Office of The RegistrarWilliams College

peoplesoft login

Winter Study Courses 2000

 

WINTER STUDY PROGRAM

REMINDERS ABOUT WSP REGISTRATION

All students who will be on campus during the 1999-2000 academic year must register for WSP. Registration will take place in the early part of fall semester. If you are registered for a senior thesis in the fall which must be continued through Winter Study by departmental rules, you will be registered for your Winter Study Project automatically. In every other case, you must complete registration. First-year students are required to participate in a Winter Study that will take place on campus; they are not allowed to do 99's.

Even if you plan to take a 99, or the instructor of your first choice accepts you during the registration period, there are many things that can happen between registration and the beginning of Winter Study to upset your first choice, so you must list five choices. You should try to make one of your choices a project with a larger enrollment, not that it will guarantee you a project, but it will increase your chances.

If you think your time may be restricted in any way (ski meets, interviews, etc.), clear these restrictions with the instructor before signing up for his/her project.

Remember, for cross-listed projects, you should sign up for the subject you want to appear on your record.

For many beginning language courses, you are required to take the WSP Sustaining Program in addition to your regular project. You will be automatically enrolled in this Sustaining Program, so no one should list this as a choice.

The grade of honors is reserved for outstanding or exceptional work. Individual instructors may specify minimum standards for the grade, but normally, fewer than one out of ten students will qualify. A grade of pass means the student has performed satisfactorily. A grade of perfunctory pass signifies that a student's work has been significantly lacking but is just adequate to deserve a pass.

If you have any questions about a project, see the instructor before you register.

Finally, all work for WSP must be completed and submitted to the instructor no later than Friday, January 28th. Only the Dean can grant an extension beyond this date.

WINTER STUDY 99'S

Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible to propose "99's," independent projects arranged with faculty sponsors, conducted in lieu of regular Winter Study courses. Perhaps you have encountered an interesting idea in one of your courses which you would like to study in more depth, or you may have an interest not covered in the regular curriculum. In recent years students have undertaken in-depth studies of particular literary works, interned in government offices, assisted in foreign and domestic medical clinics, conducted field work in economics in developing countries, and given performances illustrating the history of American dance. Although some 99's involve travel away from campus, there are many opportunities to pursue intellectual or artistic goals here in Williamstown.

99 forms are available in the Registrar's Office. The deadline for submitting the proposals to faculty sponsors is Thursday, 30 September.

WINTER STUDY 99'S

Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible to propose "99's," independent projects arranged with faculty sponsors, conducted in lieu of regular Winter Study courses. Perhaps you have encountered an interesting idea in one of your courses which you would like to study in more depth, or you may have an interest not covered in the regular curriculum. In recent years students have undertaken in-depth studies of particular literary works, interned in government offices, assisted in foreign and domestic medical clinics, conducted field work in economics in developing countries, and given performances illustrating the history of American dance. Although some 99's involve travel away from campus, there are many opportunities to pursue intellectual or artistic goals here in Williamstown.

99 forms are available online. The deadline for submitting the proposals to faculty sponsors is Thursday, 30 September.

COURSES OFFERED WINTER STUDY 2000

AMES 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by candidates for honors by the thesis route in African and Middle Eastern Studies.

AAS 030 Senior Project

To be taken by students registered for Afro-American Studies 491 who are candidates for honors.

AMST 030 Senior Honors Project

To be taken by students registered for American Studies 491 or 492.

ANSO 011 Berkshire Farm Center Service-Learning Internship

This course involves a service-learning field placement at Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth in Canaan, New York. Berkshire Farm Center is a residential treatment facility for troubled, at-risk adolescent boys from all over New York State. These youths come primarily from lower socio-economic strata (The "other side" of the American Dream), are ethnically diverse, and hail from both urban and rural areas. The problems and troubles that they bring to Berkshire Farm Center are multiple. These include: the psychological scars of dysfunctional families, including those of physical, emotional, and sexual abuse & neglect; chemical abuse & dependency; juvenile delinquency; youth gang issues; an inability to function in school settings; and various other issues. Residential treatment is a multi-modal approach that includes anger-replacement training, social skills training, and behavioral modification.
Williams students will commute to Berkshire Farm Center in individual cars or in a Williams van and work under supervision in one of the following areas: school, cottage life, chemical dependency unit, research/evaluation, recreation, adventure based counseling, volunteer services, performing arts, or as an individual tutor/mentor.
Students will be contacted by the instructor in November for an initial organizational/coordination meeting. During Winter Study the course will include an informal weekly seminar with the instructor that will draw on service-learning experiences. With the instructor's assistance and approval, students will determine their individual placements and time schedules. Hours of participation may be flexible.
Evaluation: students will keep a journal/log reflecting on their experiences and will provide a summation thereof at the conclusion of the course; also at the end of the course, students will share their experiences at a seminar meeting. Please note: all in queries about this course should be directed to the instructor, who can be reached at 518-781-4567, ext. 322.
Prerequisites: placement only through interview (via phone) with the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: none.

LARI BRANDSTEIN (Instructor)
M. F. BROWN (Sponsor)

Lari Brandstein is Director of Volunteer Services at Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth.

ANSO 012 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

The incidence of reported child abuse and neglect has reached epidemic proportions and shows no signs of decreasing. Preventive and prophylactic social programs, court intervention, and legislative mandates have not successfully addressed this crisis. This course allows students to observe the Massachusetts Department of Social Services attorney in courtroom proceedings related to the care and protection of children. Students will have access to Department records for purposes of analysis and will also work with social workers who will provide a clinical perspective on the legal cases under study. The class will meet regularly to discuss court proceedings, assigned readings, and the students' interactions with local human services agencies.
Students will keep a journal and submit a 10-page paper at the end of the course. Full participation in the course is expected. Please note: all queries about this course should be directed to the instructor, who can be reached at 413-236-1800.
Enrollment limited to 15. Access to an automobile is desirable but not required; some transportation will be provided as part of the course.
Cost to student: $25 for books and photocopies.

JUDITH LOCKE (Instructor)
M. F. BROWN (Sponsor)

Judith Locke is the Assistant Divisional Counsel for the Massachusetts Department of Social Services.

ANTH 013 Islam and The Satanic Verses

This course involves an intensive investigation of Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses, viewed as a work of literature and in relation to the political crisis that erupted around it. The first half of the course will be devoted to a close reading of the novel, along with additional background articles that contextualize the social, religious, and historical dynamics that Rushdie drew upon in creating the book. The second half of the course will focus on the response of the Muslim world to Rushdie's work, especially the decree by the Iranian government authorizing Rushdie's death, and the reaction of groups and individuals in the West who saw the threats to Rushdie as an attack on the right of free expression. These responses will be examined and discussed in depth as a way of trying to assess the larger political and ethical implications of the controversy.
Students will be expected to write two 6-page papers, one on the novel itself and the second on the controversy. Regular attendance at class meetings is also expected and will be factored into the final grade, with more than two unexcused absences resulting in a perfunctory pass and more than three absences resulting in a failure.
Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: $35 for books.

D. EDWARDS

ANTH 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Anthropology 493-494.

SOC 010 The Black Middle Class

What does it mean to be black and middle class in America today? This course will investigate the contemporary black middle class experience through the lenses of social science, popular culture, and first-hand social experience. We will begin with the evolution of the idea and reality of a black middle class as seen through the classic works of W. E. B. Dubois and E. Franklin Frazier, and review the shifts in income, education, and social integration that have occurred among African-Americans since the civil rights revolution. Most of the course, however, will be devoted to understanding contemporary social experience.
We will accomplish this through a detailed examination of popular culture aimed at a black middle-class audience, reading of fiction and non-fiction that attempt to capture the black middle class experience, and in dialogues with guest lecturers.
Students will be expected to complete assignments, participate in class discussions, and produce a final paper or project that integrates course materials. Class will meet three times per week, and we will take one overnight weekend field trip.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: $100 for books, transportation, and lodging.
Meeting time: mornings.

BACON

SOC 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Sociology 493-494.

ARTH 010 The Philadelphia Tradition in American Art

How is that a city with so unpromising an artistic culture as Quaker Philadelphia produced some of America's most important artists and architects? Among painters, Thomas Eakins, Mary Cassatt, and the Ashcan School are all Philadelphians, as are the architects Frank Furness, Louis Kahn and Robert Venturi. This Winter Study project will be devoted to an examination of the artistic and architectural culture of Philadelphia-its Quaker roots, its nineteenth-century realism and its leadership in post-modernism. During an extended field trip we will visit the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia's Victorian suburbs and the campuses of Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges.
Evaluation will be based on a report on a major work or artist and, where possible, will present their findings on site.
Prerequisite: ArtH 264 and consent of instructor. Enrollment limited to 9.
Cost to student: $125.
Meeting time: afternoons.

LEWIS

ARTH 012 Spaces for Selling or Buying

THIS COURSE HAS BEEN CANCELLED!!

ARTH 014 Casting an Eye on Bronze: The Eternal Sculpture Medium

Why is bronze metal so remarkable as a sculpture medium? How did this copper-alloy become the preeminent material for the expression of fine art by the Chinese, Egyptians and the Greeks as well as American and European artists. This course will discuss the tools and techniques utilized in the production of bronze sculpture throughout the centuries as well as the deterioration mechanism bronze can undergo including physical and chemical changes which occur especially in the outdoor environment. Modern art conservation methods of documentation, examination and technical analysis, stabilization and treatment options for indoor and outdoor bronzes will be addressed. Many opportunities for first hand observation and discussion will include a visit to a premier art foundry, an artists' studio who is working in bronze and behind-the-scene inspections of bronze sculptures at local museums.
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance in class and on field trips, participation, a 10-page paper and an oral presentation.
No prerequisites. Preference given to art and chemistry majors. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: $25.
Meeting time: mornings and one full-day field trip and one half-day field trip.

INGRID NEUMAN (Instructor)
HEDREEN (Sponsor)

Ingrid Neuman is a professional conservator of three-dimensional objects with 10-years experience in major museums in the United States.

ARTH 016 Contemporary Issues at Regional Art Museums

This course will survey the best of contemporary art offerings throughout our region. This will include temporary exhibitions and permanent collection displays at such institutions as, MASS MoCA, the Wadsworth Atheneum, the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art as well as other college and university art museums. The class will also travel to Boston and/or New York depending on current exhibition schedules. The class will begin with a tour of WCMA and continue with four, weekly day-long museum excursions.
Evaluation will be based on participation in all museum visits and one researched presentation and accompanying paper. The topic of this assignment is an object on view at one of the included institutions. The artwork will be selected by the student from a list available at the first class and then be presented to the rest of the class during the museum visit.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 12.
Cost to student: approximately $25. Students will be required to pay reduced-rate admissions to some of the museums. The cost and schedule of museum visits will be available during enrollment and at the first class.

IAN BERRY (Instructor)
HEDREEN (Sponsor)

Ian Berry received his M.A. in Curatorial Studies at the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College and is Assistant Curator at the Williams College Museum of Art.

ARTH 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for ArtH 493, 494.

ARTH 033 Honors Independent Study

To be taken by candidates for honors by the independent study route.

ARTS 011 Visual Conversations

This course offers students the opportunity to partake in visual conversations by making artwork directly in response to art found in area museums. Students will be required to select a specific work of art from a museum and embark upon a studio art project which directly responds to, and conceivably influences the understanding of the selected artwork. Field trips (during class time) to museums, slide presentations, group critiques, and discussions will support and provide feedback for each student's individual project.
Students will be evaluated on the basis of a completed studio project and a 5-page paper explaining an understanding of what it means to have a visual conversation in art and defending the particular project. Regular attendance, class participation, and effort will also be taken into account. The class will meet as a group.
Prerequisite: Drawing I. Priority given to art majors. Enrollment limited to 12.
Cost to student: $75-$100.
Meeting time: mornings.

PETER R. BRUUN (Instructor)
HEDREEN (Sponsor)

Peter Bruun is the Exhibition Coordinator for the Contemporary Museum in Baltimore, Maryland. He received his M.F.A. at the Maryland Institute, College of Art.

ARTS 012 Japanese Dyeing: The Joy of Kusaki-zome (Same as Asian Studies 012)

(See under Asian Studies for full description.)

ARTS 013 Figure Modeling

This course is designed as an introduction to the challenges of working with the figure in a sculptural context. The class will be structured as a working studio with the students sculpting in clay from a live model. The first half of the course will emphasize learning the technical and physiological aspects of the human figure; structure, proportion, gesture, and basic anatomy. The latter half of the course will be concerned with the creative aspects of working with the figure and of developing individual interpretations of the human form. In addition to working studio sessions, there will be two slide lectures on the human form in art.
Each student will be evaluated on the success of his/her sculpture, attendance, participation, and effort. This course requires approximately 15 hours per week of individual investigations into the human form.
Prerequisite: ArtS 100. Enrollment limited to 15.
Lab fee: $85.
Meeting time: mornings.

PODMORE

ARTS 015 Product Design

This design course explores the process by which products acquire their unique character and form. Students will gain a fundamental knowledge of techniques industrial designers use to create the objects of our everyday lives. This knowledge will be used to design and build a working prototype of a unique product based upon assigned design criteria. Assignments will encompass market research, human factors, materials, manufacturing processes, 2D, and 3D sketching. Class will meet twice a week for three hour sessions with additional supervised shop time and student-instructor meetings. Class time will include the introduction of new material and group critiques of assignments. A field trip to a research facility will supplement material covered in class.
Evaluation will be based on a presentation of the prototype and a compiled report of class assignments to a critique committee.
Prerequisites: basic skills in drawing and modeling are helpful but not required. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: $150.
Meeting time: afternoons.

RICHARD GOODWIN (Instructor)
BENEDICT (Sponsor)

Richard Goodwin began his career in theatrical design and went on to receive a Master's Degree in Industrial Design from Pratt Institute. He is a principal in the firm RixDesign specializing in toys and leisure products.

ARTS 017 Fabric Palette, Quilt Canvas

Quilts are timeless. They appeal to our physical and emotional well-being, recalling memories, evoking feelings of comfort and appealing to our sense of color and design. In this course, we will touch on the history of traditional quiltmaking in this country and discover when traditional quiltmaking methods moved into the realm of artmaking.
After accomplishing basic quilting techniques, each member of the class will create and complete an Art Quilt which will be the basis of a show in the Wilde Gallery, the student gallery in the WLS Spencer Studio Art Building. Though it is not necessary to be an experienced sewer prior to this course, some facility with a needle would be helpful. More important will be your concept of design and color and willingness to use fabric and stitching as your palette and canvas.
Evaluation will be based on completed project, participation and attendance in class.
No prerequisites, but some drawing or sewing experience helpful. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: $100 for materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

SYBIL-ANN SHERMAN (Instructor)
TAKENAGA (Sponsor)

In addition to her 26 years as Williams College support staff, Sybil-Ann Sherman has taught quilting workshops at North Adams State College (now MCLA) and the YMCA in North Adams. She has participated in demonstrations of her craft at both Williams and at large craft fairs around Massachusetts. Her work has been featured in Berkshire Magazine.

ARTS 018 Introduction to Woodcarving

This course will offer the opportunity to learn about, and participate in, the dying art of woodcarving. Students will be instructed in the basic skills of relief and chip carving. We will discuss the history of carving and seek a new appreciation for the skill and craftsmanship that went into many of the beautiful and historic buildings on campus. Pieces of furniture and woodwork that may have been around most of your life will have new meaning. Students will feel the pride of making a one-of-a-kind item, with the satisfaction and knowledge that their work can last for hundreds of years.
The course requires that students spend a minimum of twenty hours outside of class time in the quest of acquiring skill beyond technique in the art of woodcarving. Each student must complete a carved scoop plate and one other carving in relief or chip. In the past students have carved picture frames, spoons, moldings, nature scenes, and mirrors. The many different possibilities are left open to the students' creative abilities and imagination. The spectrum in carving is so vast that rigid boundaries on possible projects are not set. It has been the instructor's experience that freedom to be creative presents many new learning experiences and fosters a desire to continue the craft once the traditional course has been completed.
Evaluation is based on effort and commitment rather than quality. Students will however, be encouraged to produce work that will commensurate with their ability.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: $100.
Meeting time: 4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. twice per week. Students should be sure that they do not have a conflict with this time before registering for the course.

WES PECOR (Instructor)
HEDREEN (Sponsor)

Wes Pecor is a local craftsman. He has been carving and working with wood for over 20 years. He has completed many projects on the Williams College campus. Wes previously taught a Winter Study course and offers private instruction.

ARTS 019 American Stained Glass: History and Restoration

The purpose of this course is to teach students how to study the history and evaluate the condition and restoration needs of stained glass windows in American buildings. We will study the history of stained glass, beginning with a brief survey of the craft before the nineteenth century. We will also study how stained glass windows are made, with a "show-and-tell" glass session and a visit to Cummings Stained Glass Studios. We will review how the materials of stained glass windows age and deteriorate, and what proper restoration techniques are required to forestall future deterioration.
Evaluation will be based on a written report and a 20-30 minute oral presentation on 3-4 windows in a local church. Reports and presentations will be include the history of the windows and an assessment of their conditions. Quality of research, observations, and communication skills will be important.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: $75. Students should also have access to binoculars, camera, tape measure, and flashlight.
Meetings will occur in three 3-hour lectures during the first week. During the second week there will be a day-long field trip to the Albany area. Students will meet individually with the instructor to prepare their projects and work on their own on their projects. In the final week, presentations will be made.
Meeting time: afternoons.

JULIE L. SLOAN (Instructor)
HEDREEN (Sponsor)

Julie L. Sloan is vice-president of Cummings Stained Glass Studios, Inc., North Adams, M.A. and adjunct professor of historic preservation at Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture. She received her B.A. in art history from New York University and her MS in historic preservation from Columbia University.

ARTS 020 Stained Glass Workshop (Same as Biology 020)

(See under Biology for full description.)

ARTS 033 Honors Independent Project

Independent study to be taken by candidates for honors in Art Studio.

ASST 011 Chinese Popular Culture

How do the Chinese celebrate? Through readings, discussions, and practical "hands-on" experience, we will explore how Chinese have traditionally celebrated popular holidays and religious festivals. Topics will include the religious and cultural meanings of the various festivals, regional differences in how holidays are celebrated, the roles of different members of the traditional Chinese family, the preparation (and eating!) of festival foods, calligraphy, and taijia exercises.
Evaluation will be based on participation in class sessions and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: approximately $60 for books, duplicated materials, and food.
Meeting time: mornings.

TONG CHEN (Instructor)
C. KUBLER (Sponsor)

Tong Chen, a former faculty member in the Chinese language program at Williams, is currently Lecturer in Chinese at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

ASST 012 Japanese Dyeing: The Joy of Kusaki-zome (Same as ArtS 012)

Have you heard about "Kusaki-zome"? Kusaki-zome is a traditional Japanese art using plant dye. With a simple technique, it brings out the wonderful colors in natural things, such as vegetables, flowers, tree leaves, and twigs. For instance, tea leaves provide light brown. What color do you think onion skins would give? The most interesting thing is that the color is never the same, since the hue of colors differs greatly depending on the season when the plants were harvested. The technique is simple; if you can boil eggs, you can enjoy kusaki-zome. The course will include lectures on the history of kusaki-zome as well as hands-on experience. The technical exercises will be done through several projects under the instructor's supervision. This class requires no previous artistic training. The class will meet three times a week.
Evaluation will be based on the completion of two projects, with a journal describing the projects, as well as participation in the final class exhibition.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: lab fee of $35.
Meeting time: mornings.

KYOKO KABASAWA (Instructor)
YAMADA (Sponsor)

Kyoko Kabasawa is a Japanese textile and dyeing artist who teaches at Hokkaido Women's College. In addition to a number of prizes awarded in Japan, she won an originality award in the Hawai'i Handweavers' Hui 45th Anniversary Biennial Exhibition in August 1998.

ASST 013 Ecology and Chinese Religions (Same as Environmental Studies 020 and Religion 013)

In order to explore various perspectives on nature and the growing need for new human-earth relations, this course will focus on religious approaches to ecological issues with special emphasis on Chinese religions, including Taoism, Confucianism, and Mahayana Buddhism. We will highlight the deep relationship with nature in Chinese culture and its relevance to modern eco-consciousness such as earth spirituality and ecofeminism, among others.
Evaluation will be based on participation in class discussions, a group project, and a 10-page paper. No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: about $60 for books and duplicated materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

HO

ASST 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Asian Studies.

CHIN S.P. Sustaining Program for Chinese 101-102

Students registered for Chinese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Chinese Sustaining Program. Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9:00-9:50.
Requirements: regular attendance and active class participation.
Prerequisite: Chinese 101.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.

LANGUAGE FELLOW

CHIN 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Chinese.

JAPN S.P. Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102

Students registered for Japanese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Japanese Sustaining Program. Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9:00-9:50.
Requirements: regular attendance and active class participation.
Prerequisite: Japanese 101.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.

LANGUAGE FELLOW

JAPN 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Japanese.

ASTR 016 Observational Astronomy

This course, meant for non-majors, will focus on the most basic aspects of astronomy and will be observing-intensive, taking full advantage of various telescopes housed on the Williams College observing deck. Topics to be covered will include the constellations and night sky in general, planets, the moon, the sun, stars, and galaxies. Study of these topics will require a mix of both day and night class sessions during which students will be required to make observations using binoculars, telescopes, and the naked eye. Student observations will be recorded in drawings, notes, and computer printouts and/or photographs.
Evaluation will be based on the report of these observations.
Observing will take place on all class dates during which the sky is clear. On those days when the sky is cloudy, we will do in-class exercises or discuss current topics in astronomy such as results from the Hubble Space Telescope.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 25. Preference to students with no previous astronomy observing experience.
Cost to student: $10 for materials and $20 for book.
Meeting times: 3 two-hour evening observing sessions each week plus additional self-scheduled observing or World Wide Web work; separate daytime sessions for solar observing; and a few afternoon sessions, mainly to make arrangements for observing.

STEPHAN MARTIN (Instructor)
PASACHOFF (Sponsor)

Stephan Martin is Instructor of Astronomy and Observatory Supervisor at Williams College.

ASPH 031 Senior Research

To be taken by students registered for Astrophysics 493, 494.

ASTR 031 Senior Research

To be taken by students registered for Astronomy 493, 494.

BIOL 010 Electron Microscopy

Three dimensions versus two! We will take pictures from the scanning electron microscope, the transmission electron microscope, and the light microscope, and see which is best for what. Go digital and manipulate those images in Photoshop (do you want your erythrocytes red or blue?), or go conventional and do tried-but-true black and white photography.
There will be brief reading assignments, a guest speaker and an 8-page paper with 6 really good micrographs required. Students will do their own sample processing for the microscopes. Class will meet for two hours, three times a week, plus scope time.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 8.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for text and readings.
Meeting time: afternoons.

NANCY PIATCZYC (Instructor)
D. LYNCH (Sponsor)

Nancy Piatczyc received her B.S. in Biology from Tufts University. She attended the School of Electron Microscopy in Albany, NY. She is a trained electron microscopist who operates and maintains the electron microscope facility at Williams.

BIOL 014 Evolutionary Medicine

While the practice of medicine in the 50s and 60s was characterized by great optimism, that of the 80s and 90s is becoming increasingly pessimistic. Many diseases which should have been conquered are on the rise and frightening new ones keep appearing. Is there a fundamental failure in our approach to medicine? We will take an evolutionary and ecological perspective on this problem, considering the origins and potential treatments for various diseases in this light. Class will meet three times per week and will be a combination of lecture and discussion.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a final 10-page paper.
This course should be of interest to both the committed pre-med and the medically curious, so there is no prerequisite. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: approximately $45 for books and a reading packet.
Meeting time: afternoons.

LEE VENOLIA (Instructor)
D. LYNCH (Sponsor)

The Instructor is a former Assistant Professor in the Biology Department and is trained in genetics.

BIOL 017 Outbreak: Viruses and Culture

The popular press would have us believe that the AIDS pandemic is a unique example of a viral pathogen causing cultural, political, and behavioral changes in society. In fact, infectious diseases and viral epidemics have impacted society throughout recorded history. This course will examine the intersection of infectious disease and society. The basic biology of viruses will be covered in context of examining the impact of viruses on human history and politics. The current interest in emerging viruses will also be examined with a focus on the social, economic, ecological, and cultural factors which induce episodes of viral emergence. We will screen popular films and read sections of recent best selling novels to see how the representation of infectious diseases has evolved. How viruses have been portrayed by the entertainment industry, in both the print and film media, will be considered for their accuracy and intent.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, two short papers (2-3 pages) relating to assigned readings and films, and a screenplay proposal.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 30.
Cost to student: approximately $20.
Meeting time: mornings.

ROSEMAN

BIOL 019 Antibiotics: From Silver Bullet to Flash in the Pan?

How many times have you received antibiotics? In the last 50 years, we have become reliant upon antibiotics for medical and veterinary uses. However, evolutionary processes have resulted in the emergence and proliferation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, opening up the possibility of an explosion in infectious diseases in the very near future. This class will consider the past, present and future use of antibiotics from scientific, historical and economic perspectives, including the mechanisms of antibiotic action and the genetic basis of the emergence and transmission of resistance. The class format will entail lectures, discussions and short lab experiments/demonstrations, three times per week.
Evaluation will be based on two short papers based on reading assignments and on class participation.
No prerequisites.
Cost to student: approximately $10 for reading packet.
Meeting time: afternoons.

KAREN PEPPER (Instructor)
D. LYNCH (Sponsor)

Karen Pepper received her Ph.D. from the Pasteur Institute, University of Paris. She has published a number of scientific papers on antibiotics and antibiotic resistance.

BIOL 020 Stained Glass Workshop (Same as ArtS 020)

This is a studio/workshop course designed to introduce the student to the techniques involved in working with stained glass. Lectures will describe the use and manufacture of stained glass windows from medieval to modern times. Demonstrations will illustrate how to design, cut and assemble stained glass forms using the copper foil technique. If there is sufficient interest, techniques related to etching designs in glass will be demonstrated as well.
Each student will complete a small assigned project during class to learn the basics of the technique. Students will then complete a larger independent project as their "journeyman piece." This may consist of a traditional window, a free-form mobile or a three dimensional form.
Evaluation will be based upon class participation as well as upon the design and execution of the journeyman piece. Class will meet two times a week for three hours. Additional time outside of class will be necessary to design and complete the independent project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 12; first priority to juniors and seniors.
Cost to student: approximately $70 for materials.
Meeting time: afternoons.

ADLER

BIOL 021 Internships in Field Biology

Sophomores, juniors and seniors wishing to do internships with conservation organizations, national or state parks, or field research at other institutions should sign up for Biology 021 as their winter study course. Previous internships have included such diverse programs as working on the problem of introduced species with a local or national environmental organization, working at a raptor rehabilitation center and working with their home state's department of environmental management. Students must make all the arrangements for the internships directly with the sponsoring organization. The costs of travel and room and board must be borne by the student. Before a student can receive approval to sign up for the course, a student must work out a detailed plan with Professor Edwards by early October. Evaluation will be based on a daily field notebook and a summary paper or laboratory report.
Prerequisites will depend on the program chosen. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: will vary with the program.

J. EDWARDS

BIOL 022 Introduction to Biological Research

An experimental research project will be carried out under the supervision of a member of the Biology Department.
It is expected that the student will spend 20 hours per week in the lab at a minimum, and a 10-page written report is required.
This experience is intended for, but not limited to, first-year students and sophomores, and requires the permission of the instructor. Interested students should contact Professor DeWitt for more information before registering.
Prerequisites: Biology 101. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

DEWITT

BIOL 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Biology 493, 494.

CHEM 010 Structure Determination with Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Techniques

This course will introduce intermediate-level chemistry students to advanced techniques in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometer operation that are employed in modern molecular structure analysis. Topics covered in the course will include basic spectrometer architecture, the fundamentals of NMR theory, spin-spin coupling interactions, simple decoupling experiments, simple multinuclear applications, and multipulse sequence experiments. Special emphasis will be placed on powerful "one-dimensional" and "two-dimensional" analysis techniques, including (1D): Distortionless Enhancement by Polarization Transfer (DEPT) and Nuclear Overhauser (NOE) difference spectra and (2D): H,H Correlation Spectroscopy ("H,H, COSY") and H,C COSY and C,C COSY ("2D INADEQUATE"). Class members will be trained in the operation of the Chemistry Department's NMR console and data station and problem sets and the final class project will be carried out on this instrument. A command of introductory organic chemistry will be required.
The course will consist of three lectures and completion of one "spectrometer-based problem set" per week. Students will be expected to plan for and schedule spectrometer use in view of other Chemistry Department NMR spectrometer needs and regular due dates for problem sets.
Evaluation will be based upon attendance and participation in class, problem sets, and one 10-page paper detailing a structural analysis using advanced NMR techniques.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 201-202. Enrollment limited to 8.
Cost to students: approximately $60 for textbook and a packet of photocopied materials.
Meeting time: mornings and weekly afternoon lab sessions.

RICHARDSON

CHEM 011 Science for Kids (Same as Environmental Studies 011 and Special 011)

Are you interested in teaching? Do you enjoy working with kids? Do you like to experiment with new things? Here is a chance for you to do all three! The aim of this Winter Study project is to design a series of hands-on science workshops for elementary school children and their parents. Working in teams of 2-4, students will spend the first three weeks of Winter Study planning the workshops. This will involve deciding on a focus for each workshop (based on the interests of the students involved) followed by choosing and designing experiments and presentations that will be suitable for 4th-grade children. On the third weekend of Winter Study (January 22, 23) we will bring elementary school kids with their parents to Williams to participate in the workshops.
You will get a chance to see what goes into planning classroom demonstrations as well as a sense of what it's like to actually give a presentation. You'll find that kids at this age are great fun to work with because they are interested in just about everything and their enthusiasm is infectious. You'll also be giving the kids and their parents a chance to actually do some fun hands-on science experiments that they may not have seen before, and you'll be able to explain simple scientific concepts to them in a manner that won't be intimidating.
Evaluation will be based on participation in planning and running the workshops, and each group will be expected to prepare a handout with descriptions of the experiments for the kids, parents, and teachers.
No prerequisites. You need not be a science major; all that is needed is enthusiasm. Enrollment limited to 25.
Scheduling: We will meet 3 times/week for approximately 2-3 hours each time for the first 3 weeks of Winter Study. We will run the workshops on the third weekend of Winter Study (January 22, 23), so attendance from 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. is mandatory that weekend. We will also call one or two brief meetings late in the fall term for preliminary planning.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

KOEHLER and T. SMITH

CHEM 012 Science Journalism (Same as Special 012)

Since the public depends primarily on the media for news about science, science journalists play crucial roles as translators of scientific information. How do they make the complex understandable? A good science writer takes specialized technical material and makes it clear, comprehensible, and compelling.
In this course we will read many examples of good science writing being published in newspapers and magazines for the general reader and try to understand the techniques that skillful writers use to achieve their ends. In addition to a lot of reading, we will also do a lot of writing. The goal of this course is to develop an appreciation of good writing about science and to learn how to write popular scientific articles.
Students will keep a journal; do weekly writing assignments; and write a final article ready for publication. The class will analyze press coverage of science issues and students are expected to follow coverage of science and technology in the print media.
Prerequisite: one Division III course at Williams prior to this course or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: approximately $25 for books.
Meeting time: afternoons. Classes will meet three times a week for two hours each session.

JO PROCTER (Instructor)
RICHARDSON (Sponsor)

Jo Procter, News Director at Williams, has an M.S. in communications from Boston University. She has worked for Popular Science Magazine and Harvard University's Arnold Arboretum and Peabody Museum where she wrote for the general public about botany, dendrology, archaeology, and paleoanthropology.

CHEM 013 Science and Archaeology

Archaeological studies, which consider the human impact on the environment, can include materials as recent as nineteenth-century glass, or as old as stone tools from hundreds of thousands of years ago. And paleoanthropology, the study of early human remains, covers materials that are millions of years old. Natural science can answer a wide variety of questions for researchers in the field, not just how old an object is, but also where, how, and sometimes why an object was made. These answers in turn tell us about patterns of human development and settlement, and also help us distinguish forgeries from genuine artifacts.
The course will consist of approximately two weeks of class meetings and readings, after which students will select a project either in the lab or based on the readings. Students are expected to spend approximately 10 hours on individual projects during the third week of winter study. In the final week students will meet with the instructor for a conference on preparing a report and will then come to two final meetings where all projects are presented. In addition, in the final week there will be a tour of the Art Conservation Lab so that students can see further examples of the techniques mentioned in class.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, completion of the project, and submission of a satisfactory 5- to 7-page written report.
Prerequisite: a high school chemistry course; college-level chemistry is not required. Enrollment limited to 12.
Cost to student: approximately $5 for reading packet.
Meeting times: mornings.

ANNE SKINNER (Instructor)
RICHARDSON (Sponsor)

Anne Skinner is Senior Lecturer in Chemistry at Williams.

CHEM 014 Emergency Medical Technician-Basic

A course designed to prepare students for the Massachusetts EMT exam and to provide training to become certified as an Emergency Medical Technician. The course teaches the new national standard curriculum which makes reciprocity with many other states possible. This is a time-intensive course involving approximately 130 hours of class time plus optional emergency room observation and ambulance work. Students will learn, among other skills, basic life support techniques, patient assessment techniques, defibrillation, how to use an epi-pen, safe transportation and immobilization skills, as well as the treatment of various medical emergencies including shock, bleeding, soft-tissue injuries, and child birth. The class may meet a few times at the end of the fall semester in order to reduce the number of class hours during Winter Study Period.

Evaluation will be based upon class participation and performance on class exams, quizzes and practical exercises.
Prerequisite: It is recommended that students have American Heart Association Level C BLS Provider CPR Cards or American Red Cross BLS provider CPR cards before entering the EMT Class. A CPR class will be offered in October for those students wishing to take the EMT class who don't already have CPR cards. Enrollment limited to 24.
Cost to student: $300/student plus approximately $75 for textbook, stethoscope, and BP cuff.
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons; schedule TBA in October.

KEVIN GARVEY (Instructor)
RICHARDSON (Sponsor)

Kevin Garvey is a Massachusetts state and nationally approved EMT-I (Intermediate) and an EMT-IC (Instructor/Coordinator). He had been involved with Emergency Medical Services for 15-20 years. Mr. Garvey currently works for Baystate Health Systems as an RN (registered nurse) and EMT-I and also works as an EMT-I for Village Ambulance in Williamstown. Mr. Garvey is also an EMT training instructor at Greenfield Community College.

CHEM 016 Glass and Glassblowing

This course provides an introduction to both a theoretical consideration of the glassy state of matter and the practical manipulation of glass. While no previous experience is required, students with patience, good hand-eye coordination, and creative imagination will find the course most rewarding. The class is open to both artistically and scientifically oriented students.
Evaluation based on class participation, projects, and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 10, preference given to juniors and seniors.
Cost to student: $50 for supplies.
Meeting time: laboratory sessions will meet 10 hours per week, Monday through Friday mornings.

THOMAN

CHEM 017 Principles and Techniques of Cooking (Same as Special 017)

In this course we will consider the practice and pursuit of food and its preparation. Students will study the hands-on aspects of specific techniques, and will explore a variety of writings which discuss the preparation and appreciation of food within the context of various cultures as well as the question of whether serious cooking can be considered an "art." Classes will involve an hour of discussion of specific techniques and ingredients, followed by the preparation of full menus designed to illustrate variations on those topics. We will consider each of the specific elements of a recipe, from ingredients to techniques, why each is included and how each works. For instance a menu might focus on different types of pastas, and would include a discussion on why different pastas are paired with specific sauces based on shapes and textures, how specific dishes have evolved, and how similar culinary concepts are represented in the cuisines of other cultures. Readings will include a number of short works that consider very different aspects of food and cooking: the emotive power of familiar foods, the chemical transformations that occur within a cooking process, the symbolism associated with certain foods, cooking as an art form, and the cultural history of specific dishes. Featured authors may include Brillat-Savarin, Colwin, M. F. K. Fisher, David, McGee, and Simeti. Students are expected to be generally comfortable working in a kitchen, though no prior professional experience is expected. You need only an adventurous palate and a true interest in learning something about food, its preparation, and the different ways in which it is viewed . Students are expected to provide their own chef's knife, apron, and dishtowel; they should be willing to get messy, work hard, and eat well!
Attendance at all classes for the entire class period is mandatory, and evaluation will be based on performance in the kitchen, as well as on a final written assignment; this may be a research paper on the history of a particular ingredient (such as a specific spice) or may be a paper discussing the role of food in a specific culture. Prospective students with any potential scheduling conflicts must consult with Professor Park in advance.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 18.
Cost to students: approximately $120, which will cover food supplies (you will get to eat the meals you prepare) and a packet of photocopied materials. All equipment other than those items listed above will be provided by the instructors.
Meeting time: MTW afternoons (approximately 12:30-6:00 p.m.), in the Fort Hoosac kitchen (on campus).

L. PARK and ANGELA CARDINALI (Instructors)

Lee Park is a Professor in the Chemistry Department as well as a graduate of the Professional Technical Program at Peter Kump's Cooking School in NYC; her training and expertise are in the areas of classical French technique and various Asian cuisines. Angela Cardinali is the editor of several cookbooks, and her expertise is in the area of Italian cuisine.

CHEM 018 Metalloproteins: The Inorganic Chemistry of Life

It is well-known that certain trace elements are essential to life. Our daily diets are frequently supplemented with zinc, iron, potassium, calcium, and even cobalt. To what end? Metals play a vital function in biology encompassing such diverse tasks as the oxygen carrying iron complex in hemoglobin, cobalt-containing cofactors essential to B12-dependant enzymes, and the zinc finger proteins necessary for gene regulation. Moreover, modern medicine employs certain metal complexes in cancer treatment, capitalizing on their affinity for DNA binding, in the development of radioactive imaging agents, and in the treatment of lead- and mercury poisoning. In this course we will examine the fundamental role of metals in these and other systems. After a brief introduction to coordination chemistry, themes relevant to understanding the biological activity of metals will be explored. To this end, a series of case studies will be presented to illustrate how many metals are guided, by the biomolecules bound to them, to carry out a unique function. In particular, we will consider the choice of particular metals for each biological task, the contribution that metals make to the activity of enzyme systems, the role the surrounding protein plays in controlling the reactivity of the active site, and the ways in which fundamental studies of model complexes have contributed to understanding the complex reactions catalyzed by metal-containing enzymes.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, an in-class lecture/presentation, and a final project.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 201-202 or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 10.
Cost to student: approximately $65 for text and readings.
Meeting times: mornings.

SCHOFIELD

CHEM 022 Introduction to Scientific Research

An experimental project will be carried out under the supervision of a member of the Department in fields such as biochemistry, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, or physical chemistry.
A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least Chemistry 101) and permission of the Department. Nonscience majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to 12.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

RICHARDSON

CHEM 031 Senior Research and Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Chemistry 493, 494.

CLAS 010 The First European Philosophers: An Introduction to Greek Philosophy, from its Beginnings up to Socrates

Although the primary purpose will be to learn about the pre-Socratic philosopher-scientists, the Sophists, and Socrates, this course will consider several foundational questions: How can we mark the "beginning" of philosophy? What is philosophy, and what makes it different from other kinds of thinking? The earliest Greek philosophers, the pre-Socratics, provoke us to think on a larger scale than usual, about the beginnings of life, the universe, and everything. They combine elegant and poetic visions of the world with often tough and gritty argumentation. The attitudes of the Sophists, in contrast, range from a kind of world-weary cynicism to a realization of the kinship of all human beings, whatever their color or nationality. As distinct from the cosmic scale of their predecessors' theories, the Sophists focused on human beings and society. Contemporary with the Sophists was Socrates, of whom Cicero later remarked that he brought philosophy down to earth. In defending traditional values against the assaults of the Sophistic movement, Socrates developed a famous and still useful philosophical method of questioning. But if that is all he did-ask questions-how can we know anything about the man himself? Can we glimpse him behind his ironic facade? Readings for the course include, as essentials: R. D. McKirahan, Philosophy Before Socrates; and Plato, The Last Days of Socrates (Penguin).
Evaluation will be based on active class participation and on a final 10-page paper. This class is a discussion seminar and will meet three times a week for two hours each.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: under $30.
Meeting time: mornings.

ROBIN WATERFIELD (Instructor)
CHRISTENSEN (Sponsor)

Robin Waterfield has been a lecturer at the universities of Newcastle on Tyne and St Andrews in Britain. He is the author of about 25 books, many of which are translations from ancient Greek, and a number of academic articles in the field of ancient Greek philosophy.

CLAS 011 Hollywood Classics: Greece, Rome, and Modern Cinema

Modern Cinema's fascination with ancient Greece and Rome is amply attested by the large number of motion pictures, television movies, and television series based on Greek and Roman historical, mythological, and literary material. Just as the ancient authors `rewrote' ancient mythical stories both as a means to study human nature and in order to understand their own reality, so modern cinematic authors `rewrite' ancient narratives for their importance as `great stories', and to address problems of our own time. In this course we will explore Hollywood's varied uses of the classical world by focusing on cinematic representations of Greek and Roman myth, history, and literature. We will treat the films as visual texts to be considered on their own terms, while at the same time comparing them with the ancient texts which we will read in translation. In so doing, we will look at the use of myth and history as forms of visual and textual representation in ancient and modern times. We will concentrate on those films that are most important for their lasting impact on American popular culture as well as on those that constitute the most imaginative renderings of the ancient past. We will also discuss one or more cinematic adaptations of ancient myths that are set in modern times. In addition to film screenings and readings of the Greek and Latin texts in translation, we will also read some works on film theory and popular culture.
Evaluation: students will be expected to attend all classes and screenings, participate in class discussions, take short quizzes on names and identifications, and write a 15-page research paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit 15.
Cost to student: $30 or less for purchase of texts.
Meeting time: class will meet three times a week, mornings. Screenings scheduled for two or three films per week.

PANOUSSI

CLAS 031 Senior Thesis

May be taken by students registered for Classics 493, 494.

CSCI 010 C, UNIX and Software Tools

This course serves as a guided tour of programming methods in the Unix operating system. The course is designed for individuals who understand basic program development techniques as discussed in an introductory programming course (Computer Science 134 or equivalent), but who wish to become familiar with a broader variety of computer systems and programming languages. Students in this course will work on Unix workstations, available in the Department's programming laboratory. By the end of the course, students will have developed proficiency in the C programming language.
The increasing success of Unix as a modern operating system stems from its unique ability to "prototype" programs quickly. Students will use prototyping tools, such as Awk and "shell scripts" to write "filters" for transforming data from a variety of sources. In many cases, it will become clear that the overhead of programming in a language, such as C, Pascal, or FORTRAN is unnecessary.
Moreover students will learn to effectively use software tools such as debuggers, profilers, and make files.
Evaluation will be based on four or five programming assignments and shell scripts due throughout the term. While none of the projects in the course will be particularly large, the successful student will develop a tool chest, which will extend their computing "effectiveness" in their particular field. Students with computing needs particular to their field are encouraged to advise the instructor before the first meeting.
Prerequisite: Computer Science 134 or equivalent programming experience. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: texts.
Meeting time: mornings.

LERNER

CSCI 030 Senior Project

To be taken by candidates for honors in Computer Science via a route other than the thesis route.

CSCI 031 Senior Honor Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Computer Science 493-494.

CMAJ 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Contract Major 493, 494.

ECON 011 The Six Million Dollar Man

Is Albert Belle overpaid? What about Dennis Rodman? Oprah Winfrey? Bill Gates? This course will use basic statistics and simple economic theory to analyze what determines a superstar's salary. Questions addressed will include: (I) What should determine salary? (ii) Can we quantify an individual's productivity? (iii) Why are there so few six million dollar women? Theories will be critiqued with alternative views in economics and in other fields and through class discussion. Simple statistical techniques for analyzing some of these questions will be introduced.
The class will meet three times per week for two hours. Readings outside of class will consist mostly of articles and chapters from books. Each student will be responsible for researching, writing and presenting a case study of any individual of interest to the student using the theories and techniques learned in class.
Students will be evaluated on the case study and class participation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: approximately $25 for books and handouts.
Meeting time: mornings.

CONSTANTINE

ECON 012 The Economics of Sports

Among the questions this course on the economic structure of collegiate and professional sports may address are the following: Should colleges field athletic teams? If so, how much should student-athletes be paid, if at all? Does the NCAA behave as an input cartel that may act against the interests of student-athletes? What antitrust issues are involved in professional sports? Should professional sports franchises be allowed to move at the whim of the owner?
The class will meet regularly for the discussion of the readings. The readings will consist of a number of articles and books. Each student will write and present a paper on a topic of her interest in the area.
The course grade will be based on this paper and presentation, quizzes, and class discussion.
Prerequisite: Economics 101. Enrollment limited to 16.
Cost to student: $75 for books and photocopying.

Meeting time: afternoons.

SCHULZ

ECON 014 Accounting

The project will examine the theoretical and practical aspects of financial accounting. Although the beginning of the course will explore the mechanics of the information gathering and dissemination process, the course will be oriented mainly towards users, rather than preparers, of accounting information. The project will include discussion of the principles involved in accounting for current assets, plant assets, leases, intangible assets, current and long-term debt, stockholders' equity, the income statement and the statement of cash flows. Students will be expected to interpret and analyze actual financial statements. The nature of, and career opportunities in, the field of accounting will also be discussed.
The project is a "mini course." It will present a substantial body of material and will require a considerable commitment of time by the student, including regular attendance and participation in discussion and homework cases and problems.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 30.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

LEO McMENIMEN (Instructor)
BRADBURD (Sponsor)

Leo McMenimen is returning to Williams this January from the School of Business, Montclair State College.

ECON 015 Stock Market

Elementary description and analysis of the stock market. Emphasis will be on the roles of the market in our economy, including evaluation of business firms and the success of particular capital investments, allocating savings to different types of investment, and providing liquid and marketable financial investments for individual savers.
The course will focus on the description of mechanics of trading on various exchanges and other markets, stock market indexes of "averages" (Dow-Jones, S&P, 500, etc.), how to read the financial news, historical rates of return on stocks and portfolios, role of mutual funds, beta coefficients, and "random walk" theory. The course will also involve a brief introduction to financial reports of firms and analysis of financial ratios.
Each student will participate in discussions, do some homework assignments, follow a hypothetical portfolio during January, and write a 10-page report analyzing the wisdom or folly of having chosen the portfolio.
Not intended for students who already know much about the stock market; students who have had Economics 317 not admitted. The course will involve a two-day field trip to New York City. Students will leave on a Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. and return late Friday evening.
Prerequisite: Economics 101. Enrollment limited to 30.
Cost to student: $30 for text plus $50 for bus transportation to New York City, obligatory and paid at time of registration. Meals and lodging in New York City are not included in this price and are the responsibility of the student.
Meeting time: afternoons.

LEO McMENIMEN (Instructor)
BRADBURD (Sponsor)

Leo McMenimen is returning to Williams this January from the School of Business, Montclair State College.

ECON 016 Entrepreneurism

This course will use interactive case studies, guest appearances from those in the trenches, and extensive discussion to learn about entrepreneurism, how small business operates, and the different stages and issues small businesses face as they move forward. "Small" means start-up companies up to sales of $30 million. Emphasis will be on the role of the entrepreneur in starting, focusing, and managing a small business through its different stages, but attention will be given, too, to the position of the firm in the middle of a network of supporting organizations-banks, venture capitalists, consultants, lawyers, accountants, etc.
Students should expect to make a significant time commitment to the course. Classes will meet an average of three times per week for three hours in the morning. For those who desire, discussion and conversations will continue over lunch. Guests will be involved with the day's cases and will stay through lunch after class to discuss their professions and their daily work lives.
Students will be evaluated 80% discussions, and 20% final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: $50-$75 which covers the costs of books and cases.
Meeting time: mornings.

H. MICHAEL STEVENS (Instructor)
BRADBURD (Sponsor)

Mike Stevens is President of New England Capital Management, Inc., an acquisition company in Boston that he co-founded in 1989. He is a 1973 graduate of Williams, and a 1976 graduate from Stanford Business School.

ECON 017 Business Economics

In this course, the class will carry out a real-time forecast of the U.S. economy and explore its implications for the bond and stock markets. The course will build upon principles of both macro and micro-economics. It will provide an introduction to the work done by business economists and the techniques they use. Each student will receive a disk (for IBM-compatible computer) containing an economic database, chart-generating software and a statistical analysis program. This provides essentially the same resources that an economics consulting group has in a regular business setting.
The class will be divided into teams of 2 or 3 students with each team focusing on a particular aspect or sector of the economy. For example, we will examine prospects for inflation, interest rates, basic industries, high-technology industries, and the internet. Class time will be divided between lectures (demonstrations of forecasting tools, discussion of business cycle theories and special topics) and team presentations. The conclusion of the project will be a formal presentation of the economic forecast with invited guests from the Wall Street investment world.
The class will meet three times per week in the morning with two afternoons of optional workshops.
Each student should expect to spend a reasonable amount of time on independent work, to participate in short presentations of their analyses as the work progresses as well as in the formal presentation during the last week. There will also be a 3-page paper summarizing the result of the forecast project.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 recommended. Enrollment limited to 24.
Cost to student: about $25 for text and other materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

THOMAS SYNNOTT '58 (Instructor)
BRADBURD (Sponsor)

Thomas Synnott '58 is Chief Economist, U.S. Trust Company of New York

ECON 020 Evaluation in Development

This course examines three puzzles in development: Why do countries with abundant natural resources tend to grow more slowly than those lacking such resources? If economic growth causes agriculture's share of GDP to shrink, why have countries that invested in their agricultural sectors grown faster than those that did not? If poor countries require investment to grow, and if the rich save and invest a higher proportion of their income than the poor, why have countries with high inequality grown more slowly than those with a relatively equitable distribution of income? We answer these questions through explorations of theory and country case studies, exploring the possibility that the answers to all three questions are linked.
Requirements include several short papers, an in-class presentation, and a final exam.
Prerequisite for undergraduates: one class in economic development or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited.
Class will meet 4-5 times per week for 90 minutes.
Cost to student: none.

PINCKNEY

ECON 030 Honors Project

The "Specialization Route" to the degree with Honors in Economics requires that each candidate take an Honors Winter Study Project in January of their senior year. Students who wish to begin their honors work in January should submit a detailed proposal. Decisions on admission to the Honors WSP will be made in the fall. Information on the procedures will be mailed to senior majors in economics early in the fall semester.
Seniors who wish to apply for admission to the Honors WSP and thereby to the Honors Program should register for this WSP as their first choice.
Some seniors will have begun honors work in the fall and wish to complete it in the WSP. They will be admitted to the WSP if they have made satisfactory progress. They should register for this WSP as their first choice.

CONSTANTINE

ECON 031 Honors Thesis

To be taken by students participating in year-long thesis research (ECON 493-W031-494).

ENGL 010 Fan Cultures

This course will explore the history of and current critical interest in fans of popular culture. We will read recent accounts of X-philes, Barbie collectors, soccer "supporters," Star Trekkers, romance novel readers, and Civil War battle reenactors, to name but a few. As well, we will examine some of the ways fans express their interest in popular cultures-through zines, in on-line discussion groups, at conventions, in the sampling techniques of rap and techno music, or in the retro styles of fashion. Chief among our concerns as a class will be: Are fans merely consumers of mass culture or are they cultural producers in their own right? What kinds of television programs, sports events, films, or dance crazes spark fan interest? Why do fans identify with specific fictional characters? Are fans radically different from or entirely representative of "mainstream" society? In what ways do fans appropriate subcultural interests ("alternative" music, folk traditions)? In what ways do fans resist or reinterpret mass culture? Students will have the opportunity both to engage in critical analyses of popular culture and to document, either through autobiography or ethnography, a specific example of fan culture of their own choosing. Readings will include the work of Walter Benjamin, Antonio Gramsci, Roland Barthes, Michel De Certeau, Bill Buford, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Dick Hebdige, Wayne Koestenbaum, Henry Jenkins, George Lipsitz, Constance Penley, Jan Radway, and Erica Rand.
The course will require two 4- to 6-page papers, as well as active class participation.
No prerequisites.
Cost to students: $40 in books/coursepack.
Meetings: mornings.

BENJAMIN WEAVER (Instructor)
PYE (Sponsor)

Benjamin Weaver is a Visiting Part-time Lecturer in English at Williams.

ENGL 011 Bertolucci: Film Auteur

Italian director Bernardo Bertolucci describes his oeuvre as "one film, even if it has many titles or chapters. . . . If we put the films together, we will have the figure of one man, of an auteur, transferred in many different characters naturally. But the film is one film." This course will explore the consistency of content and style in Bertolucci's films which establish him as a film auteur. From the epic intimacy of Last Tango in Paris to The Last Emperor, described by Bertolucci as an "intimate epic," his content has been sex and politics, psychoanalysis and ideology. His style is visually lush, with a mise-en-scene that depends on richly textured and intersecting patterns of psychological and social meaning. Films to be studied include Before the Revolution, 1900, The Conformist, The Spider's Stratagem, Last Tango in Paris, Luna, The Last Emperor, The Sheltering Sky, and Stealing Beauty.
Evaluation will be based on in-class performance and one 10-page paper. Classes will meet three times per week for two hours.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20, with preference given in this order: 1.) Students who have taken a film course previously; 2.) English Majors; 3.) Seniors.
Cost to students: approximately $50 for books.
Meeting time: afternoons.

BUNDTZEN

ENGL 012 Joyce's Art of Memory

In A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, James Joyce confronts questions whose answers have deeply influenced the way we view ourselves and our literature: What challenges do artists face when rendering in fiction aspects of their own pasts? By what process does memory nourish imagination, and imagination inform memory? What forms of exile are necessary for the creation of modern art? And how can language-our inheritance from the past-be used to liberate us from the past?
Our purpose will be to consider Joyce's brilliant exploration of these concerns in Portrait, and to appreciate as fully as possible this novel's rich art and subtle vision. We will re-read Portrait several times during the month in order to grasp in detail the novel's structure, imagery, and style, and to consider how our memories and past experiences with the book alter and inform each successive reading of it. Our method, then, should help us understand the concerns of a writer like Joyce, who views his past as a text to be re-read. We will also attempt to trace the real and fictional pasts that shape Portrait by reading Joyce's Stephen Hero (the prototype for Portrait), Ellmann's great biography of Joyce, and The Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius.
Students will be expected to attend all classes (three 2-hour meetings per week); participate in class discussions and in small groups (focused on particular issues) that will meet occasionally outside of class; and write a 10-page essay.
Prerequisite: any 100-level course except 103 or 150. Enrollment limited to 15 (preference given to English majors, but all students are welcome).
Cost to student: approximately $75 for books.
Meeting time: afternoons.

FIX

ENGL 013 Writing Non-Fiction

This is a course for students interested in writing a long, non-fiction essay. We shall begin by reading together the work of some contemporary practitioners such as David Foster Wallace, Adam Gopnik and Janet Malcolm and by considering the distinctive styles of several general-interest magazines including Harper's, Rolling Stone and Salon.
Throughout the course, students will work independently on their essays, which should run between 2,500 and 3,000 words and reflect extensive research or reporting. Students will be expected to have selected a topic before the first class meeting. The class will meet three times a week.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 14.
Cost to student: $50-$75.
Meeting time: afternoons.

KLEINER

ENGL 014 Introductory Old English

The Norman Conquest in 1066 profoundly altered the character of the English language. By the fourteenth century Chaucer's Middle English has a recognizably "modern" look and sound ("Bifil that in that seson on a day, / In Southwerk at the Tabard as I lay, / Redy to wenden on my pilgrimage . . ."). Old English (Anglo-Saxon) was a thoroughly Germanic language, with closer links to Old Norse and Old High German than to Latin and French: "Nu sculon herigean heofonrices weard, / meotodes meahte and his modgepanc." This course will introduce students to pronunciation, vocabulary, and enough simple grammar to navigate a short poem like The Wanderer and excerpts from Beowulf. You can't master Old English in three and a half weeks, but you can learn enough to get a real taste of the pleasures it has to offer. Medieval buffs, language enthusiasts, Tolkien fans, and/or the merely curious are all welcome. The class will meet in the afternoons, four days a week for the first week and three days a week after that, for two hours.
Evaluation will be based on quizzes, translation exercises, and a final project that will involve translation and commentary on a substantial passage of Old English.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: $45 for books.
Meeting time: afternoons.

KNOPP

ENGL 015 The Masque Revived

The course will fall into two parts, each with its own perspective on a common subject: the masque as a performance of ideas. Many genres of Renaissance art have survived to us, while undergoing endless mutations: the sonnet, tragedy, comedy, satire, epic narratives, laureate praises and celebrations, and others. But the masque seems to have disappeared with the end of the Stuart monarchy in the English Revolution. During its brief and glittering career, it proposed to "speak to power" about pressing social and political issues, and it did so by combining music, dance, dazzling spectacle, and the power of imaginative prose and poetry. In short, it was the first multimedia event.
In the first part of the course we will read a few masques, acquainting ourselves with their characteristic forms, and paying attention to the ways in which they both responded to and influenced the currents of history and the development of authors and their works. Our primary texts will be masques written for James I and his ill-fated (or feted) son Charles I, by poets like Ben Jonson and Thomas Carew, as well as the masque written by John Milton, an outsider to the court. In the second part of the course we will turn our hands to making a masque for our times: that is, members of the class will write, design, and compose the elements of a symbolic theatre performance, after discussing and choosing the subject of the masque, its intended audience, and its polemic or didactic purpose. What we want our masque to say, and to whom, will determine what kind of thing it might be. We will clearly need to call on a variety of skills and talents.
Work to be evaluated may consist in essays, designs, or compositions; but all will have to be accompanied by expository, explanatory, or analytical prose so that all members of the course can understand the contributions of the several arts that combine in the masque. Three two-hour sessions per week, or two three-hour sessions, depending on the room schedule and the preferences of the group.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: approximately $25.
Meeting time: afternoons.

DONALD FRIEDMAN (Instructor)
PYE (Sponsor)

Donald Friedman teaches at the University of California at Berkeley, concentrating on the literature of England in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. In the past, he chaired the Department of Dramatic Art, and is currently chair of the Artistic Advisory Council of Cal Performances, the "presenting" organization for professional artists on the Berkeley campus.

ENGL 016 Short Story Workshop

This class will be divided into two parts. For the first two weeks we will talk in generalities about various aspects of writing fiction: structure, plot, voice, characterization, pacing, etc., while looking at examples from the work of established writers. There will also be a couple of private meetings with me, during which we will discuss your ideas for your own short story. Class time will be limited during this period, so that you will feel less chagrined when we start meeting every day, from about the 15th on, to workshop your first drafts. A passing grade will be based on class participation and the submission of a final, revised manuscript. If anybody is interested, we could also spend a day talking about the business of writing fiction and getting published.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: approximately $30 for photocopies.
Meeting times: afternoons.

PAUL PARK (Instructor)
PYE (Sponsor)

Paul Park has published five novels in a variety of genres, as well as numerous short stories.

ENGL 017 In Search of Bob Dylan: The Music, The Man, The Myth

Robert Allen Zimmerman, a middle-class Jewish boy of no particular distinction from rural Minnesota, grew up to be Bob Dylan, a man generally acknowledged to be one of the great figures of twentieth-century popular culture. With reference to his recordings, writings, films, and interviews, and with the aid of biographies and critical texts, we will closely examine Dylan's work and career in an attempt to define and categorize just precisely what were his innovations, and to place them in some greater cultural context.
Requirements: Evaluation will be based on in-class participation and one, 10-page, critical paper. Class will meet three times a week for two hours, with film showings scheduled outside of regular class time.
Prerequisites: While there are no academic course prerequisites, a basic level of familiarity with American musical forms (folk, blues, country, jazz, rock and roll) and with the cultural context of Bob Dylan's work and career will be assumed. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: approximately $80.
Meeting time: mornings.

SETH ROGOVOY (Instructor)
R. BELL (Sponsor)

Seth Rogovoy (Williams '82) is a music journalist whose work has appeared in Newsday, The Boston Phoenix, Sing Out! Magazine and other publications. He has been the Berkshire Eagle's pop-music critic for over a decade. He has written extensively about Bob Dylan.

ENGL 018 English Rhymes and Rhythms

Blest be all metrical rules that forbid automatic responses,
Force us to have second thoughts, free from the fetters of self
-W.H. Auden

This course is designed to increase awareness of the expressive possibilities of the traditional sounds of English verse, those established patterns of rhyme and rhythm from which "free verse" is free. We will not only read verse, but listen to it, speak it, and write it, in pursuit of a fuller experience of past and present poetry. Each student will also create a "memory anthology" of individually chosen poems. Our goal is to awaken the ear as well as the mind. Though the course should improve the ability to recognize and analyze poetic forms and prosodic effects, it will proceed through practical exercises rather than analytical essays, with a strong tilt toward the actual writing of verse. We will examine poems by such versifiers as Dr. Seuss, Shakespeare, Hopkins and Larkin, with others suggested by the class, and verse written by class members. We'll end with a reading of Vikram Seth's brilliantly formal (and informal) novel in verse, The Golden Gate.
Students will be evaluated on the basis of their verse exercises, their regular and active attendance, and the care and commitment with which they present their anthologies, to be spoken from memory in the presence of the instructor.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to students: approximately $25.
Meeting time: afternoons.

CLARA PARK (Instructor)
PYE (Sponsor)

Clara Park is Senior Lecturer Emerita at Williams.

ENGL 019 Fantasy Novels of C. S. Lewis and Charles Williams (Same as Mathematics 019)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

ENGL 020 Journalism

In this introduction to journalism, students will learn reporting, writing and editing skills through written assignments and in-class exercises. We will examine how different styles of writing serve different needs, and the practical and legal limits within which journalists work. Assignments will include writing a news story, a feature article, and an editorial. Students will also practice the essential art of rewriting.
Requirements: each student will submit articles on deadline; read and discuss current newspapers and magazines; and attend all classes. Classes will meet for four 2-hour sessions each week.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15, with preference given to first-year students.
Cost to students: approximately $20.
Meeting time: mornings.

SALLY WHITE (Instructor)
PYE (Sponsor)

Sally White worked at Time Inc. magazines in New York and Washington for thirteen years. She is now a freelance magazine writer.
ENGL 025 Arizona Highways

"The point is not to write the sociology or psychology of the car. The point is to drive." So writes Jean Baudrillard in America. This course explores what Baudrillard calls the "power museum" of Arizona, a state predicated on highways, crossings, travel. We will spend as much time on the road as off, exploring the polarized visions-of utopian deserts and nightmarish "edge cities," of ancient cultures and futuristic Biospheres-that have characterized Arizona from the time of Cabeza de Vaca's Relacion on. Sites studied will include built environments (Wright's Taliesen West, Soleri's Arcosanti, Anasazi cliff-dwellings, Navajo Reservation); "natural" wonders (Grand Canyon, Turrell's Roden Crater); monuments and reenactments (Coronado National Memorial, Tombstone's O.K. Corral, Bisbee's Shady Dell R.V. Park); New Age vortexes (Sedona). We'll also look closely at Phoenix, the fastest growing city in America, to see what its cloverleaves, runaway sprawl, and trash dumps reveal about our nation's future. Throughout, we'll ask a single overarching question: How is meaning invented or recovered in a state often treated as the epitome of deracinated space?
Requirements: Students will be responsible for at least 20 hours of class meetings and site visits per week in Arizona (roughly January 4 to January 18). On our return, the class will meet three times a week to discuss the trip and work on final projects. Each student must also attend three planning meetings and film screenings to be held in the fall. Persons missing these meetings will not be accepted into the course.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and attendance; a 15-minute oral presentation in the field; and a 10-page essay or multimedia project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 16. Preference will be given to English and American Studies majors, and to students with an interest in the Southwest.
Cost to student: $1475 plus transportation to and from Phoenix.

ROSENHEIM and CLEGHORN (Instructors)
PYE (Sponsor)

Cassandra Cleghorn has taught for nine years in the English Department and American Studies Program at Williams.

ENGL 030 Honors Project: Specialization Route

Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the specialization route.

ENGL 031 Honors Project: Thesis

Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the thesis route.

ENVI 010 Writing and Drawing-The Naturalist's Journal

This course will explore the tools for studying the natural world through various uses of writing, literature, and drawing. Students will spend time outdoors learning the ecosystem of the Williamstown area and time indoors doing observational drawing, reflective writing, and reading and discussion of nature literature.
The month's work will be contained in a nature journal, to be displayed and discussed as part of a final project.
Designed for students with interests in environmental studies, natural history writing, and drawing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 12.
Cost to student: $50 for books and art supplies.
Meeting time: mornings.

CLARE WALKER LESLIE and CHRISTIAN MCEWEN (Instructors)
ART (Sponsor)

Clare Walker Leslie returns to teach for the seventh year and is the author/illustrator of seven books, the most recent being: Nature Journaling: Learning to Observe and Connect with the World Around You, published locally by Storey Books. She lives in Cambridge, MA. Christian McEwen is a writer and editor in Charlemont, Massachusetts.

ENVI 011 Science for Kids (Same as Chemistry 011 and Special 011)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

ENVI 012 Moral Principles and the Environment

How do we make choices regarding our environment? What kinds of assumptions do we usually make? Where do we turn for guidance when our roles as makers or implementers of policy call upon us to face probable political choice with which we find ourselves in profound personal disagreement? We examine these questions, and many others, from a variety of standpoints that include utilitarianism, natural law, deep ecology, and ecofeminism. Students work extensively on improving their writing skills by writing about issues that they deem significant. Students keep a winter study journal in which they enter observations about their own lives in relation to the readings and class discussions. Mornings classes twice a week, followed by individual conferences.
Requirements: the journal and a final 10-page paper based on it.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 11.
Cost to student: approximately $55, including books and copying costs.
Meeting time: mornings.

HARVEY CARTER (Instructor)
ART (Sponsor)

Harvey Carter '60 has taught at Williams College for the past twelve years as a part-timer. He owns and operates a sheep dairy with his wife.

ENVI 013 Global Trends, Sustainable Earth

This course examines the emergence over the past 200 years of long-range trends, which have altered dramatically the human presence on the planet. Although it is widely agreed among demographers that human population growth is slowing, that is but one ingredient of a sustainable long-term relationship between humans and nature. Other important aspects, including the loss of biodiversity, consumption and a globalizing economy, and technological change will be reviewed, in an effort to illuminate the possibility of a Sustainability Transition, a future in which material prosperity might be combined with preservation of the life-support systems of the human and natural world.
Students will complete a 10-page assignment developing one (or more) indicator of human interaction with the natural world and documenting sources for the indicator or ways it could be measured or estimated reliably.
Meeting time: mornings.

K. LEE

ENVI 020 Ecology and Chinese Religions (Same as Asian Studies 013 and Religion 013)

(See under Asian Studies for full description.)

ENVI 021 The Winter Landscape (Same as Geosciences 021)

With autumn's foliage but a fading memory, landforms emerge attired in a snowy coat which highlights every ridge crest, ledged slope, and valley hillock. Glacial landforms from the bygone Ice Ages reveal themselves, unburdened of their leafy shroud, and tell me their story of flowing ice and rushing meltwaters. Inarguably, winter affords the geomorphologist--student of landscape evolution--the best view of the land. The outdoors becomes our sole classroom and snowshoes/crampons our mode of travel through the winter landscape.
This course will introduce you to the glacial history of northwestern Massachusetts, southern Vermont, eastern New York and the Adirondacks. In addition, we will discuss the ecological and cultural history of the Adirondacks during an extended stay. Within the Adirondacks Blue Line, an experiment in land conservation continues, the largest park in the lower 48, yet composed of more private than public holdings, all overseen by the controversial Adirondacks Park Agency. What does the future hold?
Itinerary/discussions: a) (January 4-7) day trips depart 9 a.m. and return 4 p.m.--Pleistocene and post-glacial history of the NY-VT-MA region; b) (January 10-14) Adirondacks expedition departs 8 a.m. Monday, returns Friday evening (Monday--arive Indian Lake for lunch; afternoon ascent of Blue Mountain (3759') or Snowy Mountain (3899')/lakes...the real Adirondacks; Tuesday--Cascade (4098') and Porter (4059') Mountains/High Peaks overview; Wednesday--Algonquin 5114') and Iroquois (4840')/alpine glaciation; Thursday--Mt. Colden (4714')/glacial and cultural history; Friday--Avalanche Pass to Lake Colden/mass wasting and meltwater channels; c) (January 17-21) meet in small groups for independent projects; d) (January 24-28) presentation of project results.
Evaluation will be based upon participation, independent project and presentation of results. Projects may be field or literature surveys and should focus on the glacial, land use or cultural history of some area. Field or oral presentations and slides or posters are preferred with a short text. Students may work in pairs for suitable projects.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 10. (Note: Students must supply their personal gear and must contact the instructor for a list of necessary equipment before leaving for the holiday break. This will give you ample time to secure gear.)
Cost to student: $200.
Meeting time: mornings.

DAVID DESIMONE and WILL MORGAN '96 (Instructor)
ART (Sponsor)

David DeSimone has taught in the Geosciences Department at Williams for the past 14 years, and is a winter outdoor enthusiast.

ENVI 031 Senior Research and Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Environmental Studies 493-494.

GEOS 010 Geology of the National Parks

A vicarious trip through selected national parks of the U.S. and Canada with emphasis on the geological basis for their unique scenery. Areas to be studied will be chosen in order to illustrate a wide variety of geologic processes and products. The class will meet most mornings during the first two weeks for lectures and discussions, supplemented with lab work devoted to the interpretation of topographic and geologic maps and to the study of rock samples. Readings will include a paperback text as well as short publications of the U.S. Geological Survey and various natural history associations. The second half of the project will involve independent study of topics chosen by the students in preparation for half-hour oral presentations during the last week. The oral reports will be comprehensive, well illustrated explanations of the geology of a particular national park or monument of the student's choice, using maps, slides, and reference materials available within the department and on the internet. A detailed outline and an accompanying bibliography will be submitted at the time of the oral presentation.
No prerequisites. Open only to students with no previous college-level study of geology. Preference will be given to first-year students.
Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for the text.
Meeting time: mornings.

WOBUS

GEOS 012 The Lost World

The Lost World by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was written in 1939. Besides being a classic thriller, it shows us where dinosaur science stood at the beginning of this century. Interest in dinosaurs was low the next forty years. New theories about dinosaur biology and function, however, launched a golden age for dinosaurs in the 1980s. The movies Jurassic Park and Lost World, based on the novels by the same names by Michael Crichton, represent the popularization of these new theories and media fulfillment of a renewed interest in dinosaurs. The 1990s have witnessed an array of studies on dinosaurs and amazing new dinosaur finds. Foremost among these are the feathered dinosaurs of China. This course will investigate how our views of dinosaurs have changed through the century. We will use the books and movies mentioned above as a basis for discussions of dinosaurs as living organisms. What is the science behind these books and in what direction is dinosaur science moving today?
The class will meet three times a week for 120-minute sessions. Students are expected to do research from the paleontological literature on one type of dinosaur and present the result as a written paper for evaluation and group discussion. There will be a day-long field trip to the dinosaur exhibition at the American National Museum of Natural History in New York or the Peabody Museum at Yale.
Required reading: Michael Crichton: Jurassic Park and Lost World, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: The Lost World, and a selection of scientific dinosaur articles.
Evaluation will be based on the submission of the paper and oral presentation, as well as participation in group-discussions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 12.
Cost to student: approximately $30 for books and $20 for the field trip.
Meeting time: afternoons.

GUDVEIG BAARLI (Instructor)
M. JOHNSON (Sponsor)

Gudveig Baarli is a research associate in the Geosciences Department at Williams College. She received her Doctor of Philosophy degree from the University of Oslo in 1988.

GEOS 021 The Winter Landscape (Same as Environmental Studies 021)

(See under Environmental Studies for full description.)

GEOS 025 Hawaii Field Geology

The big island of Hawaii contains some of the best studied active volcanoes in the world. The U.S. Geological Survey runs a well staffed observatory and scientists from the University of Hawaii and around the world investigate how lava is transported hundreds of kilometers from the mantle to the earth's surface. Mauna Loa is the world's biggest mountain when measured from its base on the ocean floor. Gravitational subsidence in the form of massive submarine landslides together with stream erosion prevent the mountain from attaining greater heights. We will visit Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and other parts of the big island to study first-hand the processes that form the volcanoes. We will also investigate the forces that act to reduce elevation on the island.
Participants will meet in Hilo, Hawaii and travel via rented vehicles to our base in Kailua-Kona. The first part of the trip will involve group field trips to visit geologically important sites. During the second part of the course students will work in small groups on projects related to growth and erosion of the volcanoes. The field component of the course will last two weeks. We will be joined by Dr. Richard Hazlett of Pomona College, a leading authority on the geology of Hawaii and author of the Roadside Guide to the Geology of Hawaii. The final part of course will be devoted to preparation of student papers.
Course evaluations will be based on field notes compiled during the trip and a ten page paper describing the results of the field projects.
Prerequisite: Geosciences 255T (offered only in the Fall Term 1999). Enrollment limited to 10.
Cost to student: food ($200) plus airfare to and from Hilo, Hawaii (approximately 300 to $700).

RICHARD HAZLETT and KARABINOS (Instructors)

Richard Hazlett teaches geology at Pomona College and is a leading authority on the geology of Hawaii. He is the author of Roadside Geology of Hawaii.

GEOS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Geology 493-494.

GERM S.P. Sustaining Program for German 101-102

Something new and different for students enrolled in German 101-102. Practice in the use of German for everyday purposes; creation and performance of short dramatic sketches through group collaboration; games; songs; storytelling; reading. No homework.
Class meets four times a week for 50 minutes.
Requirements: active participation and regular attendance earn a "Pass" grade.
Prerequisite: German 101 or equivalent. Limited to German 101-102 students.
Cost to student: the price of one paperback text.
Meeting time: 9:00-9:50 a.m.

GREINEDER, SCHAGERL

GERM 025 German in Germany

Begin or continue study of the German language at the Goethe Institute in Prien, Germany. The Goethe Institute program attracts students from all over the world. A typical course meets for four weeks, 18 hours/week, generally providing the equivalent of one semester course at Williams.
To earn a pass, the student must receive the Goethe Institute's Teilnahme-Bestatigung which denotes regular attendance at classes, completion of homework, and successful completion of a final test.
Students wishing to apply must fill out an application, obtainable in the office of the Center for Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Cultures in Weston, and return it to the Goethe Institute as soon as possible (admission is on a first-come, first-served basis). It is also possible to apply online at www.goethe.de.
No prerequisites, but any student interested in beginning German with this course and then entering German 102 at Williams should contact Professor Kieffer by December 1, at the latest. Enrollment limited to 15. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: from approximately $1300 to approximately $1800 for tuition and room and board, plus round trip travel costs. The Goethe Institute arranges for room and board at various levels upon students' request, but students must make their own travel arrangements. This course is not defined as a "trip" for financial aid purposes. The maximum reimbursement to financial aid students is $300.

NEWMAN

GERM 030 Honors Project

To be taken by honors candidates following other than the normal thesis route.

GERM 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for German 493-494.

HIST 010 Historical Research and Thesis Writing

This course will demystify the strategies and methods of doing historical research. Among the subjects to be covered are formulating a workable topic, identifying and locating relevant sources, evaluating and organizing historical data, and framing appropriate hypotheses. The course will involve extensive work in the resources and technologies of Sawyer Library. Students will complete a number of short exercises culminating in a detailed research design for a project of their own choosing.
Requirements: class attendance and participation, several short exercises and a detailed research design. Class will meet three times a week.
No prerequisites. Strongly recommended for anyone considering an Honors Thesis in History. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: $30 covering books and Xeroxes.
Meeting time: afternoons.

R. DALZELL and LEE DALZELL

Lee Dalzell is Head of Reference Services at Sawyer Library.

HIST 011 Latino Material Culture

This course is a hands-on introduction to Latino material culture, with an emphasis upon learning about Latinos through making popular objects from Latino material culture. Instruction will include an overview of Latino cultures in the US with a particular focus on the historical origins and cultural development of what one sociologist described as "the Rainbow People." Through recreating Latino festivities and ritual celebrations, listening to popular music, making decorations like pinatas and paper flowers, watching telenovelas, and cooking Latino foods, we will explore how Latinos have held on to their sense of self while negotiating the pressures of American society.
Requirements: class attendance and participation, a 10-page final paper, and completion of class projects. Class will meet three times a week.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to students: less than $50.
Meeting time: mornings.

PAGÁN

HIST 012 American Strategy in World War II: War Plans and Execution

During the Second World War, the United States fought a global conflict. By late 1943, for example, American forces were in combat in Italy, New Guinea, the Solomon Islands and the Central Pacific. The war against the U Boat threat and the air war against Germany continued with increasing intensity, and the allied staffs were engaged in planning the 1944 invasion of France.
To achieve the nation's basic political objective-the unconditional surrender of Germany and Japan-the United States devised a series of strategic and operational war plans for both the European and Pacific areas of operation. A number of factors including inter-allied and inter-service disputes, logistics and enemy actions frequently led to results that were quite different from the planner's expectations.
The course will examine the major US war plans using selected readings and a number of actual plans. The seminar will then explore the realities of battle and the differences between plans and execution.
Requirements: class participation and attendance, and a 10-page essay. Class will meet twice a week for three hours.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: $30 for books and Xeroxes.
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons.

STEVEN ROSS (Instructor)
WAGNER (Sponsor)

Steven Ross, '59, holds the Admiral William V. Pratt Chair of Military History at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island.

HIST 013 The Vietnam War in Literature and Film

Writers and film makers on all sides of the complex Vietnam War have struggled for some time to produce works that both portray the realities of war and (for some) entertain the public. This WSP looks at a few of the classic films of the period such as The Green Berets, Good Morning Vietnam, Platoon, A Rumor of War, The Killing Fields, and Apocalypse Now, and tries to compare it with U.S. and Vietnamese writing to get some sense of how the war (or more properly, wars) have been represented.
Requirements include film viewing, some short readings, two 5-page papers, and active participation in discussion.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 25. Preference will be given to students who were dropped from History 322.
Meeting time: mornings.

FROST

HIST 014 Belgium: Straddling a Cultural Divide

This course surveys the history of a land that straddles the Germanic-Romanic cultural divide-from its conquest and addition to the Roman Empire to its adherence to the European Union and adoption of a common European currency. Since the Roman era, this cultural cleavage has split Belgium internally, encouraged interventions and invasions of foreign powers advancing their commercial and empire-building interests at the "crossroad of Europe" and accentuated Belgian concern for European harmony. The cultural split combined with the intrusions of European powers contributed to: the breakup of the Carolingian Empire, conflict among the medieval fiefdoms, the rise and demise of Burgundy, the subjection of the land to Spanish, Austrian, French and Dutch domination and the threats faced by independent Belgium. Somewhat paradoxically, two World Wars increased Belgian ardor not only for unifying Europe but also for dividing Belgium along linguistic lines into federated regions, in part because of the Nazi discrimination between Flemings and Walloons during each occupation.
Requirements: class participation and attendance. Each student will prepare and present a 10-page paper indicating how the past has affected one aspect of its present internal or international challenges. Class will meet three times a week.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to students: $30 for books and Xeroxes.
Meeting time: mornings.

SAMUEL HUMES (Instructor)
WAGNER (Sponsor)

Samuel Humes, '52, former professor Boston University, Brussels, and a partner in Management Development International (MDI) in Belgium.

HIST 015 "The Fatherland in Cleats": Soccer, Baseball, and Boundaries in the Americas

This course will examine the cultural meanings of futebol and beisbol in inter-American contexts. Across the Americas people have used both of these often low-scoring sports to define themselves, their nations, and even their civilizations. Looking at both the darker tendencies (especially violence) and the aesthetically pleasing products (such as Brazilian "football-art" or "the beautiful game") of soccer and baseball, we will discuss the boundaries involved in such definitions-between Latin American countries and the United States, between men and women, between macho and non-macho men, between racial and ethnic groups. Among the questions we will address are: What does baseball represent for players and spectators in Iowa and the Dominican Republic? What does the participation of Latin American players mean for the "national pastime" of the United States? Why do nations develop distinct styles of play? Will the rise of women's teams challenge soccer machismo? Students will also explore the themes of the course in a project on a specific team, game, athlete, or league.
Requirements: regular attendance and a 10-page paper. Class will meet three times per week.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: $50 for books and photocopies.
Meeting time: mornings.

KITTLESON

HIST 016 "I Will Bear Witness Until the Bitter End:" The Experience of a German-Jew in the Third Reich, 1933-1945

This course will be devoted to reading the two-volume diary of Viktor Klemperer, a German-Jew living in Dresden, who managed to survive both the Holocaust and the fire-bombing of that city. From 1933 to 1945, Klemperer, a professor of Romance languages and literature, kept a diary in which he described his personal experiences in Nazi Germany. The diary raises important issues of identify, victimization, resistance, and the relationship between writing and life. It illuminates German-Jewish attitudes and relations over the course of the Third Reich and paints a vivid portrait of life in Germany from 1933 to 1945. But most of all, the diary gives an account of one person's day by day experience of the gradually tightening Nazi noose that takes the reader's breath away.
Requirements: class participation and attendance and a 10-page paper. Class will meet three times a week.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: $40 for books and Xeroxes.
Meeting time: mornings.

KOHUT

HIST 017 Theoreticians, Writers and Activists: The West Indian Intellectual Tradition

This course will examine the life and writings of three heroes of the modern Caribbean: Eric Williams, C. L. R. James, and Walter Rodney. All three were historians, but they each wrote broadly, covering areas including economics, political theory, literature, sports, and culture. They were also each activists, committed to various causes including independence, Black Power, Pan-Africanism, Federation, and class struggle. Eric Williams became Prime Minister of independent Trinidad and Tobago, C. L. R. James became a leader of various groups of activists in Trinidad and abroad, earning him imprisonment in Ellis Island and house arrest in Trinidad, and Walter Rodney was assassinated while fostering the development of radical politics in his native Guyana. Through their example and their voluminous writings, they have played an important role not only in the West Indies but in the wider world, especially in the United States of America, Great Britain, and various African nations. In this course we will read excerpts from some of their works-works like How Europe Underdeveloped Africa, Groundings with My Brothers, Every Cook Can Govern, The Life of Captain Cipriani, British Historians and the West Indies, and From Columbus to Castro. We will also read some important biographical works on these individuals, as well as recent West Indian appraisals of the contribution of these men to the modern Caribbean.
Requirements: class participation and attendance and three (3) short (3-5 pages) papers. Class will meet twice a week for three hours.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: $40 for books and Xeroxes.
Meeting time: mornings.

SINGHAM

HIST 018 Decadent Memories: The Sixties in Theory and Practice (Same as Mathematics 018 and Special 018)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

HIST 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for History 493-494.

LEAD 010 Corporate Leadership and Social Responsibility

This course considers the responsibilities of leadership in corporate life through the perspectives of visiting alumni who hold leadership positions in American corporations. It examines the social obligations created by success in business, the risks versus rewards of corporate leadership, the benefits and the costs of fulfilling or exceeding expectations, and the range of professional, social, and personal dilemmas faced by leading figures in modern corporations. Readings will include material from philosophy and psychology, as well as relevant biography and autobiography.
Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation in class discussions and a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: approximately $30 for books.
Meeting time: mornings.

BETH RAFFELD and GEORGE KENNEDY '48 (Instructors)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Beth Raffeld is Director of Principal Gifts for Williams College. George Kennedy '48 is retired chairman and chief executive officer of International Minerals and Chemicals, and Mallinckrodt Group, Inc., both Fortune 250 companies. Mr. Kennedy chaired the 50th reunion fund for Williams in 1998 when the class of 1948 designated significant support to underwrite the Leadership Studies program.

LEAD 012 Theodore Roosevelt and Franklin Delano Roosevelt: The Anatomy of Greatness

What makes great presidents? Courage and conviction or skill in brokering deals?
In this course we will focus on the presidencies and accomplishments of the two upper-class cousins, both of whom graduated from Harvard to become assistant secretaries of the Navy, governors of New York, and the greatest American presidents of the twentieth century. Although the two Roosevelts were deeply committed to social reform and economic justice, and although TR's "Square Deal" evolved into FDR's "New Deal," they both found themselves ensnared by forces they could not control and by men they could not master. The "Square Deal" and the "New Deal" were ultimately only half dealt. Thus, this course will also raise fundamental questions about the American political system and the limitations it imposes on even the most creative leadership.
In addition to three class meetings per week, we will spend two days conducting research at the Roosevelt Library in Hyde Park, New York. Students will write one 15-page paper, in part based on research at the FDR Library.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 12.
Cost to student: $50 for books and $200 for one night and two days in Hyde Park.
Meeting time: afternoons.

DUNN and JAMES MACGREGOR BURNS (Instructors)

James MacGregor Burns, Woodrow Wilson Professor Emeritus of Government, Williams College, is the author of Roosevelt: The Lion and the Fox and Roosevelt: Soldier of Freedom, which won the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and the Parkman Prize. He is also the author of The Deadlock of Democracy, Leadership, and other books. Professor Burns and Professor Dunn are currently co-authoring Three Roosevelts: Class Betrayal and Moral Leadership.

LEAD 019 Outdoor Leadership and Group Dynamics

This Winter Study project is for students interested in an outdoor experiential leadership course off-campus, e.g. National Outdoor Leadership School or Outward Bound. Two preparatory meetings will precede the off-campus course and two meetings to reflect on the experience will follow. These meetings help to create a framework for monitoring the development of group dynamics and for studying a variety of leadership styles during the off-campus experience.
Requirement: a 10-page paper on outdoor leadership. Grades are based on an oral presentation of the paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 30. Not open to first-year students. Interested sophomores, juniors, and seniors must consult the instructor before registration.

SCOTT LEWIS (Instructor)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Scott Lewis is an Assistant Professor of Athletics and Director of the Outing Club at Williams.

LEAD 021 Leadership in the World of Affairs: Regional Internships

This course provides a hands-on study of leadership in organizational contexts, combined with a sociology of occupations, organizations, and leaders. Guided by a professional mentor, each student works as an intern in one of a variety of northern Berkshire profit or nonprofit organizations. In addition, all student interns meet regularly as a group with the instructor to do a systematic comparative analysis of their experiences in their organizations.
Requirements: a 10-page paper on leadership in organizations. Grades are based on mentors' and the instructor's evaluations. The mentors negotiate work schedules with students.
Internships are available in organizations in the following fields:

Architecture Information Technologies Startup
Arts Programming Journalism
Community Organizing Legal Services
Financial Services Municipal Government
Health Care Tourism/Hospitality

Selection requirements: At the time of registration, all students interested in joining the course must submit a resume and cover letter explaining their interests. Materials should be sent to the Leadership Programs Coordinator, Bronfman Science Center.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 12.
Cost to student: $20 for books plus cost of local transportation.
Meeting time: afternoons.

JACKALL

LIT 011 The Colonialist Vision

From the peak of imperialism to its decline, what were the myths, observations, and prejudices that informed the European view of the colonial enterprise? How is the relationship between colonialists and the colonized expressed in literature and film? This course will explore what happens to the novel when it explicitly confronts problems of class, race and ideology, oppression and resistance, the individual and the mass, the meeting of two radically different cultures and systems of belief. Do men and women writers figure the colonialist experience differently? The readings will include both authors who wrote from direct contact with the peoples of Asia and Africa and those who fabricated a purely imaginary construct of a different culture. Other topics for discussion will focus on romantic images of conquest, the symbolism of exotic settings, the varied places assigned to women within the colonialist enterprise-from idealized icon of the colonialist imagination to autonomous agent. Texts will probably include Flaubert's Salammbo, Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Kipling's The Man Who Would Be King, Foster's Passage to India, Dinesen's Out of Africa, Markham's West With the Night and autobiographical material by Kenyan and Indian women. We will also watch the filmic adaptations of Kipling's, Dinesen's, and Foster's novels.
The class will meet for discussion for two hours twice a week, plus two hours a week of film screenings.
A passing grade will require active class participation and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: $30.
Meeting time: mornings.

DRUXES

LIT 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Literary Studies 493, 494.

MATH 010 Acting Practicum (Same as Theatre 010 and Special 010)

In this course, students will read, interpret and perform scenes from contemporary plays with an emphasis on women playwrights. We will work on basic acting techniques, monologues and scene studies, culminating in a showcase performance.

Evaluation will be based on the final performance of the scenes studied.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: $20-30 for materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

AMELIA ADAMS (Instructor)
ADAMS (Sponsor)

Amelia Adams is a regional actor who has performed in a variety of theatrical and commercial venues over the last ten years. She is a member of the Actor's Equity Association and the American Federation of Radio and Television Actors.

MATH 012 Teaching School

We will teach in local schools, probably 4-6 graders. In my column and TV show, available on the web at http://www.maa.org/news/columns.html I've found that 4-6 graders are the most interesting, original thinkers around, and that the show goes best when I let them tell me what to explore. So we will explore what they are interested in and give them a chance to ask the questions and express their ideas, and then publicize their ideas in my column and elsewhere. Of course I hope that mathematics will be one topic, the Williams students may have some special interests, and the school may have some suggestions.
Grade based on participation, preparation of materials for instruction, submission of materials for publication, weekly reports, final ten-page report.
Daily meetings, depending on school schedule.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to students: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons; may have to change to work with elementary school.

MORGAN

MATH 013 Chaos, Infinity and the Fourth Dimension in the Humanities and Social Sciences (Same as Special 013)

Have you ever wondered if sexy math ideas can be applied to the humanities and social sciences? If so, then this course is for you. In reading literary criticism or anthropology or art history you may have encountered a mathematical concept or allusion and wondered if the allusion was accurate. Here we will, in a completely non-technical way, discover the enticing ideas of "chaos," "infinity," and "dimensionality" from a mathematical standpoint and then move to see how these ideas are evoked outside the sciences. Our goals will be to understand these interesting math concepts; to see how these ideas are used in the humanities and social sciences; and, then, to determine if they are being used in a meaningful way.
Evaluation will be based on several short essays and one final project.
No prerequisites.
Cost to student: $20.
Meeting time: mornings.

ROBERT TUBBS (Instructor)
BURGER (Sponsor)

Robert Tubbs is Associate Professor of Mathematics and past department chair at the University of Colorado-Boulder. He has been a member of the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute and and Institute for Advanced Study. He is the author of numerous mathematical papers.

MATH 014 Modern Dance (Same as Special 020)

This dance class will be based on a combination of techniques that the instructor acquired while touring as a professional modern dancer including influences from Mary Wigman and Alvin Nikolai. The class is open to anyone who is interested, including beginners and men and women alike. It will be multi-level and will concentrate on movement across the floor. Students will have the opportunity to choreography a short piece either as a soloist or in small groups. We will finish the course with a short lecture-demonstration illustrating what we have learned.
No prerequisites.
Meeting time: mornings (class will be held Monday through Thursday).

R. DE VEAUX

MATH 018 Decadent Memories: The Sixties in Theory and Practice (Same as History 018 and Special 018)

In a shutter-stop series of lectures, slides, and visions (but no revisions) the Sixties, warts and all, will be examined in theory and practice through its media (its books, movies, newspapers and manifestos); its attitudes on rock and revolution. Underlying all will be an examination of how the "Revolution For The Hell Of It" became the stuff of MTV buzz clips, with diversions and discursions into how the peculiar mechanism of American capitalism eventually reduces all cultural movements to fashion. Decadent Memories will also deal with the widely held contemporaneous belief that you could be anything that time around if only you knew who you were. It is hoped that students will revise their views about what constitutes the study of contemporary cultural history.
The course will consist of discussions, screenings of seminal films as well as selected directed listenings of pertinent music showcasing the era's far-reaching cultural eclecticism (i.e., Everything from Little Walter to Root Boy Slim and the Sex Change Band, from Balinese Monkey Chants to Varese as well as the Dead, early Dylan, The Stones, the Mothers, The Doors, the usual suspects).
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper or its equivalent.
Prerequisite: an agile mind willing to question authorities (even the instructor's), and an animating intelligence coupled to an intellectual curiosity anxious to understand and experience the most important decade of the twentieth century through the examination of its primary sources. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: $40-70 for materials.
Meeting time: afternoons.

DAVID WALLEY (Instructor)
S. JOHNSON (Sponsor)

David Walley is the author of a variety of work on culture in recent decades, including No Commercial Potential: Frank Zappa Then and Now, The Ernie Kovacs Phile and Teenage Nervous Breakdown: Music and Politics in the Post-Elvis Age.

MATH 019 Fantasy Novels of C. S. Lewis and Charles Williams (Same as English 019)

Both Lewis and Williams were members of The Inklings, the remarkable group of British authors and thinkers who met regularly at "The Eagle and Child" Pub in Oxford, where writers (including Tolkien) read their works in progress to one another. Lewis is well-known; the works of Williams have received less recognition, but were admired by W. H. Auden, Dorothy L. Sayers, and T. S. Eliot. Both Lewis and Williams approached their work as staunch Anglican Christians, and their point of view will be respected in this course; however, their novels can speak to the lives of all readers who are sensitive to their own world and to human relationships.
We'll read Lewis's Screwtape Letters (for background and also for fun) and The Great Divorce. To prepare for That Hideous Strength (often called "the Charles Williams novel written by C. S. Lewis"), we'll turn to Williams's War in Heaven with emphasis upon the themes of co-inherence and substitution. We'll then read Williams's Descent into Hell and either The Place of the Lion or All Hallows' Eve (depending upon availability of the novels). The month will conclude with Lewis's final novel, Till We Have Faces.
To qualify for a Pass, students must expect to attend and to participate in all discussions. The final project will be a 10- to 20-page short story in the style of, incorporating some ideas of, or using literary techniques of the novels read. Alternatively, students may choose to write an expository paper of about 15 pages relating some or all of the novels read to other fiction by these two authors or to works of comparable writers such as George MacDonald or Madeleine l'Engle.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 14.
Cost to student: $40-70 for books.
Meeting time: mornings.

V. HILL

MATH 030 Senior Project

To be taken by candidates for honors in Mathematics other than by thesis route.

MATH 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Mathematics 493-494.

MUS 010 Woodwind Chamber Music Performance

Students will be formed into chamber music ensembles and prepare music for performance in a studio concert to be held during the last week of Winter Study. The make-up of the ensembles will be determined, in part, by the instrumentation available. Preexisting ensembles will be considered for admission. Ensembles will rehearse daily during the morning, for a minimum of six hours per week of coached rehearsals and master class. Additional non-coached rehearsals required. Attendance at all rehearsals and weekly master classes will be required.
This course is for intermediate and advanced instrumentalists. Admission is by permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 14.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

STEPHEN WALT (Instructor)
KECHLEY (Sponsor)

Stephen Walt is Adjunct Teacher of Bassoon and Director of Woodwind Chamber Music at Williams.

MUS 012 Ghanaian Music and Dance

This course is an intensive workshop in Ghanaian music and dance open to students at both the beginning and advanced levels. Students may learn dance or drum in a variety of Ghanaian styles. A limited number of advanced students may play marimba. Students will be required to practice outside of class time.
It will be taught by Sandra Burton and Ernest Brown, co-directors of Kusika, the Williams College African music and dance ensemble, with Obo Addy, master drummer and composer. In addition, a Ghanaian dancer, as yet unselected, will participate.
The course will culminate in a performance on the evening of Tuesday, January 25. Classes will be scheduled for approximately 2 hours per day 5-6 days per week. There will be a tech and a dress rehearsal outside of the normal WSP in preparation for the performance. There may be additional rehearsals on the weekend before the performance. Students may miss one class and receive a passing grade. Students may not miss the dress rehearsal, tech rehearsal, or the performance. The performance will be the last meeting of this course. It will be difficult for students to enroll in this course and another WSP course.
Students will be evaluated on their participation and progress in class, rehearsals, and the performance. In addition, students will be evaluated on a journal of their experience taking the course.
No prerequisites. Interested students should submit a one page statement to Prof. Brown in the Music Department. Statements should include a student's name and contact information, a description of the student's music or dance background, and a statement of interest in the course. Preference to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 30.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: TBA.

E. BROWN, Music
S. BURTON, Dance
OBO ADDY (Instructor)

Obo Addy is a Ghanaian master drummer and composer who has performed with Kusika on several occasions.

MUS 013 Handbell Choir

A performance Winter Study project, the Handbell Choir will rehearse two hours per day, five days per week, from 10 a.m. to noon. A five-octave set of English handbells will be used. Repertoire will be wide-ranging, from the classics to popular music, from original compositions to arrangements. Difficulty of repertoire will depend on the skill of the ensemble as it develops.
Each student must make at least one written arrangement for handbells of a tune of their choice; the instructor will approve that choice and assist in arranging if necessary. Each arrangement will be read by the ensemble, and some will be rehearsed and performed.
The final week of Winter Study will consist of several performances of materials mastered during the previous three weeks of rehearsals.
A passing grade is assigned upon satisfactory completion of at least one arrangement and attendance at all rehearsals unless excused only for reason of illness.
Ringers must be able to read music well, but no prior experience playing handbells is needed. Bells are quite easy to play; ringers will be taught various handbell ringing techniques, and go on to experience the process and teamwork necessary to build a musical ensemble. Current ringers welcome, as are others willing to learn. Enrollment limited to 11.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

D. MOORE

MUS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Music 493, 494.

NSCI 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Neuroscience 493-494.

PHIL 010 Philosophical Puzzles

For good reason, the Philosophy Department at Williams tends to look at philosophical problems as developing out of historically located texts and situations. There is another approach, however, which is perhaps better suited to Winter Study: seeing philosophical problems as arising from puzzles. We will spend January discussing such questions as: Could God create a stone so heavy He couldn't lift it? Is this merely a joke or does it show the impossibility of a perfectly omnipotent being? Is the set of all sets that do not contain themselves a member of itself or not? Why do some philosophers consider that last question one of the great questions of the twentieth century? Do those philosophers have too much time on their hands? We will examine puzzles from the Liar to the Prisoner's Dilemma, in fields from metaphysics to ethics.
Requirements: class participation, an in class presentation, a paper, a deep mind, and a sense of humor
Cost to student: two paperback books.
Meeting time: mornings.

GERRARD

PHIL 012 Rabbis at Play: Introduction to Midrash

Why did Cain really kill Abel? What did God test with the binding of Isaac? How does the Jewish tradition read the Bible?
Turning to Hebrew and Aramaic texts (all in English translation), this course explores the traditional Jewish understanding of Biblical narratives. Midrash, "agadic literature," Common Era works as Mechilta d'Rabi Ishmael of fourth-century Palestine, the Talmud of fifth-century Babylonia, and linear commentators such as Rashi of eleventh-century France, explicate and illuminate Sacred Writ and portray the world of the rabbis. The Jewish view of Christianity and Islam, women and family values, God and humanity leap from the springboard of the Bible through Midrash.
Midrash will be taught as it was written-reverently, carefully and playfully in round table, group discussion that captures the excitement of the discovery.
Texts: one book is required; an English Bible is helpful.
Requirements: attendance, participation, one short (2-3 page) paper and one longer (7-8 page) final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 30.
Cost to student: approximately $30.
Meeting time: mornings.

DENNIS ROSS (Instructor)
GERRARD (Sponsor)

Rabbi Dennis Ross is Rabbi of Temple Anshe Amunim in Pittsfield. He has written on subjects ranging from bioethics, the Ten Commandments, and multiculturalism.

PHIL 025 Ancient Greek Philosophy in Greece

Ancient Greek philosophy is not only the origin of most of our present-day philosophical concerns and views, but is also formative of our ways of understanding what philosophy is, and how it should be pursued. The contemporary relevance of ancient Greek philosophers, however, too often obscures the fact that their culture, and their metaphysical, scientific and social assumptions greatly differ from our own. By visiting the archaeological sites of ancient Greek cities, temples, theaters and stadiums, we will try to understand the ancient Greek world in its own terms; for although we cannot hope to visit a world long lost to us, we can still try to interpret what remains of it by looking at more than just the preserved texts. Combining close readings, seminar-style evening discussions, and on-site student presentations (to be prepared in advance of the trip), we will discuss some of the central questions asked by ancient Greek philosophers, with a special focus on pre-Socratic philosophers, whose thoughts may have, for the most part, survived only in fragments.
Locations to be visited: Athens, Sounion, Megara, Corinth, Nemea, Mycenae, Argos, Epidaurus, Messina, Pylos, Tripolis, Olympia, and Delphi.
Duration of the trip: two weeks.
Required readings: Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Philosophers; Kirk & Raven, The Presocratic Philosophers; Plato, Apology, Crito, Protagoras, and Symposium; Aristotle, Poetics; plus a course packet.
Requirements: on-site presentation, participation in evening discussions, and a short (approximately 5 pages) paper, due in Williamstown on the last day of the Winter Study period. Each student should formulate his or her own topic, on any aspect of the course, and have it approved by me before we leave Greece.
Prerequisite: Philosophy 101, or consent of the instructor.
Cost to student: no more than $2500, including airfare, hotel, food, ground transportation, admissions, and books.

MLADENOVIC

PHIL 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Philosophy 493-494.

PHYS 011 Photography: The Personal Document

In recent years the number of photographers working with the personal as their principal subject matter has increased tremendously. This course is designed to explore this trend as students pursue a photographic project on some area of their lives. The first classes will present an extensive introduction to historical and contemporary representations of the personal, from Lartigue's candids of his family in the early 1900's to Nan Goldin's "Ballad of Sexual Dependency" music and slide show from the last few years. Students will then focus on their own work for the remaining weeks, with classes alternating between critiques, lab sessions, and various demonstrations.
Students can choose to work in any film/camera format, in color or black and white (though can only work in black and white in darkroom spaces), and employ as many media as necessary. Projects can cover a wide range, from a reworking of old family negatives to creating a visual book of personal objects. This is an ideal course for those interested in developing a concept or a body of work over an entire course; it is especially well-suited for those with a particular interest in recording their lives.
We will meet two or three times a week for three-hour sessions, with extra supervised lab times scheduled in accordance to our needs. Most shooting and darkroom work will be completed outside of class.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation, and consistent work on the project, culminating in a final visual presentation and a short paper.
Prerequisite: previous photographic experience, at the intermediate level or above, is required in order to gain the most from this course. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: $75. Students must also supply their own fully adjustable (manual option) 35 mm camera.
Meeting time: afternoons.

CECILIA HIRSCH (Instructor)
STRAIT (Sponsor)

Cecilia Hirsch, a local photographer, holds an M.F.A. from the Massachusetts College of Art and has taught photography at a variety of institutions including the Smithsonian, the Art Institute of Boston, and Bowdoin College.

PHYS 012 Meet the Right Side of Your Brain: Drawing as a Learnable Skill

Representational drawing is a not merely a gift of birth or a magical ability granted by angels, but a learnable skill. If you ever wanted to draw, but doubted you had the ability or believed you could not learn, then this course is for you. This intensive course utilizes discoveries in brain research to teach representational drawing. By using simple techniques and extensive exercises you will discover and develop the perceptual shift from your symbol based left hemisphere to your visually based right hemisphere. This cognitive shift enables you to accurately see and realistically represent the physical world. You will learn to draw a convincing portrait, self-portrait, and still life. This course is designed to develop your powers of observation and enhance your innate creative problem solving abilities, which are applicable in any field. Students need no previous artistic experience, just the willingness and desire to learn a new skill.
Students will be expected to attend and participate in all sessions. They will also be required to keep a sketchbook recording their progress and complete a final project.
Evaluation will be based on participation, effort, and development. The class will meet three times per week (about 10 hours lecture and group exercises) with substantial additional independent student work.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 30. The course will meet in two sections of 15.
Cost to student: text and drawing materials (approximately $30).
Meeting time: afternoons.

WILLIAM ZIEMER (Instructor)
STRAIT (Sponsor)

Bill Ziemer is a multimedia artist living in Williamstown and in Berkeley, California.

PHYS 013 Automotive Mechanics

The purpose of this course will be to provide an understanding of the basic function of the major components of the modern automobile. Through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on experience, individuals will learn basic maintenance of an automobile. In addition, students will be expected to study in depth one of the major automotive systems which include carburetor or fuel-injection systems, the lubrication and cooling system, the electrical system, the steering, brake and suspension system, and the power train for both manual and automatic transmissions.
The course will meet two hours a day, three times a week for classroom instruction. In addition, students will meet at the Flamingo Motors in Williamstown one evening each week for practical demonstrations and hands-on activity.
Students will be required to attend class regularly, read assigned material from the text, actively participate in work at the garage, and pass written midterm and final examinations.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 30. The class will be broken into three sections for lab work. Preference given to seniors.
Cost to student: approximately $45 for text.
Meeting time: mornings and evenings.

MICHAEL FRANCO (Instructor)
STRAIT (Sponsor)

Michael Franco is the owner of Flamingo Motors in Williamstown.

PHYS 022 Research Participation

Several members of the department will have student projects available dealing with their own research or that of current senior thesis students. Approximately 35 hours per week of study and actual research participation will be expected from each student.
Students will be required to keep a notebook and write a five-page paper summarizing their work. Those interested should consult with members of the department as early as possible in the registration period or before to determine details of projects then expected to be available.
Prerequisite: permission of specific instructor. Enrollment limited to 1 or 2 per project.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: to be arranged with instructor.

STRAIT and members of the department

PHYS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Physics 493, 494.

STRAIT and members of the department

POEC 031 Honors Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Political Economy 493.

PSCI 010 Introduction to NeuroMetrics (Same as Psychology 010)

This course provides an introduction to new emerging field, neurometrics. Both in the realm of politics and in marketing, emotions and thoughts combine to shape how people respond to events and how events are presented. Whether watching Presidential debate or a new commercial for a car or drug, people react. The development of a new apparatus that enables careful examination of brain activity, by monitoring electro-encepholographs (EEG) and evoked potentials (EP) enables real time investigation of how people respond to what they see and hear. After an introduction into the basic elements of neuroscience and emotion, as well as the uses of emotion in commercial advertising and political campaigns, students will be shown the apparatus and how to use it.
Students will form teams to explore various kinds of brain activity in humans who are observing student-chosen stimulus materials. Evaluation will be based on the completion of each project, a class presentation, and a brief written research report. We will meet initially daily for lectures and presentations, then in lab sessions for training. Thereafter, the individual groups will meet as necessary to execute their projects. The final week of winter study will be used for class presentations.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

MARCUS and SOLOMON

PSCI 012 The Politics of Gender-Bending: Drag, Camp, Butch and Fem in the Life and Movies of the End of the Twentieth Century (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 012)

In the last ten or twenty years, just about every mass-mediated paragon of woman and man as Dustin Hoffman, Julie Andrews, Kurt Russell, Barbra Streisand, Gerard Depardieu, Whoopi Goldberg, Robin Williams, Ellen Barkin, Patrick Swayze, Wesley Snipes and the Canadian figure-skating pair of Lloyd Eisler and Isabelle Brasseur have won acclaim for their cross-dressed performances, fixed up as someone of the opposite sex. Even though the 80s and 90s have been thought of as the rebound of political conservatism after the 60s and 70s, the same era has been the renaissance of gender-bending, to the point that even politicians have gotten into the act: witness New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani's unlikely appearance in early 1997 in full and lavish drag, as "Rudia Giuliandrews," alongside not only four cross-dressed deputy mayors (two men and two women) but accompanied by Julie Andrews in her get-up as a woman who plays a female impersonator from the Broadway show Victor/Victoria.
This course asks the questions: What is going on here? And what is the politics of this mass-mediated revival of gender-bending in recent film and culture? How in the world do we make sense of Dennis Rodman or RuPaul or k.d. lang? To figure this out, we'll spend some time focusing on the politics of gender-bending in the communities that have been most devoted to it-those of lesbians and gay men-and how the meanings of gender-bending in lesbian and gay worlds have shifted as they've been gleefully adopted by society as a whole. It may be that gender-bending does not really replace standard notions of gender with androgyny; instead, the elevation of the feminine "glamour queen" and the masculine "diesel dyke" may simply reinforce the dualism of masculinity and femininity.
To explore these questions, we'll examine some historians, theorists and/or practitioners of drag, camp, butch and fem. We'll study a number of movies, beginning with two classic cases of cross-dressing (Queen Christina and Some Like It Hot). Then we'll turn to more recent films that look at the connections of gender-bending heterosexuality (Tootsie, Victor/Victoria), with farce (La Cage Aux Folles), with defiance (Outrageous!), with "passing" (The Ballad of Little Jo), with misogyny (Menage), with race (The Associate) politics high (The Crying Game) and politics low (The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert). Finally, we'll conclude with a look at new subcultures such as women's bodybuilding and voguing (e.g., Pumping Iron II: The Women and Paris Is Burning).
Requirements: inquisitiveness and independence, along with frequent attendance at films, regular attendance at class (thrice weekly).
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper (or equivalent, including videotapes, performances, etc.) at the end of winter study.
No prerequisites. All welcome. Enrollment limited to 30.
Cost to student: books and offset packet.
Meeting time: mornings.

COOK

PSCI 013 Political Pundits-The Media's Political Oracles

The impeachment trial of President Clinton gave a new life to political pundits. The media has markedly increased its use of such political experts to explain and make predictions of this and other political events. These pundits are fast becoming the continuing education instructors for all things political to most Americans. This course examines this growing field of media political experts. To better understand what they do and how they do it, students will learn the basic skill of writing an op-ed newspaper column on a political topic. Subject to availability, some national and state media pundits will discuss their craft with the class via a telephone conference hookup.
Course requirement is the preparation of a weekly 800 to 900 word column on a current political topic, one of which will be selected by each student at the end of the course for submission by the instructor to the Berkshire Eagle where they will be reviewed by the editor for his selection of one for publication.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.

Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

ROBERT F. JAKUBOWICZ (Instructor)
MICHAEL MACDONALD (Sponsor)

Mr. Jakubowicz served in the Massachusetts legislature. His political experience also includes 10 years service as a local elected official and participation in national political campaigns. He is a local media political pundit with monthly columns in the Berkshire Eagle. His columns have also appeared in the Boston Globe, Boston Herald, the New Bedford Standard Times, and the Cape Cod Times.

PSCI 014 Corporate Information Policy and Insider Trading

The development of corporations as the principal entity for business organization and the related capacity to raise investment capital by the issuance of shares are the basis for the enormously successful growth of both American business and our capital markets. The federal securities laws, in the name of preserving integrity and with it investor confidence, impose substantial restrictions on how and who may use information about a business. That information, although called an asset of the business, cannot be used without concern for public, marketplace responsibilities imposed by law. Breaking those rules can result in losing money one had gained, paying fines or even going to jail. Yet some knowledge is different from other knowledge and that difference changes the nature of corporate information from "insider" to other. All of these laws and responsibilities depend in large measure on something called the efficient market hypothesis, which until recently was an oxymoron but with the Internet may become a virtual reality. Or is there simply too much information to be useful? And what ought a corporate manager do anyway?
Requirements: class participation and an essay examination requiring analysis of a given fact pattern.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: $25 to $50 for reading materials (excerpts from court decisions, SEC regulations, journal and newspaper articles, etc.)
Meeting time: mornings.

PETER D. HUTCHEON (Instructor)
MACDONALD (Sponsor)

Mr. Hutcheon, '65, is a an attorney of corporate financing and has published several articles. He is a member of the New Jersey Corporate and Business Law Study Commission, Chair of Securities Advisory Committee to the New Jersey Bureau of Securities and Officer of the American Bar Association.

PSCI 017 The Politics of New England Food: Why New Englanders Eat What They Eat

Have you ever wondered why the food of New England is bland: is it the people, the land, the economy? Do New Englanders like their diets or are they forced into them? This course will investigate these kinds of questions by looking at the political, economic, cultural, and climactic factors that have shaped the diet and culture of New Englanders.
We will begin our course by learning about the ecology and culture of food developed by Native Americans: how did they hunt, gather and farm, and how did their methods of procuring food form their relationship to nature and the division of labor? Then we will consider the diet of the first white settlers, the interaction between Puritan and Native American cultures of food, the role of Puritan asceticism in shaping diets, and the consequent impact on family and social structures. Next we will examine how food was used to socialize Catholic immigrants from Europe, looking particularly at the pioneers of nutritional science (home economics), such as Fannie Farmer and her Boston Cooking School, and why they struggled to convince immigrants to reject their traditional foods in favor of their less nutritional -but more bland -"American" substitutes. Finally, we will conclude with a look at how the change in the production of food from the family farm to agribusiness has touched families, communities, and the role of women. We will enjoy an historically accurate demonstration of life in the 1700's at Historic Deerfield, a tour of the Bennington Museum and farm life in the 1800's, a visit to a community supported farm in our time, a guest speaker and several movies.
Requirements: a 10-page paper, reading and class participation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: $20 for museum entrance fees.
Meeting time: afternoons.

ROBIN LENZ MACDONALD (Instructor)
MACDONALD (Sponsor)

Robin MacDonald received her B.A. and M.A. in Political Science from UC Berkeley. She has written several articles about "food and its history" and has extensive experience in her field. She owns "Robin's Restaurant" on Spring Street, Williamstown.

PSCI 025 Cuba: Politics, Culture and Society at the Crossroads

This course aims to introduce students to the complexities of contemporary Cuban social and political life. Forty years after Fidel Castro's rise to power, Cuba remains a socialist state, albeit one that embodies numerous paradoxes and contradictions. Recent efforts to open Cuba up to ideologies and influences previously considered incompatible with the state's goals have led to such memorable recent events as the Pope's visit to Cuba in early 1998 and the announcement that Christmas could be once again publicly celebrated. In part, these policy changes reflect the tremendous pressure that Cuba faces from both external forces (largely in the form of ongoing economic sanctions) and sources of internal discontent (as the economic situation of the country worsens). During their stay in Cuba, students will investigate the changing political climate and social context of the country through a series of field trips and meetings. The aim of these excursions is to help students gain first-hand knowledge of the particular challenges facing the Cuban state and Cuban society. Our group will be based in Havana, but during the second half of the trip will make side-trips to provincial cities and areas of the countryside. Organized outings will include visits to selected museums, schools, farm co-operatives, and factories, sports clubs, and community centers.
Students will be evaluated on a research essay.
Prerequisites: strong preference for Spanish speakers. Enrollment limited to 12.
Cost to student: $1650.

M. DEVEAUX and MAHON

PSCI 026 The Politics of National Identity in the Arab World

This course will bring students to two Arab states, Syria and Jordan, to investigate the construction of national identities in these two "artificial" colonial constructions. In each country, we will first examine the "official" history of the nation, as represented in museums, historical sites, monuments, and festivals. As part of this, we will examine how each state has dealt with the legacies of colonialism, British and French respectively. We will then examine competing alternative narratives of the nation today by meeting with politicians, journalists, artists and intellectuals. In Jordan, for example, we will visit both a "tribal" area of the south and a Palestinian refugee camp, to compare the perspectives and narratives of Jordanian history found there. We will also meet with Islamists, students at the University of Jordan, and feminist activists. In Syria, which is less amenable to openly political activities, we will concentrate upon cultural representations of the nation, while visiting both Damascus and Aleppo to see the differences. Arrangements for the trip will all be made by the Amman and Damascus offices of AMIDEAST, a Washington based organization that organizes such trips.
Requirements: a 10- to 15-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15-20 students.
Cost to student: approximately $2900.

M. LYNCH

PSCI 027 Among Strangers: Taking Theories About the "Other" to Real Cultural Differences

How do we, and how should we, make sense of people who live in cultures radically different from our own? A number of courses across our curriculum consider this question on a theoretical level. It is central to such forms of inquiry as comparative politics, anthropology, religion, and philosophy and to reading such diverse writers as Salman Rushdie, Edward Said, Benedict Anderson, Emmanuel Levinas, Samuel Huntington, Clifford Geertz, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Gayatri Spivak, Jacques Derrida, Immanuel Wallersten, and Donald Davidson. All of these thinkers have theories-very elaborate theories, and theories that conflict with one another-designed to answer this question. How do these theories measure up in practice? Are any of them useful when one actually finds oneself in an alien cultural environment? That is the question this Winter Study is intended to explore.
The course will be open only to students who have already taken or will have taken one of the courses listed in the prerequisites, below. Students who have met this prerequisite may then apply for admission to the Winter Study, with a proposal describing a) a course of immersion-oriented travel (low budget, focused on one or two places, and preferably making use of homestays) in a developing Asian or African country that they have not hitherto visited, and b) how they plan to make use of one of the thinkers they have already studied to examine their own experience in understanding the people they meet when they travel. A student might propose, for example, a critical reflection on Arjun Appadurai's account of global cultural flows while making sense of downtown Katmandu-but the range of promising projects is vast. Whatever topic students propose to work on, they must demonstrate that they have already engaged in some depth with the writer or writers they choose-a 5-page paper on that writer should be submitted as part of the application. That paper then gets expanded, over the course of the WSP, to include a focused examination of how their study of the theory did or did not help them in their actual travels. Finally, the papers are shared, upon return to Williamstown, in an oral presentation to the other students in the class, together with the professors of the classes that were taken as prerequisites. Those admitted will receive substantial help from the Instructor in planning their trip, but no one will be accompanied on their travels by a faculty member. You can expect that your experiences will include a number that prompt questions like, "what ever led me to think I should come here?" The idea of this course is to promote the kind of travel that requires courage and fosters intense reflection on the nature of culture shock, while at the same time setting this experience in the context of theoretical frameworks that allow the reflections to be self-critical and deep.
Prerequisites: a willingness to take some risks and endure some discomfort, plus at least one of the following courses: Anthropology 101, 331, or 312T; ANSO 205 or 305; English 342 or 373; Linguistics 202; Literary Studies 111; Philosophy 204, 215T; Political Science 101 (Shanks), 235, 334T, 430; Religion 256, 281, 283, or 304. Enrollment limited to 10.
Cost to student: will range depending on country chosen and student need-complete funding available for students on financial aid and for others on a sliding scale.

REINHARDT

PSCI 030 Senior Essay

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 491 or 492.

PSCI 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 493-494.

PSCI 032 Individual Project

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 495 or 496.

PSCI 033 Advanced Study in American Politics

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 481-482.

PSYC 010 Introduction to NeuroMetrics (Same as Political Science 010)

This course provides an introduction to new emerging field, neurometrics. Both in the realm of politics and in marketing, emotions and thoughts combine to shape how people respond to events and how events are presented. Whether in watching when Presidential debate or a new commercial for a car or drug, people react. The development of new apparatus that enables careful examination of brain activity, by monitoring electro-encepholographs (EEG) and evoked potentials (EP) enables real time investigation of how people respond to what they see and hear. After an introduction into the basic elements of neuroscience and emotion as well as the uses of emotion in commercial advertising and political campaigns students will be shown the apparatus and how to use it. Students will form teams to explore various kinds of brain activity in humans who are observing student chosen stimulus materials.
Evaluation will be based on the completion of each project, a class presentation, and a brief written research report. We will meet initially daily for lectures and presentations, then in lab sessions for training. Thereafter, the individual groups will meet as necessary to execute their projects. The final week of winter study will be used for class presentations.
Enrollment Limited to 15.
Cost to students: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

MARCUS and SOLOMON

PSYC 012 Psychology Gallery

Shortly, the new science library will be completed, and all the books and shelving in the current psychology library space will be moved out. In this course, students will work collaboratively with psychology professors and professional curators to design a series of exhibits for this space. Together, we will decide what should be displayed and how, and will actually create the exhibits. We anticipate that the exhibits will eventually showcase a diversity of psychological phenomena in a variety of media (artifacts, text, photographs, and perhaps hands-on and computer-based demonstrations). There will be "pods" of students and professors working on various project areas (e.g., perceptual phenomena, mental illness and treatment, history of psychology).
Requirements are attendance and active participation, and a 10-page final paper.
Prerequisites: Psychology 101 and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 16.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting times: afternoons.

HEATHERINGTON

PSYC 013 Navigation and Wayfinding

THIS COURSE HAS BEEN CANCELLED!

PSYC 014 Race, Gender, and Body Image

According to recent statistics, 50% of women and 25% of men suffer from "negative body image." Poor body image is also a core feature of both anorexia and bulimia. This course will examine the various components of body image, how it is measured, and how it varies as a function of ethnicity and gender. It will also examine the theories that have been proposed to account for these differences. The first portion of the course will consist of lecture and class discussion. Once the basic concepts and theory have been covered, students will break into groups and develop a research project to test one of the major issues in body image. During the final week of the course students will present the results of their research in class.
Requirements: reading, class participation, field research, and a 10-page research paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting times: afternoons.

ALAN ROBERTS (Instructor)
KAVANAUGH (Sponsor)

Alan Roberts is Assistant Professor of Psychology at Southampton College of Long Island University. He received his Ph.D. in Social Psychology from the University of Louisville. He did an American Psychological Association-approved Predoctoral Clinical Internship at the FDR V.A. Hospital in Montrose, New York. His research is on racial differences in substance abuse etiology.

PSYC 015 Principles of Psychotherapy

Outlining the principles underlying the "talking cure," this course represents the kind of overview of psychotherapy the instructor wishes he had received as an undergraduate. Topics covered will include the particular arrangements for therapy, how they differ from other social situations, the initiation of therapy, and principles of transference, counter-transference, personal history investigation and interpretation. Of particular interest will be to describe how, during psychotherapy, persons change. By using both imagined therapy dialogues and published student autobiographies, efforts will be made at each stage to illustrate ways in which the general principles work out in practice. For the course paper, students will be asked to describe an issue of concern in the student's own experience and to imagine how a therapist might collaborate in working on that issue. At the end of the course the instructor will discuss each paper individually with each student.
Requirements: readings, class discussion, and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 10. Preference given to juniors and seniors.
Cost to student: approximately $25.
Meeting time: mornings.

RICHARD Q. FORD (Instructor)
KAVANAUGH (Sponsor)

Richard Q. Ford received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Chicago in 1970 He was, for twelve years, on the medical staff on the Austen Riggs Center in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, and has for the past sixteen years been in the private practice of psychotherapy in Williamstown. He is co-author with Sidney J. Blatt of Therapeutic Change: An Object Relations Perspective.

PSYC 017 Teaching Practicum

Students interested in teaching may submit applications for a Winter Study assignment as a teacher's aide at Mt. Greylock Regional High School or at the Williamstown Elementary School. Those accepted will work under the supervision of a regular member of the teaching staff and submit a report on their work at the end of the Winter Study Period. This project involves a four-week commitment to full-time affiliation with the school. Interested students should consult before winter study registration with Prof. Kassin, 305 Bronfman. He will assist in arranging placements and monitor students' progress during the four week period.
Criteria for pass include full time affiliation with the school and a final 10-page report. The final report should summarize the student's experiences and reflections as drawn from a daily journal.
Prerequisite: approval by Professor Kassin required. Enrollment limited to number of places available at the two participating schools.
Cost to student: none.

KASSIN

PSYC 018 Institutional Placement

Students interested in a full time January placement in a mental health, social service or applied psychology (e.g., advertising, law) setting may consult with members of the Psychology Department to make appropriate arrangements. Students should first make their own contacts with an institution or agency. They should also arrange to obtain a letter from a sponsor at the institution who will outline and supervise the student's duties during January. The student must agree to keep a journal and to submit a final paper summarizing and reflecting upon the experiences outlined in the journal.
Requirements for a passing grade are a satisfactory evaluation from the institutional sponsor and a 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: none.

KASSIN

PSYC 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Psychology 493-494.

REL 013 Ecology and Chinese Religions (Same as Asian Studies 013 and Environmental Studies 020)

(See under Asian Studies for full description.)

REL 014 Language of the Holocaust

How name what is unnameable, unthinkable, unimaginable? Is silence the only response to unspeakable acts? Or, if you can articulate a name, an authority, an identity, a reason for genocide, for the annihilation of the Jewish people, how do you express or represent the experience without the luxury of artifice? What are the terms of such expression? What claims does the experience make on those who wish to define it? Is there an ultimate fiction greater than fact that such an event requires? This course will concentrate on the relationships between historical/recorded (mimetic) interpretations (i.e., first person accounts, religious and historical texts, documentary footage) and constructed (poesis) interpretation of the Holocaust. The latter will include a sampling of films, novels, poems, art of victims and survivors and others using the material of genocide as primary source for the creation of a work of art. Within this framework questions regarding both the particular and universal nature of the Holocaust will be addressed. Course readings and material will offer provocative pairings to sharpen and question the necessary yet paradoxically unstable distinction between the mimetic and poetic mode: These might include Wiesel's Night; selections from the Old Testament (Akidah and Book of Job ) and the Zohar, Borowski's This Way to the Gas Chambers, Ladies and Gentlemen and Scrap of Time and Other Stories; Charles Reznicoff's Holocaust and Artie Spiegelman's Maus I and Maus II ; Expressionistic and concentration camp art; various historical accounts; and selections form the work of Paul Celan, Nelly Sachs, A. Sutzkever, Edmund Jabes, Aharon Appelfeld, Andre Schwarz-Bart, Terrence Des Pres and Daniel Goldhagen. Films might include Europa Europa, Nasty Girl, Shop on Main Street, Shoah and Schindler's List.
Requirements: a 10-page paper, class participation and regular attendance.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 25.
Cost to student: $60 for books and xeroxes.
Class will meet three times a week, two hours per class.
Meeting time: mornings.

DAVID RAFFELD (Instructor)
DARROW (Sponsor)

A poet and writer, Williamstown resident David Raffeld has written widely on the themes to be developed in this course. In addition to offering this course several times, Raffeld has taught Winter Study term courses at Williams in the Departments of Religion, Philosophy, and English. He has also been a Writer-in-Residence in the Department of Theater for the production of his Isaac Oratorio, which was written in part in response to the Holocaust.

REL 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Religion 493-494.

RLFR S.P. Sustaining Program in French 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study period. There are three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: 9:00-9:50 a.m.

Teaching Associate

RLFR 010 Asterix the Gaul: French Culture through the Prism of the Comic

The longevity and popularity of the Asterix comic strip series over successive generations of French (and foreign) readers can be explained, in part, by its subtle and incisive rendering of Europeanism through caricature. This course will examine some of the most enduring texts in the Asterix saga as interpretations, first, of French culture and the way the French view themselves with respect to the rest of Europe and, second, of the way they view Europe in dialogue with French cultural norms. Such issues as "la patrie" (homeland), linguistic characteristics, the idea of France, French provincial distinctiveness, France's view of homogeneous national character seen through its own cultural diversity, and the relationship of France to other specific regional cultures will be studied as a way not only of defining the nation's historic legacy, but of coming to terms with the way it sees its place within the vision of the European Union. Among the texts to be studied will be Asterix the Gaul, Asterix and the Banquet, Asterix and the Normans, Asterix in Corsica , Asterix in Britain, Asterix and the Goths, Asterix in Belgium, Asterix in Switzerland. Analysis of the primary texts will be complemented by secondary cultural readings by prominent interpreters in French culture. The course will be conducted in English; readings will be in English, but those students who wish to read the texts in the original French should make arrangements in advance with the instructor. Three 2-hour meetings a week.
Requirements: class participation and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 10.
Cost to student: books and reading packet only.
Meeting time: mornings.

NORTON

RLFR 025 Study French in France

For students who wish to take a three-week French course in France or in a French-speaking country. Programs are available in Paris, Nice, Guadeloupe, and other areas. Students are responsible for making all their own arrangements.
Cost to student: around $2500. This course is not defined as a "trip" for financial aid purposes. The maximum reimbursement to financial aid students is $300.

DUNN

RLFR 030 Honors Essay

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLFR 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for French 493-494.

RLIT S.P. Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: 9:00-9:50 a.m.

Teaching Assistant

RLSP S.P. Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: 9:00-9:50 a.m.

Teaching Associate

RLSP 020 Don Quixote in English Translation

Miguel de Cervantes' Don Quixote is the first modern European novel, and by all accounts, still one of the best. In this class we will read the entire novel in the finest English-language rendition available. We will discuss the work in detail using relevant historical and literary information, and our discussion will address the novel, the environment that helped shape it, and the scope of its influence.
Requirements: three class meetings a week and a 10-page paper. Attendance and participation are crucial.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 30.
Cost to student: about $25.
Meeting time: mornings.

ROUHI

RLSP 030 Honors Essay

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLSP 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Spanish 493-494.

RUSS S.P. Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102

Required of all students enrolled in Russian 101-102. Three meetings per week, 50 minutes per session. Practice in speaking and comprehension based on material already covered as well as some new vocabulary and constructions. Designed to maintain and enhance what was acquired during fall semester, using new approaches in a relaxed atmosphere. No homework.
Regular attendance and active participation required to earn a "Pass." Open to all.
Meeting time: 9:00-9:50 a.m.

KOLOMEETS

RUSS 025 Williams in Georgia (Same as Special 025)

Williams has a unique program in the Republic of Georgia, which offers students the opportunity to engage in three-week-long internships in any field. Last year's students worked in the Georgian Parliament, helped in humanitarian relief organizations like Save the Children, interned in journalism at The Georgian Times, taught unemployed women computer skills at The Rustavi Project, studied with a Georgian sculptor, did rounds at the Institute of Cardiology, and learned about transitional economies at the Georgian National Bank. In addition to working in their chosen fields, students experience Georgian culture through museum visits, concerts, lectures, meetings with Georgian students, and excursions. Visit the sacred eleventh-century Cathedral of Sueti-tskhoveli and the twentieth-century Stalin Museum, take the ancient Georgian Military Highway to ski in the Caucasus Range, see the birthplace of the wine grape in Kakheti and the region where Jason sought the Golden Fleece. Participants are housed in pairs with English-speaking families in Tbilisi, Georgia's capital city.
Evaluation: at the end of the course students write a 10-page paper assessing their internship experience.
No prerequisites. Knowledge of Russian or Georgian is NOT required. Enrollment limited to 8.
Cost to student: approximately $2000.

GOLDSTEIN

RUSS 030 Honors Project

May be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RUSS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Russian 493-494.

THEA 010 Acting Practicum (Same as Mathematics 010 and Special 010)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

THEA 011 Practicum in Stage Production

This course is a workshop for students with significant experience in theatre at Williams. It will enable a limited number of students to prepare one-act plays under the supervision of the instructor. Workshop performances of these short works will take place at the end of winter study.
Individual and collective meetings with the instructor will be required, and the instructor will attend a number of the rehearsals of each play.
Evaluation of the students' work in the course will be based upon participation in class, observation of the rehearsal process, and the quality and breadth of a production portfolio documenting the materials used in formulating the production.
Prerequisite: significant work in production at Williams and permission of the instructor. Interested students are required to consult with the instructor prior to registration. Enrollment limited to 8.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: none.

BUCKY

THEA 012 Comedy Writing Workshop

No one can be taught how to be funny, but funny people can learn how to write "funny." This is a course designed to help students develop and execute their comedic story ideas, either in play, television, or screenplay format. The focus will be on dramatic structure, development of each individual's comic voice or tone, and the importance of the feedback/rewriting process. Attention will also be given to outlining the practical steps for having material produced: from getting an agent, to exploring potential outlets for students' work. Students will be required to submit written work, in a number of formats, which will be read aloud in class, discussed and evaluated. Video clips from films, as well as their texts, will be analyzed to help students understand how being funny "on paper" translates to funny "on screen."
Evaluation will be based on committed participation in class and the development and improvement from first to final drafts. Class will meet on Wednesday and Thursday from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Prerequisites: course will be open to all classes, but students must submit either a writing sample to the Department or a (possibly comic) essay detailing why they want to develop their comedic writing skills in this class; and a comment on the statement: "Comedy is tragedy plus time." Enrollment limited to 15.
Meeting time: afternoons.

DAVID KATZ '89 (Instructor)
BUCKY (Sponsor)

David Bar Katz '89 received two Tony Nominations as co-writer/director for the Broadway production of "Freak". Television writing credits include: "House of Buggin" (co-creator/supervising producer); and the HBO special, "Freak". Films include "The Pest' (writer/co-producer); "The Organ Donor" (writer); and he is currently writing a screenplay entitled "Neurotics" for Wesley Snipes and John Leguizamo). Emmy nomination for best comedy special (1999).

THEA 013 Contemporary Dance-Theatre: Pina Bausch to Bill T. Jones

Dance-theatre is arguably the most influential and cutting edge practice to shape the late-twentieth-century European theatrical and choreographic avant-garde. Drawing from dance, theatre, visual arts, cinema, literature, and music, it is a truly interdisciplinary art form. This course will explore the genesis, development, and current tendencies of dance-theatre in Europe, as well as consider how dance-theatre has influenced and been absorbed by contemporary American choreographers. We will start by analyzing the work of one of the founders of the genre, German choreographer Pina Bausch. We will investigate her rehearsal and staging practices and techniques developed throughout the 1970s. We will then contextualize those practices against other artistic tendencies of the time in the visual arts, dance and theatre, most notably Fluxus, Tadeusz Kantor's theatre of images, and Trisha Brown's Equipment pieces. We will proceed to view a series of works from the 1980s by several European choreographers and directors who appropriated, expanded, and utilized Bausch's insights-such as Johan Kresnik (Berlin); Lloyd Newson and his dance group DV8 (UK); Caterine Diverres (France); and Jan Fabre, Win Vandekeybus and Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker (Belgium). We will see how, in the 1990s, a new generation of European choreographers exploded the dance-theatre paradigm: Francisco Camacho (Portugal), Jerome Bel (France), and Alain Platel (Belgium). Finally, we will see how dance-theatre has been interpreted and performed in the United States by choreographers such as David Rousseve, Bill T. Jones, John Jasperse, and Meg Stuart, among others.
Evaluation will be based on an oral presentation and a 10-page paper considering dance-theatre as a form of scholarship. Attendance and class participation will also be taken into account.
No prerequisites. Enrollment is limited to 20. Visual arts, dance and theatre students are highly encouraged to enroll.
Meeting times: afternoons.

ANDRE LEPECKI (Instructor)
BUCKY (Sponsor)

Andre Lepecki is a writer, dramaturg, and Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Performance Studies, New York University. He is currently working on an art installation for the Vienna Festwochen 2000 on the history of the body in dance. In addition, he is the dance dramaturg for American choreographer Meg Stuart (Belgium), and the U.S. correspondent for Ballet International (Germany).

THEA 025 Performance in New York City

New York City is recognized throughout the world as the nexus of the performing arts. Drawing upon Williams' proximity to New York, we will attend an expansive mixture of theatre, dance, and performance art over the course of three weekends, including Broadway musicals, downtown performance art, Shakespeare revivals, and contemporary intercultural productions. We will synthesize our collective and individual experience throughout the weekend through discussions and, in addition, students will write a critique analyzing their performance-viewing experience. On campus, we will meet twice a week for two hours in the afternoon to debate students' critiques and discuss readings selected to expand our perspective on the performances seen. Students will attend mandatory performances on each Winter Study weekend on Friday night, Saturday matinee, Saturday night, and Sunday matinee. Transportation will be provided, and accommodations arranged at the Williams Club. Meal places will include the Williams Club and various locations throughout the city. Evaluation will be based on the generation of three 5-page critiques and participation in class discussion.
No prerequisites, but preference will be given to Theatre majors. Enrollment limited to 12.
Cost to student: approximately $1425.
The class will meet one afternoon during the week of 4 January. During the weeks of 10, 17 and 24 January, the meeting/travel time will be Tuesday-Thursday mornings.

BEAN

THEA 030 Senior Production

May be taken by students registered for Theatre 491, 492 but is not required.

THEA 031 Senior Thesis

May be taken by students registered for Theatre 493, 494 but is not required.

WGST 012 The Politics of Gender-Bending: Drag, Camp, Butch and Fem in the Life and Movies of the End of the Twentieth Century (Same as Political Science 012)

(See under Political Science for full description.)

WGST 030 Honors Project

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

WGST 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Women's and Gender Studies 493, 494.

SPEC 010 Acting Practicum (Same as Mathematics 010 and Theatre 010)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

SPEC 011 Science for Kids (Same as Chemistry 011 and Environmental Studies 011)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

SPEC 012 Science Journalism (Same as Chemistry 012)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

SPEC 013 Chaos, Infinity and the Fourth Dimension in the Humanities and Social Sciences (Same as Mathematics 013)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

SPEC 014 Winter Emergency Care, CPR, Ski Patrol Rescue Techniques

The course is in three parts. When successfully completed it can lead to a certification as a National Ski Patrol member and certification in Professional Rescue CPR. It will also be designed to teach wilderness and outdoor emergency techniques.
The Winter Emergency Care Course designed by the National Ski Patrol is the main ingredient. It will be supplemented by the Red Cross CPR for the Professional Rescuer. An additional 18-hour outdoor course in Ski Patrol rescue techniques will be taught. Passing all three courses will certify the student as a National Ski Patrol member if he/she is a competent skier.
The course will deal with and teach how to treat wounds of all types, shock, respiratory emergencies, poisoning, drug and alcohol emergencies, burns, frostbite and other exposures to cold, also bone, joint, and back injuries, and sudden illnesses such as heart attacks, strokes, convulsions, etc. It will also teach the use of all splints, backboards, bandages, and other rescue equipment. It will teach extrication and unusual emergency situations and the use of oxygen. The outdoor course will include rescue toboggan handling, organization of rescues, and outdoor practical first aid.
Classroom work will include lectures, seminars, and practical work.
Requirements: there will be a mid-term and a final exam which will be both written and practical. Each week there will be 17 hours of classroom work plus 8 hours of practical outdoor work at Jiminy Peak ski area. Attendance at all classes is mandatory.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 18, chosen on the basis of skiing interest and ability and prior first aid experience.
Cost to student: $100 which will include all materials, books and registration fees.
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons.

JAMES BRIGGS and KEVIN HAMEL (Instructors)
PECK (Sponsor)

Jim Briggs was the Outing Club director at Williams for many years. He has led trips to the Alps on a number of occasions. He and Kevin Hamel are both certified OEC instructors.

SPEC 015 Deaf and Proud: An Introduction to Deaf Language and Culture

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the world of deafness. Although it is not a sign class, we will learn about the differences between American Sign Language (A.S.L.) and invented signed systems such as Signed English. Representations of deafness as a disability will be challenged from the perspective of those who argue that deaf people comprise a linguistic minority. Students should expect to develop a basic understanding of the linguistic status of American Sign Language (A.S.L.), a language in which the grammar is expressed on the face and which does not share the English grammatical structures. We will give specific attention to the social and economic status of the deaf community at large and to the social and political constraints imposed upon its members by a hearing community which denies them education in their own language. Three approaches to deaf education will be addressed: oral, signed English, and A.S.L. Native signers will be invited to lecture on A.S.L. and to engage in dialogue with students about deaf politics and culture.
Major texts for the course may include the following: In This Sign, by Joanna Greenberg, a child of deaf adults; The Mask of Benevolence, by Harlan Lane; Voices from a Culture, by Padden and Humphries; and a collection of articles and videos.
We will meet twice a week for 3-hour sessions. Since much class time will be spent viewing videotapes of deaf speakers, as well as films that explore deaf issues, attendance is mandatory.
Evaluation will be based on the following: attendance, short and informal writing assignments, class participation, and a final project (i.e., oral presentation, performance, video, essay, etc.).
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: $30 for books.
Meeting time: mornings.

LAURIE BENJAMIN (Instructor)
SAWICKI (Sponsor)

Laurie Benjamin is a graduate from the University of Massachusetts in multicultural and international education. Ms. Benjamin has taught deaf students at the secondary level. She is a nationally certified A.S.L. interpreter for the deaf with extensive experience in a wide range of interpreter settings including mental health and performance interpreting.

SPEC 016 Strategies for Classroom Management and Discipline

Short Title: Classroom Management

In this course students will study techniques in Teacher Effectiveness Training, Reality Therapy, Behavior Modification, Transactional Analysis, and other approaches. Will their applicability and effectiveness in the middle school and secondary setting. This course is part of the teacher certification program, and involves seminar activities and discussions as well as student teaching in local schools.
Meeting time: TBA.

ELLEN BARBER (Instructor)
ENGEL (Sponsor)

Ellen Barber is Assistant Professor of Education at MCLA.

SPEC 017 Principles and Techniques of Cooking (Same as Chemistry 017)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

SPEC 018 Decadent Memories: The Sixties in Theory and Practice (Same as History 018 and Mathematics 018)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

SPEC 019 Medical Apprenticeship

A student is assigned to a local physician, dentist, or veterinarian to observe closely his or her practice in the office and/or at the North Adams Regional Hospital, Berkshire Medical Center (Pittsfield, MA), or Southwestern Vermont Medical Center (Bennington, VT). It is expected that a student will spend the better part of the day, five days a week, with the physician or a period mutually agreed upon by the student and the physician as being educationally significant. The program has proven to be extremely successful in giving interested students a clear picture of the practice of medicine in a non-urban area. An effort is made to expose the student to a range of medical specialties.
A 10-page report written on some aspect of the month's experience is required.
Prerequisite: interested students must attend a mandatory information meeting in early October, prior to applying for this course. Preference is given to juniors, and then sophomores, whose course work has been suggestive of a firm commitment to preparation for medical school. Enrollment limited to 44.
Cost to student: none, except for local transportation and vaccinations.

SPEC 020 Modern Dance (Same as Mathematics 014)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

SPEC 021  Documentary Photography: Public Documents and Personal Narratives

This course combines a survey of the twentieth century documentary and narrative tradition in photography with each student's creation of a documentary project entailing written narrative and photography. Topics include Brassai, Weston's Daybooks, Cartier-Bresson, Robert Frank's The Americans, Diane Arbus, and the new generation document makers including Gilles-Peress, Abelardo Morell, Nicholas Nixon, and Sally Mann. We will also explore the gray areas between photographic fact and personal fiction through the work of Joel Peter Witkin, Duane Michaels and others. The students' daily ritual of exploring a documentary topic with their cameras and then processing and editing their work into a formed narrative document will give the students insight into the core issues of documentary photography as well as into their personal writerly and photographic vision.
The class will meet three mornings a week for two hours. In addition students will be expected to work for two sessions each week in the darkroom. Students will be encouraged to work on individual projects of their own choice provided that their attention to the documentary narrative process is engaged. Students will be evaluated on classroom and lab participation. Each student will be required to complete a documentary project portfolio of photographs and narration, and journal entries reflecting on fieldwork and lab work experiences.
Prerequisite: Basics of black and white film processing and printing. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to Student: $70-100 for film and photographic paper.
Instructor: Kevin Bubriski

Kevin Bubriski was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in Photography and an Asian Cultural Council Fellowship in 1994. His book Portrait of Nepal received top honors in Documentary in the Golden Light 1993 Book of the Year competition. His photographic prints are in many museum collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art and the International Center of Photography.

SPEC 025 Williams in Georgia (Same as Russian 025)

(See under Russian for full description.)

SPEC 027 Teaching and Writing at Theodore Roosevelt High School

Students choosing this Winter Study project will live in New York and travel daily to Roosevelt, a large comprehensive high school in the Bronx. A typical day includes: conducting small group work in selected classes (mostly English and Social Studies, but others are possible), working one-on-one with selected students, working in school departments (e.g. daycare center, college guidance office, tutoring center), and seminar-style meetings in which we discuss and write on issues that emerge from the work with students and teachers.
Requirements: Active and reliable participation in tutoring and discussion during January; participation in several brief orientation meetings before January (possibly including a half-day trip to TRHS), a journal during the program, a written report in a format of the student's choice at the end.
Prerequisites: Strong interest in working with young people. Enrollment limited to approximately 15 sophomores, juniors and seniors.
Cost to student: Approximately $350 for transportation and food. We will attempt to provide housing for tutors. Consult with instructor.

NEWMAN
Sponsored by the German and Russian Departments

SPEC 028 Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan

Participating sophomores, juniors and seniors will be expected to pursue a full day's program of observing, teaching, tutoring, and mentoring at Christopher Columbus HS in the Bronx or at A. Philip Randolph HS in Manhattan. Each of the schools will provide a resident supervisor for the Williams teaching interns who will meet regularly to assist with questions and to monitor individual schedules.
Criteria for a pass include full-time affiliation with the school for the entire winter study, keeping a daily journal, participating in the weekly after school seminars held for all of the NYC teaching practicums, and submitting a 5- to l0-page report at the end of Winter Study reflecting upon and summarizing the month's learning experience. Orientation meetings and a visit to the high school prior to the start of winter study will be arranged.
Cost to student: approximately $400 for food and transportation. Housing in NYC will be arranged where necessary.

P. SMITH
Coordinator of High School/College Partnerships

SPEC 029 Junior High School Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan

Participating sophomores, juniors, and seniors will be expected to pursue a full day's program of observing, teaching, tutoring and mentoring at PS 45 in the Bronx (a feeder school to Roosevelt HS) or at Roberto Clemente Junior High School in Manhattan (a feeder school to A. Philip Randolph HS). Each of the schools will provide a resident supervisor for the Williams teaching interns who will meet regularly to assist with questions and to arrange individual schedules.
Criteria for a pass include full-time association with the school for winter study, keeping a daily journal, participating in the weekly meetings for all of the Williams Teaching Interns, and submitting a 5- to l0-page report at the end of Winter Study reflecting upon and summarizing the month's learning experience. An orientation program and a visit to the school will be arranged prior to January.
No prerequisites.
Cost to student: approximately $400. for food and transportation while in NYC. Housing will be arranged for those needing it.

P. SMITH
Coordinator of High School/College Partnerships

SPEC 034 The Contemporary Singer/Songwriter

This course will focus on learning how to write and perform songs in a contemporary style. Topics addressed will include song structure, how to create a lyric that communicates, vocal and instrument presentation, performing techniques, publicity for events, and today's music industry. This class will culminate in a public performance of material written during the course.
In order to pass this course, each student will be expected to complete a minimum of two songs, both music and lyrics. One of these songs will be presented during the final performance, preferably by the student. If not, the student must arrange for someone else in the class to assist him or her. Also, a 2-page paper will be passed in on the last day of class.
There are no prerequisites for this course, although students with musical backgrounds and the ability to play instruments may be given preference for entry. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: approximately $75 for books and xeroxing costs.
Meeting time: afternoons (Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursdays for two-hour sessions).

BERNICE LEWIS (Instructor)
KECHLEY (Sponsor)

Bernice Lewis is an accomplished singer and songwriter who has performed her work throughout the country. She lives in Williamstown.

SPEC 035 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel

Each class will begin with a lecture-demonstration, followed by practice on the potter's wheel. Each student will have the use of a potter's wheel for each class. We will work on mugs, bowls, pitchers, plates, jars, lids, vases, and bottles, and will finish these shapes as required by trimming and adding handles, lugs, lids, spouts, and knobs. We will also work on several different handbuilding projects. After the tenth class session, all class work will be biscuit-fired. The eleventh class will be devoted to glazing the biscuited pieces. Glazing techniques will include pouring, dipping, layering, brushing, and stamping, and using wax resist and other masking techniques to develop pattern and design. The completed work will then be glaze-fired. The last meeting will be devoted to a "final exam" gallery show of your best work. Woven into lecture-demonstrations will be presentations on various topics relating to the science and history of pottery making.
The two most important requirements for this course are attendance at all class sessions and enthusiasm for learning the craft of pottery making.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 9.
Cost to student: $135 plus makeup class fees ($25 per class), if applicable.
Meeting time: mornings.

RAY BUB (Instructor)
Sponsored by the Winter Study Committee

Ray Bub is a ceramic artist and potter at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery in Pownal, Vermont. He also teaches pottery making at Southern Vermont College.

SPEC 036 Teaching Practicum: St. Aloysius School, Harlem

An opportunity for up to five sophomore, junior or senior students to observe, tutor, teach and mentor at St Aloysius School in Harlem under the direction of Principal Laurel Senger. An orientation session and a visit to the school in December will be arranged prior to Winter Study.
Criteria to pass include full-time participation at St Aloysius for the month, keeping a daily journal, participating in the weekly meetings of all NYC practicum students, and submitting a 5- to l0-page report at the end of WSP reflecting upon and summarizing the month's learning experience.
Enrollment limited to 5 sophomores, juniors or seniors interested in teaching
Cost to student: approximately $400. for food and transportation. Housing in NYC will be arranged where necessary.

P. SMITH
Coordinator of High School/College Partnerships

SPEC 039 Composing a Life: Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams

To be at Williams, you have learned to be a successful student, but how do you learn to be successful in life? What will be your definition of a successful career? What will be your definition of a successful personal life? How will you resolve the inevitable tradeoffs between your personal and professional lives, between family and career? In short, what will constitute the "good life" for you?
We borrow the concept of "composing a life," from a book of that title by Mary Catherine Bateson, as a very apt metaphor for the counterpoint and resolution of issues in defining success and balancing family and career. This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to explore their own assumptions and goals about life after college (with particular focus on the challenges of balancing career and family). More specifically, the course objectives will be: 1) to offer undergraduates, on the threshold of entering adulthood, an opportunity to examine and define their beliefs, values, and assumptions about their future personal and professional lives, in the broader context of life planning and composition, and to consider how they might achieve a successful balance; 2) To encourage students to gain a better understanding of how culture, ideology, and opportunity affect their choices about career and family; and 3) To provide an opportunity for students to "try on" different models of success and balance. An emphasis on case studies and "living cases" (in the form of guests from various professions who have made different life choices) will enable students to simulate real life without the actual risks of reality. We will look at the choices and tradeoffs, the consequences, and adaptations to the various models with the assumption that there is no one right answer to the dilemmas one might face in life after Williams.
Through the use of selected readings, case studies, guest speakers and field interviews, we will explore both the public context of the workplace and institutions as well as the private context of individuals and their personal relationships in determining life choices and career/family decisionmaking.
Students will complete a survey at the beginning of the course to explore their attitudes about defining success and balancing career and family in the future. They will also conduct one interview with a couple who has dealt with career/family issues to explore further the life choice decisionmaking process and its consequences. A major requirement of the course will be to write a final paper (10 pages) where students will be asked to discuss how the course materials, class discussions, interviews, and guest speakers have informed, validated, or challenged their personal thinking on defining success and balancing career and family in life after Williams. The final paper, we would hope, might become the foundation of a personal decisionmaking framework for future life choices.
Course requirements: regular attendance, class participation, field interview, and a 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: approximately $35 for photocopied articles, cases, and/or books.
Meeting time: mornings.

CHIP CHANDLER '72 and MICHELE MOELLER CHANDLER '73 (Instructors)
P. MURPHY (Sponsor)

Michele Moeller Chandler '73 and Chip Chandler '72 taught a similar Winter Study course for the past three years. They have been both personally and professionally engaged in the course topic. Michele's career has been in college administration, and she has an M.A. from Columbia, and a Ph.D. from Northwestern. Her Ph.D. dissertation focused upon the career/family decisionmaking of professional women who altered their careers because of family obligations. Chip is a senior partner with McKinsey & Company, an international management consulting firm, and he has an M.B.A. from Harvard. He will share the teaching load on a part-time basis. Guest speakers and faculty will address related topics. If you have questions about the course, you can contact the instructors via e-mail (chandler@bcn.net).

WILLIAMS PROGRAM IN TEACHING

Students interested in exploring one or more of the following courses related to teaching and/or working with children and adolescents should contact Susan Engel, Director of Education Programs, who will be able to help you choose one that best suits your educational goals.

ANSO 011 Berkshire Farm Internship

(See under Anthropology/Sociology for full description.)

ANSO 012 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

(See under Anthropology/Sociology for full description.)

CHEM 011 Science for Kids (Same as Environmental Studies 011 and Special 011)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

LEAD 019 Outdoor Leadership and Group Dynamics

(See under Leadership Studies for full description.)

MATH 012 Teaching School

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

PSYC 017 Teaching Practicum

(See under Psychology for full description.)

PSYC 018 Institutional Placement

(See under Psychology for full description.)

SPEC 015 Deaf and Proud: An Introduction to Deaf Language and Culture

(See under Special for full description.)

SPEC 016 Strategies for Classroom Management and Discipline

(See under Special for full description.)

SPEC 027 Teaching and Writing at Theodore Roosevelt High School

(See under Special for full description.)

SPEC 028 Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan

(See under Special for full description.)

SPEC 029 Junior High School Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan

(See under Special for full description.)

SPEC 036 Teaching Practicum: St. Aloysius School, Harlem

(See under Special for full description.)

WILLIAMS-MYSTIC PROGRAM IN
AMERICAN MARITIME STUDIES

An interdisciplinary one-semester program co-sponsored by Williams College and Mystic Seaport which includes credit for one winter study. Classes in maritime history, literature of the sea, marine ecology, oceanography, and marine policy are supplemented by field seminars: offshore sailing, Pacific Coast, Nantucket Island, and New York harbor. For details, see "Williams-Mystic Maritime Studies Program" or our website: www.williamsmystic.org.

 

Questions or concerns?
Send Email

Registrar Home . | .Williams Home