Prerequisites: none; open to all
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: if overenrolled, selection will be based on a written statement of interest
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $10
Instructor: Christina Simko

SOC 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Sociology 493-494.

ARABIC STUDIES


ARAB S.P. Sustaining Program for Arabic 101-102
Sustaining Program for Arabic 101-102.

ARAB 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Arab Studies 493-494.

ART


ART HISTORY
ARTH 14 Basquiat and Defacement: Conceptualism, Black Lives Matter and Black Identity
This course capitalizes on the short-term presence of a painting by Jean-Michel Basquiat at the Williams College Museum of Art. Defacement (The Death of Michael Stewart) centralizes police brutality and state violence in a way that demands a rigorous examination of how a painter — in this case, Basquiat — internalizes the social politics of the time and the explicitness of violence to turn it into art. And this question is particularly important as Defacement is one of the rare treatments in Basquiat’s oeuvre of violence which cannot be metabolized into “nobility”, one of the artist’s favorite subjects. In an attempt to understand why Basquiat chose such a strong departure for Defacement, we will look at Goya’s Disasters of War and Picasso’s Guernica (Basquiat’s favorite painting). From there, we will use these to understand how Defacement not only reflects the national conversation about police brutality, but how the idea of Basquiat as a Conceptual artist informs contemporary and Millennial Black identity in the backdrop of high rates of police brutality and the Black Lives Matter movement. Class will meet 6-10 hours per week.
Method of evaluation: 5-page paper and final presentation
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 12
Method of selection: statement of intent
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $100
Instructor: Chaédria LaBouvier
Chaédria LaBouvier is a 2007 graduate of Williams College and contributing writer for Elle, Medium and Glamour where she focuses on pop-culture, police brutality and politics. She is a co-founder of Mothers Against Police Brutality and is writing, What a Time to Be Alive, a narrative non-fiction about police brutality, social media and the Black Lives Matter movement.

ARTH 15 Public Art and Climate Change: Ghana ThinkTank and the Making of a Museum Installation (Same as ARTS 15)
In this course students will work directly with members of the artist collective Ghana ThinkTank to design and implement an installation at the Williams College Museum of Art. Students will play an integral role at a key moment in a year-long project that brings Ghana ThinkTank and Williams College together to tackle climate change.
Ghana ThinkTank is an international collective that “develops the first world” by flipping traditional power dynamics, allowing the “third world” to intervene in the lives of the people living in the so-called “developed” world.
Ghana ThinkTank collects problems from communities throughout the USA and Europe, and sends them to think tanks they have created in “developing” communities. The think tanks — which include a group of bike mechanics in Ghana, people who run a rural radio station in El Salvador, and Sudanese refugees seeking asylum in Israel, among others — propose solutions that are then implemented in the “first world”. This innovative approach to public art reveals blind spots between otherwise disconnected cultures, challenges assumptions about who is “needy,” and turns the idea of expertise on its head.
In this winter study, we'll consider a range of exhibition making and interpretive approaches, and use a variety of sculptural skills and DIY strategies. The resulting museum installation in WCMA's Rotunda will function as both an active workspace and display to engage the public with Ghana ThinkTank's project at Williams. It will serve to reveal the range of climate change-related problems submitted by members of our community, and invite visitors to submit their own problems, observe the think tanks in discussion, and sign up to be involved in implementing their solutions. The course will culminate with a public opening of the installation. The installation itself will continue to grow and change throughout the 2016-2017 academic year as the broader project unfolds on campus.
We will use class time (about 6 hours per week initially, more as we build physical components) to discuss readings, craft design approaches through ideation and iteration, and hold work sessions with Ghana ThinkTank artists and museum staff. Time out of class will involve minimal reading, research, design proposals, and prototype building.
Method of evaluation: participation, public exhibit and short 2- to 3-page page paper
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: statement of intent
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $30
Instructor: Sonnet Coggins

ARTH 16 Intro to Fashion Studies (Same as COMP 16 and GERM 16)
See under GERM 16 for full description.

ARTH 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for ArtH 494. For requirements of entry into the course, please see "The Degree with Honors in Art, Art History" in the catalogue or on the Art Department's webpage. Enrollment limit: 8
Method of selection: students need permission of the department to register for this course
Instructor: Chavoya

ARTH 33 Honors Independent Study
To be taken by candidates for honors by the independent study route.

ART STUDIO
ARTS 11 Audible Imagination: Exploring Sound Across the Arts (Same as RLFR 11)
This is a course about sound and its relationship to the visual arts, technology and the environment. We focus on sound art, an interdisciplinary movement that emerged from twentieth-century avant-garde movements. The chief purpose of this course is practical: artists and non-artists will be invited to test the boundaries between art and everyday life, between seeing and hearing, and between noise and music. The first week reviews the fundamentals of sound production: how to make your own microphones, how to record, and how to use basic production software. In the second week, you’ll apply these production techniques in a project of your own design. In the final week, you’ll share your final project with professional sound artists who will visit and perform in our classroom. Class meets twice a week for three hours. Work for the course includes readings (Cage, Oliveros, Schwitters, Westerkamp), weekly online postings to the course blog, two short projects, and final sound project.
Method of evaluation: four online posts, two short projects, one short paper (3- to 4-pages), and one final project
Prerequisites: all are welcome
Enrollment limit: 15
Method of selection: preference to Romance Language majors; students in Music, Studio Art, Theatre, and Dance
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $50
Instructor: Matthew Anderson
Matt Anderson is a multimedia artist and has worked in sound, performance, and installation since 1993. He studied at the Studio for Interrelated Media at the Massachusetts College of Art and has exhibited and performed in venues including the Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow, UK; Tmuna Theatre, Tel Aviv, Israel; and Festival Ecuatoriano de Musica Contemporanea, Quito, Ecuador.

ARTS 12 Narrating the Figure through Drawing
In this workshop we will be drawing the figure(s) and his or her environment. The environment in which the figure exists tells as much about our intentions for a drawing as how we construct the figure itself (i.e. do we want the confrontation of a shallow space, or the greater narrative potential of a deeper space?).
The course will stress individual critiquing by the instructor in a workshop environment. Different students may be working on different projects and at different skill levels. Although a model (we will use both male and female models) will be available most classes, we will also learn how to work with the figure without having to rely on an actual person being present in front of us. It is important as artists to have the ability and confidence to alter your work, to respond to your drawing's needs. This may require actions beyond just direct observation. Drawing is a dialog between you and your "surface". You make a mark and then you respond. This "give and take" is essential to the creative process.
Many graphic mediums will be introduced (i.e. charcoal, conte, wax, graphite, ink). There will be a demonstration the first day of class for students uncertain or unfamiliar with the various drawing materials. Throughout the course, drawing techniques (i.e. line, contour and gestural; tonality; textures; perspective) will be discussed and demonstrated.
We will look at and discuss the work of 19th and 20th century masters such as Edgar Degas, Mary Cassat, Pablo Picasso, Kathe Kollwitz, Lucian Freud, Alice Neel, Philip Guston, Marlene Dumas, and Richard Diebenkorn.
 All students are welcome, regardless of their level of experience. The emphasis of the workshop is more on experimentation and process than on product. The objective of the workshop is to experience the fun and challenge of telling a story with the drawn image.
Method of evaluation: students will be evaluated on the development of their portfolio, and their effort, and participation in individual and group critiques (two group critiques will be held, one half way through class and the other on final day of class)
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 12
Method of selection: Art majors first
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $100
Instructor: James Peters
Jim Peters, painter/printmaker, holds an MFA from Maryland Institute, College of Art and an MS from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has taught at Rhode Island School of Design and Massachusetts College of Art and Design and exhibits his work at ACA Galleries and Ethan Cohen Fine Arts Gallery in New York City.

ARTS 13 Creative Portraiture in the Darkroom (Same as RLFR 13)
 In this course we will revisit the boundaries between self-portraiture and portraiture. Working in pairs, students will both practice being a model and a photographer: they will pose as a model for their classmate and assist a classmate in creating a self-portrait. In addition, using as a point of departure Hippolyte Bayard’s photograph Self-Portrait as a Drowned Man, the first self-portrait in the history of photography, students will learn how to use a view camera (a large format camera used during the invention of photography in 1839 and still in use today).
 We will also study the characteristics of film photography, specifically, light, chemicals, sensitive emulsion, and negative and use them as tools to make creative portraits in the darkroom. By the end of the course students will have learned to shoot with a 4 x 5 view camera and have practiced with manipulations in the darkroom in order to create unique portraits. Each student will exhibit his or her work as a triptych in an exhibition.
Class will meet for three hours three times a week for a total of 9 hours per week.
Homework includes online tutorials, reading, film viewing, and practice.
Method of evaluation: in-class discussion, participation, shooting, lab work, explanation of the final project, formal public exhibit, and short paper (2- to 3-page)
Prerequisites: knowledge of black and white analog photography is preferred but not required
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: Art majors and minors then first come and first served
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $100
Instructor: Daniel Goudrouffe
Born in France and from Guadeloupe, Daniel Goudrouffe is an author photographer who is influenced by humanist photographers and by the philosophy of the Magnum co-operative agency. He uses poetic realism as his principal mode of expression to document the experiences of people from the Caribbean.

ARTS 15 Public Art and Climate Change: Ghana Think Tank and the Making of a Museum Installation (Same as ARTH 15)
See under ARTH for full description.

ARTS 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as CHEM 16)
See under CHEM 16 for full description.

ARTS 17 Intermediate Painting
This course is a hybrid of independent study and classwork for students with some experience in painting. The goal of the class is to develop individual style and concept while improving technique. The class meetings will focus on technical improvement. The emphasis of the course, however, will be the independent project, in which students are free to develop style and content and create a series of paintings to be exhibited in the Wilde Gallery. Experimentation and risk taking will be rewarded! We will meet three times a week, once in small tutorial groups to develop and critique individual projects and twice as a full class for 2 and a half hours of instruction in representational figure painting and abstraction. We will also visit our local museums to study painting. Students may choose to work in acrylic or oil paint for the term and are responsible for gathering paint, brushes, medium, thinner, gloves, palette and palette knives before the first class meeting. Paper, canvas, gesso and charcoal will be supplied and the cost will be added to the term bill.
Method of evaluation: weekly critiques, portfolio review, and exhibition in the Wilde Gallery
Prerequisites: ARTS 241; if you have not taken Arts 241, please send via email 5 images of paintings to the professor for review
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: seniors and juniors will have priority
Meeting times: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 1:00 to 3:30
Cost per student: $350
Instructor: Michael Glier

ARTS 18 Wood and Woodturning (Same as PHYS 18)
See under PHYS 18 for full description.

ARTS 31 Senior Studio: Independent Project Art Studio
Independent project to be taken by candidates for honors in Art Studio.
Instructor: Podmore

ASIAN STUDIES


ASST 12 The East is Red? — Socialism in Asia (Same as HIST 12 and PSCI 12)
This course provides a historical and political overview of socialism in Asia from the 1910s to the present. It examines the spread and influence of Marxism in Asia, the polices of socialist states and movements in relation to decolonization, the Cold War, and the Sino-Soviet split, and the marriage between market reforms and ostensibly socialist governments in the present day. In addition to looking at the socialist governments of China, Mongolia, North Korea, Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia, we will examine cases of “unsuccessful” socialist movements in Japan, Indonesia, Nepal, and India. Class materials include memoirs of survival by non-state actors, the writings of socialist leaders (Mao Zedong, Ho Chi Minh, Kim Il Sung, etc.), and cultural constructions such as revolutionary theatre, songs, and contemporary films. We will also engage secondary scholarship that deals with Asian approaches to modernity, the use of revolutionary and state violence, and gender relations under socialism. Questions that will be addressed include: Why did Marxism, a Eurocentric theory of revolution intended for advanced capitalist societies, find such resonance in Asia? How was Marxism adapted for an Asian environment? Twenty-five years after the fall of communism, why have Asian socialist states remained in power? And in the scales of history, how should we judge the effects of socialism in Asia?
Method of evaluation: leading one class discussion, a 5- to 6-page research paper, and a class journal; attendance and participation will also be taken into account
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: preference will be given to students majoring in the fields of Asian Studies, History, or Political Science
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $10
Instructor: John Knight
John Knight is a Ph.D. candidate in East Asian History with a focus on Modern China. In addition to offering this course at Williams College last Winter Study, he has taught East Asian and World History at Ohio State University, Capital University, and Seton Hall.

CHINESE

CHIN S.P. Sustaining Program for Chinese 101-102
Sustaining Program for Chinese 101-102.

CHIN 13 Tai Chi
Taichi is a popular form of physical exercise. This class will teach students the 24 movements of Yang-style Taichi and the auxiliary qigong skills. It will also introduce to students the history of the development of Taichi and the Chinese cultural values embedded in it. Combining in-class practice, assigned readings, and multimedia medium, students are expected to be able to complete the movements learned in class and self-practice them out of class at their wish. The class will meet three times a week for two hours each time. Attendance will be taken in class. Students will write a 500-word essay that demonstrates their understanding of the cultural aspects of Taichi.
Outfit Requirement: Students should come to class in work-out clothing.
Reminder: If you have any medical conditions, be sure to consult your health professional that learning Taichi is appropriate for you, and let the instructor know about your conditions.
Method of evaluation: evaluation will be based on attendance, effort in class, a 5-page short paper discussing the cultural aspects of Taichi, and a final demonstration that shows students can complete all learned movements with precision and coherence
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: seniors and Asian Studies students are selected before other students
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Youlin Shi
Youlin Shi has been teaching Taichi for twenty years. She is an adjunct faculty in the Department of Physical Education at MCLA and teaches Tai Chi classes in North Adams, Adams, and Williamstown.

CHIN 16 Acting Out: Translation, Migration, and Transformation in Asian Theatres (Same as THEA 16)
It is intriguingly difficult to define the temporal and regional features of “Asian Theatres” in today’s world. Old legends come to life on the contemporary stage; avant-garde experiments from one era/area are transformed into established canons begging for reinvestigation in another; theatre talents and fans migrate to leave or search for home. The profound liminality of Asian Theatres will be addressed in this course through the ventures of reading, watching, and play-making. Materials engaged will cross and challenge historical demarcations, geographical boundaries, and media specificities. We will first explore the metamorphoses of “Madam White Snake” from a Chinese oral legend, to a Korean-Japanese-Chinese meme in the late 1950s and early 1960s, to contemporary productions (a theatre by Mary Zimmerman and a Hong Kong film by Hark Tsui) and White Snake-themed tourist sites that reflect creative cultural entrepreneurship. Then, we will approach through close, deep, and cold readings contemporary plays about interculturality written by the established Asian American playwrights Young Jean Lee and Philip Kan Gotanda as well as the emerging Sinophone playwright Zhu Yi. The course will end with rehearsals and a public performance (comparable to near zero-budget lab works) of selected acts from the plays we have covered. Topics explored include the performability of gender, racial, and specie identities; the relationship between fantasy and reality, and the status of the “self” and the “community” generated by performance. Students will develop an understanding of the “trans” inherent in Asian Theatres: from page to stage; from East Asia to the world; from old to avant-garde and vice versa, as well as personally experience the joy of play making. All class materials and discussions are in English.
Method of evaluation: 1) active class participation; 2) three short writing assignments (consisting of blurbs for theatre/film promotion; one 1- to 2-page response paper to scholarly readings; and one 3- to 5-page close reading paper); 3) one of the following individual/group “play-making” activities to prepare for the public performance (short dramaturge practice/custom design with limited budget/choreograph design/blocking practice); and 4) carrying out the final production
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 15
Method of selection: slight preference to students who are interested in performance and/or Asian Studies; first-year and sophomore students are encouraged
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $25
Instructor: Man He

CHIN 24 Taiwan Study Tour
Interested in learning first-hand about Taiwanese culture and becoming acquainted with the so-called Taiwan (economic and political) "miracle"? Want to learn or improve your knowledge of Mandarin, the language with the largest number of native speakers? Then join us on this 24-day study tour to Taiwan, Republic of China. We'll spend the first two weeks in Taipei, the capital city, where 3 hours of Mandarin language classes at levels from beginning to advanced will be scheduled each morning at the Mandarin Center of National Taiwan Normal University. After class each day, we'll meet as a group for lunch and discussion. Activities with Taiwanese university students and visits to cultural and economic sites of interest will be scheduled for some afternoons and Saturdays, with other afternoons, evenings, and Sundays free for self-study and individual exploration. During the last week, we'll travel to central and southern Taiwan, staying at youth hostels or small hotels. Two orientation sessions will be conducted on campus in the fall to help participants prepare for their experience.
Method of evaluation: active participation in all scheduled activities, quality of work in the language course, 10-page paper
Prerequisites: none; not open to first-year students
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: based on applicant’s statement of rationale and goals for wishing to participate; CHIN and ASST majors without previous experience in Taiwan will be given priority
Cost per student: $3,050
Instructor: Cornelius C. Kubler

CHIN 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Chinese.

JAPANESE

JAPN S.P. Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102
Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102.

JAPN 11 The Japanese POW Camp in Film
During the Pacific War in the East, the pace of territorial conquest of the Japanese Imperial Army was so rapid and ferocious that it overwhelmed every colonial power in its wake, even the Americans in the Philippines under General Douglass MacArthur — all fell like dominoes. The Japanese seemed indomitable.
Once established in these former colonies, the Japanese set up their infamous POW camps that housed tens of thousands of surrendered allied soldiers. But Japan was not a signatory to the Second Geneva Convention of 1929 protocols governing the Treatment of Prisoners of War. Consequently, POWs were not inviolate but stripped of any protective status as soldiers and treated as slaves, subject to the whims of brutality, incessant work in harrowing conditions and relentless, inhumane abuses. This was the conqueror’s hallmark.
As a film course we will focus on this unending existential ordeal of merciless mistreatment specific to the POW camps in each film, films that are rooted in eyewitness accounts of former POWs who were reduced to wretched skeletons in rags, emaciated beings, with some, who because of their resilient spirit and stoicism bore the brunt of savagery by their captors.
The academic thrust of this class will be to address questions of moral conduct that the films’ sordid imagery evokes: How can one explain the scale of mistreatment so rampant and repellent in Japanese POW camps? Was it racism that influenced the behavior of Japanese soldiers as John Dowers argues in his book, War Without Mercy? Or, can we attribute the flagrant violations of so-called Western “norms and values” of civilized behavior to the deeply ingrained authoritarian ideology of bushido, the code of the samurai, which deemed surrender dishonorable, a disgrace? So, was the dehumanization that prevailed in the camps a matter of a perversion of bushido or, simply errant and renegade indiscipline, meant to degrade and demoralize any vestige of resistance? Then, was it something else, something more intrinsic to Japanese, to their culture, their character, their sense of racial superiority, or even their belief in imperial divinity and destiny?
Method of evaluation: each film will require a 4- to 5-page reaction in addition to class participation; attendance is mandatory
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 30
Method of selection: first come, first served
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $50
Instructor: Frank Stewart
I spent fourteen years in the Faculty of Law at Hiroshima Shudo University in Hiroshima, Japan. I lived within a fifteen-minute walking distance of Heiwa Koen, the peace park where the atomic bomb was detonated.

JAPN 25 Kyoto Artisans: Exploring 1200 years of Cultural History of Kyoto thorough Modern Craftsmanship
Kyoto, the former imperial capital of Japan has 1200 years of history. It is called Japan’s cultural treasure house and thrives on its ancient heritage in architecture, gardens, religion, performing and culinary arts and craftsmanship. Yet Kyoto’s appearances can be deceiving. At a glance, its traditional architectures, sacred shrines and temples are absent as they are tucked away behind tall buildings and busy commercial storefronts. In Kyoto, you will find a monumental temple designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site under the shadow of ultramodern high-rising buildings. There is an enigmatic quality to the city with this juxtaposition of old and new. This unresolved tension between tradition and modernization can be Kyoto’s fascination.
The purpose of this travel course is to explore the cultural history of Kyoto and how traditional craftsmanship is perpetuated and transformed in a modern era as the city of Kyoto developed. Students will visit Kyoto artisans at their studio and through a discourse with thriving artists, they will arrive at their own conclusion about what it means to sustain tradition while pursuing modernization and innovation.
The first week of the course is conducted on campus. Students will intensively study the cultural history of Kyoto with readings, films and discussion. Also in pairs, they will conduct research on one selected area of Kyoto craftsmanship to acquire in-depth knowledge. Each pair will be responsible to educate the entire group for the onsite visit in Kyoto. Then, for the second and third week, the class will travel to Kyoto. We will first visit historic sites to learn the context of how craftsmanship developed from courtly culture in the Heian period, samurai tradition in the Kamakura and Muromachi periods, religious ceremonies and Noh Theater and tea ceremonies. After and during these excursions, we will visit four to five artisan studios. They are a sacred mirror maker who could be the last of his kind, a textile weaver, a Noh mask maker, a sculptor of Buddhist statues and a bamboo weaver. Some of these artisans are perpetuating hundreds of years of family tradition. Some started out as an apprentice and established his/her own studio. Students may also have hands on experiences at some studios.
Students are expected to participate in all the scheduled activities, keep a daily journal and share in daily reflections. At the end of the Kyoto visit, students will summarize their reflections and present their views on Japanese traditional and modern craftsmanship to the local community and the Kyoto artisans at a public forum. The class will return to campus on the fourth week and conduct a PowerPoint presentation in pairs on one area of craftsmanship to the campus community.
Method of evaluation: daily journal, a public presentation in Kyoto, and a PowerPoint presentation on campus
Prerequisites: none; not open to first-year students
Enrollment limit: 8
Method of selection: 300-word personal statement
Cost per student: $3887 (+$20 for books and $140 for passport fee)
Instructor: Kasumi Yamamoto

JAPN 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Japanese.

ASTRONOMY/ASTROPHYSICS


ASTRONOMY
ASTR 12 A Passion for Planets: Exploring Mars and Pluto (Same as GEOS 12)
This course, meant for non-majors, will deal with scientific, historical, and literary aspects of the planets Mars and Pluto. We will look at how the exploration of Mars and Pluto challenged the preconceptions of scientists and the public alike, and shattered paradigms.
It will be based on the content of the instructor's book A Passion for Mars: Intrepid Explorers of the Red Planet (2008), and also, on his experiences participating in NASA’s New Horizons mission to Pluto in 2015.
Mars: Dreamers and space scientists, engineers and biologists, backyard astronomers and artists have devoted their lives-sometimes at the expense of their careers-to the quest for Mars. Over half a century, they have transformed the Red Planet from a projection of our wildest fantasies into an even more amazing real place of spectacular landscapes, beguiling mysteries, and fantastic possibilities-as an abode for life, and even as a second home for humanity. In A Passion for Mars, Andrew Chaikin, who covered Mars exploration as a science journalist and took part in the first Mars landing, chronicled this epic quest and the enduring dream of going there.
Pluto: In 2015, NASA’s New Horizons mission gave humans their first close-up look at the much maligned “ninth planet” Pluto. Andrew Chaikin participated in the mission and is now writing a book about the adventure. In this course we will discuss Pluto’s controversial demotion from planetary status by the International Astronomical Union, as well as the incredible scientific discoveries that have been made about this distant, icy world by the New Horizons mission. We will also consider the possibility that there may be thousands planets in our solar system — many of them possibly like Pluto — instead of the 8 planets recognized by the International Astronomical Union.
Method of evaluation: quizzes on reading at the beginning of each class; level of class participation; final exam
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 12
Method of selection: if overenrolled, selection will be on the basis of emailed student description of experience or interest in the topic
Meeting times: afternoons, Tues/Thurs preferred; two 2.5-hour classes per week, plus occasional sessions to view course-related videos
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Andrew Chaikin
Andrew Chaikin is the author of numerous books and articles on space exploration. His book A Man on the Moon: The Voyages of the Apollo Astronauts (1994) has been called the definitive account of the Apollo missions. Chaikin is a commentator for National Public Radio's Morning Edition, and is an advisor to NASA on space policy and public communications. A former editor of Sky and Telescope magazine, he has written about astronomy and space exploration for three decades.

ASTR 25 The Great American Eclipse of 2017
For the first time in 99 years, the path of totality of a solar eclipse will sweep across the United States from coast to coast. We will study the science and social science of total solar eclipses, including both the astronomy aspects and the aspects of introducing hundreds of millions of Americans to eclipse observing. The whole United States will have a partial eclipse, with the 70-mile-wide path of totality going from Oregon to South Carolina.
We will begin the month of January 2017 with the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Texas and then work with solar scientists (including an alumni) at U. Colorado/Boulder and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and then proceed to our chosen eclipse site on the campus of Willamette University in Salem, Oregon. (See a map animation at GreatAmericanEclipse.com.) After overseeing the eventual expedition arrangements, we will visit major astronomical observatories in California, including the Palomar Observatory with its 200" telescope with which Williams College is joining a consortium for educational aspects of its Zwicky Transient Facility, with lodging in Pomona or Pasadena.
Method of evaluation: a day during the last week will be spent pondering what we have seen and writing a 10-page report about it; the possibility will be offered of participating in the eventual eclipse expedition in August 2017
Prerequisites: none; not open to first-year students
Enrollment limit: 6
Method of selection: one paragraph description of interest
Cost per student: $2000 ($800 airfare/$1,200 shared cost of hotel and food)
Instructor: Jay Pasachoff

ASTR 31 Senior Research
To be taken by students registered for Astronomy 493-494.

ASTROPHYSICS
ASPH 31 Senior Research
To be taken by students registered for Astrophysics 493-494.

BIOLOGY


BIOL 11 BioEYES Teaching 4th Graders about Zebrafish
BioEYES brings tropical fish to 4th grade classrooms in Lanesborough and Williamstown Elementary Schools, in a science teaching workshop. Elementary school students will breed fish in the classroom, then study their development and pigmentation during one week. Williams students will adapt BioEYES lesson plans to the science curriculum for the schools we visit, work with classroom teachers to introduce concepts in genetics and development, help the 4th grade students in the classroom, and assess elementary student learning. A final eight-page paper describing the goals and outcomes for each grade level is required. No zebrafish experience is necessary. During the first week, students will learn to set up fish matings, learn about embryonic development and the genetics of fish pigmentation as well as practice teaching the 4th grade BioEYES lesson plans with hands-on experiments using living animals. In the subsequent two weeks, we will work at the schools, and in the final week, students will write up the assessment data.
Method of evaluation: create visual aids to coincide with BioEYES lessons and a final 8-page paper
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 14
Method of selection: preference to seniors
Meeting times: varies depending on needs of schools and laboratory requirements
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Renee Schiek
Renee Schiek currently serves as the liaison between Lanesborough Elementary School and the Williams Elementary Outreach, where Williams students teach hands-on science lessons at area elementary schools. She is a frequent substitute at Lanesborough ES and holds a degree in mechanical engineering.

BIOL 12 New Orleans Style Jazz
This course has a focus on making music based on the principles of improvisation and street performance embodied by New Orleans-Style jazz. Typically composed of brass instruments, this course welcomes musicians and performers of all types, from the classically trained to those with no experience who are willing to play washboards, kazoos, and experiment with other forms of sound-making. For when you travel the world after Williams, this course will prepare you to "busk," or make money playing music on the street, where some of the most dynamic forms of jazz and improvisation have been created. The course will include various street performances and culminate in a "gig" at a local music venue.
Method of evaluation: participation in final performance, at end of term, outside of class time; original written musical composition; short written research project; attendance and participation in class is required; rehearsal with classmates outside of class is required
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: selection will occur as follows: seniors, juniors, sophomores, first-years
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $5
Instructor: Andy Kelly
Andy Kelly, a local Jazz musician and former busker, Williams College Class of '80, now travels the world bridging cultures with music, using American jazz to make peace in the world.

BIOL 13 Intro to Animal Tracking (Same as ENVI 13)
This course is an introduction to the ancient art and science of animal tracking, and its various applications in the modern world in the areas of animal research, environmental science, art and personal development. Participants will deepen their skills as naturalists, their awareness of the natural world, and discover that even the greens at Williams College are abundant with wildlife. Students will have field time in class at Hopkins Forest as well as through independent study at a convenient outdoor location of each student’s choosing. Basic concepts of animal tracking, its history and use by indigenous people throughout the world will be discussed through video, slide show and field work. Students are required to create journals and site maps of their focus group study areas, including all major features of the landscape, flora and fauna activity.
Method of evaluation: evaluation will be based on attendance, class participation, a 2-page research paper, a field evaluation, and a power point presentation of their maps and journals, with attention to detail and content
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 18
Method of selection: seniors first
Meeting times: 10:00am to 2:30pm
Cost per student: $89
Instructor: Dan Yacobellis
A tracker for over 20 years, level 3 track and sign certified from Cyber Tracker International and teacher of tracking and primitive skills for 10 years.

BIOL 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Biology 493-494.
CHEMISTRY


CHEM 10 Zymurgy
An introduction to the science, history, and practice of brewing beer. This course aims to supply the general chemical concepts and hands-on technical experience necessary to enable creative brewing and an appreciation of diverse beer styles. Lecture topics include the biochemistry of yeast, sanitary practices, analytical methods, malt types and preparation, extract vs. all-grain brewing, hops, water chemistry, the chemistry of off-flavors, and beer judging. In the lab, students progress from brewing a commercially available extract kit to producing a full-grain brew of their own original recipe. The class will also meet professional brewers and microbiologists during a private tour of a local brewery.
Method of evaluation: evaluation is based on class/lab participation, a 10-page paper, and a final presentation
Prerequisites: no prerequisites; must be 21 years of age
Enrollment limit: 12
Method of selection: preference is given to students with a strong background/aptitude in the sciences, and to those who express the earliest and most compelling interest by email to Professor Smith
Meeting times: mornings 5 days a week (longer on lab days), several evenings, and an all-day field trip Cost per student: $500
Instructor: Thomas Smith

CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as PHYS 11)
Are you interested in teaching? Do you enjoy working with kids? Do you like to experiment with new things? Here is a chance for you to do all three! The aim of this Winter Study Project is to design a series of hands-on science workshops for elementary school children and their parents. Working in teams of 2-4, students spend the first two and a half weeks of Winter Study planning the workshops. This involves deciding on a focus for each workshop (based on the interests of the students involved) followed by choosing and designing experiments and presentations that will be suitable for fourth-grade children. On the third weekend of Winter Study (January 21, 22) we bring elementary school kids with their parents to Williams to participate in the workshops.
You get a chance to see what goes into planning classroom demonstrations as well as a sense of what it’s like to actually give a presentation. You find that kids at this age are great fun to work with because they are interested in just about everything and their enthusiasm is infectious. You also give the kids and their parents a chance to actually do some fun hands-on science experiments that they may not have seen before, and you are able to explain simple scientific concepts to them in a manner that won’t be intimidating. It is a rewarding experience for all involved.
Method of evaluation: evaluation is based on participation in planning and running the workshops; each group is expected to prepare a handout with descriptions of the experiments for the kids, parents, and teachers
Prerequisites: no prerequisites; you need not be a science major; all that is needed is enthusiasm
Enrollment limit: 25
Method of selection: seniors, juniors, sophomores
Meeting times: classes meet three times a week for approximately three hours each session; the workshop is run on the third weekend of Winter Study (January 21, 22) and attendance from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. is mandatory that weekend; there are also one or two brief meetings held in the fall term for preliminary planning
Cost per student: $0
Instructors: Frederick Strauch and Laura Strauch
Laura Strauch is a lab instructor in the Chemistry Department at Williams.

CHEM 13 Ultimate Wellness: Concepts for a Happy Healthy Life
This course provides an opportunity to drastically improve your life by introducing concepts that can start making a difference in the way you feel today! We will approach nutrition, lifestyle, and happiness from a holistic perspective. Students will learn how to tune out mixed media messages and look within to find ultimate health and wellness. Topics include:
Ayurveda
Cleansing
Preventative medicine
Yoga and meditation
Food intolerance awareness
Healthy eating and meal planning
Deconstructing cravings and overcoming sugar addiction
Healthy skin care with oils
Finding your happiness
Evaluation will be based on completion of assignments, class participation, reflective 10-page paper or equivalent creative project, and final presentation that demonstrates a level of personal growth. After signing up for this course please email Nicole at nicole@zentreewellness.com with a brief statement describing your interest in the course and what you hope to achieve in it. In the event of over-subscription, these statements will be used in the selection process.
We will meet twice a week for three-hour sessions as a group. There will be several books and a DVD required for this class
*Course will include three individual sessions. An initial health assessment and two additional sessions designed to personalize the course and assist the student in applying the learned techniques.
Method of evaluation: 5-page paper (or project equivalent) and final presentation
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 15
Method of selection: after signing up for this course please email Nicole at nicole@zentreewellness.com with a brief statement describing your interest in the course and what you hope to achieve in it; in the event of over-enrollment, these statements will be used in the selection process
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $90
Instructor: Nicole Anagnos
Nicole Anagnos is Health Coach and Director at Zen Tree Wellness in Williamstown. She is co-founder of the organic skin care company, Klo Organic Beauty. She also holds a master’s degree in education.

CHEM 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as PSYC 14 and SPEC 14)
Looking back on past loves and crushes, have you ever wondered “What on earth was I thinking?!” or “Why do I keep picking the wrong guys/girls for me?” While intense sexual attraction or urges may first call the shots, people who take the time to carefully choose and build caring, mutual relationships tend to be happier, healthier and more successful in their lives than those who don’t. So how do we get there from here and make sense of all this? Well, no matter where you are on the dating spectrum, this self-exploration and relationship-skill-building course is for you if you are ready to learn how to follow your heart AND your mind to co-create a fulfilling relationship within the vortex of the “hook up” culture. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, “How to Avoid Falling In Love with A Jerk,” and “Keeping the Love You Find” curricula will guide this introspective, interactive relationship mastery course through meaningful discussions and exercises that explore the common issues, dirty fighting tactics, subconscious directives and emotional allergies that often sabotage relationships. Experiential exercises, personal experiences and journaling will also give you the opportunity to practice effective communication and conflict resolution skills that honor the constructive use of differences and promote intimacy.
Method of evaluation: requirements: attendance, class participation, reading, journaling, 1:1 meetings with instructor, assignments, and a 10-page final paper/project
Prerequisites: statement of interest
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: meaningful statement of interest
Meeting times: TBD
Cost per student: $100
Instructor: Rachelle Smith
Rachelle Smith, MSW, is a holistic, strengths-based clinical social worker, consultant, educator, and mentor bridging relationships, wellness and energy psychology.

CHEM 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as ARTS 16)
This course provides an introduction to both a theoretical consideration of the glassy state of matter and the practical manipulation of glass. We do flameworking with hand torches for at least 12 hours per week. While no previous experience is required, students with patience, good hand-eye coordination, and creative imagination will find the course most rewarding. The class is open to both artistically and scientifically oriented students.
Method of evaluation: evaluation is based on class participation, exhibition of glass projects, a 10-page paper, and a presentation to the class
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: preference is given to juniors, sophomores, and those who express the most and earliest interest and enthusiasm by email to Professor Thoman
Meeting times: 9:00 a.m. to noon, M-F
Cost per student: $75
Instructor: Jay Thoman

CHEM 18 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry
An independent experimental project in biochemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in biochemistry. Biochemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the molecular details of living systems including the interaction of biologically important molecules. In the Chemistry Department, studies are underway to investigate the structure/function relationship of proteins, the interaction between proteins and RNA and DNA, and the molecular basis of bacterial gene regulation.
Method of evaluation: a 10-page written report is required
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the department; since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the department chair before electing this course
Enrollment limit: enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab
Method of selection: expression of student interest
Meeting times: daily
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Amy Gehring

CHEM 19 Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry
An independent experimental project in physical chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in physical chemistry. Current research projects in the Department include computer modeling of non-linear, chaotic chemical and biochemical systems, molecular modeling of water clusters, laser spectroscopy of chlorofluorocarbon substitutes, and observing the dynamics in glasses using single molecule spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.
Method of evaluation: a 10-page written report is required
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the department; since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the department Chair before electing this course; non-science majors are invited to participate
Enrollment limit: enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab
Method of selection: expression of student interest
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $0
Instructors: Enrique Peacock-Lopez and Jay Thoman

CHEM 20 Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry
An independent experimental project in inorganic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in inorganic chemistry. Opportunities for research in inorganic chemistry at Williams include (1) the design and development of sensors for environmental imaging of pollutants (Barber Lab), (2) luminescent lanthanide ion complexes incorporating gemini surfactants for highly penetrating and efficient cellular imaging (Barber Lab), (3) modelling metal storage in cells using polymeric materials transport (CGoh Lab), and (4) the synthesis of metal complexes as models of enzymes (CGoh Lab).
Students will be guided through the fundamentals of project planning, record keeping, scientific writing, and presentation. The interdisciplinary nature of the research will expose students to a variety of areas including synthetic inorganic and organic chemistry, analytical chemistry and spectroscopy in the characterization of all new materials, physical chemistry in the rationalization of properties of new materials, and diverse applications of chemistry.
Method of evaluation: various writing exercises and a final technical report
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the department; since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the department chair before electing this course; non-science majors are also invited to participate
Enrollment limit: enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab
Method of selection: expression of student interest
Meeting times: M-F 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Cost per student: $0
Instructors: Patrick Barber and Christopher Goh

CHEM 23 Introduction to Research in Organic Chemistry
Representative projects include: a) Study of the selective zinc-mediated deuteration of iodohydrocarbons. Students involved in this work will learn techniques involved in organic synthesis, including analysis by NMR and GC-MS. b) Analysis of sediment and fish samples collected from the Hoosic River drainage basin for contamination with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and/or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). This project will focus on techniques used in environmental analysis including trace-level determination of persistent organic pollutants by GC-MS and/or LC-MS.
Method of evaluation: a 10-page written report is required
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the department; since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the department Chair before electing this course
Enrollment limit: enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab
Method of selection: expression of student interest
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: David Richardson

CHEM 31 Senior Research and Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Chemistry 493-494.

CLASSICS


CLAS 25 Where All Roads Go: Ancient Rome and Environs
For centuries, even for millennia, the proverb "All roads lead to Rome" was in an important sense literally true. For scholars and merchants, for people of faith, for artists of all kinds, for adventurers, migrants, and refugees, for the powerful and desperate, the curious and the jaded, for people of all trades, classes, colors, and creeds, the city of Rome was a prime destination. Today, Rome retains its importance as a center for diplomacy and international education and provides an unparalleled laboratory for architectural and art historical investigation. Rome also provides excellent lessons in sustainable and renewable urbanism and in nearly every sort of human interaction. This course will introduce students to the cultural and historical riches of Rome through an exploration of its first flourishing as the cultural and political capital of the ancient Mediterranean world. As we encounter the monuments and topography of the ancient city, observing the complex co-existence of antiquity with the present day, we will investigate the creative interrelationship that the contemporary city continues to generate with the many layers of its past.
Method of evaluation: one on-site presentation (prepared in advance), an entry in a group travel journal/blog, a two-part final paper with a reflective component and a write-up of the site report
Prerequisites: a previous CLAS or CLLA course at Williams, or instructor consent; not open to first-year students
Enrollment limit: 12
Method of selection: Classics majors or intending majors will be given preference; students who have not traveled to Rome before will be given preference within this group
Cost per student: $200-$600 for books, passport, and incidentals
Instructors: Amanda Wilcox and Edan Dekel

CLAS 31 Senior Thesis
May be taken by students registered for Classics 493-494.

COGNITIVE SCIENCE


COGS 31 Senior Thesis

May be taken by students registered for Classics 493-494.

COMPARITIVE LITERATURE


COMP 11 God in a Suffering World (Same as REL 11)
"Is God dead?" wonders the cover of the April 8, 1966 edition of Time magazine. Nietzsche, Hegel, and even Luther had already answered in the affirmative, though each meant something different when proclaiming that God is, indeed, dead. Death of God theology is still nascent, a mere half-century old, but it is increasing in popularity. Its premise is putting to rest focus on a transcendent, unreachable deity seen as irrelevant in a disenchanted world. Our primary author will be Jorgen Moltmann, whose 1972 "The Crucified God" responds to the horrors of Auschwitz and Hiroshima, offering a theology of the death of God. Our goal is to understand the mechanics, history, social promptings, and future of death of God theology. Additional readings will come from Miroslav Volf, Elie Wiesel, Richard Rubenstein, and Richard Bauckham.
Method of evaluation: 10-page paper
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: all
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $50
Instructor: Tasi Perkins
Tasi Perkins is completing a PhD from Georgetown University in Theological and Religious Studies. His research focuses on the possibilities of constructive Muslim-Christian theological conversation.

COMP 12 Grand Hotel in Film and Fiction (Same as GERM 12 and RLFR 15)
See under GERM 12 for full description.

COMP 13 The Literature and Cinema of Global Organized Crime (Same as GERM 13)
See under GERM 13 for full description.

COMP 14 Formidable French Film: New Cinema from France and the Francophone World (Same as RLFR 14)
See under RLFR 14 for full description.

COMP 15 The Spanish Civil War in English (Same as HIST 15 and RLSP 15)
See under RLSP 15 for full description.

COMP 16 Intro to Fashion Studies (Same as ARTH 16 and GERM 16)
See under GERM 16 for full description.

COMP 17 Writing in the Margins: Playwriting as Plagiarism (Same as AFR 17 and LATS 17 and THEA 17 and WGSS 17)
See under THEA 17 for full description.

COMP 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Comparative Literature 493-494.

COMPUTER SCIENCE


CSCI 11 Developing Your Developer Toolbox
Becoming an effective developer takes knowledge, dedication, and the right set of tools. In this course, you will take control of your development environment and add some important tools to your development toolbox.
Students will learn to customize and interact with their Linux environments; compile, install, and use common open source and command-line tools; and perhaps most importantly, learn how to navigate and produce useful documentation. From low-level systems researchers to aspiring App developers, these skills will help you be more efficient and more independent.
Method of evaluation: completion of labs and assignments, contributions to a collaborative wiki (5 pages of concise, formatted documentation)
Prerequisites: experience with Unix-like environments and the command line
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: preference given to students with systems development interest and experience
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Bill Jannen

CSCI 12 Stained Glass Tiling
In this course students learn geometric drawing, design, and the traditional craft skills needed to build a stained glass window. Each student will make a single panel of stained glass from a mosaic of transparent colored glass tiles. Students will learn how to cut glass; to paint and print on glass with kiln-fired enamels; to assemble, solder, patinate and frame a stained glass window. Instructional sessions on the use of tools and safe handling of materials are included where necessary. Exhibition of work on the last day of Winter Study is mandatory. All students must participate in setting up a group exhibition of work, and tidying the lab at the end of Winter Study. This course is time-consuming. More information may be found at https://coombscriddle.wordpress.com/2016/03/28/stained-glass-tiling-the-process/ Class requires 15 hours per week. Students must be willing and able to put in an additional 5-10 hours per week outside of class.
Method of evaluation: formal public exhibit and short paper (2- to 3-page); creativity; quality of finished artwork; teamwork whilst mounting exhibition; attendance
Prerequisites: no previous experience in art, drawing or geometry is necessary; ideal applicants will have an interest in art or mathematics, patience, good hand skills, and want to spend at least 20-25 hours per week working on their project
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: preference to seniors and those who have a specific interest in tiling patterns
Meeting times: mornings, 15 hours per week; students must be willing and able to put in an additional 5-10 hours per week outside of class
Cost per student: $260
Instructor: Debora Coombs
Debora Coombs' stained glass work is commissioned and exhibited internationally. She has an MFA from the Royal College of Art in London, England, and has taught at graduate and postgraduate levels for almost four decades.

CSCI 13 Building Valuable Software Products
We use software products every day to improve our lives, keep us entertained, or help us complete tasks efficiently. This course will explore how great software products actually get made by studying the tools that entrepreneurs at startups and product managers at large technology powerhouses use to build them. Students will gain an overview of the techniques at the intersection of the market and business, customer empathy and design, and technology that are used in industry today. We will explore the following techniques among others: user interviews, agile methodologies, wire-framing and story-boarding, business model canvas, pitching, and roadmap prioritization. Further, we will explore case-studies around real products in the market.
Students will be introduced to prototyping tools (like Balsamiq or InVision) to complete design work.
Students will be evaluated based on attendance and participation, homework assignments, as well as a final project. The final project will involve students making a pitch for a software product using the techniques they've learned along the way (with the option of show-casing their work to the whole campus).
Method of evaluation: attendance, assignments, and a final project
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 16
Method of selection: preference to upperclassmen and students with a demonstrated interest in tech, software, or product design
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $40
Instructor: Thomas Kunjappu

CSCI 14 Creating a Roguelike Game
Before World of Warcraft, before Diablo, before the Legend of Zelda and the Nintendo Entertainment System, before fancy graphics cards and computer mice, there were text terminals and there was Rogue. Created around 1980 by Michael Toy, Ken Arnold, and Glenn Wichman at U.C. Santa Cruz, this wildly popular video game "wasted more CPU time than anything in history." [Dennis Ritchie] and spawned an entire genre, known as 'roguelikes'. Roguelikes in the original style are created and played to this day, and many of the game design concepts and principals that Rogue pioneered can be found in modern games outside the genre. In this course we'll study (and play) some roguelikes, discuss what does and doesn't work and why, and work in small teams to design, plan, and code our own. Creating the game will require a lot of time writing code, but we'll also bring in game design, software design, user experience, project management, models and tools for collaboration, and various topics and realms related to game programming (AI, procedural content, complex data structures, persistence, help systems, etc.). In class students will do exercises, participate in discussions, give presentations, and provide feedback to each other as well as write code. Outside class students will meet with each other, do various writing assignments, and spend a lot more time coding. By the end each team will have a complete, working game that showcases their particular interests and goals.
Method of evaluation: class participation (attendance, discussion, presentations, feedback), and the larger team project
Prerequisites: completion of CS 136 or equivalent programming experience
Enrollment limit: 16
Method of selection: if overenrolled, students will be selected based on programming experience and expressed interest (writing, call, meeting, etc. all considered)
Meeting times: mornings, afternoons
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Chris Warren
Chris Warren (Williams '96, Computer Science) is a programmer with extensive web development experience, and is also a serious amateur game designer. He's worked for a couple of dot-coms, taught AP computer science in Hawaii, supported himself as an independent web developer, and has been working as a programmer in Williams OIT since 2003. He is a co-founder of a game design group that met weekly from 2002-2013, and has spent [far too] many hours over the years playing roguelike games.

CSCI 23 Introduction to Research and Development in Computing
An independent project is completed in collaboration with a member of the Computer Science Department. The projects undertaken will either involve the exploration of a research topic related to the faculty member's work or the implementation of a software system that will extend the students design and implementation skills. It is expected that the student will spend 20 hours per week working on the project. At the completion of the project, each student will submit a 10-page written report or the software developed together with appropriate documentation of its behavior and design. In addition, students will be expected to give a short presentation or demonstration of their work. Students must consult with the instructor before the beginning of the Winter Study registration period to determine details of projects that might be undertaken.
Method of evaluation: 10-page report or Software Developed with Documentation and a final presentation/demonstration
Prerequisites: permission of instructor
Enrollment limit: none
Method of selection: preference given to sophomores and juniors
Cost per student: $0
Meeting times: TBA
Instructor: William Lenhart

CSCI 31 Senior Honor Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Computer Science 493-494.

DANCE


DANC 12 Ballet Technique and Repertory
This class is for male and female intermediate/advanced ballet students interested in continuing their work on both technique and artistry. We will meet three times per week for three hours; students will be expected to work on their own with additional practice on classwork and choreography. Each session will begin with a full ballet class including barre and center work, followed by rehearsal of an original ballet that I will create for the students in this class (students who have trained previously on pointe may dance on pointe if appropriate.) The ballet will be performed in the Dance Department's Winter Study Open House at the end of January, as well as other possible venues/dates.
Method of evaluation: quality of participation and effort in classes and rehearsals; final performance(s)
Prerequisites: student must have appropriate amount of prior training; instructor permission for all interested students is required
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: students who have demonstrated prior interest and commitment to training
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $50
Instructor: Janine Parker

DANC 13 Introduction to Argentine Tango (Same as MUS 13)
See under MUS 13 for full description.

DANC 15 Suzuki Method of Actor Training (Same as THEA 15)
See under THEA 15 for full description.

ECONOMICS


ECON 10 Introduction to Financial Reporting and Statement Analysis
This course covers the concepts and methods underlying financial statements and the tools to analyze financial statements effectively as part of the process of evaluating a company's strategic and operating decisions in the context of its industry. This process is neither superficial nor one-dimensional, as it requires a thorough understanding of accounting principles and frameworks and the ability to identify the effects of management decisions on financial statements and ratios. Using topical exercises and problems based on current corporate annual reports, we will walk through the fundamentals of financial accounting and financial statements first and then examine the methods and disclosure requirements for specific transactions that most companies undertake. For example, what are the consequences of Microsoft’s acquisition of LinkedIn? Or of AT&T's decision to issue up $17.5 billion in bonds? In pairs, each student will complete a project analyzing the current financial statements and ratios of a public company and assess its profitability and risk, focusing on the connections between the company's industry characteristics, strategic choices and its financial results. We will meet four times a week for three-hour sessions for the first two weeks with extra time allocated as needed to meetings with each team. Students will complete and submit their projects during the second part of Winter Study.
Method of evaluation: evaluation will be based on the two-person project culminating in a short class presentation and a 10-page paper, as well as submitted homework assignments (problem sets) and participation in class discussions
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: preference to seniors/juniors — otherwise by lottery
Meeting times: mornings 10 am - 1 pm
Cost per student: $150
Instructor: Virginia Soybel
Ginny Soybel teaches financial accounting and financial statement analysis in the graduate, undergraduate and executive education programs at Babson College. She earned her BA at Williams and her MBA and PhD at Columbia University, and before joining the Babson College faculty, she taught at the Amos Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College.

ECON 11 Financial Accounting and Financial Modeling for Private Equity and Investment Banking
ECON 11 is an intensive winter study designed for students intending to pursue or explore professional opportunities in finance and investing, with a focus on private equity investment. Incorporating instruction by a dynamic mix of industry professionals — including investment managers and associates, accounting faculty, and financial training consultants — the course aims to equip students with the fundamental skills required in many entry-level finance positions, and prepare them for interviews, jobs and internships in the field.
The training program will consist of three sections, over three weeks: (1) introduction to finance and private equity; (2) financial accounting; and (3) financial modeling. During the course of instruction, students will gain a better understanding of the private equity and investment banking industries, and fundamental concepts of investment and finance; learn basic principles of accounting, and how to construct and analyze financial statements; and receive rigorous training in financial modeling and methods of corporate valuation. In the fourth week, students will put to test the skills they’ve acquired, and build their own financial models to evaluate potential investments in case companies.
This is a unique opportunity to receive high-level, professional training in core competencies of finance and investing, and students are expected to approach it as such. Given the nature and depth of material to be covered, students should plan on committing 20+ hours per week between in-class sessions and assignments.
Method of evaluation: evaluation will be based on a final project (financial model and presentation), short homework assignments, and attendance (mandatory)
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 30
Method of selection: preference to first-year and sophomores; in the event of over-enrollment, selections will be based upon written statements of interest/cover letters
Meeting times: mornings and afternoons, Mon-Thurs
Cost per student: $0
Instructors: Steven Graham ’82 and Alex Reeves ‘11
Steven C. Graham ’82 founded Graham Partners in 1988 and serves as Senior Managing Principal. He oversees all of the activities of the private investment firm, including investment sourcing, evaluating, monitoring and divesting. Steve serves on the boards of numerous portfolio companies of Graham Partners and on the firm’s Investment and Valuation Committees. Steve also serves on the Board of Advisors for the Center for Private Equity and Entrepreneurship at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College, Williams College Endowment’s Non-Marketable Assets Advisory Committee.
Alex Reeves graduated from Williams in 2011 and spent the next several years working as an Associate at Graham Partners, a private investment firm. At Graham, Alex sourced and evaluated new investment opportunities, and provided financial support to Graham’s portfolio companies. He also managed the firm’s intern and analyst training programs, and has significant experience training new hires and interns in financial modeling. More recently, Alex has independently consulted for several early-stage companies and venture capital investor groups.

ECON 13 Creating a Viable New Business Idea
Students working in teams develop an idea for a new business. Using the Lean Launchpad methodology taught at major universities including Stanford, UC Berkley, Michigan, and NYU, teams develop an initial business model for the idea and then proceed to use the methodology to evaluate and improve the business model. The goal is to learn a methodology which is transferable to a variety of business ideas. Class work consists of online lectures, in class discussions, group work, and presentations. Teams work together to develop and test business assumptions, revise their ideas, and develop presentations based on what they discover.
Method of evaluation: participation in class discussions of lectures and in-class assignments, team participation in research, and team participation in weekly 5-minute team class presentations, 10-minute final team presentations, and a final 2-minute video on lessons learned
Prerequisites: no prerequisites and the course is appropriate for students from any major
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: selection will be based on taking upper classmen first
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $25
Instructor: Steven Fogel
Mr. Fogel is an entrepreneurship educator who has worked with over 1,000 startups over the past 25 years. He is trained in Lean Lauchpad which is recognized by major universities and business schools as a leading approach to creating successful startups.

ECON 14 Sports Economics
This course is an introduction to the use of economic concepts and empirical tools in addressing puzzles and policy issues in the world of sports. Through independent study and in-class discussions of academic and non-academic readings, films, and other materials (including one or more talks by outside speakers), students will explore topics such as competitive performance and strategic incentives of athletes, the organizational structure of professional sports, the use of statistical methods for evaluating athletic performance, betting and gambling markets, professional athlete labor markets, the local economic impact of sporting events, and more. Students are expected to complete small research assignments outside of normal class hours, to present their findings, and to help lead discussions of readings and other materials assigned for each class. The course will culminate in a group research paper and presentation on a topic in the economics of sports.
Method of evaluation: class participation, mini research projects, and a group-based 10-page paper and final presentation
Prerequisites: one Economics AND one Math or Stats course
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: if over-enrolled, preference will be given to senior and junior Economics majors
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $50
Instructors: Will Olney and Steve Nafziger

ECON 15 Introduction to Indian Cinema
Though the Indian film industry is the world’s most prolific, American audiences have little exposure to it. This course provides an introduction, focusing on Hindi cinema, and showing how its themes have evolved in response to changes in Indian society. In particular, we will examine ways in which Hindi films reflect the threats perceived by the nation, and the resolutions attempted. We will also compare Hindi cinema’s norms and conventions to those used by Hollywood.
We will meet twice a week to watch the films (a total of seven) and once a week for discussion. Students will write a 2-page response to each film. Reading will consist of articles from film journals like Screen and Jump Cut.
Method of evaluation: seven 2-page papers
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: see instructor
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $25
Instructor: Anand Swamy

ECON 16 Venture Capital Law
The course will examine the venture capital industry from both a theoretical and practical perspective and will focus on the interplay of the legal, business, economic and financial issues that need to be dealt with in the formation, organization, governance and financing of new enterprises. The course is designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the corporate and other laws applicable to venture capital, as well as with an appreciation of the concerns of entrepreneurs and investors. 
Class sessions will be devoted primarily to a discussion of business cases taken from the entrepreneurial curriculum of the Harvard Business School. In addition, students will be required to participate in small groups prior to class to prepare advice to clients in three scenarios — an early stage company negotiating with a key executive the company is seeking to hire, a company considering two competing term sheets for venture financing and a company faced with the need for additional financing in a distressed situation.  As a capstone to the class, students will participate in an in-class business simulation game developed at Wharton that will require students to interact in assigned roles as entrepreneurs, investors or key employees. 
In addition to reading and analyzing the assigned business cases prior to class, students will be asked to review various background materials, including portions of the business planning textbook used at GW Law School. Classes will meet for at least six hours per week, with additional sessions scheduled for meetings with outside industry experts that accept invitations to address the class.
Method of evaluation: participation in class, preparation of discussion outlines (each equivalent to a 3- to 4-page paper) in connection with the small group assignments, and participation in the business simulation game
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 30
Method of selection: by lot with preference for seniors
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $200
Instructor: Robert Schwed
Mr. Schwed recently retired from the law firm of WilmerHale after a 40-year career focused on private equity and venture capital. For the past eight years, he has been an adjunct professor at George Washington University Law School teaching a course on venture capital law. Mr. Schwed graduated from Williams with a degree in Economics in 1971 and from Harvard Law School in 1974. 
ECON 17 How to Start a Startup
Students of this course will learn about the mechanics and strategy to start a company or social enterprise. Corporations are the enabling vehicle of entrepreneurs. We’ll discuss what types of corporate entities are best given the entrepreneurs’ goals — c-corporations, LLCs, benefit corporations, or 501c3’s. We’ll discuss decision-making processes including governance, voting, and management. For for-profit startups, company equity (stock) is essential to reward employees and to attract investor dollars. We’ll learn how early stage companies allocate equity and how that changes as a company grows. Finally, we’ll talk about strategies for attracting investment capital, the lifeblood of startups. We’ll make copious use of case studies and speak with several guest experts. Students will work in teams to develop models for several types of startups in various business sectors.
Method of evaluation: evaluation will be based on class participation, project contributions, and the quality of final projects
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 16
Method of selection: statement of interest
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Jeffery Thomas
Jeffrey Thomas is the Executive Director of Lever, a center for entrepreneurship and social innovation based in North Adams, Massachusetts. He has helped launch dozens of early stage companies, including more than ten startups that have been funded through the Williams campus-wide Business Plan Challenge.

ECON 18 Sustainable Business Strategies (Same as ENVI 18)
See under ENVI 18 for full description.

ECON 19 Portrayal of Housing Markets and Community in Film
What more sacred, what more strongly guarded by every holy feeling, than a man's own home? — Cicero
The dream of achieving prosperity through hard work often presents home ownership as a central feature. Beyond the private home that provides the domain within which hard-working persons ideally reign, the neighborhood and community provide a social and economic context for the home — both the structure itself and the lives of its occupants.
The private home and its neighborhood context are clearly linked, and economic studies suggest that between 25% and 50% of the market value of residential property depends on such factors as school quality, crime and environmental quality that characterize the neighborhood and community.
In this course we will explore — through film, discussion and economics — the importance of and linkages between houses and communities.
We will view and discuss 9 films that present stories about houses, communities and ownership. In addition to developing an appreciation of the economic, social and psychological importance of these ideas we will discuss associated significance for the economy. Students will prepare response essays of 2-4 pages for each film that incorporate aspects of both the film and class discussion.
Method of evaluation: class discussion plus 18-30 pages of written essays
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 30
Cost per student:
$0
Method of selection: preference given to Economics majors
Meeting times: afternoons
Instructor: Stephen Sheppard

ECON 20 A Practitioner’s Overview of Securities Markets and Investment Banking
A broad overview of various aspects of the Fixed Income and Equities Markets and the role of Investment Banks. Topics, amongst others, will include: The effect of Fiscal and Monetary policy on Markets, Securities Sales and Trading, Bonds and Bond Math, Public Equities and Asset Management, Credit Analysis, Private Equity and Leveraged Buy-outs, Mergers and Acquisitions and Risk Management. Course will focus on real life practices and may include guest speakers, role playing and trading simulations.
Course Goal: (1) to provide you with an understanding of how modern capital markets operate from a practical, real-life perspective (2) to help you think critically about issues effecting the stock and bond markets, and (3) to have fun and instill a passion in some of you for future study and/or work in the Securities Industry.
Required Readings: (1) Understanding Wall Street (Fifth Edition) by Jeffrey Little and Lucien Rhodes (2) Packet of Case Studies (3) Students will be asked to read the Wall Street Journal on the day that each class meets. Optional Reading: Too Big to Fail by Andrew Ross Sorkin.
Course Requirements: Group Case Study (Oral Presentation); Term Paper (Minimum 10 pages); Class Participation
Group Assignment (Case Study): At the end of the first class, you will be asked to divide yourselves into 5 Groups with 5 people in each group. The group will then be assigned a case study to be orally presented (slides are fine to use but NO written submission is necessary) to myself and the class for further discussion. The presentation and discussion will last No Longer than 25 minutes and each member of the team will be required to have at least some moderate speaking role. The specific case study and the date of the presentation will be given to you after teams are set. I will assign questions for each team to answer in advance. At the end of the course, the other members of your group will evaluate your participation. These peer evaluations will be factored in as part of your class participation grade.
Class Participation: I view student participation as the MOST critical part of this class. There is no such thing as a dumb question!! I hope to get interrupted frequently and to constantly prod you for your thoughts and opinions during each session. I do not want the course to be a series of monotone lectures. I will take attendance at the beginning of each class. Please plan to read the Wall Street Journal and/or NY Times Business Section on the day we meet so as to inspire group discussion.
Classroom Conduct Expectations: Simply put, conduct yourself like an adult. We will have fun, but I expect you to enjoy the course in a fashion respectful to others.
Method of evaluation: 10-page paper
Prerequisites: successful completion of ECON 110
Enrollment limit: 25
Method of selection: Economics majors prioritized
Cost per student: $50
Meeting times:
mornings, afternoons
Instructor: Michael Swenson
Michael Swenson '89 is a recently retired partner from Goldman Sachs and Co. He has spent his entire career in the fixed-income markets and was a member of a risk and commitment committees at Goldman Sachs.

ECON 24 Introduction to the Economics, Geography and Appreciation of Wine
This course provides an introduction to the economics, geography and appreciation of wine. We will be studying the economics and geography of wine production, and will also learn to identify, understand and appreciate the major wine types of the world. The course will involve lectures, outside readings, and in-class wine tastings. We will focus primarily on the Old World wine styles and regions of France, Italy, Germany, Austria, Spain and Portugal. The course has been expanded to also cover some New World wine regions, including California, Oregon, Chile, Argentina, South Africa, New Zealand and Australia.
Method of evaluation: evaluations will be based on short quizzes, including blind tastings, and either an oral presentation or 10-page paper at the conclusion of the course
Prerequisites: students must be 21 years old on or before January 3, 2017
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: if overenrolled, selection will be on the basis of a mix of academic record and diversity of backgrounds and interests
Cost per student: approximately $275 in the form of a course fee, to be used for the cost of wine purchases for the course
Meeting times: evenings, two nights a week
Instructor: Peter Pedroni
ECON 30 Honors Project: Specialization Route
The "Specialization Route" to the degree with Honors in Economics requires that each candidate take an Honors Winter Study Project in January of their senior year. Students who wish to begin their honors work in January should submit a detailed proposal. Decisions on admission to the Honors WSP will be made in the fall. Information on the procedures will be mailed to senior majors in economics early in the fall semester.
Seniors who wish to apply for admission to the Honors WSP and thereby to the Honors Program should register for this WSP as their first choice.
Some seniors will have begun honors work in the fall and wish to complete it in the WSP. They will be admitted to the WSP if they have made satisfactory progress. They should register for this WSP as their first choice.

ECON 31 Honors Thesis

To be taken by students participating in year-long thesis research (Economics 493-W31-494).
ECON 52 Micro-Simulation Modeling for Ex Ante Policy Analysis
Micro-simulation modeling provides one of the most powerful tools for ex ante evidence-based analysis of economic and social policy interventions. Rooted in representative household surveys of a country's population, the models provide a picture of poverty, employment, consumption and income levels throughout the country. A micro-simulation model enables researchers to investigate the impact of existing economic and social policy interventions (such as tax and public benefit interventions) on income levels, poverty, inequality and other outcomes. In addition, researchers are able to simulate the impact and estimate the cost of new policy interventions.
During this course, students will learn to apply these methods to analyze public policies and interpret the findings. The course examines measurement issues, analytical tools and their application to household survey data for a range of developing countries. The course also links the outcomes of the analysis with the challenges of policy implementation, exploring how the political environment and/or institutional setting may result in the implementation of second-best options. This is a hands-on modeling course, and students will build a micro-simulation model for a country of their choice and use this model in completing the course requirements. The course will employ Excel, Stata and advanced micro-simulation packages. The final requirement for the course is a policy paper that provides students with an opportunity to write accessible prose that communicates the methodology adopted and the key lessons of the analysis.
Method of evaluation: exercises, presentation, policy papers
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: statement of interest emailed to instructor
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Michael Samson

ECON 54 Financial Crises
Financial crises — currency, sovereign debt, and banking and other financial markets — have been with us for as long as modern banking has existed. Few countries have escaped direct experience with their own crises, and no country has avoided the consequences of international crises. In this course we will study the three main forms of financial crises, looking first at analytical models of each and learning how the various types of crises interact. We will then turn to a variety of case studies to see why so many crises look different in their details but resemble each other greatly from a broader perspective. Cases covered will include Chile (early 1980s), Mexico (1994), East Asia (1997), and Brazil, among others. Although the focus is on emerging markets, we will also discuss the crisis of 2007-08, which was concentrated in the U.S. and selected European countries but which had a global impact. These events are painfully similar to those in low- and middle income-countries and offer useful lessons for avoidance and policy response; in addition, they are likely to influence financial regulation for years — for better or for worse.
Method of evaluation: two 5- to 10-page papers and a presentation
Prerequisites: ECON 505 or 506
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: instructor's discretion
Meeting times: scheduled by CDE
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: James Hanson
Jim Hanson has worked on financial policy, macroeconomic policy, and debt, and crisis issues at the World Bank for over 25 years in East and South Asia, Latin American and Egypt, and earlier as an associate professor at Brown University.

ECON 58 Growth Diagnostics
Evidence suggests that the “binding constraints” to economic growth have been remarkably heterogeneous across countries and over time — i.e., the potential for economic growth can be unlocked in a large variety of ways. For instance, pre-reform China had been constrained by poor supply incentives in agriculture, whereas Brazil has been held back by an inadequate supply of credit, South Africa by poor employment incentives in manufacturing, El Salvador by insufficient production incentives in tradables, Zimbabwe by poor governance, and so forth. How can a developing country’s policymakers arrive at conclusions such as these, thus enabling them to pragmatically pursue a selected set of growth-promoting policies, as opposed to a “laundry list” of reforms that are simply based on “best practice” rules-of-thumb? This course will serve as a primer on “growth diagnostics,” an empirically-driven analytical framework for identifying the most binding constraints to growth in a given country at a specific point in time, thereby allowing policymakers to develop well-targeted reforms for relaxing these constraints while being cognizant of the country’s prevailing economic, political, and social context. The course will employ a range of country-specific case studies to not only elucidate how the framework can be operationalized for policymaking but also demonstrate its scope and limitations. Students will be required to work in groups, each representing a given developing or emerging-market economy, in order to build a mini growth diagnostic for their group’s assigned country by the end of the course.
Method of evaluation: evaluation will be based on extensive class participation, one 20-page group paper comprising a mini growth diagnostic for a country, and a group presentation on the mini growth diagnostic
Prerequisites: ECON 501, ECON 502/503, ECON 504, and ECON 505/506
Enrollment limit: 12
Method of selection: if overenrolled, priority will be based on written statement of interest
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Quamrul Ashraf
ENGLISH


ENGL 11 Shakespeare's Henry IV
This course focuses on one of Shakespeare's best plays, Henry the Fourth, part one. We will follow the history of Prince Hal and Falstaff in the sequel, Henry the Fourth, part two and in Henry the Fifth. Discussions will concentrate on Shakespearean language and theatricality, with some attention to historical sources. We will also study three splendid films, Laurence Olivier's "Henry the Fifth," Kenneth Branagh's "Henry the Fifth," and Orson Welles's "Falstaff: Chimes at Midnight." Classes meet three times a week for two hours. Students write brief commentaries (a page or two) for every class.
Method of evaluation: students will write brief (1-2 page) commentaries for every class
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 15
Method of selection: random
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $20
Instructor: Robert Bell

ENGL 12 Stand-up Comedy: Joke Writing and Performance
This class will study and test comedy theory through joke writing and performance.
Class requires three three-hour meetings per week. We will perform, discuss and revise student work. Students will be expected relate homework assignments to in-class critiques. Readings will include philosophy and criticism by Susan Sontag and Henri Bergson. Screenings will include performances by Trevor Noah, Kathleen Madigan, Louis CK and Bob Newhart. Students will write two short essays (one on the role of comedy in society, the other a critical assessment of the philosophy of laughter) and perform five minutes of original material the last week of Winter Study.
Method of evaluation: two 2- to 3-page papers and a final performance
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 15
Method of selection: emphasis on personal and academic diversity, and excluding students who have worked with me at the summer theater lab
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Cecilia Lederer
Cecilia Lederer is a stand-up comedian and screenwriter living in Los Angeles. She has written for TV shows ‘The Colbert Report’ and ‘Totally Biased.’ She graduated Williams in 2006.

ENGL 13 Detection
What do we do as literary interpreters? Well, we look for the signs — the clues to meaning — we look for deeper patterns, and we try to discover the undisclosed source of meaning, which, lo and behold, can turn out to be ourselves. There is, of course, an entire genre devoted to just such a (classical) model of meaning revealed: the detective novel. We’ll look at a range of examples of that genre — some Sherlock Holmes stories, Raymond Chandler’s Big Sleep and The Long Goodbye, that detective classic, Sophocles’s Oedipus Rex, Hitchcock’s Strangers on a Train, Vertigo, and North by Northwest, Robbe-Grillet’s The Erasers, and Roman Polanski’s Chinatown — in order to think about literature and film as variants of criminality.
Method of evaluation: 10-page paper
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 15
Method of selection: English majors
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $65
Instructor: Christopher Pye

ENGL 14 Humor Writing and Analysis
Do you have a desire to write for The Onion, use humor to persuade or just get in touch with your creativity? In this class you’ll write fake news stories, devise bad first sentences of novels and pen a review of a really bad movie. We’ll examine humor in several genres and analyze what works in each. We’ll discuss related topics, such as whether humor in advertising helps sell products and whether there is social utility in sexist, ethnic and religious humor.
Method of evaluation: class participation; one oral presentation; there will be a short reading assignment and a writing assignment of three (3) to 750 words for every class; all assignments must be completed on time
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 14
Method of selection: random selection
Meeting times: class will meet 1:30-4:30 pm Tuesdays and Fridays (except the last week, when the final class will be the last day of the term — Thursday Jan 26)
Cost per student: $15
Instructor: Eric Randall
Journalist Eric D. Randall has previously taught courses in humor writing and actually gotten paid for it. His work has been published in USA Today, Time, Newsweek and The Washington Post, as well as some reputable publications.

ENGL 15 Ishmael Reed, Multiculturalist and Satirist (Same as AFR 15)
Ishmael Reed has been a unique figure on the American literary scene. His writing as a poet, novelist, essayist, playwright, and political gadfly has all conveyed a distinctive and rambunctious voice. Credited with coining the term “multiculturalism” as we now commonly use it, Reed has always practiced what he preaches, embracing the deep and complex cultural traditions of African American people in his writing and politics while at the same time remaining open to the cultures of other ethnic groups. As a cultural activist in the San Francisco Bay area, Reed was founder and publisher of The Yardbird Reader, a seminal and profoundly influential journal of literary work by writers of various ethnic groups. At the same time, he was a prime mover in the creation of the Before Columbus Foundation, a cultural organization that united artists from many cultural traditions in working cooperatively.
This course will examine Reed’s work in various genres, as well as his cultural and political activism and provocations. He has been original and outrageous, contentious and controversial. We will evaluate his work as a literary artist and his endeavors as a cultural worker, with particular attention to how he uses the concept of warfare to characterize the long history of strife between cultural traditions and his own battles with black nationalists, feminists, and other political factions. All in all, he has been one of the most accomplished and influential cultural figures of the past half-century.
Method of evaluation: class presentations and a 10-page paper
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: by major, concentration, and judgment of the professor
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $75
Instructor: DL Smith

ENGL 16 Adorno's Aesthetic Theory
Theodor Adorno was one of the twentieth century's most challenging thinkers — a German Jewish refugee who loathed the United States but ended up in Los Angeles, who had no hope for Germany but returned there after the war. His intellectual contributions are too extensive to list: He produced groundbreaking work in philosophy, musicology, literary criticism, sociology, and political theory. The last book he ever wrote was called Aesthetic Theory and summed up a lifetime of thinking about what had happened to art in the twentieth century. Its questions will be our questions: What is the responsibility of art in the face of suffering? What kind of art is possible in a world reduced to rubble? Is it possible to produce a form of art that does not dominate others, that cannot be put in the service of their domination? The book is almost impossible to read cold, so we'll meet every weekday for a couple of hours to read it together.
Method of evaluation: informal writing, three times a week, 1- to 2- pages
Prerequisites: coursework in continental philosophy or critical theory is recommended, but not strictly necessary
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: priority given to juniors and seniors
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $50
Instructor: Christian Thorne

ENGL 25 Journalism Today
This course will give students an in-depth view of the inner workings of journalism today. It will feature the perspectives of several Williams alumni who work in a broad spectrum of today’s media universe, including print, broadcast, and new media. Our guests will discuss specific reporting skills, and experiences in their background (students should be aware that our precise meeting schedule week by week may vary, to accommodate the schedules and availability of our guests). In addition to readings of work by guests, there will be one required text about reporting and writing. Students will be expected to complete several small reporting and writing exercises, as well as one feature-length news story on a topic to be assigned at the beginning of the course. There will be a week-long trip to New York for field work and to visit various newsrooms. In previous years, organizations visited have included CNN, the New York Times, the Columbia School of Journalism, ABC News, MSNBC, Conde Nast, Pro Publica, the Wall Street Journal and NPR.
Method of evaluation: participation in class discussions, and reporting and writing exercises, and the completion of one fully-reported, original, feature-length news story about a topic to be assigned at the beginning of the course.
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: preference will be given to students with a demonstrated interest in journalism or media (as explained in a statement of interest), with a priority given to upperclassmen
Cost per student: $914
Instructor: Christopher Marcisz

ENGL 30 Honors Project: Specialization Route
Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the specialization route.

ENGL 31 Honors Project: Thesis
Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the thesis route.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES


ENVI 13 Intro to Animal Tracking (Same as BIOL 13)
See under BIOL 13 for full description.

ENVI 14 Landscape Photography (Same as GEOS 14)
See under GEOS 14 for full description.

ENVI 16 Confronting Climate Change: Reducing Emissions at Williams
Climate change poses a critical threat to modern human existence and we need to do something about it. That is why this is Williams’s year of Confronting Climate Change. In this class, we will study climate change, climate policy, and the ways net greenhouse emissions can be reduced. Students will be trained to help run a “wedge exercise:” a simulation in which members of the campus community choose from a menu of ways to cut emissions at Williams to reach an emissions reduction goal. The class will culminate in an event in which students help run this wedge exercise on campus to broaden and deepen the conversation about climate change.
Method of evaluation: 10-page paper
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 16
Method of selection: expressed interest, diversity of backgrounds, and/or chance
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $5
Instructor: Sarah Jacobson

ENVI 18 Sustainable Business Strategies (Same as ECON 18)
This course explores the practical realities of "sustainable business." We will develop our own definition of "sustainability" that encompasses the dual meanings of (1) financial success as well as (2) long run positive impact on climate and the environment. Topics include:
What are the criteria for sustainability? E.g. Renewable energy; organic farming; creative waste disposal; broader social purpose.
How does the concept of externalities relate to sustainability? Must all external costs and benefits be “internalized” in order for a business to be truly sustainable?
Should “environmentalism” be a “rear guard” movement seeking to slow, conserve, protect, defend, and delay economic growth, or whether should modern environmentalism embrace the dynamic power of capitalism to create technologies and businesses that actively work against climate change?
Can sustainable business models coexist with traditional shareholder value maximization models? We evaluate the role of “B” companies allowing directors to take into account the interest of all stakeholders including workers, consumers, the society at large, and the environment.
How does sustainability reconcile with the priority of economic growth, particularly in the developing world? What is the relationship to fair labor standards and environmental regulation?
What is the optimal role and purpose of governmental subsidies? When should subsidies sunset and leave industries to succeed (or fail) on their own?
How — if at all — will the implementation of the Paris Accords help to stimulate private sector activity in support of sustainable business practices and renewable energy development and deployment?
How can investors promote sustainable businesses proactively through their capital allocation strategies?
Should large philanthropic organizations (foundations and endowments) consider proactive values aligned investing as an alternative to divestment from fossil fuels companies?
Method of evaluation: teams of 2-3 students will target a company or topic of their choice and present (during the last week of class) a critical evaluation of relevant progress, challenges, and prospects for success both financially and in terms of their sustainability goals; team members will each submit a 5-page paper on their individual learning and reflections
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 22
Method of selection: selection based on submissions of interest via email
Meeting times: mornings, afternoons
Cost per student: $110
Instructor: Don Carlson
Don Carlson is currently a venture partner with Rubicon Venture Capital and a senior consultant with Lansberg Gersick Associates. Don has been a Williams faculty member (CES and chair of political economy, 1990-92); chief knowledge officer at Goldman Sachs; a business leader and/or CEO at Axiom, Matterhorn, Corporate Executive Board, and Business Intelligence Advisors; a trial lawyer at Williams and Connolly, and legislative director for Congressman Joseph P. Kennedy II. Don is a serial entrepreneur, board member and investor in more than a dozen of growth stage companies. Don’s current work with large family foundations has put him squarely in the cross-hairs of the values-aligned investing movement. He is actively involved on the forefront of new initiatives in this arena. Don graduated from Williams as a Political Economy major in 1983 and Harvard Law School in 1986. Don lives in Greenwich, CT, with his wife and three teenage children.

ENVI 24 Touring Black Religion in the ‘New’ South (Same as AFR 24 and REL 24)
See under AFR 24 for full description.

ENVI 25 The Front Lines of Climate Change: Planning for Climate Change on Eleuthera
This class will function as a research team working in collaboration with local NGO, One Eleuthera. In collaboration with my co-teacher from the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication, and with guidance from Caribsave and the Alliance of Small Island States, and involvement of the Cape Eleuthera Institute, we will assess climate vulnerabilities in South Eleuthera, begin vulnerability mapping of essential services and infrastructure that will be affected by flooding, assess other specific areas of vulnerability, and begin to develop a plan to reduce risks from flooding and storms. Another element of our work will include interviewing residents about their climate awareness and developing culturally appropriate educational materials to communicate about climate impacts. These are highly sensitive issues that require utmost tact because their land as well as their entire culture, is at stake. A third project will be researching local tools for climate adaptation at the household and community level to increase resiliency to storms and disasters. This includes household-level approaches such as rainwater collection, home solar electricity generation, and home food production from gardens, poultry and livestock. Students will work in small teams on these projects, and the work will be combined into a draft climate adaptation plan framework. Of course, our project will be just a start of the plan, but it will develop a structure for One Eleuthera to build on. We will focus on developing collaborations and partnerships with other organizations that will continue this work. Our final product will be a report and a public presentation on the island and the preparation of educational materials.
Method of evaluation: daily active and engaged participation, final written report, and presentation
Prerequisites: none; not open to first-year students
Enrollment limit: 9
Method of selection: 1) students with coursework or experience with environmental studies; 2) students with an interest in the Caribbean and developing world; 3) students who have not had opportunity to travel outside the US
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Sarah Gardner

ENVI 26 Climate Policy in the New Presidency (Same as SPEC 26)
See under SPEC 26 for full description.

ENVI 31 Senior Research and Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Environmental Studies 493-494.

GEOSCIENCES


GEOS 12 A Passion for Planets: Exploring Mars and Pluto (Same as ASTR 12)
See under ASTR 12 for full description.

GEOS 14 Landscape Photography (Same as ENVI 14)
This class will broaden students' appreciation for the appearance and history of the landscape and teach the skills of making a successful photograph. Williamstown, situated in a valley between the Green and Taconic Mountains and bisected by the Green and Hoosic Rivers, is a place of great natural beauty. The local landscape is a subject that inspires both professional and amateur photographers alike. While Williamstown will be the subject of most of our work, we will use it to learn principles of universal application. Students will discover the importance of light in making a photograph. They will also learn camera skills and the mechanics of digital photography, which will be reviewed at biweekly class meetings. In addition to photographing and critiquing images, the class will visit collections at the Clark Art Institute, WCMA and Chapin Library to see original paintings and photographs. Course will include an overview of the history of landscape photography with an emphasis on American workers such as Carlton Watkins, Eadweard Muybridge, Alfred Stieglitz, Eliot Porter and Ansel Adams. Demonstrations will include examples of cameras such as medium and large format. Students will produce a body of successful photographs that will be projected at the Winter Study presentation day and on the web http://nicholaswhitmanphoto.com/winterstudy2014/ and http://nicholaswhitmanphoto.com/winterstudy2015/
Students will submit short written explanations with each of their photographic assignments.
Method of evaluation: evaluation will be based on attendance, the student's photography, and their presentation
Prerequisites: students will need a digital single lens reflex camera (DSLR) or an electronic viewfinder (DSL) camera such as those by Sony or Olympus; see http://digital-photography-school.com/blog/how-to-buy-a-dslr-camera/; also a laptop pc with Adobe Lightroom and 1TB external drive
Enrollment limit: 15
Method of selection: recommendation and random
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $100
Instructor: Nicholas Whitman
Nicholas Whitman is a professional photographer and the former Curator of Photography at the New Bedford Whaling Museum. A 1977 graduate of the Rochester Institute of Technology, he has honed his craft to make landscape photographs of power and depth. See more at www.nwphoto.com.

GEOS 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Geology 493-494.

GERMAN


GERM S.P. Sustaining Program for German 101-102
Sustaining Program for German 101-102.

GERM 11 DDR, The Life and Death of a Vanished Nation: East Germany, 1949-1990 (Same as HIST 11)
See under HIST 11 for full description.

GERM 12 Grand Hotel in Film and Fiction (Same as COMP 12 and RLFR 15)
The grand hotel with its dual promise of luxury and estrangement was considered a theater of social transformations in the age of travel. We will discuss novels, short stories and films that feature the hotel as a space of both class distinction and possible class confusion, of sexual taboo breaking, and gendered performance, and a transnational extension of colonialist oppression. Authors will include Edith Wharton, Thomas Mann, Vicki Baum, Ali Smith, Rick Moody. Films may include: The Last Laugh, Gran Hotel, Grand Hotel Budapest, Anomalisa, Screaming Man, Hotel Sahara, Hotel Rwanda, A Single Girl, Maid in Manhattan. We will also consider short theoretical readings on conspicuous consumption, branding, modernity and metropolitan spaces, and postcoloniality.
In the present, hotel dramas focus on issues of the invisible worker, neoliberalism (Anomalisa, Single Girl), or the trauma of civil war and the raced body (Hotel Rwanda, Screaming Man), or cultural alienation and the inability to feel joy (Lost in Translation, Hotels of North America). Comedies explore the fantasy of a dramatic social climb through identity confusion in a hotel setting (Maid in Manhattan), satires highlight the confidence man/trickster who profits from social pretensions (Felix Krull, Grand Hotel). Class lines are straddled and the boundaries between death and life blurred (Hotel World, Hotel Sahara) as the hotel space becomes a riotous echo chamber, mirroring precarious lives of illegal migrants and displaced workers.
Method of evaluation: 10-page final paper
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 15
Method of selection: email rationale to instructor
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $60
Instructors: Helga Druxes and Katarzyna Pieprzak

GERM 13 The Literature and Cinema of Global Organized Crime (Same as COMP 13)
In this course we will examine the demonized, self-consciously romanticized, or pointedly de-glamorized images of organized crime in literature and cinema across the contemporary global village. The subcultures of organized crime groups in the countries within Eastern Europe and Mexico, Italy, France, Japan and India manifest striking similarities in their social and political attitudes and folkways. We will examine the ways in which literary and cinematic texts portray the lives of organized crime workers within the international marketplace, and how the presence of such individuals reflect increasingly symbiotic economic relations across the globe. We will also study theories of confessional and postmodernist narratology, in an effort to de-code representations of the criminal self that finds itself trapped in a world driven by the neoliberal economic policies of outsourcing and transnational mergers.
Method of evaluation: term paper (10-12 pages); in-class presentation of term paper project; participation in class discussions
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: through their position on a wait list
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $108
Instructor: Alexandar Mihailovic

GERM 16 Intro to Fashion Studies (Same as ARTH 16 and COMP 16)
Long frowned upon as a frivolous and superficial interest, fashion has since earned its credentials as a discipline worth researching about. Because Fashion is at the intersection of many disciplines (art history, history, anthropology, sociology, psychoanalysis, to name a few), its study gives a valuable insight into a society, a culture, and a time period.
This course is meant as an introduction to Fashion Studies and intends to teach students how to watch fashion shows and read designers’ collections through the lens of various disciplines.
We will anchor our investigation of fashion within the 20th and 21st centuries and focus on couturiers from France (Poiret, Lanvin, Schiaparelli, Chanel, Balenciaga, Dior, Saint Laurent, Cardin, Lacroix), designers from the U.K. (Westwood, Galliano, McQueen), Italy (Gucci, Valentino, Armani, Prada, Moschino, Dolce and Gabbana), Japan (Kenzo, Yamamoto, Kawakubo), the U.S. (Klein, Karan, Lauren, Hilfiger). We will also look at the culture of fashion worldwide with a glimpse at specific groups such as Punks, Congolese Sapeurs, Harajuku fashionistas, etc…
We will watch fashion shows, feature films (Funny Face, Prêt à Porter, The Devil Wears Prada), biopics (Coco before Chanel, Yves Saint Laurent), documentaries (Valentino: The Last Emperor, Lagerfeld Confidential, Dior and I), read articles by fashion critics (Horyn, Menkes), fashion historians (Steele, Evans), and sociologists (Bourdieu).
In this course, we will explore how fashion is both the instrument of self-expression and political liberation as well as the instrument of global capitalism and neo-colonialism.
Method of evaluation: oral presentation, two 5-page papers, final project
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 25
Method of selection: genuine interest in fashion
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $170
Instructor: Christophe Koné

GERM 30 Honors Project
To be taken by honors candidates following other than the normal thesis route.

GERM 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for German 493-494.

GLOBAL STUDIES


GBST 30 Senior Honors Project
To be taken by candidates for honors in International Studies.

HISTORY


HIST 10 North Adams, Massachusetts: Past, Present, and Future (Same as AMST 10)
This class gives students a chance to learn about Massachusetts’s smallest city, North Adams. Readings, films, field trips, and meetings with people who work with or lead nonprofits and civic organizations will introduce students to local history, current conditions in the city, and plans for future cultural and economic development. Students will be expected to complete assigned readings (one book and assorted articles) and to attend all class meetings. Final assessment will be based on students' engagement in thoughtful discussions of class materials and in-person encounters and experiences. Students will complete a final research project (10-page written report or multimedia presentation) that they present to the class and that will be incorporated into an online resource. In addition, students will submit two short (3-4 page) reflection papers. Students must be available for class meetings off-campus and that may occasionally occur outside of the regular class hours.
Method of evaluation: final research project (10-page paper); two reflection papers (3- to 4-pages)
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 12
Method of selection: priority to first- and second-year students
Meeting times: TWR 10:00-1:00
Cost per student: $18
Instructor: Anne Valk

HIST 11 DDR, The Life and Death of a Vanished Nation: East Germany, 1949-1990 (Same as GERM 11)
In 1989, in the wake of the rapid crumbling of their power in the face of massive popular resistance, the authorities in the German Democratic Republic (Deutsche Demokratische Republik, or DDR) opened the Berlin Wall. Within a year the wall had been torn down and the East German state voted itself out of existence, absorbed wholly into the belly of its larger and more powerful neighbor to the West. Suddenly, the nation born of the promise to create a genuine people’s democracy and claiming the moral high ground as an anti-Fascist state had vanished, its political culture and social institutions suddenly erased. What were the promises of the regime and what happened to those promises? What were the contradictions in East German society and why and where did resistance slowly build to the point where the entire edifice came crashing down? This course will briefly chart the short history of the DDR, from the founding of the Socialist Unity Party in the Soviet occupation zone of a defeated Germany at the end of the Second World War to the total collapse of the regime in 1989/90. The course will explore key moments in the political history of the DDR, including the uprisings of 1953 and the building of the Berlin Wall in 1961. It will also focus on the social and cultural practices of East German society, exploring the nature of everyday life under the Communist regime. The course will meet three times per week for the four weeks of Winter Study and part of the evidence for our discussions will come from the viewing and analysis of seven films, the majority of which were made in the DDR during its short existence and are essential viewing for the course. A textual history of the DDR will also be accompanied by a packet of additional reading materials that will be discussed in class.
Method of evaluation: final 10-page paper
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: preference given to History and German majors
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $30
Instructor: Chris Waters

HIST 12 The East is Red? — Socialism in Asia (Same as ASST 12 and PSCI 12)
See under ASST 12 for full description.

HIST 13 Eyewitnesses to History: American Treasures in the Chapin Library
What did Christopher Columbus write in his 1493 letter to the Spanish court? How did John Smith describe the Virginia colony in the early 1600s? What would a pioneer find when following the Oregon Trail west in 1846? How much did a female slave cost in Richmond, Virginia in 1860? These and many other questions are answered by rare books, manuscripts, and prints in the Chapin Library, primary sources which provide eyewitness accounts of important events in American history.
 In this course students will explore the extraordinary collections available at Williams and learn methods for analyzing primary sources and researching their historical context. In the first two weeks, students will investigate items selected by the instructors in a tutorial-like format, with one student giving a presentation of their research to the seminar and another student providing a critique. For the final project, students will choose an item of interest from the full Chapin collection to research, write a 10-page paper, and present what they have learned to the class. In addition, students will write a short exhibit label for their item for a public exhibition to be mounted in the Special Collections Instruction Gallery at the end of Winter Study.
Method of evaluation: evaluation based on seminar participation, oral presentations, and final paper
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 12
Method of selection: preference given to first-year students
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $0
Instructors: Charles Dew, Lori DuBois, and Wayne Hammond
Lori DuBois is a Reference and Instruction Librarian at Sawyer Library. She received her M.S. in Library Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Wayne Hammond, the Chapin Librarian, has been a rare books and manuscripts librarian at Williams since 1976. He received his M.A. in Library Science from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

HIST 14 Game of Thrones, ca. 850 B.C.: Empire, Religion and Palace Intrigue in the Neo­Assyrian Reliefs at WCMA
Long before the palace intrigues of Jaime, Cersei and Tyrian Lannister, Mesopotamian monarchs established the world's first empires and littered their landscapes with palaces and temples, fortresses and monumental art. The two Assyrian stone reliefs at WCMA are stunning examples of the "calculated frightfulness" with which the kings ruled, employing politics and religion in effective and deliberate combination.
In this course, we meet twice weekly to take an interdisciplinary, close-up look at the WCMA reliefs and other objects in the WCMA cuneiform collection to ask: What (and how) did the reliefs ‘mean?’ Why did they merit inclusion in the palace of the one of the most powerful kings in the ancient world? What (and how) do they ‘mean’ in their Williamstown setting? Our 'work' includes readings in ancient texts, learning to write cuneiform signs on clay, the Epic of Gilgamesh (a classic tale of royal adventure), royal correspondence, ancient notions about the past, sexuality, religion and stories of kings, queens and courtiers in love and war. We finish with a royal feast, featuring ancient Mesopotamian fare, and, depending on student time and interest, an overnight field trip to Yale's Babylonian Collection.
Final projects (5-page paper plus final presentation, or the equivalent) will be determined in conversation with the instructor and guided by the student's interests. All are welcome; we hope for a lively and engaging mix of backgrounds and interests!
Method of evaluation: final project or 5-page paper plus final presentation, or equivalent, to be determined in consultation with the instructor
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 10­12
Method of selection: by seniority
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $125
Instructor: Alison Gruseke
Alison Gruseke '82 is a PhD candidate at Yale who studies the Hebrew Bible in its ancient historical and physical contexts. The crossing of cultural boundaries, identity formation and the interrelationship of cultures in conflict form a strong thread that runs through her work.

HIST 15 The Spanish Civil War in English (Same as COMP 15 and RLSP 15)
See under RLSP 15 for full description.

HIST 16 The History of Panics
What is a panic? What are its causes, and how does it subside? This course will consider these questions by examining the history of various panics — financial, medical, and moral. Informed by readings from sociology, economics, psychology, and history, we will explore how anxieties, fear, rationality, irrationality, gossip and rumor, institutions, and the media have operated to shape responses around the world to economic crises, epidemic diseases, and perceived societal ills. The class will be based primarily on discussion, and will meet two to three times a week.
Method of evaluation: evaluation will be based on class participation and five short papers (2 pages)
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 15
Method of selection: expressed interest in the course
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $30
Instructor: Eiko Maruko Siniawer

HIST 17 Eyewitness to the Civil Rights Movement: Mississippi 1964-1965
During sixteen months in 1964-'65, I worked as a civil rights organizer in rural Mississippi with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). I witnessed and aided in the heroic struggle by black citizens to dismantle the pervasive structure of Jim Crow that had oppressed them for generations. I met relatively uneducated people with the stature of giants. What I encountered was an apartheid America — a vicious police state reinforced extra-legal violence — beyond the understanding of most Americans and certainly beyond the imagination of young people today. This course will explore this transformational moment in recent American history largely thru reading and discussion. Topics will include nonviolence, the role of the black church, black nationalism, Malcolm X and Black Power, the role of women, armed self-defense, the role of whites, the third party politics of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and the actions of the federal government during this turbulent time. Students will read three books and present a final project of their choosing. Documentary film and music from the period will have a prominent role. It is the intent of the instructor to convey the immediacy that only first person experience can evoke.
Method of evaluation: evaluation will be based upon class participation and final project
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: random drawing
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $90
Instructor: Chris Williams
Chris Williams was the college architect at Williams for many years. In his younger days, he was a field organizer in the civil rights movement in rural Mississippi. Today he lives on the backroads of Vermont.

HIST 18 The Name of the Rose
Heresy, labyrinths, libraries, sex, death and laughter: All are central to The Name of the Rose, a murder mystery, historical satire, medievalist fantasy, philosophical meditation, and homage to Arthur Conan Doyle penned by the Italian medievalist Umberto Eco in 1980. The setting is an unnamed Italian monastery in 1327; the protagonist is Brother William of Baskerville, a Franciscan friar and detective in the tradition of Sherlock Holmes. He and his novice Adso happen to arrive just hours after a mysterious death has put the entire monastery on edge. William agrees to investigate, but more murders follow, one each over the next seven days- all of them (as William and Adso discover) according to a strange and disturbing apocalyptic pattern. Eco's intricate and textured novel has been widely acclaimed not only as a significant work of literature, but also as an unusually insightful and sophisticated piece of historical fiction. Few novels enjoy as much cred among the medieval historians. In this course we will experience Eco's novel as entertaining detective fiction, as a work of literature, and as a port of entry into the later medieval world.
Method of evaluation: evaluation will depend upon attendance, participation, and six 1.5-page response papers
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 30
Method of selection: preference for prior coursework in medieval history
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $30
Instructor: Eric Knibbs

HIST 25 Jerusalem: One City, Two Cultures, Three Faiths, Many Narratives (Same as REL 25 and PSCI 25)
See under REL 25 for full description.

HIST 30 Workshop in Independent Research
This course is intended for both junior History majors and sophomores intending on majoring in history who think they might like to do a senior thesis, but who would like to gain more experience in independent research. Students who are interested in exploring a possible topic for a senior thesis are especially encouraged to sign up. This workshop will help familiarize students with methods for doing historical research, including how historians define good research questions; become familiar with the historiography; strategize doing primary research; and identify their sources. Students will also be introduced to doing archival work. Students will pursue their own research on any topic of their own choosing for a 10-page final paper, and we'll use a workshop format to discuss the research and writing of that paper.
Method of evaluation: class participation and 10-page final paper
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 15
Method of selection: interest in course subject determined by questionnaire
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Sara Dubow

HIST 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by all senior honors students who are registered for History 493 (Fall) and History 494 (Spring), History 31 allows thesis writers to complete their research and prepare a draft chapter, due at the end of Winter Study.
Instructor: Alexandra Garbarini

JEWISH STUDIES


JWST 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Jewish Studies 493 or 494.

JUSTICE AND LAW


JLST 11 So You Want to Be a Lawyer
This course is intended to familiarize students with both law school and the practice of law. It will be taught by two law school (and Williams) graduates: one a retired former General Counsel of public and private companies continuing his career as an arbitrator for the Financial Industry Regulatory Association and the other a lawyer who spent her first career as chief real estate counsel for TIAA and, after retiring, went on to become the General Counsel of a well-known international non-profit. The instructors met in a Winter Study class in 1971 and have been friends since. They practiced at the same New York law firm after graduation, and then had very different careers in different cities.
 The first class will consist primarily of a lecture by the two instructors describing the legal system and how law schools use cases and precedents as the basis for their teaching. Following the introductory class, the students will be asked to read and analyze copies of case decisions in a number of areas of substantive law — contracts, property, and Constitutional law for example — and the next two classes will be devoted to experiencing the Socratic Method teaching that is used in law schools.
The students will be asked to read materials about the practice of law — in firms, corporations, nonprofits and the public sector — and the next class will be devoted to talking about the readings as well as the instructors’ experiences in both those settings.
The final group of classes will be devoted to a practical exercise in lawyering. The students will be given a memo from a client seeking help in drafting a contract with a third party. The class will be divided into groups and both groups will be asked to take the role of both sides to the potential contract and will be asked to negotiate and draft a contract based on the fact situation given. Once the students have drafted the two contracts, they will be asked to advise their respective clients on how the client might free itself from the requirements of the contract.
Method of evaluation: evaluation is based on knowledge of the assigned cases and readings, participation in the class discussions, and involvement and skills in the contract negotiating and drafting sessions; the two groups will have to prepare a written contract as well as a written memorandum describing to the client its obligations and its options should it not wish to proceed under the contract
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 16
Method of selection: start with seniors and work down
Meeting times: 10-1 Mon and Tue
Cost per student: $150
Instructors: Gene Bauer and Betty Robbins
Gene Bauer '71 and Betty Robbins '72 are lawyers whose careers have taken different paths. After starting out working at the same large New York City law firm, Gene went on to become General Counsel of a number of public and private companies while Betty became head of Real Estate Law at a large insurance company. After retirement, Gene has continued to act as an arbitrator while Betty has been involved with a national non-profit organization.

JLST 22 Learning Intervention for Teens (Same as PSCI 22)
See under PSCI 22 for full description.

LATINA/O STUDIES


LATS 11 Feminist Perspectives on Latinas in Popular Media (Same as AMST 11 and WGSS 11)
Beginning with an overview of canonical and emerging works of Latina feminist thought, this interdisciplinary class will survey a range of case studies designed to deepen students’ understanding of the unique positionality of Latinas in contemporary popular media. These case studies will focus on questions of Latina representation and Latinx media audience dynamics, with an emphasis on women of color feminist agency, transnational media flows, and feminist methodologies.
Method of evaluation: two 5-page papers
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 12
Method of selection: preference to LATS concentrators, AMST/WGSS majors
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $125
Instructor: Maria Elena Cepeda

LATS 12 Death, Sex, and Money in Brazil (Same as WGSS 12)
See under WGSS 12 for full description.

LATS 17 Writing in the Margins: Playwriting as Plagiarism (Same as AFR 17 and COMP 17 and THEA 17 and WGSS 17)
See under THEA 17 for full description.

LATS 31 Latina/o Honors Thesis Seminar
Students must register for this course to complete an honors project begun in the fall or begin one to be finished in the spring.
Prerequisites: approval of program chair
Enrollment limit: limited to senior honors candidates

LEADERSHIP STUDIES


LEAD 11 Our First Amendment
“Congress shall make no law… abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press.” Those words are clear, and yet our interpretation of these essential rights has changed over the decades. In this seminar, we will study how free speech and freedom of the press have clashed with other rights as well as with governmental responsibilities. How should we balance the free flow of information with national security? How should we balance free speech with speech we hate — the neo-Nazi demonstration in Skokie, Illinois in 1977, flag burning, trigger words? Among the cases we will examine are the Pentagon Papers, the decision of the New York Times in 1971 to publish classified information about the war in Vietnam; Supreme Court decisions in the 1964 libel case, the New York Times v. Sullivan, that set a high bar for libeling public officials and other public figures, and in the Citizens United case in 2010 that equated money and speech. We will look at more recent cases that raise issues of privacy, intellectual property rights, and national security, such as Apple’s refusal to unlock a cell phone. And we will discuss uncomfortable learning at Williams College. Along with current journalism and key texts written by Madison and Jefferson, we will discuss a chapter by Williams political scientist James MacGregor Burns, Anthony Lewis’s short history of the First Amendment in the 20th century, anecdotes by James Goodale, the Times’ lawyer in the Pentagon Papers case, and an account of that case by law professor David Rudenstine.
Method of evaluation: participation in class discussions, one 3-page paper, and one 7-page paper
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 12
Method of selection: preference to Political Science and History majors
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $25
Instructor: Marc Charney
Marc Charney, ’65, has been an editor at the New York Times for more than 30 years, and is now an editor of opinion articles. He previously was foreign editor of the Times’ Week in Review section and, earlier, a foreign correspondent for the Associated Press.

LEAD 12 Principles of Effective Leadership
This course will examine issues related to effective leadership in a variety of contexts, primarily through the experience of guest lecturers. We will begin by identifying key principles of leadership with reference to several great leaders in history, moving on to consider contemporary yet timeless topics such as personal responsibility, corruption and fraud in the private sector as well as the essential role good communications skills play in exercising leadership. The majority of class sessions will feature distinguished guest speakers, many of whom are Williams alumni, who have held leadership roles in government, business, philanthropy and healthcare. Probing our guests’ approaches to organizational leadership is the primary goal of this Winter Study. Each student will be asked to host a guest at dinner or breakfast before we meet, to introduce him or her to the class, and to stimulate discussion. After each lecture, we will spend time in the next class sharing impressions, surprises and lessons learned. There will be a 10-page final paper which may take a variety of forms and formats, but which should address the basic themes in our readings as well as what you have learned from our guests, both collectively and more specifically in the case of at least three individuals.
Method of evaluation: attendance, class participation, short paper (5-page), and final presentation
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 25
Method of selection: Leadership Studies concentrators, preference to seniors and juniors
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $50
Instructor: William Simon
William E. Simon, Jr., ’73. Businessman, lawyer, and philanthropist, Mr. Simon is Co-Chairman of William E. Simon and Sons, a private equity firm, and the William E. Simon Foundation. Early in his career he was Assistant U.S. Attorney in the Southern District of New York and later was the 2002 Republican gubernatorial nominee in California. Mr. Simon is a Trustee Emeritus of Williams College.

LEAD 14 The CIA and the Politics of Intelligence (Same as PSCI 14)
See under PSCI 14 for full description.

LEAD 18 Wilderness Leadership in Emergency Care
This Winter Study course is for students who would like to participate in a 9 day, 72 hour comprehensive hands on in-depth look at the standards and skills of dealing with wilderness based medical emergencies. Topics that will be covered include, Response and Assessment, Musculoskeletal Injuries, Soft Tissue Injuries, Environmental Injuries, and Survival Skills. Additional topics, such as CPR, are also included. Students will be required to successfully complete the written & practical exams, and not miss any of the 9 classes to receive credit and WFR/CPR certification.
Method of evaluation: written and practical exam
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 22
Method of selection: submit a statement of purpose to the instructor explaining why they want to take the course and hope to gain from the experience
Cost per student: $465
Meeting times: the course runs nine consecutive days straight from 9AM - 5PM, with a possible one nighttime rescue exercise
Instructor: Scott Lewis

MATHEMATICS/STATISTICS


MATHEMATICS
MATH 11 A Taste of Austria
This course introduces students to elements of the Austrian culture around the turn of the 19th century up to today. Students will learn and prepare presentations about significant contributions to the arts and sciences from Austrians such as musician Gustav Mahler, artist Gustav Klimt, scientist Karl Landsteiner or poet Stefan Zweig. Other activities include learning how to dance the Viennese waltz composed by Johann Strauss (in case you want to attend Austria's main annual society event, the Opernball in Vienna) or how to prepare Wienerschnitzel or bake Sachertorte (the delicious cake offered by the Hotel Sacher in Vienna). If time and weather permits, we will also pursue typical Austrian winter activities such as downhill or cross country skiing, sledding or skating. The course will be conducted mainly in English, with some German intermingled.
Method of evaluation: evaluation will be based on attendance, a 10-page paper (including presentation slides) and a corresponding presentation on a topic with an Austrian connection (possible topics will be suggested, but students can choose their own), and class discussions
Prerequisites: no prerequisites necessary although some knowledge of German is welcome
Enrollment limit: 24
Method of selection: random selection
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $90
Instructor: Sophia Klingenberg
Sophia Klingenberg was born in Graz, Austria. She graduated from the Vienna University Medical School with a doctorate in Medicine in 2004 and worked at the University of Florida, Dept. of Pathology as a research scholar for three years. Currently, she is finishing her residency in general medicine in Graz, Austria.

MATH 12 The Mathematics of Lego Bricks
This course is a modification of three previous winter studies I have done on the Mathematics of LEGO bricks. Similar to those, we will use LEGO bricks as a motivator to talk about some good mathematics (combinatorics, algorithms, efficiency); however, instead of trying to build a SuperStar Destroyer in a world record time, we instead will build a large suspension bridge in Paresky for MLK Day, and partner with Williamstown Elementary and the Williamstown Youth Center on projects (probably Lego Mindstorm).
Method of evaluation: a mix of written assignments and public activities; a large portion of the course will be outreach efforts, both at the college and at local schools; students will be evaluated by their performance in these settings, and will also write at least five pages of self-reflection on the course
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 30
Method of selection: conversations with instructor
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $30
Instructor: Steven Miller

MATH 14 Math Review
Taking a Math or Stat course in the Spring? Worried that your math is a little rusty? Improve your skills and make the Spring course go more smoothly by reviewing material over Winter Study. Students will meet with the instructor to discuss their background and design a study plan. Coursework will be done independently and working in small groups with the instructor.
Method of evaluation: evaluation will be based on participation and homework
Prerequisites: none; have to be enrolled in a MATH or STAT course in the spring
Enrollment limit: 15
Method of selection: preference will be given to QS students
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $25
Instructor: Stewart Johnson

MATH 15 Pilates: Physiology and Wellness (Same as SPEC 15)
During the first half of the twentieth century, Joseph Pilates developed a series of exercises he called Contrology designed to strengthen core muscles and improve overall health. Now known as Pilates, these exercises are meant to increase flexibility, strength, endurance, and spinal health. In this course, we will study the physiology and origins of the Pilates exercises as well as how Pilates can be incorporated into an overall wellness plan. Class time will include both Pilates routines, discussion, and guest lecture. There will be weekly quizzes, readings, and a final project. We will meet 3 mornings per week.
Method of evaluation: class participation, quizzes, and final project
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: selection will be based on student responses to a course survey
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $125
Instructor: Allison Pacelli

MATH 16 The Science of Star Trek (Same as PHYS 16)
See under PHYS 16 for full description.

MATH 17 Modern Dance — Muller Technique
This dance class will be based on the modern dance technique developed by Jennifer Muller, with whom I danced professionally for 5 years in New York City and in Europe. Jennifer Muller was a soloist in the dance company of José Limon before she started her own company in 1974. She has added her own style of movement to the Limon technique, creating an expansive, free flowing dance that is wonderful to do and to watch. The class will be multi leveled and open to both men and women alike. Students will have the opportunity to choreograph a short piece either as a soloist or in small groups.
Method of evaluation: a 1/2-page journal entry is required after each class, a 1/2-page commentary on 10-12 dance videos, attendance, and a short performance at the end of winter study
Prerequisites: none; no previous dance experience necessary
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: selection will be based on the order that they sign up for the course as their first choice
Meeting times: Monday, Wednesday, Friday from 11 am until 1 pm
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Sylvia Logan
Sylvia Logan received her B.A. in Slavic Literature from Stanford University. She danced professionally with several dance companies including Jennifer Muller and the Works, a modern company based in New York City for five years.

MATH 30 Senior Project
To be taken by candidates for honors in Mathematics other than by thesis route.

MATH 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Mathematics 493-494.

STATISTICS
STAT 25 The History, Geography and Economics of the Wines of France
The history of wine making in France is long, dating back to the Greeks and later the Romans. Not surprisingly, the first areas to be planted were the areas around present day Marseille, (Massalia in Ancient Greece) in Provence, and the areas just north farther up the Rhône river valley. We will briefly survey the history of wine in France from the Romans through the middle ages, the influence of monasteries on wine production, the impact of the French revolution and the evolution of the modern classification system in the 19th century which is still in place today. The late 19th century saw a series of catastrophes that had devastating effects on both the quantity and quality of wine produced. The solutions to these problems are varied and fascinating and resulted in the hybridization of American and French vines which exist to this day. Recent history includes the spread of quality wines to the Languedoc area, an area which now rivals some of the more prestigious traditional areas of Bordeaux and Burgundy. During the first week in Williamstown, before traveling to France, we will study the basics of the French wine industry of today. During our first week we will also study the impact of global warming on the future of wine production in France and the potential economic impact. We will look at temperature data and study the relationship between temperature change and quality using statistical regression analysis. Finally, we will discuss the role of wine in French cuisine and the importance of wine to French culture.
Geography and climate play an essential and important role in grape growing. Due to its temperate and incredibly varied climates, France, while not holding a monopoly on fine wine production, is blessed with being able to grow a wide range of different styles of grapes whose sugar and acidity lend themselves to the production of quality wines. During our 10 days in France, we will visit four different areas of French wine production: Bordeaux, Languedoc, the Rhône and Burgundy. Chateau visits will include lectures by the wine growers on various methods of production particularly to the region and the varietals used. One of the sites we plan to visit is the Agricultural Research Center (INRA) in Montpellier, which has helped modernize the Languedoc wine growing region and contributed to its current standing as a major high quality wine producing region.
Structure of the course: During the first week in Williamstown, we will read about the history of wine production, study the geography of France and perform various statistical analyses relating to quality, temperature and production. In particular, we will study the relationship between price and quality as judged by experts for the 2000 Bordeaux vintage. In the second part of the course we will visit and talk with wine producers from a range of vineyards including the largest and most prestigious in Bordeaux to family operations in the Languedoc and Provence.
Selected References
[1] Climate, hydrology, land use, and environmental degradation in the lower Rhone Valley during the Roman period, SE Van der Leeuw - Comptes Rendu, Geosciences, 2005, Elsevier
[2] The red and the white: a history of wine in France and Italy in the nineteenth century/by Leo A. Loubère; drawings by Mark Blanton and Philip Loubère Albany: State University of New York Press, 1978
[3] Climate Change and Global Wine Quality, Jones, G. V. White, M. A. Cooper, O. R. Storchmann, K., Climatic Change, 2005, VOL 73; NUMBER 3, pages 319-343.
[4] Wine Growers’ Syndicalism in the Languedoc: Continuity and Change, Jean Phillpe Martin, Sociologia Ruralis, 36,3,1996.
[5] The Table Comes First: Family, France, and the Meaning of Food, Adam Gopnik, Knopf, 2011 (Possible required book).
[6] Wine and War: The French, the Nazis, and the Battle for France's Greatest Treasure, D. Kladstrup and P. Kaldstrup, Broadway Books, 2002.
Method of evaluation: a journal during the trip and a research paper on a relevant topic of the student’s choosing
Prerequisites: none; not open to first-year students
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: all students are required to write an essay describing why they want to take the course
Cost per student: $4800
Instructor: Richard DeVeaux

STAT 30 Senior Project
To be taken by candidates for honors in Statistics other than by thesis route.

STAT 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Statistics 493-494.

MUSIC


MUS 13 Introduction to Argentine Tango (Same as DANC 13)
Through reading, film viewings, and participating in musical exercises and dance workshops, students will explore the sounds and movements of Argentine tango, while also considering its broader social and historical context both in Argentina and abroad. No prior musical or dance experience necessary.
Grades will be based on course participation, regular journal entries (2 pages per week), an individual final project (including a 2- to 3-page written component), and their participation in a group-organized public tango event at the conclusion of the course (with 2-page write-up).
Method of evaluation: reading journal, final project, participation in group project, and full participation in class discussion and workshops
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 30
Method of selection: seniority, Music and Dance majors
Meeting times: mornings, afternoons
Cost per student: $40
Instructor: Corinna Campbell

MUS 14 Classic American and European Musical Theatre (Same as THEA 14)
This Winter Study will give participants an opportunity to study and perform numbers for one or more singers in great American musicals and European light operas. You have sung a solo, you have sung in chorus — now practice the exacting art of singing a solo or an ensemble on stage. The course will culminate with a performance of ensembles, solos, and duets, concentrating on connections between the music of Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim. Singers, actors, and pianists are all welcome to participate. The course is intended especially for singers who wish to have some stage time, and for actors who wish to work on their singing.
Method of evaluation: a student may fulfill the requirements of the course by performing in the final public concert
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 15
Method of selection: will communicate with those wishing to register either in person or via email
Meeting times: afternoons, MWF 1:00-3:00
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Keith Kibler
Keith Kibler has performed under some of the finest directors including David Alden, Peter Sellars, and Galina Vishnevskaya. He sang a major role in Kurt Weill's "Das kleine Mahagonny" at the American Repertory Theatre. He has appeared in numerous operas with companies in the United States and England.

MUS 15 Contemporary Songwriting (Same as AMST 15)
This course will focus on learning how to write and perform songs in contemporary styles (rock, folk, jazz, bluegrass, etc. Unfortunately, we will not be addressing rap or spoken word). Topics addressed will include song structure, how to create a lyric that communicates, vocal and instrument presentation, performing techniques, publicity for events, and today's music industry. This class will culminate in a public performance of material written during the course. To successfully pass this course, students are required to create, edit, perform and possibly record two original songs. These songs must be conceived during the course period (previously written material is not usable). Students will be guided to create both music and lyrics. They may also be required to participate in a co-write session. At least one of these songs will be presented during the final performance, preferably by the student. Attendance at classes, feedback sessions, and all officially scheduled events is mandatory. A short writing assignment based on the assigned reading will be passed in on the last day of class.
Method of evaluation: attendance, final performance, and writing assignment
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 14
Method of selection: students with a musical background and the ability to play an instrument may be given preference, but anyone interested is encouraged to register
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $85
Instructor: Bernice Lewis
Bernice is the Artist Associate in Songwriting. She also teaches at Colorado College and is an Artist in Residence for the National Park Service. With four decades of performing and seven acclaimed CDs, Lewis has built a solid national fan base. She studied vocal improvisation with Bobby McFerrin, guitar with Alex DeGrassi and Guy van Duser, and songwriting with Rosanne Cash and Cris Williamson. She has been a featured performer on NPR's Mountain Stage, and the Kennedy Center.

MUS 16 Zimbabwean Music Collaboration
This course focuses on teaching Zimbabwean music performance. Besides introducing a selection of basic songs on mbira, marimba and voice, the course explores orchestration of such music on other instruments such as brass, woodwinds, strings and additional percussion. The course content will trace both continuity and change in music from traditional song styles into African popular music. Besides the instrumental practice of the class, we will watch on YouTube and other videos the collaborative nature of this music. The class will conclude with an end-of-Winter Study performance by the participants.
Method of evaluation: end-of-Winter Study performance
Prerequisites: none; students who play other instruments are encouraged to bring them
Enrollment limit: 30
Method of selection: previous musical background; those who play other instruments may have an advantage
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Tendai Muparutsa

MUS 17 Chamber Orchestra of Williams
 The Classical chamber orchestra will perform symphonies of Haydn and Mozart. Performing music of this period demands a high level of technical ability. Performance practice of this period will be a priority. The issues of intonation, articulation, balance, bowing, dynamics, tempo, and interpretation will be the backbone of the training.
Haydn, the first composer to define the classical symphonic style, will be represented by 'Le Midi,' the middle work of his symphonic triptych, Le Matin, Le Midi, and Le Soir. Mozart continued the development of the classical symphonic style. The orchestra grew in size on Mozart's watch fueled by his need for more dramatic contrast and a richer harmonic language. Symphony no. 35, K385 will be the companion piece for COW 2017.
Two student conductors will be chosen to conduct the orchestra, one from the fall orchestral conducting class, and one from Student Symphony. They will conduct the orchestra and act as personnel managers and librarians. They will be coached on rehearsal priorities and strategies as they move forward from one rehearsal to another. There will be a final recorded and videotaped concert at the end of Winter Study. Berkshire Symphony and Student Symphony members will make up the bulk of the orchestra. Instrumentalists not involved in either ensemble are also welcome. Maximum enrollment: Strings; 12 violins, 5 violas, 4 cellos, 2 basses. Winds; 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 trumpets, timpani.
Method of evaluation: attendance and preparation
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 36
Method of selection: audition and need
Meeting times: MWF 4-6
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Ronald Feldman

MUS 18 Tuning and Temperament
Our musical system conceals a fundamental flaw — an inherent, mathematical incommensurability of its intervals: a finite collection of tones cannot be built from pure fifths and thirds and also be closed at the octave (i.e. twelve fifths from C returns not to another C, but to the distinct pitch B#). Equal temperament is our modern solution to this problem: we make the space between all tones exactly the same, spreading the discrepancy between C and B# evenly among all intervals, thereby making all intervals slightly impure. Historically, this was not always the case; in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, myriad competing methods arose to distribute the discrepancy in uneven but usable ways. As a result, different keys had different sounds — some were more harmonious, others less so; triads in those keys were not simply major or minor, but involved many shades of major and minor. Drawing on ancient legends, writers ascribed specific characters to particular keys, and such key characters undoubtedly shaped composers' choices: Mozart, for instance, reserved g minor for particularly tragic topics; E-flat suggested particular paths for modulation by Bach. The class will explore the theory, the mythology, and most importantly, the practice of diverse, microtonal tuning systems from the Baroque era: much of the class work will involve learning how to tune a harpsichord, realizing various historical temperaments on the instrument, and performing works thereupon in multiple keys, exploring the distinct sound worlds those temperaments create.
Method of evaluation: student's tuning project, and its accompanying presentation and paper
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 12
Method of selection: Music majors, performers, and students who have taken a music theory course
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Ed Gollin

MUS 19 The World and Wes Anderson
Among commercially successful American filmmakers of the new millennium, Wes Anderson has cultivated one of the most strongly recognizable styles. While his films largely embrace traditional narrative structures, they take inspiration from (and allude to) movements far outside of traditional filmmaking. In this class, we will use his films as a lens into these diverse topics, including contemporary art, interior design, film history, music history, political history, national identity, celebrity, philosophy, typography, and the environment. Class meetings will consist of lecture, discussion, group viewing sessions, and student presentations. Outside of the classroom, students will read articles, watch video, and listen to music that relates closely to the course content.
Method of evaluation: participation, presentation, creative project and short paper (1- to 3-page), final paper (8- to 10-page)
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: preference to students who have taken courses about film in any department
Meeting times: mornings, afternoons
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Zachary Wadsworth

MUS 25 Creative Art Projects inspired by Southern Florida Native American Indian History and Culture
This travel course will focus on creative work inspired by the history and culture of Native American Indians of Southern Florida. We will discuss the history and culture of Native Americans in the area, focusing mostly on the Calusa, their society, politics, system of government, trading customs, and religion. We will also talk about their construction of a canal system, and their architecture and engineering. Students will arrive at their own conclusion about the impact of Native Americans in our culture. They will also use their experiences during field trips, workshops, lectures, and group discussions as a source of inspiration for their creative work in one or more of the following fields: music composition, visual arts (video, photography), and literature. They will create their projects individually or form teams to create interdisciplinary works. If team work is selected for the creation of a project, there will be a limit of one student per discipline in each team.
We will visit archaeological and historical sites, research centers, and museums focused on the history and culture of Native American Indians of South West Florida. We will attend lectures offered by archaeologists, and will participate in the process of screening, cataloging, and analyzing samples extracted from the shell mounds of Useppa Island and Pineland at the Randell Research Center, of the University of Florida. Calusa artifacts made with ceramic materials, wood carving, and painting are recognized worldwide as remarkable examples of Native American artistic achievement. Samples of their art found during excavations in SW FL are part of exhibitions in the historical museums that we will visit. Students will learn about music inspired by pre-Columbian Native American instruments and art, performed by a flutist/composer specializing in Native American Music.
This course includes information about the estuaries, which with their rich bounty sustained the world of the Calusas. Students will study and visit mudflats, mangrove forests, and sea grass beds that supported the Calusa because so many of the animals they harvested for food, lived and found protection among these natural resources. We will participate in workshops replicating the process of weaving plant-fiber nets, and reconstructing some of their fishing artifacts, and will learn about the native plant material that they used for meals, and for the creation of their utensils.
 Students will create their projects individually or could form teams to create interdisciplinary works. If team work is selected for the creation of a project, there will be a limit of one student per discipline in each team.
Field trips will be scheduled during the mornings. Some lectures will be scheduled during afternoons and evenings. Times not scheduled for lectures or field trips will be dedicated to study articles on The Calusas and the creation of individual or team creative work. Students will have a travel journal reflecting on their experiences and their artistic response as they occur.
Students' projects in progress will be shared with members of the Pine Island Community, and once the creative process is completed we will donate copies of the projects to the Randell Research Center. Creative projects will also be shared with the Williams College community after our return to Williams. Students will also write a four-page paper describing how they integrated the knowledge acquired about the Calusa Indians and their civilization into their creative projects.
Prior to our departure, students should have read the following book: MacMahon, Darcie A. and Williams Marquardt 2004 "The Calusa and their Legacy: South Florida People and their Environments" University Press of Florida, Gainesville.
Method of evaluation: creative project and a 6-page paper
Prerequisites: none; not open to first-year students
Enrollment limit: 7
Method of selection: priority to students with experience in music, the arts, archeology, and environmental studies
Cost per student: $1970
Instructor: Ileana Perez Velazquez

MUS 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Music 493-494.

NEUROSCIENCE


NSCI 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Neuroscience 493-494.

PHILOSOPHY


PHIL 12 Ethics in Public Health (Same as PHLH 12)
It is the beginning of Winter Study on the Williams campus. Students are just arriving after their semester break, and along with them, a novel and highly transmissible strain of avian flu. It is a fictional scenario, but not unimaginable. Over the course of the winter study period we will watch it unfold, and use it as a launch pad for investigating ethics in public health. In particular, the various stages of the epidemic will give us the opportunity to explore the ethics of disease surveillance, research, resource allocation, and compulsion within the public health context (e.g., mandated reporting of disease, isolation and quarantine, compulsory vaccination and treatment), among other topics. Students will be expected to complete background readings in public health ethics taken from the philosophical, bioethics, and professional public health literature, and to participate actively in class discussions. In addition, students are responsible to give in-class presentations in which they propose public health measures at various stages of the fictional epidemic, and defend the ethical dimensions of the measures they propose. (These may be team presentations, depending on class enrollment.) Each student will submit a brief (e.g., 2-3 page) written response to at least three other presentations.
Method of evaluation: one in-class presentation, three short (2-3 page) response papers, and participation
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 12
Method of selection: Public Health concentrators and Philosophy majors will receive enrollment priority
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $10
Instructor: Julia Pedroni

PHIL 14 Yoga and an Ethical Life
“Yoga and an Ethical Life” will examine how the practice of yoga can serve as a foundation and guide for ethical living, looking in particular at yoga as an inspiration for environmental and social justice work. Alongside the physical practice of yoga, the class will investigate the ethical teachings of yoga’s ancient text, the "Yoga Sutras of Patanjali." Students will learn a number of basic yoga poses and breathing techniques in 1.5-hour classes that will meet 4 or 5 times a week. In addition, students will read and discuss excerpts from the Yoga Sutras and several different commentaries, including those of BKS Iyengar (Light on the Yoga Sutras) and Bernard Bouanchaud (The Essence of Yoga). The principal reading will be Michael Stone’s "Yoga for a World Out of Balance: Teachings on Ethics and Social Action."
Students will be expected to practice on their own on the remaining days, to keep a journal of their impressions over the month-long course, and to participate in class discussions of the readings. For final credit, students must write a 5- to 10-page paper on a theme of their choice relating to their experience of the class and the ethical teachings of yoga.
No previous yoga experience required. Students should purchase a copy of Michael Stone’s book and join a group order for a yoga mat.
Method of evaluation: class participation and final paper (5- to 10-pages); students are expected to attend all the classes; absences need to be cleared in advance with the teacher
Prerequisites: no broken bones or acute physical injuries; previous yoga experience not required
Enrollment limit: 12
Method of selection: priority to those who enroll first, with in-person follow-up to assess motivation and commitment to participate
Meeting times: Monday-Thursday, 10:30-12, at Tasha Yoga Studio, 20 Spring St., Williamstown; first class Tuesday, January 3; last class Thursday, January 26
Cost per student: $75, based on need of yoga mat and purchase of book
Instructor: Anne O'Connor
Yoga teacher Anne O'Connor is trained in the Iyengar yoga method, which she has been practicing for 20 years. O'Connor, a freelance editor, also serves on the Williamstown Select Board and is a member of the environmental group 350MA-Berkshires and the First Congregational Church of Williamstown.

PHIL 25 Eye Care and Culture in Nicaragua (Same as PSYC 25)
Among the works students will read, in part or as wholes, and then discuss, are the following:
Dix and Fitzpatrick 2011, Nicaragua. Surviving the Legacy of U.S. Policy
Hooker 2010, “The Mosquito Coast and the Place of Blackness and Indigeneity in Nicaragua”
Hooker 2011, Inaugural Lecture for the 2011 Academic Term of the University of the Autonomous Regions of the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua (URACCAN)
Kinzer 2007, Blood of Brothers. Life and War in Nicaragua.
Taylor 2005, The Time and Life of Bluefields. An Intergenerational Dialogue.
Method of evaluation: class participation and journals, along with on-site observation of the students’ participation in the eye clinics
Prerequisites: none, although it is helpful to include three to six students who are fluent in Spanish; not open to first-year students
Enrollment limit: 12
Method of selection: students will submit applications indicating why they want to take the course; in 2014, 2015, and 2016, we were able to include (1) all seniors who applied, and (2) all students who had applied for inclusion in the course in earlier years but been excluded; others were selected on the basis of their applications; those who were excluded were informed that if they reapplied in later years, we would attempt to accommodate them; we hope to be able to continue to do so; as indicated above, it is important to have some students who are fluent in Spanish, so that may be a factor in some cases
Cost per student: $3800
Instructors: Alan White, Elise Harb, and Laura Smalarz

PHIL 26 Morocco
Students spend winter study in Morocco, a country at the intersection of the West, the Middle East, and Africa that presents a compelling blend of historical influences and modern world currents. Threads of Islam, Arab traditions, and the heritage of the native Berber people are woven into a distinctive cultural tapestry, while traces of French colonialism can still be seen in the political and social structure. Travel there is a powerful way to introduce intellectual themes that require and reward a subtle blend of insight from history, literature, political science, religion, and philosophy. For the first two weeks, students study at the Center for Cross Cultural Learning (CCCL) in Rabat, attending lectures by local university faculty on various aspects of Moroccan history and culture, and taking introductory lessons in Moroccan Arabic. During this period, students live with Moroccan host families in the Rabat medina. In the third week of the course students travel in the interior of Morocco, exploring the imperial cities of Meknes, Fez and Marrakech, riding camels in the Sahara and hiking through Berber villages in the Atlas Mountains.
Method of evaluation: (1) a 10- to 15- page pre-trip research paper plus a 5- to 6-page after-trip addendum; (2) broader assessment of the students' engaged participation in all of the different intellectual and cultural components of the course in Morocco (for details, see above)
Prerequisites: none; this winter study is aimed at students from all disciplines at Williams; we have taken students whose majors are in closely allied fields (e.g. Middle Eastern history, Arabic language) as well as students from related disciplines in Divisions I and II (e.g. art history, French language, political science, philosophy, literature, and religion, to name a few); equally important, we have been delighted to take many Division III students whose academic schedules otherwise prevent their studying overseas; not open to first-year students
Enrollment limit: 15
Method of selection: we select students using a two-step process: (1) a required 1-page essay describing the student's interest in and background for the course; (2) interviews with individual students
Cost per student: $3500
Instructors: Melissa Barry and Sherron Knopp

PHIL 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Philosophy 493-494.

PHYSICS


PHYS 11 Science for Kids (Same as CHEM 11)
See under CHEM 11 for full description.

PHYS 12 Drawing as a Learnable Skill
Representational drawing is not merely a gift of birth, but a learnable skill. If you wanted to draw, but have never had the time to learn; or you enjoy drawing and wish to deepen your understanding and abilities, then this course is for you. This intensive course utilizes traditional drawing exercises to teach representational drawing. By using simple techniques and extensive exercises you will develop your ability to accurately see and realistically represent the physical world. You will learn to draw a convincing portrait, interior, and still life. This course is designed to develop your powers of observation and teach creative problem solving abilities. Students need no previous artistic experience, just the willingness and desire to learn. Students will be expected to attend and participate in all sessions. They will also be required to keep a sketchbook of homework assignments recording their progress and complete a final project.
Method of evaluation: the final evaluation will be based on class participation during the course, improvement made, and participation in a formal exhibition of drawings consisting of two drawings: one still life and one portrait; a short 2-page paper will be required in which the student is asked to describe what they have learned from the class and how their understanding of drawing has been effected by what they learned
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 18
Method of selection: if overenrolled, selection will be based on seniority
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $8
Instructor: Stella Ehrich
Stella Ehrich is a professional painter whose work includes portraits, landscapes and still life subjects. She studied for seven years at Studio Simi in Florence, she holds an MFA in painting from Bennington College and a BFA from the Memphis Academy of Art.

PHYS 13 Electronics
Electronic circuits and instruments are indispensable parts of modern laboratory work throughout the sciences. This course will cover the basics of analog circuits, including transistors and operational amplifiers, and will briefly introduce digital circuits and the Arduino, a microcontroller. Class will meet four afternoons a week for a mixture of lab and lecture, providing ample opportunity for hands-on experience. Students will build and test a variety of circuits chosen to illustrate the kinds of electronic devices and design problems a scientist is apt to encounter. In the last week, students will design and build a final project, or will write a 10-page paper.
Method of evaluation: class participation, completion of laboratory work, and the quality of the final project or 10-page paper
Prerequisites: MATH 140 or equivalent calculus; no prior experience with electronic circuits is assumed
Enrollment limit: 16
Method of selection: priority given to seniors first, first-years last
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $60
Instructors: Jefferson Strait and Jason Mativi
Jason Mativi is the electro-mechanical technician in the Bronfman Science Center. He will teach the digital electronics portion of the course.

PHYS 14 Light and Holography
This course will examine the art and science of holography. It will introduce modern optics at a level appropriate for a non-science major, giving the necessary theoretical background in lectures and discussion. Demonstrations will be presented and students will make several kinds of holograms in the lab. Thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation, we have 7 well — equipped holography darkrooms available for student use. At the beginning of WSP, the class will meet for lecture and discussion three mornings a week and for lab 2 afternoons a week. The later part of the month will be mainly open laboratory time during which students, working in small groups, will conduct an independent project in holography approved by the instructor. Attendance at lectures and laboratory is required.
Method of evaluation: students will be evaluated on the basis of regular attendance, completion of 4 laboratory exercises, and a holography laboratory project (approved by the instructor) with either a poster presentation to the class at the end of WSP; attendance at all classes and labs is required for a passing grade
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 30
Method of selection: preference to students with no physics above Physics 109; then seniors, juniors, sophomores and first-years
Meeting times: mornings, labs in afternoon
Cost per student: $50
Instructors: David Tucker-Smith and Kevin Forkey

PHYS 16 The Science of Star Trek (Same as MATH 16)
Comprising twelve motion pictures and five major television series, totaling over 500 hours of film, Star Trek has had a profound impact on pop culture and the scientific imagination. In this Winter Study course, we will board Star Trek as vehicle towards a critical discussion of science, technology, and their consequences to society. We will boldly question topics such as the nature of reality, the (uni/multi)verse according to quantum theory and general relativity, the origins of consciousness and the possibility and consequences of extraterrestrial and artificial intelligence. We will view select episodes and films from the franchise, discussing their basis in actual science and using them as a prism to understand issues facing us on Earth. For more details, see http://web.williams.edu/Mathematics/sjmiller/public_html/1701/
Method of evaluation: class participation, the completion of two short essays (3- to 4-pages) and a final project, and the Kobayashi Maru test
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 25
Method of selection: selection based on a small assignment and/or conversations with the instructors
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $30
Instructors: Frederick Strauch and Steven Miller

PHYS 18 Wood and Woodturning (Same as ARTS 18)
Woodturning — the use of a lathe to sculpt cylindrically symmetric objects from wood — dates to antiquity, with turned objects appearing in furniture, architecture, and art through the ages. This course will introduce the basic concepts of woodturning, including lathe and tool safety, tool selection, and techniques for shaping both side grain and end grain. We will use gouges, chisels, and scrapers to turn a variety of projects like finger tops, carving mallets, bowls, pens, etc. from several different species of wood. Along the way we will also discuss topics related to woodworking such as sharpness and sharpening, metallurgy, moisture and wood movement, and forestry. We will meet for approximately 12 hours weekly for demonstrations and individual work on projects.
No previous experience is required; however, students with patience, good fine-motor skills, and some imagination will find the course most rewarding. This course is open to both artistically and scientifically minded students.
Method of evaluation: class participation, exhibition of woodturnings, and a 10-page paper
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 6-12, depending on equipment availability
Method of selection: preference given to juniors, sophomores, and those who express the most and earliest interest by e-mail to Professor Doret
Meeting times: Monday-Thursday, 1-4 pm
Cost per student: $150
Instructor: Charles Doret

PHYS 20 Loop d’ Loop d’ Loop d’ Loop d’ Loop d’ Loop... (Same as MUS 20)
This class is about music, but you don’t have to be a musician to take it. It is about recursion, but you don’t have to be a computer scientist to get it. We will play with the subjective and social meanings of sound-art, but you don’t have to be an artist to play along.
Imagine that you record yourself speaking in a room; You record the sound of that recording as it plays back in that same room; You record the recording of the recording; You sit back and let this loop repeat and repeat. Eventually your words are smoothed out by the resonances of the room into a rich melody.
In this class we will explore the world of sound-art. We will transmute audio samples by harnessing the resonances of architectural spaces in Williamstown, from dorm room to theater. Emphasizing hands-on projects, students will create, listen, read, and field trip their way to a new understanding of sound and recursion.
Method of evaluation: first project and final project — both require substantial work
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: seniority
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $20
Instructor: Daniel Fox
Daniel Fox is a composer and a mathematician who explores moments of unusual materiality in music and sound. His compositions have been performed by the Momenta Quartet and the Either/Or ensemble. His website is thoughtstoodefinite.com.

PHYS 22 Research Participation
Several members of the department will have student projects available dealing with their own research or that of current senior thesis students. Approximately 35 hours per week of study and actual research participation will be expected from each student.
Those interested should consult with members of the department as early as possible in the registration period or before to determine details of projects then expected to be available.
Method of evaluation: students will be required to keep a notebook and write a 5-page paper summarizing their work
Prerequisites: permission of instructor
Enrollment limit: 1 or 2 per project
Method of selection: permission of instructor
Meeting times: to be arranged with instructor
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: David Tucker-Smith and members of the Physics department

PHYS 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Physics 493-494.

POLITICAL ECONOMY


POEC 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as PSCI 21)
See under PSCI 21 for full description.

POEC 23 Endowment Investment Management
This class is designed to provide students with an overview of endowment and investment management and is taught by members of the Williams College Investment Office. The Investment Office is responsible for overseeing Williams’ $2.4 billion endowment. Through presentations, discussion, readings, and project work, Winter Study students will gain a better understanding of the various components of an institutional investment portfolio, how it is managed, and how investment managers are selected and monitored. Students will learn about portfolio theory as well as specific asset classes such as global equities, hedge funds, venture capital, buyouts, real estate, and fixed income. Students are expected to attend all on-campus classes (approx. 6 hours/week) and complete a set of relevant readings, a case study exercise, journal entries, and a final project. Students will also be required to complete an introductory excel course.
Method of evaluation: final project presentation (5- to 10-PowerPoint slides and a 15-minute presentation)
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 7
Method of selection: to apply, please select POEC 23 as your first choice; additionally, please send an email with a resume and cover letter to: investmentoffice@williams.edu by 11:59 PM ET on Sunday, October 9, 2016; students will be selected via phone interviews
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Abigail Wattley
Abigail has served as a Director in the Williams College Investment Office since 2010. From 2007 to 2008 Abigail worked in the Investment Office as an Investment Analyst. Prior to Williams, Abigail worked as a Senior Consulting Associate at Cambridge Associates, an investment consulting that provides investment advice to endowed non-profits. Abigail received a B.A. in Economics from Williams College in 2005 and a Master of Business Administration from the Harvard Business School in 2010.

POEC 31 Honors Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Political Economy 493.

POLITICAL SCIENCE


PSCI 10 All Politics is Local — Or is it?
The course will focus on the changes that have taken place in American politics over the past thirty-five years. Students will compare the similarities and differences between the political culture of the eighties and now. They will learn how two strong-willed leaders were able to get things done despite their philosophical differences. The relationship between President Ronald Reagan and Speaker of the House Tip O'Neill is one that has been analyzed by many, yet understood by few. They were able to reach compromises in order to keep the government functioning, while at the same time being able to maintain the support of their base. Tip O'Neill was often quoted as saying that "all politics is local," and he saw himself as the voice of the working class. Reagan however, was able to win over many blue-collar workers despite his support of policies which were considered harmful to the working class. Students may also discover that maybe not much has changed in the past thirty-five years. The deep divide in American politics today is no greater than it was thirty years ago, yet something has changed. The class will hear from political leaders of both parties, some who began their political careers when Reagan and O'Neill were leaving Washington, who will give their thoughts on how the political discourse in America can change for the better. Political leaders who will be speaking with students during winter study will include both former and current Mayors, legislative leaders, and members of the executive branch of State government. Their participation will offer meaningful insight into the world of politics and government service.
Method of evaluation: two 5-page reports and a 15-minute presentation to class
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 15
Method of selection: lottery
Meeting times: mainly morning/some may have to be in the afternoon based on guest schedule
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: John Barrett
John Barrett has been involved in politics and government for nearly 45 years beginning in 1972 when first elected to the Massachusetts Democratic State Committee from Berkshire County. He held elective office from 1975-2009; Northern Berkshire Vocational School District 1976-1984, Berkshire County Commissioner from 1977-1981, 26 years as Mayor of North Adams, MA 1984-2010.

PSCI 12 The East is Red? — Socialism in Asia (Same as ASST 12 and HIST 12)
See under ASST 12 for full description.

PSCI 13 The Art of War
This course will examine the meaning and uses of the classical Chinese text, The Art of War, by Sun Tzu. Students will consider Sun Tzu's insights both in the context of ancient Chinese philosophy and in terms of their contemporary relevance. The first half of the course will concentrate on placing Sun Tzu in historical and philosophical context; the second half will examine how The Art of War has been used in a variety of modern fields.
Method of evaluation: evaluation will include mandatory class attendance and participation, and a 10-page paper
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: seniors and juniors will have priority
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $75
Instructor: Sam Crane

PSCI 14 The CIA and the Politics of Intelligence (Same as LEAD 14)
This course will trace the evolution of CIA from an organization largely focused, in its early days, on coups and regime change under the Dulles brothers, to its present role in the war on terror and beyond. Students will consider how intelligence is and ought to be gathered, and the political issues that emerge from those activities. Some of the Agency's signal successes and failures will be examined, and some of its directors will be evaluated. The fluctuating relationship between CIA and the FBI will also be discussed. Stress will be placed on the personal experiences of those who have served in the Agency.
Method of evaluation: evaluation will include class attendance and participation, and a short, 3- to 4-page retrospective paper on the course and its content
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: preference to PSCI and LEAD students
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $50
Instructor: Donald Gregg
Donald Gregg served in CIA from 1951-82, worked in the White House from 1979-89, and was US Ambassador to South Korea from 1989-93. He is now chairman emeritus of The Korea Society. 1980-89, taught a second-year graduate level course at the Master of Science in Foreign Service Program of Georgetown University. He is now chairman of the Pacific Century Institute in Los Angeles.

PSCI 15 Heroic Enemies of World War II
What contributions to justice and peace do soldiers from among the Axis powers of World War II offer us today? Find out in this exploration into the inspirational lives of Japanese radiologist and atomic bomb survivor Takashi Nagai and German SS medic Gereon Goldmann. Together we will glean powerful lessons from their stories. After a month of lectures, movies, and student-led discussions, participants conclude the course with a book review and a 5-page policy paper applying their acquired knowledge to the contemporary social issue of their choice.
Method of evaluation: reading assignments, student-led discussions, class/online participation, and community service will culminate with two 5-page papers
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 35
Method of selection: seniority
Meeting times: Tues/Thurs 11am-2p (includes lunch meeting in small groups)
Cost per student: $50
Instructor: Fr. Michael Sheehan
In the span of three months, Father Michael F. Sheehan, FPO, went from a Spandex Ephs speedsuit to a wool Franciscan tunic. A PSCI/IR major at Williams (2003), he is now a Catholic priest of Boston and a friar of the Franciscans of Primitive Order in Roxbury.

PSCI 16 The Art of Persuasion: Aikido as both a Physical and Political Art
Aikido is a Japanese martial tradition that combines the samurai arts of sword and grappling with the philosophical desire to forge a path of harmony in the midst of chaos. As such, it addresses situations of conflict that manifest themselves physically, but also offers insight into how to redirect the energies —social, psychological, or political — that might otherwise become conflict in one or another aspect of our lives. As a martial art, Aikido teaches more than simply how to survive; it also teaches us how to physically express our noblest intentions — our compassion — in movements that protect not only ourselves but the attacker as well. Put another way, Aikido is persuasion made physical. Political oratory seeks to inspire one's dedicated allies, undercut one's committed opponents, and persuade the undecided in a context where, typically, use of force is not an option. Compelling and strategic oratory is therefore the ammunition and battle plan occupying the nonviolent side of Clausewitz's infamous equivalency ("war is a mere continuation of politics by other means"). The physical training (10-12 each morning in Currier Ballroom) will improve each student's strength, balance, posture, and flexibility. Everyone will also learn how to throw their friends across the room. About 25% of training time will be devoted to sword, staff, and dagger techniques. The academic component of the course will engage with how the physical training resonates with the tactical practices of successful political rhetoric and the strategic thinking that it helps implement. Students will read and perform influential speeches (by Lincoln, Churchill, Roosevelt, Gandhi, King, Reagan, Obama, etc.) and analyze the linguistic (framing), acoustic (cadence, rhythm), narrative, and cultural elements that made them successful. Students in small groups will then pick a policy position, and be responsible for crafting speech text, a social media campaign, and a YouTube video which supports that policy position. This work will be inspired by the great speeches they've analyzed and their growing understanding of aikido principles, and will be suitable for inclusion in our new President's Inauguration address on January 20th. By integrating physical and intellectual components, the course seeks to forge in each student a stronger and more coherent perspective on how the pursuit and embodiment of harmony can resolve the conflicts that some falsely contend are endemic and inevitable. Additional relevant experiences, such as meditation practice, outdoor misogi, and clips from The West Wing will be woven into the course as schedules permit. Students should understand that this course, because of its dual physical and intellectual components, asks them to invest more of their time in class than some other Winter Study offerings.
Method of evaluation: students will be evaluated on the quality of their participation in both physical and intellectual course components (class discussions, reconciliation journal, final project); students are encouraged to correspond with the instructor (rkent-at-williams.edu) before registration begins if they have questions
Prerequisites: same physician's approval on file as the school requires to participate on sports teams; students do not have to be especially athletic, and in Aikido women train as equals with men
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: if overenrolled, selection will be based on a questionnaire
Meeting times: mornings, afternoons; 10-12 for aikido in Currier Ballroom, 1-2:15 for academic class meetings, typically over lunch in Paresky
Cost per student: $175
Instructor: Robert Kent
Robert Kent '84 spent 3 years in Kyoto, Japan earning his first dan directly after majoring in both Philosophy and Religion at Williams. He trained for 21 years at Aikido West under Frank Doran Shihan, earning his 4th dan. He is currently President of Aiki Extensions, Inc. and Founder of The PeaceCamp Initiative, for which he won Ben and Jerry's 2008 Peace Pioneer Prize. He earned an MA in Philosophy at Claremont Graduate School in 1993, writing his thesis on the Ethics of Authenticity.

PSCI 17 American Films of the 1970's
This class will explore the diversity of Hollywood films produced during the 1970's and their relationship to the turbulent politics of the decade. Films to be studied and analyzed include The Godfather, Chinatown, Klute, Taxi Driver, The Deer Hunter, Apocalypse Now, Annie Hall, All the President's Men, and Breaking Away.
Method of evaluation: 10-page paper and weekly film critiques
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: preference will be given to Political Science and History majors
Cost per student: $50
Meeting times: afternoons
Instructor: James McAllister

PSCI 18 GUNS! The Politics and Law of the Second Amendment
There are few issues in American politics that generate quite so much passion and journalistic ink, yet has so little accompanying political science analysis as that of “politics and law of the 2nd Amendment.”
What does the 2nd Amendment to the U.S. Constitution establish? It states: A well-regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed. Two broad, rival positions were staked out early on the meaning of the 2nd Amendment. On the one hand, there is the “collectivist view,” well-articulated by political groups such as the Brady Campaign and Handgun Control, Inc., and by Garry Wills (a reading), that the Amendment establishes only a collective, statewide right, and not an individual right to keep and bear arms. There is the rival claim, let’s label it the “individualist view,” most vigorously represented by the National Rifle Association and Gun Owners of America, and well-articulated by John Ashcroft, George W. Bush's Attorney General (in a reading), that the Amendment establishes an individual right to gun ownership. The collectivist view has long been the “conventional view” of sociologists, political scientists, and most law faculty. A “revisionist and individualist view” that is more supportive of an individual’s right to possess and carry guns has grown in recent years, a view that has been fueled by a number of scholars in law, economics, and history. Some "middle-ground positions" have been awkwardly carved out recently in light of two important U.S. Supreme Court cases. The Court in the “Heller decision” appears to have settled the argument for once and for all. However, as we will discover, Heller advanced the argument, but it did not settle it. The argument was further extended by the Court in McDonald v. Chicago. Neither Heller nor McDonald settled the issue; each unleashed many more court cases and unfolding political action. We conclude the seminar by discussing developing consequences of Heller and McDonald both in the courts and in the states' legislatures.
Texts: Bound Xerox collection of articles
Class meetings: Three two-hour seminar meetings per week.
Method of evaluation: two one- to two-page paper per week, on average, six or seven papers in all, to be written on any of the ten asterisked dates; papers are to be single-spaced, one-inch margins on topics drawn from the readings and that I give out in advance of class; papers are to handed in to me at the beginning of the class period and will provide the framework for discussion
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 16
Method of selection: by major and by class
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $50
Instructor: Richard Winters

PSCI 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as POEC 21)
This course is a participant-observation experience in which students work full-time for a governmental or nongovernmental (including voluntary, activist, and grassroots) organization or for a political campaign. Students may find placements in government and nonprofit organizations in which their work involves significant involvement with public issues. Examples include: town government offices; state or federal administrative offices (e.g., environmental agencies, housing authorities); interest groups that lobby government (e.g., ACLU, NRA); nonprofit organizations such as service providers or think tanks (e.g., Habitat for Humanity, Cato Institute); and grassroots, activist or community development organizations (e.g., Greenpeace or neighborhood associations). The instructors will work with each student to arrange a placement; such arrangements must be made in advance of the Winter Term. Students should first make their own contracts with an institution or agency. The instructors and members of the Political Science Department are available to help students find placements, if necessary. Each student's fieldwork mentor shall send a confirmation letter to the instructor verifying the placement and describing the nature of the work to be performed by the instructor, and write a final paper summarizing and reflecting upon the experience. A group meeting of all students will occur after winter study to discuss the experience.
Method of evaluation: 90 hours of fieldwork; satisfactory evaluation from the institutional sponsor; 10-page final paper or equivalent; participation in final meeting
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 30
Method of selection: selection will be based on a resume and letter of interest; at the time of preregistration interested students should send a resume and letter of interest to Paula Consolini (pconsolini@williams.edu)
Cost per student: approximately $15 for readings, student covers transportation costs to and from internship site
Meeting times: some meetings will take place prior to Winter Study and at the end, as students are off-site in internships during the term
Instructor: Paula Consolini

PSCI 22 Learning Intervention for Teens (Same as JLST 22)
This course pairs energetic Williams students with adolescents involved in the Juvenile Court System of Berkshire County. Judges can assign teens to this alternative sentencing program — this is certified as an official Commonwealth of Massachusetts probation program — when their absence from or misbehavior in schools has been a central feature of their delinquency. The goal of this program is to give these teens the experience that learning can be fun, can center on topics that matter to them, and can be empowering. If the teens see school as something other than a form of incarceration, they will be motivated to stay there and to succeed. Each Williams student helps a teen investigate, develop a report on, and present their conclusions about a topic of the teen's choosing. In the past these have ranged from Michael Jordan v. Kobe Bryant: who is the best all-time shooting guard? to the Distinctions among Ghosts, Poltergeists, Shades and Spirits, to the causes of teen methamphetamine use, and more than once have featured those frogs that squirt blood from their eyes. The course ends with a presentation in which each adolescent/Williams student pair formally presents its work via PowerPoint to an audience that includes the Berkshire County Juvenile Court judges and probation officers, town and city chiefs of police, County District Attorney and assistant DAs, the teens' peers and families, Williams faculty and community members. Williams students gain experience serving in an official capacity, learn to teach and motivate challenging teens, and gain insight into the causes of and solutions to the incidence of juvenile crime and underachievement. Williams students are expected to read relevant training materials, meet with their teens three times a week, give a final presentation, and keep a weekly journal detailing their meetings.
In order to enroll in the course, all students must write a paragraph explaining why they want to take the course. Students should email their paragraphs to January '17 student coordinator Audrey Thomas aat1@williams.edu and cc: cshanks@williams.edu
Method of evaluation: a final 5-minute presentation given with their teen, and a reflection paper on the course
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: students will be selected based on a paragraph of interest
Cost per student: $0
Meeting times: afternoons
Instructors: Cheryl Shanks and Michael Wynn
Mike Wynn is the Chief of the Pittsfield Police Department and graduated from Williams in 1993.

PSCI 25 Jerusalem: One City, Two Cultures, Three Faiths, Many Narratives (Same as HIST 25 and REL 25)
See under REL 25 for full description.

PSCI 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 493-494.

PSCI 32 Individual Project

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 495 or 496.

PSYCHOLOGY


PSYC 11 Designing your Life and Career After Williams
This course will help students determine which directions they would like to take in their lives and careers. We will take stock of your interests, talents, strengths and challenges, and figure out which careers play to your strengths. We will discuss the importance of understanding your own values (e.g., security, meaning in your work, money, fame, and freedom in your schedule) and how that fits with the choices ahead of you. We will identify how careers differ in meeting these needs and help you to find a healthy balance. The class will try to help you identify which activities come so naturally to you, perhaps without you even fully realizing it, that they may point to a career path. We will talk about your life story up until now, and how that has shaped what you think you should do with your life. We will help you to imagine complete freedom in rewriting your life story and see what emerges. We will discuss how workplace and professional cultures differ and help you to figure out which cultures are good fits. We will look some at practical resources that are available to you to pursue dreams, once you have chosen an initial path. Students will consider how important choosing a fitting romantic partner is, and how destructive it can be to ignore your instincts. We will look at how choosing a great partner and developing a rewarding career can be synergistic. The course will culminate by writing and presenting life plans that are courageous and authentic, and that excite you. Articles, books, lectures, and films will be used to help you discover and develop your plan. This course will also reference and make use of material from a formative class the instructor had with famed psychologist Elliot Aronson, PhD, when he was a senior at Williams.
Method of evaluation: 5-page paper describing your life and career plan, and formal presentation to the class of your plan
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 15
Method of selection: juniors and seniors will be given first priority
Meeting times: three mornings per week for two hours each (likely Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday or Thursday)
Cost per student: $20
Instructor: Ben Johnson
Dr. Johnson is a clinical psychologist and founder and director of RICBT, a large cognitive-behavioral therapy and coaching practice in Rhode Island. He is board-certified in Cognitive and Behavioral Psychology and President of the Rhode Island Psychological Association. In his clinical practice, he helps people understand their life stories and find career directions that feel authentic and inspiring. Dr. Johnson received his B.A. from Williams College and his Ph.D. from Yale University.

PSYC 12 Alcohol 101: Examining and Navigating the College Drinking Scene
Seventy-two percent of college students report that they used alcohol at least once within the past 30 days. Where is the line between fun and danger? This course will examine the realities of the role of alcohol in the social lives of college students. Students will engage in active discussions of readings, videos, and myths vs. facts, as well as personal observations and opinions. Class structure will involve 3-hour classes that meet twice weekly. Participants will learn scientific facts about alcohol, including how it gets metabolized in the body differently in men and women, and how to recognize and respond to the signs of alcohol poisoning. Films will include evocative footage and interviews, such as "College Binge Drinking and Sober Reflections." We will hear from an expert in trauma and sexual assault and explore the significant role of alcohol in sexual assault on college campuses. We will discuss alcohol-related medical emergencies and problem-solve strategies to stay safe when choosing to use alcohol. Statistical data from colleges here in the Northeast will be reviewed, including survey results from the Core Institute and the Harvard School of Public Health Alcohol study. Method of Evaluation will be in-class participation and the final presentation of a project aimed at educating peers.
Method of evaluation: class participation, short (5-page) paper, and final project
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 15
Method of selection: permission of instructor
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $25
Instructor: Kathy Foley Niemeyer
Kathy Foley Niemeyer holds an M.A. in Counseling Psychology from Boston College and is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor with current private practices in Williamstown and Pittsfield. She has worked in the Fitchburg State and Stonehill College Counseling Centers and was also the AOD Prevention Program Coordinator at Stonehill. She taught the semester-long Alcohol and Other Drugs course at Boston College and has been a regular guest lecturer at Williams.

PSYC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as CHEM 14 and SPEC 14)
See under CHEM 14 for full description.

PSYC 15 Ephquilts: an Intro to Traditional Quiltmaking
This studio course will lead the student through various piecing, applique̩ and quilting styles and techniques, with some non-traditional methods included. Samples will be made of techniques learned, culminating in the completion of a sizeable project of the student's choosing (wall quilt or lap-size quilt). There will be an exhibit of all work (ephquilts), at the end of winter study. "Woven" into the classes will be discussions of the history of quilting, the controversy of "art" quilts vs. "traditional" quilts, machine vs. hand-quilting and the growing quilting market. Reading list: Pieces of the Past by Nancy J. Martin; Stitching Memories: African-American Story Quilts by Eva Ungar Grudin; Sunshine and Shadow: The Amish and Their Quilts by Phyllis Haders; A People and Their Quilts by John Rice Irwin; Treasury of American Quilts by Cyril Nelson and Carter Houck; The Quilt: New Directions for an American Tradition, Nancy Roe, Editor. Requirements: attendance of all classes (including field trip), a love of fabric, design and color, an enthusiasm for handwork, participation in exhibit. Extensive time will be spent outside of class working on assigned projects.
Method of evaluation: two completed projects, participation in exhibit
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 15
Method of selection: preference given to seniors, juniors
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $250
Instructor: Debra Rogers-Gillig
Debra Rogers-Gillig, one of the top quilters in New England, has been quilting for 35 years, and teaching classes and coordinating shows and exhibits for 30 years. She has received numerous prizes and awards from quilt shows in New York and New England and been published in quilt magazines.

PSYC 16 Psychology of Eating
Research suggests that we make an average of over 200 food-related choices each day — including what, when, where, with whom, and, importantly, how much to eat and drink. In this course, we will consider how behavioral science can inform our understanding of why we eat the things we do and how our food-related decisions can be powerfully influenced by an overwhelming number of factors — only one of which is hunger. Among the questions we’ll consider: How does everything from the utensils you use and the plate a meal is served on influence what and how much you consume? Can we make changes to our eating environments in ways that will encourage us to make healthier choices? What factors influence our perception of our gustatory experience, shaping our expectations and ultimate enjoyment of the foods we eat? Classes will be structured around discussing and critiquing behavioral science that speaks to each of these core questions. Along the way, we’ll: (a) watch the latest Blockbuster movie (over popcorn, of course), (b) make our own ice cream sundaes, and (c) take a trip to the supermarket, the dining hall, and a high-quality restaurant to explore these eating environments firsthand and the ways in which behavioral science has informed the way they structure food-related decisions.
Method of evaluation: course participation and a 10-page final paper
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: random
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Jeremy Cone

PSYC 18 Call In Walk In Training for Peer Health (Same as SPEC 18)
See under SPEC 18 for full description.

PSYC 21 Psychology Internships
Would you like to explore applications of psychology in the "real world?" This course gives students an opportunity to work full-time during Winter Study in a mental health, business, education, law or other setting in which psychological theories and methods are applied to solve problems. Students are responsible for locating their own potential internships whether in the local area, their hometowns, or elsewhere, and are welcome to contact the course instructor for suggestions on how to do this. In any case, all students considering this course must consult with the instructor about the suitability of the internship being considered before the Winter Study registration period. Please prepare a brief description of the proposed placement, noting its relevance to psychology, and the name and contact information of the agency supervisor. Before Thanksgiving break, the student will provide a letter from the agency supervisor which describes the agency, and the student's role and responsibilities during Winter Study. Enrolled students will meet the instructor before Winter Study to discuss matters relating to ethics and their goals for the course, and after Winter Study to discuss their experiences and reflections.
Method of evaluation: evaluation will be based on a 10-page minimum final paper summarizing the student's experiences and reflections, a journal kept throughout the experience, and the supervisor's evaluation
Prerequisites: approval by Betty Zimmerberg is required
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: Psychology majors will be given preference
Meeting times: by appointment
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Betty Zimmerberg

PSYC 22 Introduction to Research in Psychology
This course provides a research opportunity for students who want to understand how psychologists ask compelling questions and find answers about behavior. Several faculty members, whose subfields include behavioral neuroscience, cognitive psychology, social psychology, clinical psychology, developmental psychology, and the psychology of education, will have student projects available. Since projects involve faculty research, interested students must consult with members of the Psychology Department before electing this course.
Method of evaluation: evaluation will be based on the quality of research participation, student's lab journal, and either an oral presentation or a written 10-page report of the research project
Prerequisites: permission of instructor
Enrollment limit: limited to space available in faculty research labs
Method of selection: selection will be based on evaluation of departmental application and number of faculty available as mentors
Meeting times: determined by faculty
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Noah Sandstrom

PSYC 25 Eye Care and Culture in Nicaragua (Same as PHIL 25)
See under PHIL 25 for full description.

PSYC 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Psychology 493-494.
Instructor: Laurie Heatherington

PUBLIC HEALTH


PHLH 12 Ethics in Public Health (Same as PHIL 12)
See under PHIL 12 for full description.

PHLH 13 Ethics in Clinical Medicine
This course will use a discussion format and case-based method to evaluate the ethical dilemmas involved in the practice of clinical medicine. Areas to be covered will include informed consent for elective and emergency procedures, parental consent, special situations, end-of-life decision-making, organ transplantation, conflict of interest, and scientific integrity.
Method of evaluation: final project involving a 10-page paper
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: preference to pre-med students
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $40
Instructor: Christopher Baker

PHLH 14 Epidemiology, Public Health, and Leadership in the Health Professions (Same as SOC 14)
See under ANSO 14 for full description.

PHLH 15 The Human Side of Medicine and Medical Practice
In today's health care atmosphere of physician accountability, advanced medical technology, and evidence-based diagnosis, the "human side" of medicine is often minimized or even disregarded. Medical schools debate how or whether to emphasize this more interpersonal aspect of medicine within their curriculums. Increasingly research shows that the combination of BOTH perspectives — patient centered understanding and technical proficiency — leads to better diagnosis and treatment; improved patient compliance and satisfaction; and to increased physician professional satisfaction. These positive outcomes become a powerful case for future health care professionals being exposed to the philosophy, understanding and concrete tools of the more human side of medical practice.
Texts:
Lisa Sanders, Every Patient Tells A Story
Paul Kalanithi, When Breath Becomes Air
Reading packet to be provided by instructor
Content may include:
Definition of a "patient's story"
Communication, relationships and interpersonal skills within the medical interview
Skills of self-reflection and self-care for the doctor, and why these are important for good medical practice
How to talk to patients and the important role/skills of clinical empathy
Complicated moments during an interview
"Hot" topics within the profession; ethics and professionalism; recent public commentary about the medical profession; electronic records; technology, relationship and the "i-patient"
Method of evaluation: class discussion and active student participation; practice interviewing and problem solving role plays; group presentations; 2 reaction papers (2- to 3-pages each); final project (approval required) or paper (5- to 6-pages); minimum 10-pages written work required
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 14
Method of selection: priority to pre-med juniors and seniors, Public Health concentrators and those with demonstrated interest in healthcare
Meeting times: Tues, Wed, Thurs, 10:00am-noon
Cost per student: $50
Instructor: Sandra Goodbody, MSW
The instructor maintained a long time psychotherapy practice in Washington DC, and currently serves on the clinical faculty at The George Washington University School of Medicine. She has held positions at The Catholic University School of Social Work and the Institute of Medicine.

PHLH 16 Addiction Studies and Diagnostics (Same as SPEC 16)
The goal of "Addiction Studies and Diagnostics" is to help students develop an effective understanding of the definition, impact, and treatment of addiction. Students will be familiarized with the DSM-5, the text used to diagnose mental illness in the US. Speakers will tell their stories in their journey from addiction to recovery. Students will be expected to accurately diagnose the speakers according to the criteria in the DSM-5. This course will benefit people intending to work in business, the medical arts, or be a member of a family or a friend.
Method of evaluation: oral presentation, essays, and attendance
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 14
Method of selection: by lecturer's permission
Meeting times: TBD
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Rick Berger

PHLH 23 Gaudino Fellowship: Immersive Engagement and Reflection
The Gaudino Fund is offering Gaudino Fellowships for a group of 2 to 4 students during Winter Study 2017, based upon a proposed domestic or foreign collaborative project. Student teams should organize their proposed projects around two main components: 1) direct encounter with otherness, and 2) self-reflection
Projects will be evaluated on whether they subject the students to "uncomfortable learning", i.e. having an experience that challenges and perhaps alters one's view of what it is to live a good life and the group's commitment to incorporate separate home stays for each fellow as part of their project, either joint or separate work/engagement internships, and a structure to facilitate collaborative action and learning. The team selected will be guided and overseen by the Gaudino Scholar who will help assure successful arrangements and will conduct appropriate preparatory discussions and follow-up sessions to optimize and help students articulate lessons learned from the overall experience. The intent of the program is to open the student to an understanding (of both the familiar and unfamiliar), and to a development of empathy, that could not be achieved without the fellowship experience.
N.B. Although this course is housed in PHLH, projects are not limited to public health.
Each prospective team needs to meet with the Gaudino Scholar as early as possible, but no later than September, and submit their group application by October 15th. Application guidelines can be found at http://gaudino.williams.edu/gaudino-fellowship/.
Each student is expected to write a short (3-4 page) self-reflection before leaving for the WSP, keep a journal of their experience, as well as write an 8- to 10-page paper by the end of the Winter Study period reflecting on the WSP experiences and what has changed in the student's perceptions and beliefs from the opening essay. They will also meet the other members of the team on a weekly basis during Winter Study and regularly update the Gaudino Scholar by email and/or Skype calls. The team that receives the Gaudino Fellowship will give a brief presentation to the Board about their experience at the Board's spring meeting in April.
The team whose project is approved will receive the Gaudino Fellow designation. In addition, students on Financial Aid will receive Gaudino funding from a minimum of 50% to a maximum of 90% of the budget for the project up to $2,500, as determined by the Financial Aid office. No additional funding for students' projects will be provided by the College.
Method of evaluation: 10-page paper
Prerequisites: none; not open to first-year students
Enrollment limit: none
Method of selection: selection is made on basis of proposal
Meeting times: students are away
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Lois Banta

RELIGION


REL 11 God in a Suffering World (Same as COMP 11)
See under COMP 11 for full description.

REL 12 Zen Buddhism Intensive
This course is designed to provide students with an intensive experience in the study and practice of Zen Buddhism. The explosive growth in communication technology is one of many factors that have people searching for ways to stay grounded and to live lives of purpose. This course will teach students how to find and keep their center ground as they go through the everyday activities of living. They will learn how to breathe properly, something neglected in Western cultures for the most part but well known in the East. The practice of abdominal breathing, in turn, makes it easier to get one’s attention into the area of the abdomen known as the tanden (J.) or tan t’ien (C.). Proficiency in doing this provides the centering or grounding that many people wish for without knowing clearly how to achieve it. Students will also encounter the fact that deep spiritual truth cannot be accessed through the intellect. The writings studied and the meditation methods practiced are designed to help students make contact with the foundation of life itself, something greatly facilitated by shifting one’s attention or consciousness to the tanden. As Matija B.,’15, said in his discussion prompt for the Buddhist Meditation and Discussion Group, “It is necessary to study and it is necessary to practice. There is no way around it.” This course is based on the understanding he described so well.
Ideally, the class will have at least 4 and no more than 15 attendees. We shall meet each day from Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to noon. After morning tea will come chanting practice followed by at least 2 twenty minute periods of zazen (meditation). Both koan study and sutra study will take place. Three koans a week will be examined carefully and discussed. Zen Comments on the Mumonkan by Zenkei Shibayama will be the main text. The students will be asked to write a paragraph or two expressing their sense of the koan. Sutra study will focus on The Diamond Sutra, one of the classic texts favored by the zen school. Periods of zazen will take place during and after the study sections. Other auxiliary readings will provide exposure to such influential teachers as D.T. Suzuki, Yasutani Roshi, and Red Pine. The students will keep a journal in which they will document their experiences and reflections as they study and practice shifting the center of consciousness to the tanden. This journal will be reviewed weekly by the instructor and comments on it will be made. At the end of the month they will write a one to two-page paper expressing their final thoughts on their experience.
The climax of this course will be a two-day retreat in the style of a traditional Japanese sesshin. At some suitable location, the students will follow a sesshin schedule from 5:00 am to 9:00 pm. The retreat will be a silent one and will feature listening to an actual talk given on such a retreat by my teacher, Joshu Sasaki, Roshi. Students will be able to provide feedback and suggest program implementations as the course proceeds.
Method of evaluation: two 1- to 2- page short papers, journal evaluation, and final koan answer
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 16
Method of selection: by submitting a paragraph on their motivation for taking the course
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $144
Instructor: James Gordon
Williams,'62; retired physician; 47 years of Zen practice,15 as a monk.

REL 13 Hangin' With Hakuin: A Zen Guide
This course will feature a close look at some of the writings of Hakuin Ekaku, the zen monk from whom all current practitioners of Rinzai zen in Japan are descended. The primary text will be The Essential Teachings of Zen Master Hakuin: A translation of the Sokko-roku Kaian-fusetsu,
translated by Norman Waddell.
Students taking this course will also be doing zen practice, sitting zazen each day and wrestling with the koans so prominent in Hakuin's writings. The students will keep a journal in which they will document their experiences and reflections as they practice zazen and contemplate the teachings of Hakuin.
A major focus will be looking at how zen training can impact one's efforts to live a satisfying life as a developed human being in the 21st century.
The class will meet every day from Monday through Friday from 1pm to 3pm.There will be a reading assignment for each class, and occasional short papers on various topics and/or koans will
be required.
Method of evaluation: weekly journal evaluation, two or three 2-page papers, and a final “exam” on a koan
Prerequisites: 2016 WSP course in Zen Buddhism, or a course in Buddhism at a college level
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: by submitting a paragraph on their motivation for taking the course
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $25
Instructor: James Gordon
Williams,'62; retired physician; 47 years of Zen practice,15 as a monk.

REL 14 Yoga at the Intersection of Practice and Theory
Yoga offers experiential access to ever deepening levels and layers of human experience, from outer actions to physical poses, breath, emotions, thoughts and more. In this course we learn practices that increase our mindful awareness of increasingly subtle, yet gradually more palpable, dimensions of life. Without a theoretical framework, however, those experiences are unlikely to land. We are unable to fully identify and register what we are sensing. A theoretical basis makes us able to explain and sustain our practices with greater self-reliance. So we will study both classic, primary as well as both ancient and contemporary secondary texts for their applicable theoretical perspectives. In addition to class meetings you are offered the tools and invited on a daily basis to practice meditation, yoga asana, and contemplation of philosophical texts. In the process you gain a foothold for being present in your own life. This then is the basis upon which each of us can be of service to others and make our offerings in the world. A day-long field trip to Kripalu Center is required.
Method of evaluation:
attendance at all class sessions, required day-long field trip, practice log and reflection, short final paper (5-page), and final project or performance
Prerequisites: email stating the nature of your interest in the course sent to njudson@williams.edu
Enrollment limit: 16
Method of selection: email explaining the nature of your interest in the course to njudson@williams.edu
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $290
Instructor: Natasha Judson
Natasha Judson M.Ed. has been practicing Hatha Yoga for over 25 years, and teaching full time since 2003. Currently she directs and teaches at Tasha Yoga, her studio in Williamstown, MA where her classes combine breath-based movement, mindful alignment within poses, and intelligent sequencing to support the optimal unfolding of each individual. Her main teachers are Patricia Walden, Senior Iyengar Yoga teacher and Dr. Paul Muller Ortega, meditation teacher and scholar. She has led yoga practices at teen and young adult meditation retreats at a Buddhist retreat center for over 15 years. Originally taught the stages of the path by Tibetan Buddhist lamas, she has a long term interest in the interactions and mutual influences of Buddhist and Vedic yogic paths.

REL 24 Touring Black Religion in the ‘New’ South (Same as AFR 24 and ENVI 24)
See under AFR 24 for full description.

REL 25 Jerusalem: One City, Two Cultures, Three Faiths, Many Narratives (Same as HIST 25 and PSCI 25)
We begin with about 8 sessions of classroom instruction and discussion during the first two weeks of WS. Students will read Karen Armstrong's JERUSALEM, and Amos Oz’s TALES OF LOVE AND DARKNESS. We begin by exposing the students to history, religion, and politics, from the Jebusites to the Israelites to the Romans to the Mamaluks to the Crusaders to the Ottomans; the narrative is one both of empire, and citizenship in a changing landscape.
Method of evaluation: a final 10-page reflection paper is required
Prerequisites: good health (there is a LOT of walking), openheartedness and open-mindedness; not open to first-year students
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: students will be required to interview with the instructor
Cost per student: $3700
Instructor: Bob Scherr

REL 30 Senior Projects
An advanced course for Senior Religion majors (who are not writing theses) to further develop their senior seminar paper into a polished 25-page research paper (which will also be the focus of a brown-bag presentation during the Spring semester). The course will help the students with general research methods, workshopping, paper writing, and presentation practice.
Instructor: Jason Josephson

ROMANCE LANGUAGES


FRENCH
RLFR S.P. Sustaining Program for French 101-102
Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study period. There are five 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting times: mornings; 9-9:50 am
Instructor: TBA (Teaching Associates)
RLFR 11 Audible Imagination: Exploring Sound Across the Arts (Same as ARTS 11)
See under ARTS 11 for full description.

RLFR 12 Introduction to Translation
A practical introduction to translation designed for non-native speakers of French with a level equivalent to French 205 or above. After a brief theoretical introduction in week one, class time in weeks two and three is dedicated to reviewing and correcting your translations (English to French and French to English). You will work from a range of literary, commercial, journalistic texts, culminating with a French-to-English translation project of your choice in week four.
Method of evaluation: five 1-page assignments and final 5-page project
Prerequisites: French 205 or equivalent
Enrollment limit: 15
Method of selection: preference given to French majors
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $50
Instructor: Annelle Curulla

RLFR 13 Creative Portraiture in the Darkroom (Same as ARTS 13)
See under ARTS 13 for full description.

RLFR 14 Formidable French Film: New Cinema from France and the Francophone World (Same as COMP 14)
In English, formidable can mean impressive, challenging, or alarming. In French, formidable signifies something marvelous, amazing, and extraordinary. In this course, we will explore recent films from France and the French-speaking world that are formidable in every sense of the word. From the cafés of Paris and beaches of Brittany, to the streets of Belgium, deserts of Morocco, and snows of Québec, Francophone cinema has produced a wide variety of both culturally and politically formidable films during the past twenty years, that focus on such diverse issues as globalization and immigration, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, faith and family, climate and the environment, terrorism and violence, colonialism and war. Whether you’re a student of French language and Francophone cultures or simply interested in French-speaking cinema, you are welcome to explore and debate recent French film in this seminar: all films are in French with English subtitles, and discussions will be in English. Readings to include texts (in English) on French film history and criticism. Films to include works by Assayas, Arcard, Audiard, Berliner, Berri, Bouchareb, Cantet, Carion, the Dardenne(s), Delpy, Denis, Dercourt, Ducastel, Émond, Falardeau, Jacquot, Jaoui, Jeunet, Lifshitz, Lioret, Martineau, Ozon, Pilon, Provost, Roby, Tavernier, Téchiné, Vallée, Villeneuve.
Method of evaluation: active class participation and 10-page paper in English
Prerequisites: none; films in French with English subtitles; discussions in English
Enrollment limit: 12
Method of selection: if overenrolled, preference given to majors in French and Comparative Literature
Meeting times: 2-3 mornings per week
Cost per student: $45
Instructor: Brian Martin

RLFR 15 Grand Hotel in Film and Fiction (Same as COMP 12 and GERM 12)
See under GERM 12 for full description.
RLFR 30 Honors Essay
To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLFR 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for French 493-494.

ITALIAN
RLIT S.P. Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102
Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting times: mornings; 9-9:50 am
Instructor: Nicastro

SPANISH
RLSP S.P. Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102
Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting times: mornings; 9-9:50 am
Instructor: TBA (Teaching Associates)

RLSP 15 The Spanish Civil War in English (Same as COMP 15 and HIST 15)
This course will offer an intensive introduction to the fascinating subject of the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), often described as "the dress rehearsal for World War II". We will explore the complex political situation in late 1930s Spain as seen by Spaniards, and by the international community. A special focus will be the American and British participation in the war, and the stories of individuals who volunteered to go to Spain as reporters (i.e. Hemingway), medical aid workers, and soldiers (including a Williams student). Materials will include historical studies, literary works, newspaper articles, personal letters, films, and songs. Each student will research a particular aspect of the war, and will give a final presentation based on their independent work. This is the first time in many years that such a course will be offered in English, making the subject available to non-Spanish speaking students. Spanish speakers are also welcome, and may choose to do some of their research in Spanish, but daily class work, discussions, and all final presentations will be conducted in English.
Method of evaluation: final project and presentation
Prerequisites: a literature and/or European history class at Williams
Enrollment limit: 18
Method of selection: relevance of course to their major, or potential major
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $33
Instructor: Soledad Fox
RLSP 30 Honors Essay
To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLSP 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Spanish 493-494.

RUSSIAN


RUSS S.P. Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102
Required of all students enrolled in Russian 101-102. Three meetings per week, 50 minutes per session. Practice in speaking and comprehension based on material already covered as well as some new vocabulary and constructions. Designed to maintain and enhance what was acquired during fall semester, using new approaches in a relaxed atmosphere. No homework.
RUSS 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as SPEC 25)
Williams has a unique program in the Republic of Georgia, which offers students the opportunity to engage in three-week-long internships in any field. Our students have worked in the Georgian Parliament, helped in humanitarian relief organizations like Save the Children, interned in journalism at The Georgian Times, taught unemployed women computer skills at The Rustavi Project, documented wildlife, studied with a Georgian photographer, done rounds at the Institute of Cardiology, and learned about transitional economies at the Georgian National Bank. In addition to working in their chosen fields, students experience Georgian culture through museum visits, concerts, lectures, meetings with Georgian students, and excursions. Visit the sacred eleventh-century Cathedral of Sveti-tskhoveli and the twentieth-century Stalin Museum, take the ancient Georgian Military Highway to ski in the Caucasus Range, see the birthplace of the wine grape in Kakheti and the region where Jason sought the Golden Fleece. Participants are housed in pairs with English-speaking families in Tbilisi, Georgia's capital city. At the end of the course students will write a 10-page paper assessing their internship experience.
Method of evaluation: 10-page paper
Prerequisites: none; not open to first-year students
Enrollment limit: 8
Method of selection: written statements of interest
Cost per student: $2500
Instructor: Baktygul Aliev

Regular attendance and active participation required to earn a "Pass." Open to all.
Meeting times: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.
Instructor: TBA

RUSS 30 Honors Project
May be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RUSS 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Russian 493-494.

THEATRE


THEA 13 Anton Chekhov's Uncle Vanya
This Winter Study course will center on the Theatre Department's production of Chekhov's drama Uncle Vanya, planned as a site-specific performance at a campus location yet to be determined. The production will be cast in the fall semester, rehearse during Winter Study and the first few weeks of the Spring Semester, and perform in mid-February. Students wishing to enroll in the Winter Study may do so as actors if they have been cast in the production through the audition process, or in technical and design positions with permission of the instructor. (Students may also participate in any of these various functions, including acting, if they do not choose to enroll in the Winter Study course.) In addition to the normal activities associated with rehearsal and production research, students in the Winter Study course will produce a written paper or design portfolio in the last week of January documenting their work to date on the project. As always, auditions will be open to all members of the community, with no experience required.
Method of evaluation: 10-page paper, or dramaturgical or design portfolio accompanied by 2- to 3-page paper
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 20
Method of selection: auditions, instructor permission
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Robert Baker-White

THEA 14 Classic American and European Musical Theatre (Same as MUS 14)
See under MUS 14 for full description.

THEA 15 Suzuki Method of Actor Training (Same as DANC 15)
The Suzuki Method of Actor Training: This course offers an intense, three-week period of practice in the Suzuki Method of Actor Training, targeting actors, dancers, and anyone interested in using their body, voice and imagination in time and space in a more effective way for their audience. Created by celebrated Japanese director Tadashi Suzuki, the Suzuki Method (not to be confused with the violin method for children) expands the performer’s technical and creative use of breath, balance and energy through a series of dynamic physical and vocal disciplines. Devised through a fusion of traditional techniques focused on the body’s core, the training strives to deepen concentration and imaginative commitment to each moment on stage. The course will also feature related readings on the theory and philosophy behind the development and proliferation of the method as articulated in Professor Steele’s recent translation of Suzuki’s writings Culture is the Body (TCG 2015) as well as screenings of works by SCOT (the Suzuki Method of Toga) and other related material.
Method of evaluation: presentation
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 30
Method of selection: physical training history
Meeting times: mornings, M-Sa 10am-noon
Cost per student: $50
Instructor: Kameron Steele

THEA 16 Acting Out: Translation, Migration, and Transformation in Asian Theatres (Same as CHIN 16)
See under CHIN 16 for full description.

THEA 17 Writing in the Margins: Playwriting as Plagiarism (Same as AFR 17 and COMP 17 and LATS 17 and WGSS 17)
“There are no new ideas waiting in the wings to save us…only old and forgotten ones.” — Audre Lorde
There is no such thing as an original play. So says playwright Chuck Mee. Someone else, certainly, said it before him. This course proceeds from an understanding that writing and performance are, and have always been, practices of plagiarism. What does it mean to possess an idea? What, conversely, might it mean to be possessed? In this Winter Study, pick a story that swallows you up, and write a short play inspired by that source material. Taking José Muñoz’ notion of “disidentification” as a framework, we will read queer playwrights and writers of color who have radically regurgitated canonical texts: Branden Jacobs-Jenkins’ AN OCTOROON; Cherrie Moraga’s THE HUNGRY WOMAN: A MEXICAN MEDEA. What does it look like to write in the margins — to productively disrespect a text? We will engage in the nitty-gritty craft of playwriting — event, tactic, arc, intention — while asking ourselves how live performance troubles the supremacy of private property in the modern era. The class will culminate in a public presentation of student works.
NOTE: This course is open to experienced writers and theater artists as well as to students who have never “darkened the doorway” of a theater. In an effort to understand “writing” as broadly as possible, students from various cultural landscapes and disciplines — musicians, dancers, filmmakers, visual artists, historians, philosophers, scientists, etc. — are encouraged to help us scribble beyond the margin of the page and into empty space.
Method of evaluation: written performance piece (10-page minimum), participation in final presentation, and critical contributions to class discussions
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 15
Method of selection: if the course is over enrolled, students will be screened through a letter of interest
Meeting times: afternoons
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Shayok Misha Chowdhury
Shayok Misha Chowdhury is a queer Bengali theater director, playwright, and poet based in New York City. He holds an MFA in Directing from Columbia University and is co-founder of the performance collaborative, THE LONELY PAINTER PROJECT.

THEA 32 Senior Honors Thesis
See description of Degree with Honors in Theatre.

WOMEN’S, GENDER AND SEXUALITY STUDIES


WGSS 11 Feminist Perspectives on Latinas in Popular Media (Same as AMST 11 and LATS 11)
See under LATS 11 for full description.

WGSS 12 Death, Sex, and Money in Brazil (Same as LATS 12)
This seminar uses contemporary Brazilian cinema and social science scholarship to investigate the political economy of gender and sexuality in Brazil, principally in Rio de Janeiro. Key topics will include: the economics of motherhood, domestic labor, and sexual violence in favelas; masculinity and gang life; policing and police violence; and sexual tourism. We have weekly film screenings focusing on contemporary Brazilian cinema immediately followed by discussion as well as seminars on the day following our screenings to analyze closely paired scholarly readings. We will also follow current political and economic events and news coming out of Brazil from week to week. There MAY also be a field trip to Northampton to attend the 5 Colleges Luso-Brazilian consortium lecture series or other relevant events.
Method of evaluation: evaluation is based on participation and a 10-page paper about an additional pairing of cinema/reading(s) chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor; a list of suggested films and readings will be provided
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: if overenrolled, students will be asked to submit a brief statement of interest
Meeting times: Mondays 1:00-4:00 pm (screening and discussion) and Tuesdays 10:00 am-1:00 pm (seminar)
Cost per student: $20
Instructor: Gregory Mitchell

WGSS 17 Writing in the Margins: Playwriting as Plagiarism (Same as AFR 17 and COMP 17 and LATS 17 and THEA 17)
See under THEA 17 for full description.

WGSS 31 Honors Project

See description of Degree with Honors in Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies.

SPECIALS


SPEC 12 Career Exploration and Developing a Career Narrative
This course is designed to help students learn how to navigate the questions of “Who am I?”, "What do I want to do?" and "How do I get there?" from an empowered place. Students will learn about the career exploration process and how to determine their interests, skills, and values. Additionally, students will explore their career narrative and learn how to effectively tell their authentic story in a resume, cover letter, interview, graduate school essay, and networking situations. This course will cover both the emotional and practical pieces of career exploration.
Outside of the classroom, students will be required to complete informational interviews with professionals working in fields they may be interested in. Other assignments may include readings, personal reflection papers, building a social media presence, completing assessments, and creating job search documents.
Method of evaluation: Career Portfolio which includes a resume, cover letter or graduate school essay, networking document, and several reflection papers; students will also complete an in class presentation
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 25
Method of selection: preference given to seniors
Meeting times: afternoons, would ideally meet for 3 classes a week for 2 hours each class
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Neal Sardana
Neal Sardana is currently a Fellow for Psychological Counseling Services. He has a background in mental health and career counseling.

SPEC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as CHEM 14 and PSYC 14)
See under CHEM 14 for full description.

SPEC 15 Pilates: Physiology and Wellness (Same as MATH 15)
See under MATH 15 for full description.

SPEC 16 Addiction Studies and Diagnostics (Same as PHLH 16)
See under PHLH 16 for full description.

SPEC 18 Call In Walk In Training for Peer Health (Same as PSYC 18)
This course is the full training for students who would like to cover Call In Walk In shifts in the Peer Health Office (Paresky 212). Students should either already be a member of Peer Health, or have an interest in joining Peer Health, as those students will get priority acceptance. Topics that we will cover include alcohol and other drug use; sex, STIs and contraception; rape, sexual assault and Title IX compliance; mental health; stress and sleep; healthy and unhealthy relationships, etc. Students will meet various on- and off-campus resources for referral. Outside of class work will include readings, video viewings, information gathering, and a possible field trip to local agencies.
Method of evaluation: students will create and submit (implementation not necessary) a Health Promotion event or campaign of their choosing, based on the topics covered in the training, or related subjects; event/campaign should be geared toward the Williams student population and will include a rationale, feasibility plan, budget, target audience and intended goals of the program
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 24
Method of selection: current active members of Peer Health will be chosen first; other students will be enrolled based on stated commitment to Peer Health; beyond that, class is open to any student interested in promoting the health and wellness of the student body and/or providing a helping role on campus (RASAN, SAPA, MHC, JA, Big Ephs/Little Ephs, athletic captainship, etc.)
Meeting times: mornings
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Laini Sporbert
Laini is a Health Educator at Williams College, focusing on substance abuse education and counseling, mental health awareness, sexuality education, and sleep. She has been at the college since 1997, and been the Peer Health Staff Advisor since 2006. She has an M.Ed. in Counseling Psychology with a specialty in addictions.

SPEC 19 Medical Apprenticeship
Firsthand experience is a critical component of the decision to enter the health professions. Through this apprenticeship, students can clarify their understanding of the rewards and challenges that accompany the practice of all types of medicine. Apprenticeships are arranged in two distinct ways: some students live on campus and are matched with a local practitioner, while others make independent arrangements to shadow a distant professional. The expectation is that each student will observe some aspect of medicine for the better part of the day, five days per week. In recent years, students have shadowed physicians, veterinarians, dentists, nurses, and public health experts.
Method of evaluation: a 5-page reflective paper is required, as is attendance (for those shadowing near campus) at three Monday evening programs; students will meet from 6:00-8:00 pm over dinner to hear from invited speakers from the medical community as a stimulus to discussion about their apprenticeship experiences
Prerequisites: interested students must attend an information meeting in late September; local enrollment is limited by the number of available practitioners; preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the health professions
Enrollment limit: limited by the number of available practitioners
Method of selection: preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the health professions
Meeting times: Mondays, 6:00-8:00 pm
Cost per student: $0
Instructor: Barbara Fuller

SPEC 20 Convicting Kafka
In the age of Suits, How to Get Away With Murder, and Better Call Saul, everyone is a lawyer. For one month you will represent Josef K. or the government as we immerse ourselves in Franz Kafka’s dizzying The Trial. A portion of the class will focus on defending and prosecuting K. in the present-day American legal system. Your zealous representation will be informed by everything from the role of social media in legal proceedings to how far you can push the envelope without being disbarred. The class will culminate in oral argument from you, the attorneys. Course materials likely will include The Trial, sample court documents, background materials on Kafka, articles on legal ethics and the role of social media in legal proceedings, and a screening of Orson Welles’ movie adaptation of The Trial.
Method of evaluation: class participation, short paper (5-page), and final project (oral argument)
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 14
Method of selection: by seniority
Meeting times: mornings, afternoons
Cost per student: $13
Instructor: Sara Echenique
Sara E. Echenique ’07 is an attorney at Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP in New York City. She has been a complex commercial litigator for over six years and tries to keep up with her ever-growing list of books to read in her free time.

SPEC 21 Experience the Workplace; an Internship with Williams Alumni/Parents
Field experience is a critical component of the decision to enter a profession. Through these field placements, students can clarify their understanding of the rewards and challenges that accompany the practice of many different aspects within a profession, and understand the psychology of the workplace. The expectation is that each student will observe and participate in some aspect of the profession for the better part of the day, five days per week, but least 30 hours per week. It is also expected that the instructor will assign a specific project to be completed within the 3- to 4-week duration of the course depending upon appropriateness.
Participation in this winter study will require the student to quickly assess the work environment, make inferences about corporate culture, performance norms and expectations, and to take initiative not only to learn from this experience, but also to contribute where and when appropriate. Understanding the dynamics within a work environment is critical to success in any organization and this hands-on experience will illuminate lessons learned in the classroom. Upon completion of the winter study, it is expected that the student writes a thorough report evaluating and interpreting the experience.
Students creating Independent Winter Study Internships (winter study internships not listed in this SPEC 21 syllabus) must submit a 99 Internship Proposal to the Winter Study Committee by Thursday, September 29, 2016.
For more details about the application instructions, application deadline and winter study internship descriptions, please to go: 
http://careers.williams.edu/winter-study-internships/
Method of evaluation: it is expected that students will complete assigned readings, keep a daily journal, and write a 5- to 10-page expository review and evaluation that will become public record as a resource for other students
Prerequisites: interested students must attend an information meeting in early October, and meet individually with Career Center staff to go over the details of their placements
Enrollment limit: enrollment is limited by the number of available teaching associates (instructors)
Method of selection: placements will be determined by the individual alum or parent sponsor based on application and possible telephone interview
Meeting times: each student will be in the field to observe some aspect of the profession five days per week, at least six hours per day
Cost per student: local apprenticeships: local transportation; distant apprenticeships: costs will vary based upon location, BUT ARE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT; the college has no extraordinary funding to support the internship
Instructor: Dawn Dellea. Williams College alumni and parents of current Williams students will be recruited to become instructors for this course. A broad range of professions will be represented as the course develops. Alumni and parents will receive individual orientations with the course director in person or via telephone conference.

SPEC 24 Community Development Health Service Work Project in Liberia, W. Africa
Interested in a great opportunity to immerse yourself in the culture of West Africa and participate in service work at the same time? This course will focus on health care and education as we work at the Ganta Rehab hospital grounds participating in daily life, helping out at the health care clinic, working on the village farm and in the local school. We will explore the close historical ties that exist between Liberia and the US. We will also examine the positive and negative effects of NGO’s and USAID on community development.
Method of evaluation: student journals and community presentation in early February at the start of 3rd quarter 2017
Prerequisites: informational and training meetings with the instructor and some reading of current books on Liberia, e.g. "The House at Sugar Beach" by Helene Cooper; not open to first-year students
Enrollment limit: 8
Method of selection: any student interested in this offering will be required to attend an informational meeting and be required to submit a written statement of purpose as to why they want to participate and what they hope to gain from this experience; I will also conduct student interviews
Cost per student: $3000
Instructor: Scott Lewis

SPEC 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as RUSS 25)
See under RUSS 25 for full description.

SPEC 26 Climate Policy in the New Presidency (Same as ENVI 26)
Climate change and climate change policy will affect every facet of life on earth. From fossil fuels, to livestock production, to agricultural and forestry practices — human activities generate greenhouse gases. Climate change will be the environmental and energy issue of your lifetimes.
This winter study course will travel to Washington, D.C. for a week to examine four critical aspects of climate policy: (1) domestic mitigation policy; (2) U.S. policy in an international context; (3) energy policy — renewables and conservation; and (4) the integration of climate science into climate policy.
In the week prior to the field component there will be three class sessions on the Williams campus to study the necessary background to engage with the Washington experts on climate policy. These will include: (1) U.S. domestic policy — Kyoto to the Clean Power Plan; (2) the U.S. and the UNFCCC process; and (3) energy economics.
Upon returning to campus, we will meet to debrief our Washington experience.
The timing of our trip to Washington also allows us to participate in nationally significant events including: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day in D.C and the inauguration of the next president.
Meetings with Williams alumni who work in the climate field will form the core of our Washington experience. These include:
Domestic mitigation policy:
Nadine Block ’93, Senior Director of Government Outreach, Sustainable Forestry Initiative
Robert Bendick ’68, Director of Golf of Mexico Program (previously Director of U.S. Government Relations), The Nature Conservancy
Chris Murphy ’96, Junior United States Senator from Connecticut
U.S. policy in an international context:
John Coequyt ’92, Director of International Climate Program, The Sierra Club
Jennifer Potvin ’11, Project Coordinator, Foreign Policy Program, Brookings Institution
Neecia Shaw ’10, Special Events Senior Associate, United Nations Foundation
Energy policy:
Douglas Hollet ’76, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Renewable Energy, Department of Energy
Scott Fenn ’78, Director of Research, Solar Energy Industries Assoc.
Evelyn Robinson ’05, Economist, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
Colin McCormick ’95, Energy Innovation, Department of Energy
Climate science:
Bruce Beehler ’74, Research Associate, The Smithsonian
Readings:
There is a vast amount of excellent material on climate policy on the websites of the following institutions:
Brookings Institution
Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES)
Department of Energy (DOE)
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
Government Accountability Office (GAO)
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)
International Energy Agency (IEA)
Nature Conservancy
Resources for the Future (RFF)
Sierra Club
United Nations Foundation
World Resources Institute (WRI)
Readings will be drawn from the publications of both the organizations with which we will meet, e.g., the DOE, Nature Conservancy, Sierra Club, but also the organizations listed above.
The three papers below provide useful background on U.S. policy:
Clemm, G. and Smith, M.G. “Emerging U.S. Climate Policy: Where we are and how we got here.”
Smith, M. G. “The US vs. the EU: Institutions and their Impact on Climate Policy.”
Stavins, Robert. “A U.S. Cap-and-Trade System to Address Global Climate Change,” The Hamilton Project, Washington, D.C.: The Brookings Institution, 2007.
In addition to the meetings with more established alumni, we will plan to have a dinner event to include younger alumni to allow them to share their experiences with looking for work, and working, in D.C.
Method of evaluation: evaluation will be based on (1) a pre-trip background brief on a major topic of our Washington meetings (2 pages); (2) a post trip letter to their U.S. Senator focusing on policy issues examined during the course (5 pages); and (3) a reflection on the outlook for climate policy in the new administration (3 pages); we will also welcome proposals for creative final projects, with prior approval of the instructors
Prerequisites: none
Enrollment limit: 10
Method of selection: if overenrolled, the students will be selected by a statement of interest and interviews during the fall semester
Cost per student: $323
Instructors: Postyn Smith, Sustainability Coordinator at the Zilkha Center for Environmental Initiatives, and Mark Smith, Professor at Colorado College.

SPEC 28 Class of 1959 Teach NYC Urban Education Program
Students in this course learn about the front-line challenges of urban public education by working in one of New York City's public schools. Participants will be expected to pursue a full day's program of observing, teaching, tutoring and mentoring in their choice of more than 20 different school situations from elementary through high school. Each of the participating schools will have a resident supervisor who will meet with the January interns to arrange individual schedules and provide mentoring during the month. There will be weekly seminar meetings of all the interns who are expected to participate in group discussions, keep a journal and write a 5 page paper reflecting upon their experience. The course will conduct orientation meetings with students prior to January, matching each student's interest with appropriate teaching subject areas and a host school. Dormitory-style housing will be provided along with some assistance with transportation and food costs-estimated at $400 for the term. Further assistance is available for financial aid students.
METHOD OF EVALUATION: evaluation will be based on a journal and a 5-page paper.
PREREQUISITES: sophomore, junior or senior standing; not open to first-year students.
ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 12.
COST PER STUDENT: $400.
MEETING TIME:off-campus fieldwork: daily 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. and weekly seminar dinners.
INSTRUCTOR: TRACY FINNEGAN
Sponsor: WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE

Tracy Finnegan is a master's level teacher with training and teaching experience in a variety of approaches and settings.

SPEC 35 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel
Each class will begin with a lecture-demonstration, followed by student practice on the potter's wheel. Every student will have exclusive use of a potter's wheel for each class. Pottery making classes will be held in the mornings, 9 AM to 12:00 PM, at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery in Pownal, Vermont. We will use both stoneware and porcelain clay bodies, and will work on mugs, bowls, pitchers, plates, jars, lids, vases, and bottles, and will finish these shapes by trimming and adding handles, lugs, lids, spouts, and knobs. We will also work on hand-building projects. Early in the Winter Study Session there will be a 1.5-hour slide presentation held one afternoon at a location on campus. After the tenth pottery making class meeting, all completed work will be kiln-fired to biscuit, approximately 1750F. The eleventh meeting will be devoted to glazing your biscuited pieces. Glazing techniques will include pouring, dipping, layering, brushing, and stamping, and using wax resist and other masking techniques to develop pattern and design. The completed work will then be glaze-fired to cone 5, approximately 2150F. The last meeting, held at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery early in the new semester, will be devoted to a "final project (positive-orientation) critique" in the studio of your finished work. Woven into lecture-demonstrations will be presentations on various topics relating to the science and history of pottery making.
Method of evaluation: final project critique session
Prerequisites: none; no pottery making experience necessary
Enrollment limit: 9
Method of selection: level of enthusiasm for learning the craft of pottery making
Meeting times: mornings, 9am-12pm
Cost per student: $355
Instructor: Ray Bub
Ray Bub is a ceramic artist and teacher at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery in Pownal, Vermont, 10 minutes north of the Williams College campus. All class meetings except the slide show take place at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery. Learn more about Ray Bub at www.raybub.com

 


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