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Winter Study Courses 2001

 

WINTER STUDY PROGRAM

REMINDERS ABOUT WSP REGISTRATION

All students who will be on campus during the 2000-2001 academic year must register for WSP. Registration will take place in the early part of fall semester. If you are registered for a senior thesis in the fall which must be continued through Winter Study by departmental rules, you will be registered for your Winter Study Project automatically. In every other case, you must complete registration. First-year students are required to participate in a Winter Study that will take place on campus; they are not allowed to do 99's.

Even if you plan to take a 99, or the instructor of your first choice accepts you during the registration period, there are many things that can happen between registration and the beginning of Winter Study to upset your first choice, so you must list five choices. You should try to make one of your choices a project with a larger enrollment, not that it will guarantee you a project, but it will increase your chances.

If you think your time may be restricted in any way (ski meets, interviews, etc.), clear these restrictions with the instructor before signing up for his/her project.

Remember, for cross-listed projects, you should sign up for the subject you want to appear on your record.

For many beginning language courses, you are required to take the WSP Sustaining Program in addition to your regular project. You will be automatically enrolled in this Sustaining Program, so no one should list this as a choice.

The grade of honors is reserved for outstanding or exceptional work. Individual instructors may specify minimum standards for the grade, but normally, fewer than one out of ten students will qualify. A grade of pass means the student has performed satisfactorily. A grade of perfunctory pass signifies that a student's work has been significantly lacking but is just adequate to deserve a pass.

If you have any questions about a project, see the instructor before you register.

Finally, all work for WSP must be completed and submitted to the instructor no later than Friday, January 26th. Only the Dean can grant an extension beyond this date.

WINTER STUDY 99'S

Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible to propose "99's," independent projects arranged with faculty sponsors, conducted in lieu of regular Winter Study courses. Perhaps you have encountered an interesting idea in one of your courses which you would like to study in more depth, or you may have an interest not covered in the regular curriculum. In recent years students have undertaken in-depth studies of particular literary works, interned in government offices, assisted in foreign and domestic medical clinics, conducted field work in economics in developing countries, and given performances illustrating the history of American dance. Although some 99's involve travel away from campus, there are many opportunities to pursue intellectual or artistic goals here in Williamstown.

99 forms are available online. The deadline for submitting the proposals to faculty sponsors is Thursday, 28 September.

COURSES OFFERED WINTER STUDY 2001

AMES 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by candidates for honors by the thesis route in African and Middle Eastern Studies.

AAS 030 Senior Project

To be taken by students registered for Afro-American Studies 491 who are candidates for honors.

AMST 030 Senior Honors Project

To be taken by students registered for American Studies 491 or 492.

ANSO 010 The Ayn Rand Cult (Same as Literary Studies 010)

(See under Literary Studies for full description.)

ANSO 011 Berkshire Farm Center Service-Learning Internship

A field placement at Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth in Canaan, New York. Berkshire Farm Center is a residential treatment facility for troubled, at-risk adolescent boys who have been remanded to the Farm by the Family Court. These youths come primarily from lower socio-economic strata, are very ethnically diverse, and hail from both urban and rural areas throughout New York State. The problems that they bring to Berkshire Farm are multiple. These include: the psychological scars of dysfunctional families, including those of physical, emotional, and sexual abuse; chemical dependency; juvenile delinquency; inability to function in school settings; and various other issues. Residential treatment is a multi-modal approach that includes anger-replacement training, social skills training, and behavioral modification.
Williams students will commute to Berkshire Farm and work under supervision in one of the following areas: school, cottage life, chemical dependency unit, research, recreation, performing arts, or in individual tutoring and mentoring.
Students will keep a journal reflecting on their experiences and submit a 5- to 10-page paper synthesizing their work. A weekly seminar with the instructor will draw on service learning experience. Please note: all queries about this course should be directed to the instructor, who can be reached at 518-781-4567, ext. 322.
Prerequisites: placement only through a telephone interview with instructor before registering for course. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: none.

LARI BRANDSTEIN (Instructor)
D. EDWARDS (Sponsor)

Lari Brandstein is Director of Volunteer Services at Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth.

ANSO 012 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

The incidence of reported child abuse and neglect has reached epidemic proportions and shows no signs of decreasing. Preventive and prophylactic social programs, court intervention, and legislative mandates have not successfully addressed this crisis. This course allows students to observe the Massachusetts Department of Social Services attorney in courtroom proceedings related to the care and protection of children. Students will have access to Department records for purposes of analysis and will also work with social workers who will provide a clinical perspective on the legal cases under study. The class will meet regularly to discuss court proceedings, assigned readings, and the students' interactions with local human services agencies. Students will keep a journal and submit a 10-page paper at the end of the course. Full participation in the course is expected. Please note: all queries about this course must be directed to the instructor, Judge Locke. Phone messages may be left at 458-4833.
Access to an automobile is desirable but not required; some transportation will be provided as part of the course.
Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: $25 for books and photocopies.

JUDITH LOCKE (Instructor)
D. EDWARDS (Sponsor)

Judith Locke is Associate Justice of the Juvenile Court, Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

ANSO 013 Lawyers: Specialists in Conflicts

An examination of the paradoxical position of the lawyer in American society. Throughout American history, the lawyer's role has been ever-changing, yet ever consistent. The legal profession is simultaneously honored and pilloried. The lawyer's craft is lauded for its inventiveness and precision, yet reviled as the lowest chicanery. The lawyer is both advocate and mediator, an agent of change and a conservative force. The lawyer is powerful and privileged, yet utterly dependent on the interests and whims of others. Such is the fate of the professional described by Karl Llewellyn, a preeminent twentieth-century legal scholar and activist in the bar, as "a specialist in the conflict of interests between men." This course will plot the interrelationship over the past two centuries between the major structural transformations in American society and the key developments within the legal profession. The course will pay special attention to the profound and continuing consequences of the development of the corporation, itself a creation of lawyers. It will also scrutinize the particular and peculiar characteristics of legal craft, the habits of mind, and the unique moral sensibilities that make lawyers an indispensable occupational group at the center of American social order.
The readings for the course will be classic analyses from observers both inside and outside the legal profession, including Alexis de Toqueville, Louis Brandeis, Roscoe Pound, Woodrow Wilson, Karl Llewellyn, Felix Frankfurter, James Willard Hurst, and Robert T. Swaine.
Requirements: active participation in the seminar and a 10-page paper.
Cost to student: approximately $30 for books and readings.
Meeting time: mornings.

DUFFY GRAHAM (Instructor)
D. EDWARDS (Sponsor)

Duffy Graham '83 is an attorney at Preston Gates Ellis, Seattle.

ANSO 014 Wilderness and the American Mind

This course explores the romantic origins and Native American inspirationsof the American love affair with wilderness. We will read and discussselections from Henry David Thoreau, John Muir, Ernest Thompson Seton, AldoLeopold, Rachel Carson, Gary Snyder, and Bill Sessions, among others.Genres to be studied include: philosophical essay, nature story, poetry,scientific analysis, and environmental advocacy. A few of the questions wewill address: What is the difference between nature and wilderness? Arethese ideas "socially constructed"? Is wilderness preservation a strictlyAmerican conception and agenda?
Requirements: 10-page paper.
Enrollment limited to 25.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for books.
Meeting times: mornings.

CRIST

ANTH 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Anthropology 493-494.

SOC 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Sociology 493-494.

ARTH 012 Feng Shui (Same as Asian Studies 013)

Feng shui is the study of the way in which our environments affect every aspect of our lives. The selection of a property site and the placement of buildings on a property, of rooms within a building and of furniture within a room influence us, sometimes in obvious ways, often in very subtle ways.
The goal in this course is to give students a foundation in the concepts of feng shui that will lead to the practical application of feng shui. We will explore the origins and principles of this ancient Chinese discipline and analyze how this Eastern philosophy is applicable in our Western society. Our in-depth analysis of the many levels of feng shui, from the mundane to the transcendental, will include a comparison of feng shui to the similar architectural designs, traditions and rituals of other cultures and of the animal world. We will also consider the correlation between an environment and the individuals who inhabit that particular space. We will analyze properties on or near the Williams campus, including spaces in which the students have a special interest, and we will determine what changes can be made in those environments to improve the lives of the occupants.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, class assignments and a research paper or design analysis.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 18.
Cost to students: approximately $50.
Meeting time: five times a week for two hour sessions in the mornings. Field trips in Williamstown, North Adams and Hancock area to analyze specific properties will be held during class time.

VINCENT SMITH (Instructor)
HEDREEN (Sponsor)

Vincent Smith is a feng shui consultant, lecturer and author who is based in New York City. He was graduated from Harvard College and Yale Law School. He practiced law for 25 years before forming the VMS Feng Shui Design Co. Vincent Smith has traveled and studied with Professor Lin Yun, who is considered by many to be the leading feng shui master in the United States. He recently taught a course in feng shui at Berea College in Kentucky.

ARTH 014 Inventing Joan of Arc: The History of a Heroine in Pictures and Film

Joan of Arc was one of the most dynamic and yet enigmatic personalities of the French Middle Ages. Born into a poor peasant family in 1412, she gained control of an army, won brilliant military victories, crowned a king, and was burnt at the stake as a heretic, all before her twentieth birthday. Doubly marginalized by gender and socio-economic status, she nonetheless managed to shake the Church and State establishments to their very core. But who was Joan of Arc? Instrument of God's grace? Delusionary fanatic? Nationalist martyr? Champion of the disenfranchised? Casualty of childhood trauma? Over the centuries since her death, artists, and not just politicians and scholars, have attempted to answer this question, creating myriad visions of La Pucelle, as she was also known, under the influence of an ever-changing lens of contemporary tastes and concerns. This course will begin by surveying, through lectures, readings and discussions, the history of Joan of Arc in painting and sculpture. The class will then watch a series of film versions of her story (by the likes of DeMille, Fleming, Preminer, Dreyer, Bresson, Rivette and Besson), accompanied by further readings and discussion.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page paper (or alternative project approved by instructor).
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to students: $50 for books.
Meeting time: three times a week for two-hour sessions in the mornings, with extra sessions for viewing films, according to need.

LOW

ARTH 016 Museums and Culture

In the fall of 2000, the Williams College Museum of Art will open the fifth exhibition in the "Labeltalk" series, where Williams College faculty from a broad range of disciplines write labels for works of art from their own academic perspectives. Why has this series been so popular with both the college community and the general public? What is different about museums today that would lead to labels written by non-museum voices? Is this part of a museum trend to simply make art exhibitions more attractive to the general public, or does this represent a more significant shift in how museums interpret art and engage their audiences?
This course will explore the role of the art museum today in the collection, interpretation and dissemination of culture. Readings and class discussions will examine collections management, acquisitions and deaccessioning policies, exhibition development, funding, community outreach, and education, and how these aspects of museum work can impact the interpretation and presentation of an art object. Special attention will be given to recent museum controversies such as the "Sensation" exhibition at The Brooklyn Museum of Art. This course will include speakers from the Williams College Museum of Art and possibly other museums, and Williams College faculty. Students will prepare their own "Labeltalk" labels, which will be added to the "Labeltalk 2000" exhibition.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, Labeltalk labels, research project, and class participation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 12. Students from all majors encouraged.
Cost to students approximately $25.
Meeting time: twice per week for three hour sessions in the mornings.

STEFANIE JANDL (Instructor)
M. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Stefanie Jandl is the Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Associate at the Williams College Museum of Art and coordinator of the "Labeltalk" exhibition series. She received her M.A. in art history from the Williams College Graduate Program in the History of Art and has 15 years of experience in the arts.

ARTH 018 Dormant: The Awakening of an Artwork

In the tradition of Andy Warhol's Raid the Icebox and Fred Wilson's Mining the Museum, work with artist Michael Oatman during the conceptual and early stages of an installation for the Williams College Museum of Art. Dormant (working title) will look at one of the museum's galleries, in particular its previous life as a dormitory. The installation will involve actors, costumes and the production of a short film made with the cooperation of students. From research to production, from proposal to documentation, this course will take you step-by step through the complex processes of making a multi-media installation. Students will be asked to research on the web, at the museum and in the community in helping the artist prepare for this exhibition. Interviews and narratives will be produced as part of a collaborative video project. Participation can include writing, acting, prop-making and special effects.
Evaluation will be based on participation in all class activities and a written report on the student's research. Students may be required to purchase a text. A brief reading list will be available at the first class.
No prerequisites, although previous experience with video and or studio art/art history is desirable. Enrollment limited to 10.
Meeting time: afternoons.

MICHAEL OATMAN (Instructor)
M. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Michael Oatman is a painter and installation artist. He received a BFA from The Rhode Island School of Design and an MFA from the University of Albany. He teaches at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and the graduate programs at Vermont College and the University at Albany. He has exhibited widely in the U.S. and is currently working on exhibitions for MASS MoCA in North Adams

ARTH 020 Contemporary Issues at Regional Museums

This course will survey the best of contemporary art offerings throughout our region. This will include temporary exhibitions and permanent collection displays at such institutions as Mass MoCa, the Wadsworth Atheneum, the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, the Worcester Art Museum, and other college and university art museums. The class will also travel to Boston or New York depending on current exhibition schedules. The class will begin with a tour of WCMA and continue with four weekly, daylong museum excursions.
Evaluation will be based on participation in all museum visits and one research presentation and accompanying paper. The topic of the assignment is an object on view at one of the included institutions. The artwork will be selected by the student from a list available at the first class and then presented to the rest of the class during the museum visit.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 12.
Cost to student: approximately $25. Students will be required to pay reduced-rate admissions to some of the museums. The cost and schedule of museum visits will be available during enrollment and at the first class.

IAN BERRY (Instructor)
M. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Ian Berry received his M.A. in Curatorial Studies at the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College and is Assistant Curator at the Williams College Museum of Art.

ARTH 022 Audubon and His Oeuvre

The life work of John James Audubon (1785-1851), known primarily for his depictions of North American birdlife, will be compared with other ornithologists and artists in terms of their comparative biographies, the quality of their art, their degree of verisimilitude, and the context of exploration and discovery of New World natural history. An intent of this course is to familiarize ourselves with the breadth of Audubon's writings, much less known than his elephant folio volumes of engravings. Two all-day field sessions to the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology in Ithaca and to the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Possible local trips to meet with regional ornithologists and scholars.
Requirements: readings and discussions, short papers on specific illustrations or paintings as well as modern ornithological understandings of bird species and behavior.
No prerequisite. Enrollment limited to 30.
Cost to student: $50.
Meeting time: mornings.

SATTERTHWAITE

ARTH 023 Media Moguls and Hollywood Harems: American Orientalism, Then and Now
How do you think about the Islamic world? In order to explore this question, we will consider first the diverse ways that the Islamic world has been represented in the past. Drawing on a wide range of material evidence, including painting, decorative arts, advertising, fashion and film, we will analyze orientalism at the turn of the twentieth century, when the United States was emerging as a world power and mass culture was coalescing. In the process, we will compare American orientalism with similar attitudes in France and elsewhere, in order to understand the complex and varied dynamics between Self and Other. Then, on the basis of our findings, students will study Orientalism as it surfaces in the contemporary world with reference to art, movies and mass media.
Each student will be expected to document their findings and present them to the class.
Evaluation will be based on a 10- to 15-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 12. Cost to students: books and printed materials.
Meeting time: mornings.
H. EDWARDS

ARTH 024 The Ramayana, Epic in Art (Same as Religion 024)

The "Travels of Rama" is one of the most popular epics of India. It is a heroic tale involving romance, sacrifice, villainy, and warfare in both the human and cosmic or heavenly scales. To know the Ramayana is to grasp the essentials of Hindu religion, culture, and values. This course will explore the exciting visual and performing arts inspired by the Ramayana in India, where the story originated, as well as in the lands of southeast Asia where it spread. Arts to be explored will include great temple sculptures in stone and bronze, large scale and miniature painting, plays, dance and musical drama, batik, puppet shows, even modern day comic books, and film and television productions of the Ramayana. Social and esthetic issues to be considered may include the roles played by the arts in society; methods and aims of artistic expression; ideals of beauty and of virtue; social status and gender; the various transformations of the Ramayana in both literature and art in various parts of India and by various levels of society ("folk" art versus "high" art), as well as in the various different cultures in southeast Asia. The course will be half art history and half studio art.
Evaluation will be based on attendance (mandatory), participation in class discussions based on readings, and the production of painted illustrations to the story.
No prerequisites. No prior artistic training or skill will be required, only enthusiasm and effort. Enrollment limited to 30.
Cost to students: $120.
Meeting time: mornings (twice per week).

GARY SMITH (Instructor)
JANG (Sponsor)

Gary Smith has a Master's degree in the art history of India from the University of California, Berkeley, and has traveled widely in India and Southeast Asia. He is also a painter, with an interest in illustration, and in both Asian and Western art.

ARTH 025 South Indian Textiles

There is more creative energy spent on producing textiles in the subcontinent of India than any other place in the world. Early trading records indicated that European, Asian and Levantine civilizations valued India's fine cotton fabrics and the fastness of their colors. Today there is a vast quantity of apparel and table linens at stores in the U.S. that are made in India and moreover, these are just the exports. Only by being in India can one truly appreciate the array of textiles made there. The patterns, produced by so many different methods, make these textiles rich and beautiful in contrast to the simplicity of the places where they are made.
Cultural history will be examined through cloth production and utilization in Andhra Pradesh in a thriving community of ikat dyers and weavers as well as the revived art of resist painted kalamkari cloth. Further south the famous temple town of Kanchipuram in Tamil Nadu is a center of silk weaving, some of which is brocaded with zari (gold) threads in traditional patterns. Block-printing, tie and dye, and embroidery also decorate handloomed cottons. Many Indian people work where they live and the guest not only learns about the art but also the artisan.
The travel study will appeal to a variety of students including those interested in art, anthropology, sociology and history. Travel will be limited to one region of India allowing more time on-site. Students will be expected to have a valid passport to surrender by November 1st along with two photos for the visa application.
Requirements: the book, Traditional Indian Textiles by John Gillow and Nicholas Barnard will be required reading prior to Winter Study. A journal is to be kept and a short paper written and illustrated with drawings, photos, and/or materials will be due by the end of the trip.
Enrollment limited to 10. Priority given to seniors, then juniors, etc.
Estimated cost to student: $2500 which will include visa, all travel to, in and from India, lodging, meals, guides/interpreters and entrance fees.

ELIZABETH MICHAELS (Instructor)
HEDREEN (Sponsor)

Elizabeth Michaels, the group leader, is a textile colorist and designer with 23 years of experience. She has a masters in product design and taught a 1997 Winter Study program on "Creating Color" in the Art Department and lead a group during the 1999 Winter Study program on the travel study, "Village Textiles in India," which was concentrated in western India.

ARTH 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for ArtH 493, 494.

ARTH 033 Honors Independent Study

To be taken by candidates for honors by the independent study route.

ARTS 011 Introduction to Computer-Aided Design with AutoCad

This course provides basic instruction in computer aided drafting and design with emphasis on their use in producing architectural and engineering drawings. Students will receive hands-on instruction in the use of AutoCad software. Topics include basic drawing use of AutoCad commands and editing. The course is geared toward art and theatre students who have an interest in design or architecture.
Evaluation will be based on the degree and quality of completion of an assigned CAD project.
No prerequisites, however, a basic knowledge of PC computer use is helpful. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to students: $200 for AutoCad software.
Meeting times: mornings-three times a week. Two-thirds of the class time will be devoted to lab work.

JOHN NOVELLI (Instructor)
BENEDICT (Sponsor)

ARTS 013 Figure and Costume

This is a drawing course focusing on the body, nude and clothed. Utilizing a skeleton, a live model and a wonderful collection of costumes from the theater department, assignments will cover basic technical and expressive techniques. Meeting from 1pm to 4pm three times a week, the majority of required work will be done in class; homework will be limited to one drawing assignment per week and a reading assignment on figure drawing. Because of the extended class time and relatively small class size, the instructor can address individual needs, so students at all levels of experience, including the beginner, are welcome. Students who would like to be excused from the Arts 100 requirement may at the end of this term, submit their portfolio for departmental review.
Evaluation will be based on personal improvement, the quality of class work, vigorous class participation, and the imaginative resolution of four class-based assignments.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15. Priority will be given in the following order: Seniors, Juniors, Sophomores, Freshmen.
Cost to student: approximately $120 for materials and a book.
Meeting time: afternoons, 1 to 4 p.m., three times a week.

GLIER

ARTS 015 The Personal is Political: Strategizing Sculpture from a Domestic Space

The home, perhaps the most personal of all spaces, is the point of origin in this sculptural investigation. What is political in your house? Students will be encouraged to dissect the home, room by room, for issues and draw from the materials therein. The course will begin with the analysis of personal narratives for political concerns. Activities, materials and aesthetics specific to the domestic space will be considered as carriers of personal resonance and political meaning. Projects will employ "sculpture" techniques such as manipulating domestic ready-mades, home craft processes, and food fabrication. Studio work will be initiated after a class expedition to Wal-Mart, where students will purchase their own materials, and concluded with an exhibition of works produced in class. Students may come with fabrications skills or acquire them in class.
Evaluation will based on individual in-class studio work and a final exhibition of sculpture.
Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: approximately $50.
Meeting times: introductory evening lecture, two 3-hour classes per week in the mornings, final exhibition opening.

SHEILA PEPE (Instructor)
PODMORE (Sponsor)

Sheila Pepe is an artist who lives in New York City. Her work takes a variety of forms: sculpture, drawing, installations and video. Recent solo exhibitions include, "Josephine" at Thread Waxing Space in New York City and "Shrink" at the Zihlka Gallery at Wesleyan University. She currently teaches at SUNY Purchase and has taught at a variety of schools including Williams and Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts.

ARTS 017 Introduction to Theatrical Mask-making (Same as Theatre 017)

(See under Theatre for full description.)

ARTS 019 Introduction to Japanese Woodblock Carving and Printing (Same as Asian Studies 019)

The course teaches the technical aspects of creating Japanese woodblock prints as well as a brief overview of the history of wood block printing in Asia. The students will each create a woodblock print of their own design from laying out the initial format to carving and printing a 3 or 4 color print. There will be "work in progress critiques" and discussion of alternative methods.
Evaluation will be based on attendance and effort, 6 hours per week in studio.
Prerequisite: an interest in art and/or printing techniques would be helpful. Enrollment limited to 12.
Cost to student: approximately $75.
Meeting time: afternoons.

JOSHUA ROME (Instructor)
JANG (Sponsor)

Joshua Rome lived in Japan from the age of twenty-one for twenty-four years. While there, he studied woodblock techniques with Clifton Karhu for three years and then went on to study cabinetry and lacquer techniques with Kuroda Kenrichi for another three years. Rome has had over forty shows at prominent galleries throughout Japan as well as shows in New York and San Francisco. His works are in the permanent collections of the British Museum in London, the James A. Michener Collection in Hawaii, the Cleveland Museum of Art, and the New York Public Library.

ARTS 023 Exploring Self-Portraiture in Video Art

This course will examine how the electronic medium of video can be used for investigations into and reflections of the self. The immediacy, intimacy, and accessibility of the video camera, combined with the raw texture of the video image (think Cops, Blair Witch Project), can provide a unique vision of the video artist. Does art in general, and video art in particular, inevitably become a self-portrait of the artist? How can the artist manipulate this medium, and shape his/her reflection in it? How does this visual texture of video differ from the texture of film? Can the electronic video signal display our reality with more accuracy than other media, such as photography, painting or sculpture can? Can video function as a mirror? We will explore these questions as we learn how to shoot and edit video. We will look at self-presentation in the work of video pioneers (Vito Acconci, Joan Jonas, William Wegman) and current video artists (Sadie Benning, Daniella Dooling, Anne Robertson, Ken Kobland). Screenings will be followed by discussions of the work shown. Students will be introduced to the basic technical concepts of video, and will learn basic shooting and editing skills. Each student will produce a video piece that in some way functions as a self-portrait (experimental approaches encouraged). Occasional readings will be handed out in class, and students will be required to write short, weekly responses to readings and work shown in class.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation in class discussions, and the imagination and effort put into their writing and video projects.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 12. Priority given to art majors.
Cost to student: $50.
Meeting time: two times per week in the afternoon.

ANNA VON SOMEREN (Instructor)
LALEIAN (Sponsor)

Anna Von Someren is a video artist currently living in Boston. She received her M.F.A. from the Massachusetts College of Art, and her work has been screened at such prestigious venues as the New York Video Festival and the Hong Kong Arts Center. When not making her own experimental work, she freelances as an editor, cutting television commercials and independent films.

ARTS 027 Fabric Palette, Quilt Canvas

Quilts are timeless. They appeal to our physical and emotional well-being, recalling memories, evoking feelings of comfort and appealing to our sense of color and design. In this course, we will touch on the history of traditional quiltmaking in this country and discover when traditional quiltmaking methods moved into the realm of artmaking.
After accomplishing basic quilting techniques, each member of the class will create and complete an Art Quilt which will be the basis of a show in the Wilde Gallery, the student gallery in the WLS Spencer Studio Art Building. Though it is not necessary to be an experienced sewer prior to this course, some facility with a needle would be helpful. More important will be your concept of design and color and willingness to use fabric and stitching as your palette and canvas. Since quilting bees are part of the tradition and fun, expect to work on your project outside of class hours along with other members of the class! You must be prepared for the time commitment required for completion of your project.
Evaluation will be based on completed project, participation and attendance in class.
No prerequisites, but some drawing or sewing experience helpful. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: $100 for fabrics and other materials related to the course; unless you provide your own machine, there is an additional $50 fee for sewing machine rental.
Meeting time: mornings - Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

SYBIL-ANN SHERMAN (Instructor)
TAKENAGA (Sponsor)

In addition to her 26 years as Williams College support staff, Sybil-Ann Sherman has taught quilting workshops at North Adams State College (now MCLA) and the YMCA in North Adams. She has participated in demonstrations of her craft at both Williams and at large craft fairs around Massachusetts. Her work has been featured in Berkshire Magazine. Ms. Sherman last taught this course in January 2000.

ARTS 033 Honors Independent Project

Independent study to be taken by candidates for honors in Art Studio.

ARTS 035 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel (Same as Special 035)

Each class will begin with a lecture-demonstration, followed by practice on the potter's wheel. Each student will have the use of a potter's wheel for each class. We will work on mugs, bowls, pitchers, plates, jars, lids, vases, and bottles, and will finish these shapes as required by trimming and adding handles, lugs, lids, spouts, and knobs. We will also work on several different handbuilding projects. After the tenth class session, all class work will be biscuit-fired. The eleventh class will be devoted to glazing the biscuited pieces. Glazing techniques will include pouring, dipping, layering, brushing, and stamping, and using wax resist and other masking techniques to develop pattern and design. The completed work will then be glaze-fired. The last meeting will be devoted to a "final exam" gallery show of your best work. Woven into lecture-demonstrations will be presentations on various topics relating to the science and history of pottery making.
The two most important requirements for this course are attendance at all class sessions and enthusiasm for learning the craft of pottery making.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 9.
Cost to student: $135 plus makeup class fees ($28 per class), if applicable.
Meeting time: mornings.

RAY BUB (Instructor)
HEDREEN (Sponsor)

Ray Bub is a ceramic artist and potter at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery in Pownal, Vermont.

ASST 010 Daoism (Same as Political Science 010)

(See under Political Science for full description.)

ASST 011 Heterogeneous Japan, 2001: Outside Mainstream of Society

This course looks at different life styles and philosophies of Japanese people of many kinds and types and discusses whether there is some distinctive Japanese-ness even in such heterogeneity. Topics of study will include: cult-followers, "queers," and modern nobilities; voices of Japan's minorities-racial, ethnic, physical, etc.-versus the "cosmopolitan" flavor in Japan's pop culture; Japan's tough urban youths versus teenagers at competitive high schools; Japan's media image of women versus housewives' grassroots socio-political movements. Class participants will become connoisseurs of contemporary Japan. Regular course reading will be supplemented by movies, music, and other audio-visual materials.
Evaluation will be based on regular classroom participation and a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: $50 for books.
Meeting time: mornings.

KOSHIRO

ASST 012 Women and Religion in Contemporary Chinese Society (Same as Religion 012 and Women's and Gender Studies 012)

This course will examine what impacts the religious traditions of China, including Confucianism, Taoism and Mahayana Buddhism, have had upon shaping the social experiences, roles and images of women in twentieth century China and Taiwan. We will be exploring dimensions of the modern encounter between women and traditional Chinese traditions such as the construction of genders and the roles given them in the Chinese religions, and the images of the "goddess" and the symbolism of the female in art. We will also engage with contemporary Chinese women's responses to the traditional representations of their spiritual, sexual and social roles in various women's social movements, as well as a new presentation of the female body in contemporary Chinese cinema.
Evaluation will be based on participation in class discussions, a group project and a 10-page research paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: about $50 for books and duplicated materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

HO

ASST 013 Feng Shui (Same as Art History 012)

(See under Art History for full description.)

ASST 014 Forms of Violence and State Responses: An Indian Context
This course will examine the nature of violence in India by focusing on violence against the individual, the community and the State. Violence against the person will be examined primarily through biographies of prisoners from my own fieldwork in a central prison in India, and placed in the context the nature of crime and of penal institutions both in India, and in Western societies.
T o understand violence against the community, the course will focus on certain violent events, deeply etched in public memory and strongly present as public discourse, such as violence during partition of India at independence, the 1984 riots spurred by the assassination of the Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, and the Bhopal gas tragedy. Finally, we will examine the nature of violence against the State through the example of the Naxalite movement, which started as a peasant uprising but graduated to a violent mass movement against a dormant, inactive State. These case studies will help us consider both the nature of violence and the nature of the Indian State. We will conclude by considering the Gandhian philosophy of ahimsa, or non-violence as a critique to the expression of violence, and as an alternative ideology.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a final paper and presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: books and reading packet.
Meeting time: mornings.
MOHUA BANERJEE (Instructor)
BACON (Sponsor)

Mohua Banerjee is a visiting scholar from the Delhi School of Economics in India. Her current interests include the study of violence in institutions and in people's everyday lives. She has spent the past five years working in some of the most notorious prisons in North India, interviewing and observing prison life as experienced by administrators, guards, and inmates and their families.

ASST 019 Introduction to Japanese Woodblock Carving and Printing (Same as Art Studio 019)

(See under Art Studio for full description.)

ASST 025 Study Tour to Taiwan

Interested in learning first-hand about Chinese and Taiwanese culture and becoming acquainted with the so-called Taiwan (economic and political) "miracle"? Want to improve your knowledge of Mandarin, the world's most widely spoken language? Then join us on this 24-day study tour to Taiwan, Republic of China. We'll spend the first two and a half weeks in Taipei, the capital city, where three hours of Mandarin language classes will be scheduled each morning. After class, we'll meet as a group for lunch and discussion. Visits to cultural and economic sites of interest will be scheduled for some afternoons and Saturdays, with other afternoons, evenings, and Sundays free for self-study and individual exploration of the city. During the last week, we'll conduct a seven-day tour of central and southern Taiwan. Two orientation sessions will be conducted on campus in November and December to help prepare participants for their experience.
Requirements: satisfactory completion of the language course and active participation in the other scheduled activities.
Prerequisite: Chinese 101. Enrollment limited to 15. Interested students should consult the instructor before registration.
Cost to student: $2000 (includes round-trip air fare from New York City, tuition, textbooks, accommodations, weekday lunches, local excursions, and tour of central and southern Taiwan; does not include breakfasts, dinners, and weekend lunches while in Taipei, estimated at $250, or incidental expenses.)

KUBLER

ASST 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Asian Studies.

CHIN S.P. Sustaining Program for Chinese 101-102

Students registered for Chinese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Chinese Sustaining Program. Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9:00-9:50.
Requirements: regular attendance and active class participation.
Prerequisite: Chinese 101.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.

LANGUAGE FELLOW

CHIN 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Chinese.

JAPN S.P. Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102

Students registered for Japanese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Japanese Sustaining Program. Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9:00-9:50.
Requirements: regular attendance and active class participation.
Prerequisite: Japanese 101.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.

LANGUAGE FELLOW

JAPN 012 Japanese Dyeing: Joy of Kusaki-zome

Kusaki-zome is the traditional Japanese art of dyeing with plant dye. Using a simple technique, it brings out the wonderful colors in vegetables, flowers, tree leaves and twigs. For instance, tea leaves provide a light brown color. What color do you think onion skins would give? The most interesting thing is that the color is never the same since the hue of colors differs greatly depending on the season when the plants were harvested. The technique is simple; if you can boil eggs, you can enjoy Kusaki-zome. This class requires no previous artistic training.
To accommodate student demand, two sections of this course will be offered.
Evaluation based on the completion of two projects, with a journal describing the projects, as well as participation in the final class exhibition.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15 per section.
Cost to student: lab fee of $35.
Meeting time: mornings.

KYOKO KABASAWA (Instructor)
CRANE (Sponsor)

Kyoko Kabasawa is a Japanese textile and dyeing artist who teaches at Hokkaido Women's College. In addition to a number of prizes awarded in Japan, she won an originality award in the Hawai'i Handweavers' Hui 45th Anniversary Biennial Exhibition in August 1998.

JAPN 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Japanese.

ASTR 011 Leadership in Astronomy: From Copernicus to Hubble and the Age of the Universe (Same as EXPR 011)

Progress in understanding our Universe has undergone major steps as the result of sweeping new ideas introduced by major scientists. Copernicus, in his book of 1543, shook the foundations of ancient science; Tycho, a few decades later, revolutionized the idea of observing the heavens; and Kepler, in 1603-1618, completed the Copernican Revolution by removing the ancient idea that perfect circles were necessary for orbits. Halley and Newton, starting in the 1680's, led the world to comprehend the universality of gravity and linked comets with planets in obeying the law of gravity. In this century, Shapley moved the Sun out of its central place in the Universe and Hubble, in the 1920's, found that our galaxy was only one out of many and that the Universe is expanding all around us. In addition to studying the contributions of these leaders, we will see how Hubble's law of the expanding Universe is being studied as a Key Project of the Hubble Space Telescope and how astronomers hope to soon know accurately the cosmic distance scale and the age of the Universe. We will consider the role of NASA, the space shuttle, and astronaut/astronomers in shaping the scientific goals. Readings include Rocky Kolb's "Blind Watchers of the Sky: The People and Ideas that Shaped our View of the Universe," about the early astronomers, and R. Christianson's "On Tycho's Island: Tycho Brahe and His Assistants, 1570-1601." Videos will include parts of Tom Hanks's "From the Earth to the Moon." Dr. Robert Williams, the former director of the Hubble's Space Telescope Science Institute; and James Voelkel, author of the book "Johannes Kepler and the New Astronomy," plan to join the class to deliver seminars.
Grading will be on the basis of a final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 30.
Cost to student: $15 for readings.
Meeting time: mornings.
(This course is part of the Leadership Studies Cluster)

PASACHOFF

ASPH 031 Senior Research

To be taken by students registered for Astrophysics 493, 494.

ASTR 031 Senior Research

To be taken by students registered for Astronomy 493, 494.

BIOL 012 Greenhouses: Defying Winter (Same as Environmental Studies 012)

The growing of plants indoors dates back to Classical times, but truly started to flourish in the Seventeenth Century with the development of the orangery. In many respects, winter-defying structures to house plants reached their peak in the Victorian Age, exemplified by the Crystal Palace at the Great Exhibition of 1851 in London. This course will explore the history and uses of greenhouses through class lecture-discussions, hands-on projects in the College's newly constructed Lewis-Mink Greenhouse, and field trips to visit greenhouses in the Berkshire County region, the Connecticut River Valley, and New York City. Students will learn principles of plant propagation and greenhouse functions, from commercial horticulture, to scientific research, sewage treatment, and horticultural therapy in hospital settings.
Evaluation: each student will conduct a plant propagation project in the Lewis-Mink Greenhouse, write a short paper relating to some aspect of greenhouses, and submit a journal integrating the course experiences.
Enrollment limited to 15. Preference will be given to students who intend to be biology majors or environmental studies concentrators.
Cost to student: $40 for books, text, and materials.
Meeting time: mornings, plus two all-day field trips.

ART

BIOL 013 Genetically Modified Organisms-Friend or Foe? (Same as Environmental Studies 013)

Are genetically modified organisms (GMOs) the next Green Revolution or Frankenfood"? While Americans were rather quietly accepting the introduction of mixed genes in their food, Europeans have been raising the alarm, and refusing to accept U.S. imports. This course will examine in depth how to create GMOs, which ones have been created, and their potential hazards and benefits. No biology prerequisite is required, as we will start from basics. Our focus will be largely in the agricultural realm. We will look at environmental and economic aspects of the controversy, and try to propose risk assessment methods.
The course will consist of lectures, discussions and debates, and will culminate in a 10-page position paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 30.
Cost to student: approximately $45 for text and readings.
Meeting time: a minimum of 3 afternoons a week.

LEE VENOLIA (Instructor)
ART (Sponsor)

Lee Venolia is a former Assistant Professor in the Biology Department and is trained in genetics.

BIOL 014 Humanity: The Next Generation

This course will explore recent progress in genetic, reproductive, and developmental technologies. We'll discuss the science as well as the social controversies associated with genetic screening, gene therapy, fetal and animal tissue transplantation, human embryo manipulation, and assisted-reproduction technologies. What advances capture our imaginations? What ones make us shudder? What are the social, economic, legal, and ethical implications of "designing" our children, transplanting animal organs into humans, or cloning ourselves? We'll also examine public perceptions of these scientific frontiers as evidenced in newspapers and magazine articles, science fiction films and books, and scientific documentaries. This course will be of interest and accessible to both biology majors and non-majors, first-year students through seniors.
Evaluation will be based on student participation in class discussions and a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Not appropriate for students enrolled in Biology 132. Enrollment limited to 16.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for books and readings.
Meeting time: minimum of three mornings a week.

ALTSCHULER

BIOL 015 Bird Song and Dance

CANCELLED!

BIOL 016 Reaching the Underrepresented: Math Software Development for Grade School (Same as Mathematics and Statistics 016)

Although software titles purporting to teach kids math abound, few successfully engage kids, especially girls, in a useful manner. In this course, we will review several games asking questions such as: is it mathematical? Is it equitable? Is it engaging? looking specifically for what engages girls of color in math activities. After exploring various technologies (multiplayer games, real-time voice, intranet, internet, voice recognition, and speech synthesis), we will write one or more simple web-based games for use in schools around the country. The goal is to build math skills, confidence and a love of math.
Evaluation will be based on preparation of one or more written reviews and participation in game design.
No prerequisite. No computer experience required. Enrollment limited to 13.
Cost to student: $5 for photocopies and materials.
Meeting time: afternoons plus field trips and extensive lab work.

LASKOWSKI and KEN STANLEY

Dr. Stanley received his Ph.D. at UC Berkeley in 1997 and his BS from Purdue in 1978. He has 11 years experience as a software engineer and is currently a postdoctorate researcher at UC Berkeley and MIT.

BIOL 019 The Winter Landscape (Same as Environmental Studies 021 and Geosciences 021)

With autumn's foliage but a fading memory, landforms emerge attired in a snowy coat highlighting every ridge crest, ledged slope, and valley hillock. Glacial landforms from the bygone Ice Ages reveal themselves, unburdened of their leafy shroud, and tell me their story of flowing ice and rushing melt water. Inarguably, winter affords the geomorphologist-student of landscape evolution-the best view of the land. The outdoors becomes our classroom and snowshoes/crampons our mode of travel through this winter landscape.
This class will introduce you to the High Peaks Wilderness of New York's Adirondack Mountains. In addition, we'll examine the region's natural/cultural history-the vegetative succession after ice retreat, the impact of logging and devastating forest fires during the early twentieth century and pre-Colonial through modern land use. Within the ADK Blue Line an experiment in land conservation continues, the largest park in the lower 48, yet composed of more private than public holdings. What does the future hold? What should be the balance between economic/residential development and conservation?
Evaluation will be based on participation, independent project and presentation of results. Projects may be field or literature surveys and should focus on the glacial, land use or cultural history of some area. Presentations using slides, posters, or computer graphics are preferred.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 10. THIS CLASS IS OPEN TO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS AND PREFERENCE WILL BE GIVEN TO FIRST- and SECOND-YEAR STUDENTS.
Cost to student: $250 plus personal gear. Students must contact the instructor for a list of required equipment before leaving for the holiday break. This will allow ample time to secure gear. The Dacks trips will be physically demanding and excellent health is necessary.
Meeting time: see itinerary.
Itinerary:
3-5 Jan; classroom discussions with local afternoon hikes on snowshoes.
8-12 Jan; Dacks trip departs 8AM Mon, returns Fri evening. ADK Loj is our base camp. The Loj provides us with meals, a bunkroom, and a warm fireplace where we can converse/relax after supper.
16-18 Jan;High Peaks tent camping for 2 nights in Johns Brook Valley. The Great Range/Mt. Marcy can be accessed. Preparation of projects should begin this week.
22-26 Jan; Completion/Presentation of projects in the classroom.
Possible peaks for your winter 46 list: Marcy(#1, 5344ft) Algonquin(#2, 5114ft) Skylight(#4, 4926ft) Gray(#7, 4854ft) Colden(#11, 4714ft) Wright(#16, 4580ft) Big Slide(#27, 4257ft) Phelps(#32, 4161ft).

DAVID J. DESIMONE (Instructor)
ART (Sponsor)

Dave DeSimone came to Williams upon completion of his dissertation in glacial geology in 1985 and is a part-time lecturer in geosciences and environmental studies. In addition, Dave operates a small consulting hydrogeology business. During the winter, Dave makes regular trips to the Dacks to summit one of the 46 Peaks as he continues to progress toward completion of this goal. He is known, perhaps not enviably, for squeezing a day trip in during the week-driving 150 miles, ascending a peak, and returning home for supper. The adirondacks are a special place for him and he avidly learns of the region's natural and cultural history as the years pass.

BIOL 021 Internships in Field Biology

Sophomores, juniors and seniors wishing to do internships with conservation organizations, national or state parks, or field research at other institutions should sign up for Biology 021 as their Winter Study course. Previous internships have included such diverse programs as working on the problem of introduced species with a local or national environmental organization, working at a raptor rehabilitation center and working with their home state's department of environmental management. Students must make all the arrangements for the internships directly with the sponsoring organization. The costs of travel and room and board must be borne by the student. Before a student can receive approval to sign up for the course, a student must work out a detailed plan with Professor Raymond by early October.
Evaluation will be based on a daily field notebook and a summary paper or laboratory report.
Prerequisites will depend on the program chosen. Not open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 30.
Cost to student: will vary with the program.

RAYMOND

BIOL 022 Introduction to Biological Research

An experimental research project will be carried out under the supervision of a member of the Biology Department. It is expected that the student will spend 20 per week in the lab at a minimum, and a 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: Biology 101. Enrollment limited to 15. This experience is intended for, but not limited to, first-year students and sophomores, and requires the permission of the instructor. Interested students should contact Professor Raymond for more information before registering.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

RAYMOND

BIOL 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Biology 493, 494.

CHEM 010 The Origins of Life

Perhaps the most fundamental questions science strives to answer is "how did we get here?". Answering this question starts with an examination of the formation of the earth, and with the appearance of life. We have to define what we mean by "life" and examine what basic biological features constitute a living organism. How did these fundamental features arise? What process allowed them to reproduce? How did early organisms survive on a planet lacking the atmosphere we enjoy today? How did simple life forms evolve into humans? We will focus our attention on how one goes about formulating and answering these sorts of questions, and the answers that are currently available. This course is of interest and accessible to both science and non-science majors, and is open to all students.
Evaluation is based on participation in discussions, a 10-page paper, and a presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 16.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for reading packet and books.
Meeting time: afternoons.

CHIHADE

CHEM 011 Science for Kids (Same as Environmental Studies 011 and Special 011)

Are you interested in teaching? Do you enjoy working with kids? Do you like to experiment with new things? Here is a chance for you to do all three! The aim of this Winter Study Project is to design a series of hands-on science workshops for elementary school children and their parents. Working in teams of 2-4, students spend the first three weeks of Winter Study planning the workshops. This involves deciding on a focus for each workshop (based on the interests of the students involved) followed by choosing and designing experiments and presentations that will be suitable for fourth-grade children. On the third weekend of Winter Study (January 20, 21) we bring elementary school kids with their parents to Williams to participate in the workshops.
You get a chance to see what goes into planning classroom demonstrations as well as a sense of what it's like to actually give a presentation. You find that kids at this age are great fun to work with because they are interested in just about everything and their enthusiasm is infectious. You also give the kids and their parents a chance to actually do some fun hands-on science experiments that they may not have seen before, and you are able to explain simple scientific concepts to them in a manner that won't be intimidating. It is a rewarding experience for all involved.
Evaluation is based on participation in planning and running the workshops, and each group is expected to prepare a handout with descriptions of the experiments for the kids, parents, and teachers. No prerequisites. You need not be a science major; all that is needed is enthusiasm. Enrollment limited to 25.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings. Classes meet three times a week for approximately three hours each session. The workshop is run on the third weekend of Winter Study (January 20, 21) and attendance from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. is mandatory that weekend. There are also one or two brief meetings held in the fall term for preliminary planning.

SCHOFIELD and T. SMITH

CHEM 012 Reporting and Writing About Science and Technology (Same as English 012 and Special 012)

In this course you read some of the best science writing being published in newspapers, magazines, and books for the general reader. We try to understand the techniques that skillful writers use to achieve their ends, especially rhetorical devices that make complex issues and arguments seem simple and comprehensible. In addition to a lot of reading, we also do a lot of writing. By emulating good writing about science and technology, we develop skills in the art of explanation, which serve you well in other courses. The goals of this course are to develop an appreciation of good writing about science and to become better writers ourselves.
There will be numerous short writing assignments, including a longer final article popularizing a topic in science or technology of your choosing.
Evaluation is based on class participation and completion of all reading and writing assignments.
Prerequisite: one Division III course at Williams prior to this course or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 10.
Cost to student: approximately $30 for books.
Meeting time: MWF afternoons.

JO PROCTER (Instructor)
D. RICHARDSON and ROSENHEIM (Co-Sponsors)

Jo Procter is news director at Williams College. She has an M.S. in communications from Boston University. Her media experience includes Popular Science Magazine, Mutual Broadcasting, and WGBH-TV (Boston).

CHEM 013 Science and Archaeology

Archaeological studies, which consider the human impact on the environment, can include materials as recent as nineteenth-century glass, or as old as stone tools from hundreds of thousands of years ago. And paleoanthropology, the study of early human remains, covers materials that are millions of years old. Natural science can answer a wide variety of questions for researchers in the field, not just how old an object is, but also where, how, and sometimes why an object was made. These answers in turn tell us about patterns of human development and settlement, and also help us distinguish forgeries from genuine artifacts.
The course consists of approximately two weeks of class meetings and readings, after which students select a project either in the lab or based on the readings. At the end of Winter Study, students present their results to the class and submit a 5-7 page written report.
Evaluation is based on class participation, completion of the project, and submission of a satisfactory report.
Prerequisite: a high school chemistry course; college-level chemistry is not required. Enrollment limited to 12.
Cost to student: approximately $5 for reading packet.
Meeting time: mornings.

ANNE SKINNER (Instructor)
D. RICHARDSON (Sponsor)

Anne Skinner is a Senior Lecturer in Chemistry at Williams.

CHEM 014 Emergency Medical Technician-Basic

A course designed to prepare students for the Massachusetts EMT exam and to provide training to become certified as an Emergency Medical Technician. The course teaches the new national standard curriculum which makes reciprocity with many other states possible. This is a time-intensive course involving approximately 130 hours of class time plus optional emergency room observation and ambulance work. Students will learn, among other skills, basic life support techniques, patient assessment techniques, defibrillation, how to use an epi-pen, safe transportation and immobilization skills, as well as the treatment of various medical emergencies including shock, bleeding, soft-tissue injuries, and child birth. In order to reduce the number of class meetings required during Winter Study Period, the course will hold a few meetings beginning in the fall semester. These class meetings, which are mandatory, are held on Sundays with the following schedule: 29 October (orientation), 5 November, 12 November, and 19 November.
Evaluation is based on class participation and performance on class exams, quizzes and practical exercises.
Prerequisite: it is recommended that students have American Heart Association Level C BLS Provider CPR Cards or American Red Cross BLS provider CPR cards before entering the EMT Class. A CPR class will be offered in October for those students wishing to take the EMT class who don't already have CPR cards. Enrollment limited to 24 students.
Cost to student: $300 plus approximately $75 for textbook, stethoscope, and BP cuff.
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons; schedule TBA in October.

KEVIN GARVEY (Instructor)
D. RICHARDSON (Sponsor)

Kevin Garvey is a Massachusetts state and nationally approved EMT-I (Intermediate) and an EMT-IC (Instructor/Coordinator). He had been involved with Emergency Medical Services for 15-20 years. Mr. Garvey currently works for Baystate Health Systems as an RN (registered nurse) and EMT-I and also works as an EMT-I for Village Ambulance in Williamstown. Mr. Garvey is also an EMT training instructor at Greenfield Community College.

CHEM 015 The X-Ray Revolution

X-rays are a valuable tool for studying the structures of life. They are used to make familiar images of coronary artery blockages and brain tumors, to create micrographs of living cells, and to produce diffraction patterns of drug-protein complexes. Thanks to new instrumentation (synchrotron radiation), scientists now have remarkable abilities to produce bright x-ray beams for these and other applications. This course starts with an introduction to modern methods of x-ray production and transport-from particle storage rings to free electron lasers. In the remainder of the class, we emphasize the application of x-rays to problems in bioinorganic chemistry and structural biology on the molecular, cellular, and organ scales. An on-campus x-ray experiment is optional. The class concludes with a 2-3 day field trip to the National Synchrotron Light Source on Long Island, where students conduct or observe an experimental project of their choice. Students present their results to the class and submit a 10-page written report.
Evaluation is based on class participation, completion of the experimental project, and submission of a satisfactory 10-page report.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 101 or 103, Biology 101, or Physics 131 or 141 or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 12.
Cost to student: approximately $100 for field trip housing and meals (subsidies available) plus approximately $20 for miscellaneous course materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

STEPHEN P. CRAMER (Instructor)
D. RICHARDSON (Sponsor)

Steve Cramer, Advanced Light Source Professor at UC Davis, was a Williams chemistry major, Class of 1973. After graduate work at Stanford and a post-doc at Cal Tech, he worked in industry (Exxon and Schlumberger) and at National Labs (Brookhaven and Lawrence Berkeley Lab).

CHEM 016 Glass and Glassblowing

This course provides an introduction to both a theoretical consideration of the glassy state of matter and the practical manipulation of glass. While no previous experience is required, students with patience, good hand-eye coordination, and creative imagination will find the course most rewarding. The class is open to both artistically and scientifically oriented students.
Evaluation is based on class participation, glass projects, a 10-page paper, and a presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 10. Preference given to juniors and seniors. Interested students should contact Professor Thoman by e-mail prior to registration.
Cost to student: $50 for supplies.
Meeting time: mornings, five days per week.

THOMAN

CHEM 017 Introduction to Research in Archaeological Science

An independent experimental project in archaeological science is carried out in collaboration with Dr. Skinner whose research involves two types of studies: dating fossil material and establishing the sources of ancient artifacts.
Requirements: a 10-page written report.
Evaluation is based upon participation in the research project and a 10-page paper.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least Chemistry 101) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in a faculty research lab, interested students must consult Dr. Skinner and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Nonscience majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: TBA.

ANNE SKINNER (Instructor)
D. RICHARDSON (Sponsor)

Anne Skinner is a Senior Lecturer in Chemistry at Williams.

CHEM 018 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry

An independent experimental project in biochemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in biochemistry. Biochemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the molecular details of living systems including the interaction of biologically important molecules. In the Chemistry Department, studies are underway to investigate the structure/function relationship of proteins, the interaction between proteins and RNA and DNA, DNA structure and repair, and the molecular basis of gene regulation.
Requirements: a 10-page written report.
Evaluation is based upon participation in the research project and a 10-page paper.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least Chemistry 101) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Nonscience majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

CHIHADE, KAPLAN, LOVETT, WEISS

CHEM 019 Introduction to Research in Environmental Science (Same as Environmental Science 019)

An independent experimental project in environmental science is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in environmental science. Current research projects include studies of atmospheric chemistry related to global warming and acid deposition, heavy metals in the local environment, and further development of laboratory techniques for ENVI 102 (Introduction to Environmental Science).
Requirements: a 10-page written report.
Evaluation is based upon participation in the research project and a 10-page paper.
Prerequisite: a one-semester science course and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Nonscience majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

KOEHLER, THOMAN

CHEM 020 Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry

An independent experimental project in inorganic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in inorganic chemistry. Opportunities for research in inorganic chemistry at Williams include the study of transition metals in biological systems (enzymes, proteins), and as building blocks for new materials with interesting electronic (magnetic, conducting) and optical properties. Students working in this area will gain expertise in the synthesis of new compounds and their characterization by modern spectroscopic techniques.
Requirements: a 10-page written report.
Evaluation is based upon participation in the research project and a 10-page paper.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least Chemistry 101) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Nonscience majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

PARK, SCHOFIELD

CHEM 023 Introduction to Research in Organic Chemistry

An independent experimental project in organic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in organic chemistry. One representative project involves isolation of the bioactive constituents of Southeast Asian dart poisons from their natural sources and the elucidation of their three-dimensional structures. Another line of investigation probes new and efficient methods for the creation of molecules of medicinal interest. Some targets include the kavalactones-the active principles of the herbal extract KAVA KAVA which is promoted as an alternative anti-anxiety remedy, and octalactin A-an interesting 8-membered ring compound isolated from marine microorganisms that has shown significant toxicity toward humans.
Requriements: a 10-page written report.
Evaluation is based upon participation in the research project and the 10-page paper.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 101) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Nonscience majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

D. RICHARDSON, T. SMITH

CHEM 024 Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry

An independent experimental project in physical chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in physical chemistry. Current research projects in the Department include computer modeling of non-linear, chaotic chemical and biochemical systems, molecular modeling of water clusters, laser spectroscopy of chlorofluorocarbon substitutes, and experimental studies of the oxidation of sulfur dioxide on atmospheric aerosols.
Requirements: a 10-page written report.
Evaluation is based upon participation in the research project and the 10-page paper.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 101) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Nonscience majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

KOEHLER, PEACOCK-LOPEZ, THOMAN

CHEM 031 Senior Research and Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Chemistry 493, 494.

CLAS 010 Ovid and the Metamorphoses

One of the most delightful and influential of all the authors of classical antiquity, Ovid was the greatest Latin poet in the generation after Vergil and Horace. His vast compendium of classical mythology, the Metamorphoses, contains the versions of Greek and Roman myths that are the most familiar to us. When we look at a painting or sculpture of a mythological scene, a primary source is usually Ovid. Shakespeare knew his Ovid well, and until the Romantic Era, Ovid was regarded among the most important classical authors. The Metamorphoses was read for the sheer joy of its pagan wit and narrative skill, as an allegory of Christian virtues, and even as foreshadowing the New Testament. Despite all the delight Ovid has provoked, the Metamorphoses remains an enigma. Two thousand lines longer than the Aeneid, with which it shares the meter and diction of Latin epic, the poem is nonetheless denied the status of epic by many critics, who also argue about its subject and design. Ovid is recognized as a master story-teller, but there is little consensus about what is at the heart of his exuberant word-play. The significance of his central theme-the metamorphosis of a figure from one form to another-is still widely debated. We will read the entire Metamorphoses in translation. After an introductory lecture, we will move to discussion of selected stories, seeking to understand aspects of Ovid's narrative technique, the purpose of his work, and the reasons for its lasting influence.
Evaluation will be based on several short written exercises, a 5- to 10-page paper, and contributions to class discussions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: $15-$20.
Meeting time: mornings.

FUQUA

CLAS 012 Renewal and Transformation (Same as Literary Studies 011 and Theatre 012)

This course will explore themes of renewal and transformation as they relate both to ancient cult, narrative, and drama and also to post-classical reworkings of ancient myth. Although we shall study the mythological, religious, and literary ramifications of these topics, our focus will be on the process by which figures like Orpheus, Odysseus, Penelope, and Helen are transformed by authors, artists, composers, etc., of later periods, a process that gives them new life and the creator new avenues of expression. Readings will include Homer's Odyssey, plays by Sophocles (Ajax, Philoctetes) and Euripides (Bacchae, Helen), and several twentieth century plays (Cocteau, Orphée; Anouilh, Eurydice; Williams, The Fugitive Kind; Giraudoux, Tiger at the Gates). As a final project or paper, students will submit either a substantial original work of art, in any medium, based on materials covered in the course, or a major paper focusing on the critical and theoretical issues involved in reworking ancient materials into new form. Our three meetings per week will be devoted to discussion of readings covered outside class and to student presentations.
Evaluation will be based on classroom participation and on the quality of the final project.
No prerequisite. Preference will be given to juniors and seniors, and to students in the creative arts. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: approximately $75 for books.
Meeting time: afternoons, three times a week.

PORTER

CLAS 025 Israel and Jordan: Intercultural Interchange, Ancient and Modern (Same as Religion 025)

Multiculturalism has attained the status of a major slogan in American society over the last decade, but confluence of various cultures has characterized societies throughout history and throughout the world. The interaction between various constituencies plays out differently in different geo-political-historical contexts. On the crossroads between Asia and Africa, and at the same time pulled between the West and the East, Israel and Jordan dramatically illustrate potential models for intercultural interchange. By visiting ancient sites while encountering modern institutions and individuals, students will examine how cultural interchange is played out in a different part of the world and compare the ancient interchanges with the modern. The ultimate purpose will be to identify and evaluate these different models of interchange. The deep connection each of these countries has to its past demands a consideration of their dichotomous heritage of dialogue and dispute, adaptation and rejection, domination and rebellion. Topics include Nabatean places: Netzana, Avdat, and Petra between Arabia and Rome; an elite Englishman's experience of Arabia: Lawrence of Arabia and Wadi Rum; Greco-Jewish harmony in Sepphoris versus Greco-Jewish conflict in Caeserea; contemporary attempts at Arab-Jewish coexistence versus tensions in Hebron; Christianity in the Holy Land: desert monasteries and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre; East meets West: the woman's movement in Israel and Jordan; Interfaith dialogue between Christian, Moslems and Jews; and the integration of Jews from Moslem lands, Ethiopia, and FSU.
Among the locations to be visited: Jerusalem, Judaean desert, Hebron, Tel Aviv, Kibbutz Lotan (Israel); Wadi Run, Humeima, Petra, Madaba, Jabal Musa, Amman, Jerash/Umm Keis, Pella (Jordan); Beit Shean/Hamat Tiberias, Gamla/Katzrin, Hazor/Tel Dan/ and Haifa, Sepphoris/Caesarea, Jerusalem (Israel).
Duration of trip: three weeks.
Requirements: an oral presentation about one of the places visited and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: $3500.

KRAUS

CLAS 031 Senior Thesis

May be taken by students registered for Classics 493, 494.

CSCI 010 C, UNIX and Software Tools

This course serves as a guided tour of programming methods in the UNIX operating system. The course is designed for individuals who understand basic program development techniques as discussed in an introductory programming course (Computer Science 134 or equivalent), but who wish to become familiar with a broader variety of computer systems and programming languages. Students in this course will work on UNIX workstations, available in one of the Department's laboratories. By the end of the course, students will have developed basic proficiency in the C programming language.
The increasing success of UNIX as a modern operating system stems from its unique ability to "prototype" programs quickly. Students will use prototyping tools, such as Awk and "shell scripts" to write "filters" for transforming data from a variety of sources. It will become clear that in many cases the overhead of programming in languages such as C, Pascal, or FORTRAN is unnecessary. Moreover, students will learn to effectively use software tools such as debuggers, profilers, and make files.
Evaluation will be based on several programming assignments and shell scripts due throughout the term. While none of the projects in the course will be particularly large, the successful student will develop a tool chest, which will extend their computing "effectiveness" in their particular field. Students with computing needs particular to their field are encouraged to advise the instructor before the first meeting.
Prerequisite: Computer Science 134 or equivalent programming experience. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: texts.
Meeting time: mornings.

TERESCO

CSCI 015 Software Engineering for Web Applications

Consider the plight of a student who wants to learn how to build a Web application. Web apps rely on multiple technology layers working reliably together 24x7. To be successful, a student will need to learn a bit about UNIX, a bit about a relational database management system, a lot about engineering the Web server object itself, one of a number of scripting languages, the basics of HTTP, a bit about administering permissions and configuration of a Web server, the syntax of HTML, etc. This course (a condensed version of a course taught in a full semester version at MIT) will attempt to teach you how to design a good web service-and give you one practical set of skills to use in doing so.
This course will be problem set based, with lectures interspersed as needed. You will find the problem sets and the course textbooks at http://photo.net/teaching/one-term-web.html. Everyone will do problem sets 1 and 2. After that, students will have their choice of one of problem sets 3-5 or a project of their own choosing. Collaborative projects, especially projects for a real audience, are encouraged.
Prerequisites: no formal prerequisites, but students will need basic UNIX and Emacs survival skills, and must know how to structure, write, and debug a computer program; Computer Science 105, 134, or equivalent experience is suggested. Students will be selected based on a questionnaire that will be available on the web (http://cynthia.arsdigita.com/williams-survey.tcl) at the time of Winter Study registration. Equal preference will be given to students with strong programming backgrounds and those with interesting website ideas. Enrollment is limited to 20.
Requirements: completion of 3 problems sets or 2 problem sets plus a project. A mix of group and individual problem set review will be used for teaching and assessment.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: TBD. Lectures will mainly be mid-morning. Lab time (approximately 40 hours per week) is self-chosen.

CYNTHIA KISER (Instructor)
BAILEY (Sponsor)

Cynthia Kiser is a graduate of Williams College. After getting her Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from Caltech and a stint as a management consultant, Cynthia found a new outlet for her fascination with databases: building database backed web sites for ArsDigita (www.arsdigita.com)

CSCI 030 Senior Project

CSCI 031 Senior Honor Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Computer Science 493-494.

CMAJ 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Contract Major 493, 494.

ECON 010 The Microfinance Revolution

Can you work in the world of finance and at the same time help to alleviate world poverty? Yes you can according to a new generation of dedicated entrepreneurs, bankers and NGO activists who in recent years have brought community organizing, information technology, and innovative financial contracting together to provide financial services to traditionally underserved communities. Examples range from Bangladesh's Grameen Bank which reaches millions of poor female borrowers in rural Bangladesh, to microlenders as nearby as North Adams or Boston. Yet microfinance also has its detractors. While enthusiasts celebrate microfinance as the best poverty alleviation formula yet because it helps the poor to help themselves and because it promises to become self-sustaining, critics point out that it may push poor people into debt and that it is commercializing the social and political agendas of many non-profit organizations. In this course we will study and discuss the new world of microfinance-both its promise and achievements as well as its possible dangers and limitations-through films, ethnographic and economic impact studies, journalistic accounts, and by talking to microfinance entrepreneurs.
Each student will participate in discussions and write a 10-page case study paper or a web report on a particular microfinance institution.
Prerequisite: Economics 101. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: about $30 for texts.

CONNING

ECON 011 Public Speaking

It has been said that most people fear public speaking more than death. In a world in which most of us are asked at one time or another to say something to a group, public speaking is a skill which everyone should learn. This course will help you become an organized and persuasive public speaker. You will create your own public speaking style that is comfortable, confident, and conversational. We will focus on organizational techniques, handling visual aids effectively, eye contact and body language. A supportive atmosphere will give each person an opportunity to receive feedback.
Students will be required to give four to five oral presentations to the class; several of these presentations will be videotaped. Students will also be required to review their videotapes and write a critique of their presentations.
Evaluation will be based on in-class presentations, class participation, and the written critique of presentations.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 14.
Cost to student: approximately $25.
Meeting time: afternoons.

BRAINERD

ECON 012 The Market for Mountains

In this course we will consider the interesting economics of high altitude climbing, an extreme sport which has experienced extremely rapid growth in the last decade. We will first consider the history of high altitude climbing, the exploration of peaks and early attempts at reaching their summit. We will then consider how increased demand for climbing opportunities has affected the labor market in relatively poor, developing countries like Nepal, where high altitude climbing opportunities are geographically concentrated. We will also examine the impact of climbing on the quality of the environment, as well as the "pack it in - pack it out" norm that has evolved in response to environmental degradation that has occurred. In addition, we will consider recent criticism of an increasingly commercialized industry that provides opportunities for less experienced climbers to ascend big peaks for big dollars. We will discuss whether the market for mountains is indeed efficient or whether there is a role for intervention and regulation of high altitude climbing.
Method of evaluation: short papers and contributions to class discussion.
Requirements: attendance at class meetings (approximately 6 hours per week) to discuss outside readings (approx. 20 hours per week), plus an overnight trip to Mount Washington in New Hampshire for winter hiking and an educational program about the dangers of high altitude climbing.
Prerequisite: Economics 101. Enrollment limited to 15. Selection Criteria: a short application to express interest.
Cost to student: $250 including books, reading packet, and overnight trip to Mount Washington. Students will be expected to provide their own winter clothing and hiking boots.
Meeting time: mornings.

SPENCE

ECON 013 The East Asian Miracle

This course is intended to help CDE Fellows integrate the material they learned in the first semester by applying it to the circumstances of a particular country or group of countries. During the 2001 Winter Term session the course will be devoted to a case study of what have been widely perceived to be successful development experiences-those of the East and Southeast Asian "miracle" economies. The focus will be on issues such as the desirability of the economic transformations that have taken place in these countries, the conditions that may have made such transformations possible, the roles that specific policies may have played in bringing them about, the causes of the recent economic crisis in the region and its implications for future growth in the affected countries, as well as the lessons that the East and Southeast Asian experience may hold for other developing countries.
The class will be conducted as a seminar. It will meet for three hours on Monday through Wednesday mornings. Course grades will be based on three components that will carry equal weight: 1) daily class participation, 2) two short (5-7 page) papers, due at the end of the second and third weeks of the course, on topics to be assigned in class, and 3) a final examination.
Admission based on consent of instructor. The course will be open to no more than three College undergraduates who have taken Economics 360 or Economics 509. Enrollment limited to 3.
Cost to student: approximately $25-$35 for the purchase of reading packet.
Meeting time: mornings.

MONTIEL

ECON 014 Accounting

The project will examine the theoretical and practical aspects of financial accounting. Although the beginning of the course will explore the mechanics of the information gathering and dissemination process, the course will be oriented mainly towards users, rather than preparers, of accounting information. The project will include discussion of the principles involved in accounting for current assets, plant assets, leases, intangible assets, current and long-term debt, stockholders' equity, the income statement and the statement of cash flows. Students will be expected to interpret and analyze actual financial statements. The nature of, and career opportunities in, the field of accounting will also be discussed.
The project is a "mini course." It will present a substantial body of material and will require a considerable commitment of time by the student, including regular attendance and participation in discussion and homework cases and problems.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 30.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

LEO MCMENIMEN (Instructor)
BRADBURD (Sponsor)

Leo McMenimen is returning to Williams this January from the School of Business, Montclair State College.

ECON 015 Stock Market

Elementary description and analysis of the stock market. The project will include an examination of the various ways businesses raise capital in the financial market. The project will include a description of the mechanics of trading on various exchanges and other markets, stock market indexes or "averages" (Dow Jones Industrial Average, S&P 500, etc.), and various methods of analyzing investment opportunities. Stocks, corporate and government debt instruments, money market funds, mutual funds, and stock options will be examined during the project.
Each student will participate in a team project aimed at analyzing a particular industry, and then a particular company within the industry. Each team will then prepare a paper justifying their selection of a hypothetical investment portfolio.
The course will involve a two-day field trip to New York City. Students will leave Williamstown Wednesday at 1:00 p.m. and return late Friday evening.
Enrollment limited to 30. Not intended for students who already know much about the stock market; students who have had Economics 317 not admitted.
Cost to student: $50 for bus transportation to New York City, obligatory and paid at time of registration. Lodging in New York City for two nights ($150-$200) and meals are not included in this price and are the responsibility of the student.
Meeting time: afternoons.

LEO MCMENIMEN (Instructor)
BRADBURD (Sponsor)

Leo McMenimen is returning to Williams this January from the School of Business, Montclair State College.

ECON 016 How to Buy a Car

The premise of this course is that car buyers get more for their money if they are aware of the economic principles involved at the time of purchase. At our first meeting, students will participate in an auto purchase bargaining game; students will be paired off, one playing the role of the "dealer" and the other the role of the "purchaser." In subsequent meetings we will discuss various issues including: the decision to buy a new or used car, foreign or domestic car; supply side determinants of car prices such as optimal pricing strategies of manufacturers and dealers, units costs, options' pricing, rebates, special interest rates, product quality, product safety, advertising, and the roles of government, insurance companies and banks; and demand side determinants of car prices such as preferences, demographics, exchange rate fluctuation, seasonal buying cycles and business cycles. At the sixth meeting, students will participate in a second auto purchase simulation.
Students are expected to do the required readings, participate in both simulations, write two 2-page synopses of the simulations and write a 5-page paper at the end of the program discussing the reasons why the material we covered helped (or hurt) them in negotiating their second car purchase.
The course will meet twice a week for two hours each session with an additional once-a-week, two-hour conference with the instructor. Students will also be expected to meet independently as a group to work on their strategic plan.
Students will meet with the instructor twice a week for two hours, but are expected to meet as a group for four hours a week to work on their strategic plan. There will be extensive use of Internet car-buying web sites.
Prerequisite: Economics 101. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: less than $10 for handouts.

HUSBANDS FEALING

ECON 017 Business Economics

In this course, the class will carry out a real-time forecast of the U.S. economy and explore its implications for the bond and stock markets. The course will build upon principles of both macro and micro-economics. It will provide an introduction to the work done by business economists and the techniques they use. Each student will receive a disk (for IBM compatible computer) containing an economic database, chart-generating software and a statistical analysis program. This provides essentially the same resources that an economics consulting group has in a regular business setting.
The class will be divided into teams of two or three students with each team focusing on a particular aspect or sector of the economy. For example, we will examine prospects for inflation, interest rates, basic industries, high-technology industries, and the internet's impact on the economy. Class time will be divided between lectures (demonstrations of forecasting tools, discussion of business cycle theories and special topics) and team presentations. The conclusion of the project will be a formal presentation of the economic forecast with invited guests from the Wall Street investment world.
Each student should expect to spend a reasonable amount of time on independent work, to participate in short presentations of their analyses as the work progresses as well as in the form presentation during the last week. There will also be a 3-page paper summarizing the result of the forecast project.
No prerequisites, but Economics 101 is strongly recommended. Enrollment limited to 24.
Cost per student: about $25 for text and other materials.
The class will meet three times per week in the morning with two afternoons of workshops.

THOMAS SYNNOTT (Instructor)
BRADBURD (Sponsor)

Thomas Synnott '58 is Chief Economist, U.S. Trust Company of New York

ECON 018 The Economics of the Internet

The Internet has turned conventional business wisdom on its head. Net businesses with few revenues and no profits are worth hundreds of times what successful "old economy" businesses are worth. Is this insanity, or has the Internet changed the ground rules of how we make a living and make a profit? We'll explore the shared cost structure of the Internet, question the legitimacy of Internet business models, and look at how Internet businesses are-and are not -changing the communities they're located in. Guest lectures with "net entrepreneurs" and development experts will be followed by group discussions.
Each student will be responsible for researching and presenting a case study examining an internet venture, or a component of the global internet.
Evaluation will be based on discussion, participation, and the case study.
No prerequisite. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: $50 for materials and xeroxing.
Classes meet two mornings a week for three hours each meeting.

ETHAN ZUCKERMAN (Instructor)
BRADBURD (Sponsor)

Ethan Zuckerman '93 is an internet entrepreneur, and co-founder of Geekcorps, a non-profit focused on internet solutions for economic growth in the developing world.

ECON 025 Cuban Socialism and Transition

In Latin America, the "Washington
Consensus" policies of opening markets to trade and foreign investment, privatization of state-controlled companies, and deregulation have become the norm. From the 1980s and 1990s to the present, comparing economies in the region has amounted to variations on a common theme. Few case studies exist that allow comparing fundamentally different economic systems. Cuba is the exception, but U.S. citizens have had limited access to the country for the past forty years. Consequently, Cuba is viewed from the United States through a veil of mystery, and often misinformation, that prevents informed comparison. Reactions to Cuba in the U.S. range from sympathy and unquestioning acceptance of the ends and means of Fidel Castro's government (in which case Cuba's education and health care systems are commonly cited), to dogmatic and equally unquestioning opposition to Castro (in which case the government's repression of political and religious dissent, and the relative poverty of the island, are commonly cited). This course is intended to challenge both positions. Since 1994, Cuba's largest source of foreign exchange has been tourism, so leisure and educational trips are common-and designed to show the government in a favorable light. Most travelers remain in Havana, Varadero, and Trinidad, stay in hotels operated by Cuban-European joint ventures, and tour sites intended to receive them. The small number of students enrolled in this course will allow us to stray from that path. Students will travel through provinces from La Habana to Camagüey to Santiago de Cuba, seeing rural Cuba and cities off the usual tourist routes, getting a feel of economic life for a broader cross-section of Cuban people, and meeting with Cubans who oppose the government: among them religious dissidents, political opponents, and aspiring entrepreneurs. On the other hand, students will also see the images the government prefers to project, which are no less "real": among them a model agricultural cooperative, a hospital, a factory, and a state ministry. Throughout the course, students will be challenged to ask themselves and others:

Students will be required to keep and ultimately submit a
journal, including entries on assigned topics. They will also be expected to contribute to group discussions on the topics. Finally, one week after returning, a 4- to 5-page paper will be due; the paper will address one of the central questions listed above.
Participation in all meetings and events on the itinerary will be required for credit.
Evaluation will be based evenly on the journal, participation in discussions, and the final paper.
Prerequisites: Spanish 105 or demonstrated Spanish fluency. Enrollment limited to 8. Students must consult the instructor before registering. Preference will be given to students with greater Spanish language abilities and a predisposition to participate in group discussions, and to those who are Economics or Political Economy majors. Nevertheless, students majoring in other areas are encouraged to inquire.
Cost to student:

If the roundtrip flight from the United States to Nassau costs $350, the total cost would be approximately $2585.
Meeting time: the itinerary and timing of group meetings are to be announced.

MEARDON

ECON 030 Honors Project

The "Specialization Route" to the degree with Honors in Economics requires that each candidate take an Honors Winter Study Project in January of their senior year. Students who wish to begin their honors work in January should submit a detailed proposal. Decisions on admission to the Honors WSP will be made in the fall. Information on the procedures will be mailed to senior majors in economics early in the fall semester.
Seniors who wish to apply for admission to the Honors WSP and thereby to the Honors Program should register for this WSP as their first choice.
Some seniors will have begun honors work in the fall and wish to complete it in the WSP. They will be admitted to the WSP if they have made satisfactory progress. They should register for this WSP as their first choice.

ECON 031 Honors Thesis

To be taken by students participating in year-long thesis research (ECON 493-W031-494).

ENGL 010 Fan Fiction: Cult/Culture

This course will examine contemporary American "amateur" fan writing as subculture and super-culture. In other words, we will read fan writing symptomatically-as both an idiosyncratic archive of marginal and cultic pleasures, but also as a current in the American mainstream, a broad taxonomy of consumer desire. We will also read it for fun, and examine our own readerly pleasure in, for example, Kirk/Spock and Xena/Gabrielle "slash" writing. After careful study of the models made available by 'zines, webrings, dedicated multimedia fan sites and personal homepages, students will write their own fan fiction and, finally, produce a short analytical companion piece for one of their classmate's stories. Evaluation will be based on these two pieces of writing and regular class participation. Supplementary readings will include works by Walter Benjamin, Constance Penley, Linda Williams, and Samuel Delany. Warning: syllabus may contain sexually explicit material. Fan writers are like that.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 19.
Cost to student: $80 for materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

CARTER-SANBORN

ENGL 011 Constructing a Film Sequence

In this course, we will examine factors and stategies involved in the construction of a sequence in a feature film: the ways in which the dramatic material of a screenplay shapes and is shaped by the work of actors, set designers, lighting designers, and cinematographers, and is ultimately broken down and restructured in the editing process. We will focus principally on analyzing sequences from finished films, identifying and comparing their characteristic strategies (asking, for instance, how Hitchcock might have edited a sequence from a film by Welles). One of the instructors, filmaker Andrew Litvack (Williams '87), may also be able to obtain for us rushes from a film, whose editing into alternative versions we would thus be able to explore.
Requirements: faithful attendance and active participation in class discussion, and a series of written exercises totalling about 10 pages of writing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: about $25 for books.
Meeting time: afternoons.

TIFFT and ANDREW LITVACK

Andrew Litvack is 1987 graduate of Williams College. He has been involved in the French film industry for a number of years and is currently a filmaker living in Paris.

ENGL 012 Reporting and Writing About Science and Technology (Same as Chemistry 012 and Special 012)

In this course we will read some of the best science writing being published in newspapers, magazines, and books for the general reader. We will try to understand the techniques that skillful writers use to achieve their ends, especially rhetorical devices that make complex issues and arguments seem simple and comprehensible. In addition to a lot of reading, we will also do a lot of writing. By emulating good writing about science and technology, we will develop skills in the art of explanation, which will serve you well in other courses. The goals of this course are to develop an appreciation of good writing about science and technology and to become better writers ourselves.
Requirements: There will be numerous short writing assignments, including a longer final article popularizing a topic in science or technology of your choosing.
Prerequisite: one Division III course at Williams prior to this course or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 10.
Required books: Anton, Ted, and Rick McCourt, The New Science Journalists, Ballantine Books, $10.90. Blum, Deborah, and Mary Knudson, A Field Guide for Science Writers, New York: Oxford University Press, $13.95. Strunk, Williams Jr., and E.B. White, The Elements of Style. New York: Macmillan $6.95. The Tuesday editions of The New York Times, $4.
Meeting time: afternoons.

JO PROCTER (Instructor)
D. RICHARDSON, ROSENHEIM, (Co-Sponsors)

Jo Procter is the college's news director. She has a B.S. in communications from Boston University. Her media experience includes Popular Science Magazine, Mutual Broadcasting, and WGBH-TV (Boston).

ENGL 013 Jane Austen

We will consider what constitutes virtue and virtuosity in Austen's notions of behavior and of literary style, and will explore how issues of shame, audacity, and obligation affect her portrayal of genteel English society during the Napoleonic Wars. We will focus particularly on Pride and Prejudice, Emma, Mansfield Park, and Persuasion.
Requirements: students will write one 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15, with preference given to junior and senior English Majors.
Cost to student: cost of books.
Meeting time: afternoons.

SOKOLSKY

ENGL 014 The Poetry Project

In this course, Williams College students and students from Williamstown Elementary school will explore together the joys and challenges of reading and writing poetry. Williams students will spend the first week of January developing a school poetry project: we will read poems by children, compile anthologies of poems that might especially appeal to children, think about effective ways to introduce children to poetry, and learn what we can from other poets who have worked in the schools. During the next two weeks, we will work closely in the classroom with elementary school students, reading and writing poetry together. This course hopes to draw Williams students who appreciate both poetry and working with children. Poets are especially welcome.
Requirements: Each student will compile a poetry anthology for use in teaching; for a final project, Williams students and elementary school students will together make a book of poems that come out of the project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: about $40 for books.
Meeting time: mornings.

SWANN

ENGL 015 The Brontes: The Making of Myths

This course will explore the mythic power of the worlds that a family of four remarkably talented children-Charlotte, Branwell, Emily, and Anne Bronte-inhabited and created in an isolated parsonage on the Yorkshire moors in mid-nineteenth-century England. It will also explore the enduring imaginative force of that world in their art. Readings will include: (1) juvenilia (selections from Angria and Gondal, the famous fantasy kingdoms the Bronte children created); (2) adult writings (Charlotte's Jane Eyre, Emily's Wuthering Heights, and selected poems); (3) competing biographies of the Brontes (every student will read and report on one). Subjects for discussion will include the Brontes' own mythmaking; the aesthetic transformation of their childhood experiences in their adult fiction; and the myths generated by contending biographical accounts. Three, two-hour class meetings per week, with substantial readings for each.
Requirements and evaluation: regular attendance and active participation; one-page journal entries for each class; two short papers; panel presentation on a Bronte biography.
Prerequisite: any English 100-level course except 103 or 150. Enrollment limited to 15, with preference given to English and language majors.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for books and xerox packet.
Meeting time: mornings.

S. GRAVER

ENGL 016 Paintings, Pictures and Prose

This is a workshop for students interested in writing short fiction with the visual arts as a starting point. The tradition of writing to and/or from visual work is a long one, and we will begin the course by talking about the relationship between the visual arts and fiction, while looking at examples-common in poetry, rarer in fiction-from the work of contemporary writers.
Requirements: the majority of the course will be spent creating, revising and workshopping student fiction that engages in a dialogue with specific works of visual art. The course also requires active class participation and one exercise; 10-20 pages of fiction with substantial revisions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 14.
Cost to student: printed materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

KAREN SHEPARD (Instructor)
FIX (Sponsor)

Karen Shepard is Part-Time Lecturer in English and a member of the Williams College class of 1987.

ENGL 017 Environmental Journalism (Same as Environmental Studies 014)

(See under Environmental Studies for full description.)

ENGL 018 English Rhymes and Rhythms

Blest be all metrical rules that forbid automatic responses,
Force us to have second thoughts, free from the fetters of self
-W.H. Auden
This course is designed to increase awareness of the expressive possibilities of the traditional sounds of English verse, those established patterns of rhyme and rhythm from which "free verse" is free. We will not only read verse, but listen to it, speak it, and write it, in pursuit of a fuller experience of past and present poetry. Each student will also create a "memory anthology" of individually chosen poems. Our goal is to awaken the ear as well as the mind. Though the course should improve the ability to recognize and analyze poetic forms and prosodic effects, it will proceed through practical exercises rather than analytical essays, with a strong tilt toward the actual writing of verse. We will examine poems by such versifiers as Dr. Seuss, Shakespeare, Hopkins and Larkin, with others suggested by the class, and verse written by class members. We'll end with a reading of Vikram Seth's brilliantly formal (and informal) novel in verse, The Golden Gate.
Requirements: students will be evaluated on the basis of their verse exercises, their regular and active attendance, and the care and commitment with which they present their anthologies, to be spoken from memory in the presence of the instructor.
No prerequisite. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: approximately $25.
Meeting time: afternoons.

CLARA PARK(Instructor)
FIX (Sponsor)

Clara Park is Senior Lecturer Emerita at Williams.

ENGL 019 Directed Reading in the Victorian Novel

This tutorial-format course is intended for students who have had some exposure to British Victorian novels and would like to pursue individual interests through further reading. Students will meet with me in advance of Winter Study to work out a selection of related novels they will read and the questions they will address, either individually or in groups of 2-3, depending on enrollments and on interests expressed. Groupings can be based on an author or group of authors (a selection of Dickens's works, Trollope's Barsetshire novels, early or late George Eliot, etc.) a subgenre (Bildungsroman, sensation or condition-of-England novels, early detective fiction), a particular theme (heroines with professional ambitions, insanity), or, in short, any grouping with a defensible basis. Students need not have a clearly defined list of novels in mind in advance to sign up-in fact, some flexibility will be an advantage in forming groups.
Requirements: during Winter Study, the course will be conducted tutorial-style, with short papers due in tutorial meetings during the term. At the end of the term, there will be a large group meeting during which students will do presentations based on their work in the course.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 10 (with no more than 5 different groups). If the class is overenrolled, selection will be based on consultation with the instructor, with preference generally given to those with prior coursework in the field.
Cost to student: books.
Meeting time: by individual arrangement.

CASE

ENGL 020 Journalism

In this introduction to journalism, students will learn reporting, writing and editing skills through written assignments and in-class exercises. We will examine how different styles of writing serve different needs, and the practical and legal limits within which journalists work. Assignments will include writing a news story, a feature article, and an editorial. Students will also practice the essential art of rewriting.
Requirements: each student will submit articles on deadline; read and discuss current newspapers and magazines; and attend all classes.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15, with preference given to first-year students.
Cost to students: approximately $20.
Meeting time: mornings, four two-hour sessions each week.

SALLY WHITE (Instructor)
FIX (Sponsor)

Sally White worked at Time Inc. magazines in New York and Washington for thirteen years. She is now a freelance magazine writer.

ENGL 022 Hamlet

This course is entirely dedicated to Shakespeare's Hamlet. We will read the play aloud and discuss its beauties and complexities, with special attention to Shakespeare's language, characterization, and theatricality. Though actors are warmly invited, you need not be an experienced performer to participate. We will also discuss several critical essays about Hamlet, and watch and discuss several film versions, by Branagh, Olivier, Mel Gibson, and others.
Requirements: each student is responsible for regular attendance, active participation, and several brief reports.
Prerequisite: English 101 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15, no particular preference given.
Cost to student: the text.
Meeting time: mornings-meets daily for an hour and a half.

R. BELL

ENGL023 Putting on a Show: Film About Film and Theater

A course on the cinematic complexities of the attempt to make Art in two specific media: film and theater. Films to be studied include Kelly and Donen's Singin' in the Rain, Malle's Vanya on 42nd Street, Yates' The Dresser, Madden's Shakespeare in Love, Fellini's 8 1/2, and Leigh's Topsy-Turvy.
Requirements: one 10-page paper.
Prerequisite: English 204 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20.
Meeting time: afternoons.

J. SHEPARD

ENGL 024 Documentary Photography: Public Documents and Personal Narratives (Same as Special 021)

This course combines a survey of the twentieth-century documentary and narrative traditions in photography with the creation of documentary narrative photographic projects by the students. Topics include Edward Weston's Daybooks, Walker Evans, Cartier-Bresson, Robert Frank, Diane Arbus, and the new generation document makers including Gilles-Peress, Josef Koudelka, Nicholas Nixon, and Sally Mann. We will also explore the gray areas between photographic fact and personal fiction through the work of Gregory Grewdson, Jeff Wall, Philip Lorca diCorcia, Duane Michaels and others. The students' daily ritual of exploring a documentary topic with their cameras and then processing and editing their work into a formed document will give the students insight into the core issues of documentary photography as well as into their personal photographic vision.
Students will be expected to work for two sessions each week in the darkroom. They will be encouraged to work on individual projects of their own choice provided that their attention to the documentary narrative process is engaged.
Students will be evaluated on classroom and lab participation and their photographic course work. Each student will be required to complete a documentary project portfolio of photographs and journal entries reflecting on fieldwork and lab work experiences.
No prior photographic experience required. Enrollment limited to 8. Priority will be given to upperclass students.
Cost to student: $75. Students must also supply their own manual option 35mm camera.
Meeting time: two mornings a week for three hours.

KEVIN BUBRISKI (Instructor)
Winter Study Committee (Sponsor)

Kevin Bubriski has received photography fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the Fulbright Foundation, the Asian Cultural Council, and the National Endowment for the Arts. His photographic prints are in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the International Center of Photography in New York, and the Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris.

ENGL 027  Henry James
This course will be devoted to the work of Henry James, considered by many to be the greatest novelist in English. His brilliant, demanding innovations of prose style and narrative technique, and his acute psychological and ethical explorations, mark the shift from the nineteenth-century to the modern novel. James writes about what it meant for American and European societies around the turn of the century to be exposed to-and by-one another. In so doing, he raises questions about what it means to be civilized, to be smart, and to be rich. We will consider how the drama of consciousness is played out in his characters' struggles with love and conscience, and in his own preoccupation with capturing stylistically the narrative logic of the passions.
We will begin with two of James' best known and most engaging novellas; The Turn of the Screw and Daisy Miller. We will then turn our attention for most of the course to a masterpiece of his late style, The Ambassadors, one of the most perfectly designed and accomplished novels ever written. Although The Ambassadors is not especially long, its extraordinary richness and subtlety call for the patient, attentive exploration that we will have the luxury of undertaking in this course.
Requirements: regular attendance and active participation; one 10-page or two 5-page papers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: approximately $25 for books.
Meeting time: afternoons.
TIFFT

ENGL 030 Honors Project: Specialization Route

Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the specialization route.

ENGL 031 Honors Project: Thesis

Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the thesis route.

ENVI 010 Writing and Drawing-The Naturalist's Journal

This course will explore the tools for studying the natural world through various uses of writing, literature, and drawing. Students will spend time outdoors learning the ecosystem of the Williamstown area and time indoors doing observational drawing, reflective writing, and reading and discussions of nature literature. The month's work will be contained in a nature journal, to be displayed and discussed as part of a final project.
Designed for students with interests in environmental studies, natural history writing, and drawing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 12.
Cost to student: $50 for books and art supplies.
Meeting time: mornings.

WALKER LESLIE and CHRISTIAN MCEWEN (Instructors)
ART (Sponsor)

Clare Walker Leslie has written many books on nature drawing including Nature Journaling, which she co-authored with Charles Roth. She illustrated Professor William T. Fox's "At the Sea's Edge." Christian McEwen is the editor of "Jo's Girls: Tomboy Tales of High Adventure," "True Grit" and "Real Life" (Beacon Press, 1997).

ENVI 011 Science for Kids (Same as Chemistry 011 and Special 011)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

ENVI 012 Greenhouses: Defying Winter (Same as Biology 012)

(See under Biology for full description.)

ENVI 013 Genetically Modified Organisms-Friend or Foe? (Same as Biology 013)

(See under Biology for full description.)

ENVI 014 Environmental Journalism (Same as English 017)

Absurd, but nevertheless true: The future of our planet's ecosystem will depend less on how well scientists understand it than on how much voters and policy-makers do. As environmental issues grow more critical, so will the need for compelling environmental journalism. This course is designed for both 1) environmental studies students who want to make their concerns and specialized research accessible to the general public, and 2) students interested in writing or journalism who wish to develop skills in communicating about science and the environment.
Through reading and discussing writings by the instructor and other professionals, participants will learn techniques in research, story structure, and narrative approaches to environmental journalism. They will attend field trips to a nearby area of particular environmental interest and to at least one news or publishing organization specializing in environmental issues (e.g., National Public Radio's Cambridge-based weekly program, "Living On Earth").
Students will be evaluated on completion of either one magazine-length article, 2-3 newspaper-length features, or a documentary radio or video script. Students will have the option of choosing their own topics or participating in a team-reporting project chosen by the class and the instructor.
No prerequisites; if demand exceeds capacity, prospective students will be asked to describe their goals in a short e-mail to the instructor. Enrollment is limited to 15.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for books.
Classes will meet four mornings a week for two hours. At least one book will be assigned to be read prior to the first class meeting.

ALAN WEISMAN (Instructor)
ART (SPONSOR)

Journalist Alan Weisman is the author of four books of nonfiction. His reports from the United States, Mexico, Central and South America Antarctica, Europe, the former Soviet Union, and the Middle East have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Los Angeles Times Magazine, Harper's, The Atlantic Monthly, Audubon, Mother Jones, Condé Nast Traveler, and many others, as well as on National Public Radio and Public Radio International.

ENVI 019 Introduction to Research in Environmental Science (Same as Chemistry 019)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

ENVI 021 The Winter Landscape (Same as Biology 019 and Geosciences 021)

(See under Biology for full description.)

ENVI 031 Senior Research and Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Environmental Studies 493-494.

GEOS 010 Natural Disasters

The earth is a hazardous place to live. Plate tectonic motions and a turbulent atmosphere-ocean system produce volcanic eruptions, violent storms, temblors, landslides, floods, and a host of other catastrophes and cataclysms which cause death and destruction throughout the world. Have you ever wondered why the earth quakes? Why hurricanes happen? What causes giant village-burying mudslides? This course will examine the geology and climatology of natural disasters. As a group, we will examine why, where, when, and how they occur, as well as methods of prediction and prevention. Each student will also pick a specific natural phenomenon to study in depth, using web-based satellite data and journalistic resources as well as library research.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, a 10-page writeup of research results, and an oral presentation.
Enrollment limited to 15, with preference to first-year students.
Meeting time: mornings.
No prerequisites.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for textbook.

COX

GEOS 012 Science of Jurassic Park

The movie Jurassic Park was one of the biggest hits in American film history and it sparked renewed interest in dinosaurs. What are the paleontological facts and theories behind the story and the dinosaur reconstructions used in this movie? The course will analyze the movie and the book it was based on by Michael Crichton. We will also read Raptor Red a novel by a "real paleontologist" to learn more of the world of dinosaurs. Through discussion, we will consider the feasibility of DNA recombination for recreating dinosaurs. Also, we will consider the various facts and their interpretations of dinosaurs' reproduction, digestive system, metabolism, locomotion, defense and attack systems, and their intelligence. Required reading: Michael Crichton's Jurassic Park, Robert T. Bakker's Raptor Red, selected passages from DeSalle and Lindley's The Science of Jurassic Park and The Lost World, and a small selection of other scientific dinosaur articles.
Students are expected to do research from the paleontological literature on one type of dinosaur or another Mesozoic animal and present the result as a 10-page paper for evaluation and group discussion.
Evaluation will be based on the submission of the 10-page paper and oral presentation, as well as participation in group-discussions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 12.
Cost to student: approximately $20 for books and a reading package.
Meeting time: The class will meet three times a week for 120 minute sessions.

B. GUDVEIG BAARLI (Instructor)
M. JOHNSON (Sponsor)

Gudveig Baarli is a research associate in the Geosciences Department at Williams College. She received her Doctor of Philosophy degree from the University of Oslo in 1988.

GEOS 019 Service Learning Internships (Same as EXPR 019 and Political Science 019)

(See under Political Science for full description.)

GEOS 021 The Winter Landscape (Same as Biology 019 and Environmental Studies 021)

(See under Biology for full description.)

GEOS 025 Baja California Field Geology

This course provides practical field experience in paleontology, stratigraphy, and tectonics as focused on the geological history of the Gulf of California. The present-day pattern of tectonics found in the gulf defines the adjacent peninsula as a mobile terrane that progressively shifted northward along a divergent plate boundary during the last 3.5 million years. Prior to that time, however, the protogulf opened by simple extension that involved only east-west expansion comparable to the Basin and Range Province of the American southwest. The Pliocene Epoch (from 5-1.8 million years ago) is a critical time interval during which the regional style of tectonics was altered to its present status. The gulf's evolution is well represented in Baja California by coastal deposits spanning much of the Pliocene. Large tracts of Pliocene shore deposits (studied by previous research teams from Williams College) show no signs of structural adjustment to this transformation in tectonic regime. Instead, coastal accommodation appears to have occurred at specific loci marked by the development of volcanic centers that are spaced well apart. Participants in this project will learn how to identify fossils, measure stratigraphic sections, and map fault zones in Pliocene sedimentary rocks associated with the Cerro Mencenares volcanic center near Loreto, in Baja California Sur (Mexico).
Participants will assemble in Los Angeles for a group flight to Loreto (Capitol of the Californias), where orientation will take place. The ensuing field course will be organized as a camping expedition to El Mangle on the gulf coast about 25 km north of Loreto. Participants should expect primitive conditions and should be willing to contribute to the duties of communal camp life. The final goal will be accomplished as a group exercise leading to a geological map of Pliocene relationships on the south and east flanks of Cerro Mencenares. Time permitting, other geological localities in Baja California Sur may be visited.
Course evaluation will be based on completion of a daily journal and a geological map with explanatory text (10-page equivalent).
Prerequisite: preference to those with Geosciences 201; any 100-level geosciences course. Enrollment limited to 4 students by permission of the instructor with priority to sophomores and juniors.
Cost to student: food contribution ($200) plus airfare to and from Loreto (cost will vary with departure point, generally between $250 and $700). All other expenses will be absorbed by the project.

M. JOHNSON

GEOS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Geology 493-494.

GERM S.P. Sustaining Program for German 101-102

Something new and different for students enrolled in German 101-102. Practice in the use of German for everyday purposes; creation and performance of short dramatic sketches through group collaboration; games; songs; storytelling; reading. No homework.
Class meets three times a week for 50 minutes.
Requirements: active participation and regular attendance earn a "Pass" grade.
Prerequisite: German 101 or equivalent. Limited to German 101-102 students.
Cost to student: approximately $5 for photocopied materials.
Meeting time: 9:00-9:50 a.m.

GERM 010 Marx and Nietzsche
CANCELLED!

GERM 025 German in Germany

Begin or continue study of the German language at the Goethe Institute in Prien, Germany. The Goethe Institute program attracts students from all over the world. A typical course meets for four weeks, 18 hours/week, generally providing the equivalent of one semester courses at Williams.
To earn a pass, the student must receive the Goethe Institute's Teilnahme-Bestätigung which denotes regular attendance at classes, completion of homework, and successful completion of a final test.
Students wishing to apply must fill out an application, obtainable in the office of the Center for Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Cultures in Weston, and return it to the Goethe Institute as soon as possible (admission is on a first-come, first-served basis). It is also possible to apply online at www.goethe.de.
No prerequisites, but any student interested in beginning German with this course and then entering German 102 at Williams should contact Professor Kieffer by December 1, at the latest. Enrollment limited to 15. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: from approximately $1300 to approximately $1800 for tuition and room and board, plus round trip travel costs. The Goethe Institute arranges for room and board at various levels upon request, but students must make their own travel arrangements. This course is not defined as a "trip" for financial aid purposes. The maximum reimbursement to financial aid students is $300.

NEWMAN

GERM 030 Honors Project

To be taken by honors candidates following other than the normal thesis route.

GERM 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for German 493-494.

HIST 010 Discovering the Twentieth-Century South

In the present century, black and white observers from both inside and outside the South have been fascinated by the region-by the land, the people, the institutions, the culture, and the complex problems that lie at the core of southern society. We will read some of the best of the books written about the twentieth-century South, works like William Alexander Percy's Lanterns on the Levee, Carl Rowan's South of Freedom, Marshall Frady's Southerners, and Eddy Harris's South of Haunted Dreams. We will discuss these works in class, and each student will select one additional book to read as the basis for an interpretative 10-page essay. Class will meet three times a week.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: $30 for books and Xeroxes.
Meeting time: afternoons.

DEW

HIST 012 American Strategy in World War II: War Plans and Execution

During the Second World War, the United States fought a global conflict. By late 1943, for example, American forces were in combat in Italy, New Guinea, the Solomon Islands and the Central Pacific. The war against the U Boat threat and the air war against Germany continued with increasing intensity, and the allied staffs were engaged in planning the 1944 invasion of France. To achieve the nation's basic political objective-the unconditional surrender of Germany and Japan-the United States devised a series of strategic and operational war plans for both the European and Pacific areas of operation. A number of factors including inter-allied and inter-service disputes, logistics and enemy actions frequently led to results that were quite different from the planner's expectations. The course will examine the major U.S. war plans using selected readings and a number of actual plans. The seminar will then explore the realities of battle and the differences between plans and execution.
Requirements: class participation and attendance. Class will meet twice a week for three hours. A 10-page essay will be required.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: $30 for books and Xeroxes.
Meeting time: afternoons.

STEVEN ROSS (Instructor)
W. WAGNER (Sponsor)

Steven Ross '59, holds the Admiral William V. Pratt Chair of Military History at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island.

HIST 013 Rockin' the Shtetl: Klezmer Music as a Mirror of Modern Jewish Civilization

For centuries up until today, klezmer music has been the soundtrack of Jewish celebration. Yet in spite of its Old World Hasidic roots, klezmer has always had a decidedly modern, secular aspect, showing the influence of the prevailing popular music of its time and space. Just as musicians of old mixed Polish waltzes, Romanian horas, and Ukrainian kozachoks with klezmer, today it is not uncommon to hear klezmer mixed with jazz, rock, reggae, hip-hop, and electro-beat. With reference to recordings, documentary films, and other resources, we will explore the evolution of klezmer and how its journey from Old World shtetls to New World nightclubs parallels changes in Jewish life and culture.
Evaluation will be based on in-class participation and one, 10-page, critical paper or equivalent project. Class meets three times a week for two hours.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: approximately $80.
Meeting time: afternoons.

SETH ROGOVOY (Instructor)
W. WAGNER (Sponsor)

Seth Rogovoy '82 is a music critic and author of The Essential Klezmer: A Music Lover's Guide to Jewish Roots and Soul Music.

HIST 014 What Was Funny?

The history of humor is a fascinating lens on American society. Jokes are a fairly exact measure of historical change, social conflict, and political culture. Our national sense of humor has always been textured by region, race, gender, and ethnicity. This class examines humor in these different contexts in order to reveal our historical capacity to distinguish, divide, and unite ourselves by laughing at what was funny.
Requirements for the course include an oral presentation and a 10-page research essay. Classes will meet twice a week for three hours.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: $30 for books and Xeroxes.
Meeting time: mornings.

WILDER

HIST 015 Hands-On Investigative Reporting

So, you've always wanted to be an investigative reporter-or at least wondered how they dig up all that stuff.
Students will learn how to obtain information - confidential and otherwise - in a moral, responsible and effective fashion. First, the course will provide a hands-on approach to how investigative reporters gather information. What methods are actually used? Second, this course will take a hard look at investigative reporting in the U.S. Increasingly, American journalists are delving into topics in politics, in business, and in the lives of individuals that previously have been off-limits. At what point will the media have gone too far? Do prying journalists make for a better or worse American society? The course will include case studies, outside readings, visits from working investigative journalists, and an assignment to "go out there and dig up your own information in the real world."
Requirements: one 10-page paper. Each student will be required to go out and search for hard-to-locate information in Williamstown. The two-part paper will discuss both the reporting techniques used and the actual information discovered by the student.
Prerequisites: an insatiably curious mind. No experience required. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: $30 for reading packet.
Meeting time: mornings.

WILLY STERN '83 (Instructor)
W. WAGNER (Sponsor)

Willy Stern, the Nashville Scene's investigative reporter, is a former staff writer at Business Week and Forbes magazines. Stern's investigative reports have won numerous national awards. A 1983 graduate of Williams College, Stern has lived and worked as a journalist throughout the U.S., Asia, Africa and Australia/New Zealand.

HIST 016 Africa and World Religions: Christianity and Islam

Christianity and Islam have had a transformative effect on African societies over the centuries. They have transformed, in very profound ways, African political, economic, social as well as cultural institutions, and influenced the cosmologies of many peoples. This course will survey the rise of these two religions in different parts of the continent and assess their impacts on African societies. The course will examine the nature of the interface between Christianity and Islam on the one hand and African traditional religions and belief systems on the other. The rivalry between the two world religions is also an important theme of the course. The history of early Christianity will focus mainly on Egypt, Ethiopia, Nubia and the Portuguese colonies. The monastic tradition in Ethiopian Christianity will be presented as a unique feature in the history of African Christianity. The role of the missionary factor and its relationship to westernization, especially the education movement, will form the core of the part on nineteenth and twentieth century Christianity in Africa. Some attention will also be paid to various attempts to Africanize Christianity. The part on Islam will concentrate mainly on North Africa, the Sudanic states of West Africa and the eastern African coast. The course will seek to demonstrate that rather than being a product of the jihad or holy war, the spread of Islam in Africa was strongly linked to the development of trade and commerce, and was aided by the relative simplicity of its theology and the sense of fraternity among its adherents. The two religions will also be examined in the context of their relationships to politics and state formation, and will be linked to the development of architecture, literature and the arts in general. The generally adversarial relationship between Islam and the colonial order will be contrasted with the strong alliance between Christianity and colonialism. Class will meet two to three times per week.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost: $50 for books and Xeroxes.
Meeting time: afternoons

KAIJAGE

HIST 022 American Wars: Directed Independent Reading and Research

An independent reading and research course on American wars from colonial times to the present. All participants will share a few common readings, but there will be no formal classes. Instead, each participant will meet individually with the instructor to develop a unique reading list on a topic of their choice. Once their topic is decided, they will spend the rest of the WSP researching and writing a substantial paper (at least 25 pages) on their topic.
Grade will depend on the quality of their paper.
Prerequisites: none, except interest in American military history. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: $40 for books.
Meeting time: no formal classes.

WOOD

HIST 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for History 493-494.

EXPR 010 Corporate Leadership and Social Responsibility

This course considers the responsibilities of leadership in corporate life through the perspectives of visiting alumni who hold leadership positions in American corporations. It examines the social obligations created by success in business, the risks versus rewards of corporate leadership, the benefits and the costs of fulfilling or exceeding expectations, and the range of professional, social, and personal dilemmas faced by leading figures in modern corporations and institutions. Readings will include material from philosophy and psychology, as well as relevant biography and autobiography.
Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation in class discussions and a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 22.
Cost to student: approximately $30 for books.
Meeting time: mornings.
(This course is part of the Leadership Studies cluster.)

G. GOETHALS and GEORGE KENNEDY '48

George Kennedy '48 is retired chairman and chief executive officer of International Minerals and Chemicals, and Mallinckrodt Group, Inc., both Fortune 250 companies. Mr. Kennedy chaired the 50th reunion fund for Williams in 1998 when the class of 1948 designated significant support to underwrite the Leadership Studies program.

EXPR 011 Leadership in Astronomy: From Copernicus to Hubble and the Age of the Universe (Same as Astronomy 011)

(See under Astronomy for full description.)

EXPR 012 The Roosevelt Century (Same as Political Science 011)

How did three members of a wealthy New York "Knickerbocker" family rise above the narrow, elitist interests of their own social class to become the great political and moral leaders of the century? In this course we will focus on the political careers and lives of Theodore Roosevelt, his niece Eleanor, and his fifth-cousin Franklin. Theodore and Franklin both graduated from Harvard to become lawyers, assistant secretaries of the Navy, governors of New York, and American presidents of unusual ability and accomplishments. Eleanor Roosevelt, a tireless advocate for the rights of working men and women of all races, led in the drafting of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Again and again the three Roosevelts demonstrated political courage and a deep commitment to an inclusive, egalitarian, and progressive democracy. Through readings, documentary films, guest lectures, and class discussions, we will explore the intertwining lives and ideas of the Roosevelts.
Requirements: in addition to three class meetings per week, students will write one 15-page paper. If any students are interested in working in original documents at the FDR Library in Hyde Park, New York, we will help them make arrangements.
Enrollment limited to 12.
Cost to student: $60 for books and $24 for luncheons with the guest lecturers.
Meeting time: afternoons.
(This course is part of the Leadership Studies cluster.)

DUNN and JAMES MACGREGOR BURNS

Professor Burns, Woodrow Wilson Professor Emeritus of Government, Williams College, is the Pulitzer Prize winning author of "Roosevelt: The Lion and the Fox," and also "Roosevelt: Soldier of Freedom." Dunn and Burns are co-authors of "Three Roosevelts: Class Traitors, Progressive Leaders."

EXPR 013 Managing Non-Profits: An Insider's Look

This course will focus on the study of the particular skills needed to run a successful non-profit organization, which include administration, creative vision, financial management, fund raising, and public accountability. It will also consider, absent the profit motive, what spurs a non-profit's pursuit of excellence. The syllabus will be built upon a series of guest lectures from administrators and directors representing arts, social service, educational, and environmental organizations, including notable organizations such as the New York City Ballet, the Children's Aid Society, and MassMOCA. Class discussion will be informed by assigned readings and case studies. A two- or three-day mid-week trip to New York City to visit non-profits and to attend performances by non-profit companies is also planned.
Evaluation will be based on class attendance and participation as well as a 10-page final paper in which the student will apply insights learned from guest lectures, site visits, and readings to an assessment of the non-profit organization studied during the course.
No prerequisites, but preference is given to former Citigroup Arts Interns and to seniors and juniors. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: $50 for books and prepared materials.
Meeting time: afternoon (except for NYC field trip).
(This course is part of the Leadership Studies cluster.)

ROBERT I. LIPP '60 and MARY ELLEN CZERNIAK (Instructors)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Robert I. Lipp '60 is the chairman and CEO of the Global Consumer Business of Citigroup. He is president of the New York City Ballet, chairman of Dance-On, a director of MASS MoCA, and a trustee of Williams College. Mary Ellen Czerniak is director of corporate and foundation relations at Williams.

EXPR 018 Wilderness Leadership

This Winter Study project is for students who would like to participate in an off-campus experiential education opportunity. Students will be required to research an accredited program-such as those offered by the National Outdoor Leadership School or Outward Bound-that will provide a suitable learning environment and be at least 22 days in length. The Director of the Williams Outing Club will assist students in their search if necessary. Upon choosing a program and being accepted, students will meet with the Director in a pre-program meeting in December to create a framework for monitoring the development of group dynamics and for studying a variety of leadership styles. There will be a follow up class meeting in the first week of February when students return from their experience. At that time, students will give an oral presentation of their journals.
Requirements: daily journal writing with a focus on leadership and group dynamic experience and a final 10-page paper.
Student assessment will be made based on an oral presentation of the journal and the final paper.
No prerequisites. Not open to first-year students. Interested sophomores, juniors, and seniors must consult with WOC Director before registration. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student will vary depending on the program selected. Students should consult with the Director of the Outing Club.
(This course is part of the Leadership Studies cluster.)

S. LEWIS

EXPR 019 Service Learning Internships (Same as Geosciences 019 and Political Science 019)

(See under Political Science for full description.)

EXPR 021 Public Affairs Internships: Power, Authority and Decisionmaking in the Public Sector (Same as Political Science 021)

(See under Political Science for full description.)

EXPR 025 Williams in Washington: Leadership in Our Nation's Capitol

An on-site study of leadership in America's leading city. Students travel to Washington, DC to experience leadership in an urban context, meeting with leaders in government, business, and the not-for-profit world. Participants may also have the opportunity to attend the Presidential inauguration while there. The course will provide a foundation for understanding how leadership influences public policy. Prior to their departure, students will meet with their instructor at Williams. The group will then travel together to accommodations near the University of Maryland in College Park and commute into the city regularly by metro. While in DC, the course will be team-taught with a faculty member from the James MacGregor Burns Academy of Leadership at the University of Maryland, where classroom sessions are held. An equal number of Williams students and students from the University of Maryland College Park Scholars Program will participate in the class, and care will be given to integrate the two groups.
Requirements: there will be a 10-page paper on leadership in Washington due at the end of Winter Study. Grades will also be based on active participation in all sessions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment is limited to 10. Preference will be given to students completing the Leadership Studies cluster. Interested students must consult the instructor before registration.
Cost to student: (estimated)$ 1,100.00***
***Prices may vary depending on lodging arrangements (single or double occupancy) and an individual's cost for meals each day. Students should consult with the Leadership Programs Coordinator early in the fall semester to discuss options.
(This course is part of the Leadership Studies cluster.)

GEORGIA SORENSON and LISA CAREY (Instructors)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Dr. Hugh O'Doherty is the Director of the Ireland-U.S. Public Leadership Program and the College Park Scholars Program in Public Leadership at the James MacGregor Burns Academy of Leadership at the University of Maryland. Dr. O'Doherty's research had focused on the evaluation of conflict resolution programs, curriculum programs in prejudice reduction, and characteristics of intractable conflict. Donald R. Carlson is a 1983 graduate of Williams College and later taught courses in public policy, environmental law and microeconomics as a faculty member. He is now responsible for stewarding the growth strategy of the Corporate Executive Board (CEB) based in Washington D.C. In 1999, he was responsible for the launch of the Marketing Leadership Council-a membership comprised of the chief marketing officers of 125 of the world's leading brand goods companies. Prior to joining CEB, he served as a trial lawyer in at a D.C.-based law firm.

LIT 010 The Ayn Rand Cult (Same as ANSO 010)

The broad, often "underground" influence of publicist-novelist Ayn Rand stands as one of the more curious sociocultural phenomena to have emerged out of post-War America. Examples: a youthful Alan Greenspan was a dedicated disciple of Rand's in the 1940s and 50s; Michael Milken was reported to have kept twenty-six copies of Atlas Shrugged in his jail cell while serving time for insider trading; each year to this day, Rand's books sell hundreds of thousands of copies; and, in a crowning recent instance of "canonization," the U.S. Postal Service issued a commemorative stamp in Rand's honor (as part of its "Great American Authors" series) in April 1999. This course will examine the nature and origins of the Rand phenomenon through reading of relevant works of journalism, fiction, and philosophy. Titles to be studied: Jeffrey Walker, The Ayn Rand Cult; Mary Gaitskill, Two Girls: Fat and Thin; Gene H. Bell-Villada, The Pianist Who Liked Ayn Rand (selections); and John Locke, Second Treatise of Government. We will also view a few films, such as the movie version of The Fountainhead (1949). Note: no books by Rand will be read in this class! It is a course not "about" Rand but rather about the cultural sociology and anthropology of Randism.
Evaluation will be based on class attendance and participation, short weekly journal entries, and a final 10-page paper.
We will meet three times a week for two-hour sessions. There will also be an evening lecture by novelist Mary Gaitskill (attendance required).
Prerequisite: some previous acquaintance with Rand's work. Enrollment limited to 30.
Cost to student: about $60 for books.
Meeting time: mornings.

BELL-VILLADA

LIT 011 Renewal and Transformation (Same as Classics and Theatre 012)

(See under Classics for full description.)

LIT 012 Surrealist Women (Same as French 012)

(See under Romance Languages-French for full description.)

LIT 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Literary Studies 493, 494.

MATH 010 Scene Studies-Comedy (Same as Theater 010)

In this course, students will be introduced to the area of contemporary comedy in the theater. Students will read humorous plays and literary works from various recent historical periods, with emphasis on performance. They will participate in improvisation and scene studies from comedic theater.
Evaluation will be based on a final performance of scenes.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: $40.
Meeting times: mornings-two hours a day, three times a week.

AMELIA ADAMS (Instructor)
O. BEAVER (Sponsor)

Amelia Adams is a regional actor who has performed in a variety of theatrical and commercial venues over the last ten years. She is a member of the Actor's Equity Association and the American Federation of Radio and Television actors.

MATH 012 Taoism and Body Movement

This course will consist of regular discussions and readings from Taoism, with particular focus on the Tao Te Ching, and body movement work in classic Chinese Tai Chi and modern western sports. While we will discuss the roots, facets, and practice of Taoism, our main focus will be on reading and discussing the Tao Te Ching, central document of Taoism. We will be concerned with content, translation, interpretation, and historical context of the document. Taoism is integral to the practice of Tai Chi in China, and in fact, Tai Chi may be thought of as Taoist meditation. Students in the course will be introduced to the long Yang form of Tai Chi Chuan, including practice in stretching, breathing, and body movement. These ancient practices will be brought into a modern western setting in the practice of snowboarding. Stance, balance, hip movement, and feeling connected to the earth from practice of Tai Chi directly translate into the basics skills needed to snowboard well. The Tao Te Ching teaches us to find the groove, go with the flow, and feel yourself in harmony with the beauty of nature that surrounds you. We will explore such wisdom in the Berkshire mountains once a week, where each student will be required to take snowboarding lessons at Brodie Mountain.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper on some aspect of Taoism, ability to perform a portion of the Tai Chi form, and completion of four snowboarding lessons.
Requirements (per week): 3 hours of discussion, 3 hours of Tai Chi practice, at least 2 hours of snowboarding.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 12
Cost to student: approximately $50 for books, and $120 for snowboard lessons.
Meeting time: mornings-8 hours a week.

S. JOHNSON

MATH 013 Sports and Stats

Who is the greatest center fielder of all time? Do basketball players get a hot hand? Will women's marathon times eventually equal or exceed men's times? In this course, we address sports questions like these using statistical analyses. Course participants do not need a formal statistical background, since many analyses require only general statistical concepts that can be easily learned in the course. A large part of the course will be devoted to course members' oral presentations of analyses of sports questions of their choosing. Additionally, there will be reading assignments and several short projects.
Evaluation: three written projects, one oral presentation, and class participation
Requirements: meet for two hours on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday to discuss readings and hear oral presentations. There will be three weekly projects and readings for every class.
Prerequisites: a love of sports and comfort with numbers. Enrollment limited to 12 to allow sufficient time for students' presentations.
Cost to students: approximately $25 for copying.
Meeting time: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday mornings.

REITER

MATH 016 Reaching the Underrepresented: Math Software Development for Grade School (Same as Biology 016)

(See under Biology for full description.)

MATH 018 Modern Dance-Muller Technique

This dance class will be based on the modern dance technique developed by Jennifer Muller, with whom I danced professionally for 5 years in New York City and in Europe. Jennifer Muller was a soloist in the dance company of José Limòn before she started her own company in 1974. She has added her own style of movement to the Limòn technique, creating an expansive, free-flowing dance that is wonderful to do and to watch.
The class is open to beginners as well as to those who have previous experience with modern dance or ballet. It will be multi-leveled and open to both men and women alike. Students will have the opportunity to choreograph a short piece either as a soloist or in small groups.
We will finish the course with a short lecture-demonstration illustrating what we have learned.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 24.
Cost to student: under $20.
Meeting time: mornings-six hours per week.

SYLVIA LOGAN (Instructor)
O. BEAVER (Sponsor)

Sylvia Logan received her B.A. in Slavic Literature from Stanford University. She danced professionally with the Jennifer Muller Dance Company, a modern company based in New York, for five years.

MATH 022 Color Photography: People and Places (Same as Special 022)

This will be an introductory course in color photography. The main themes will be portraiture and the landscape. No previous knowledge is assumed, but students are expected to have access to a 35mm camera, preferably with manual override or aperture priority. The topics covered will include composition, exposure, camera use and properties of film, direction and properties of light, and digital imaging (scanning and printing). Students will develop their eye through the study of the work of well-known photographers and the critical analysis of their own work. We will discuss the work of photographers such as Joel Meyerowitz, Constantine Manos, and Philip-Lorca diCorcia. Students will be expected to spend a considerable amount of time practicing their own photography outside of class (using 35mm color slide film). There will be one required local half-day field trip. Students will also be introduced to the program Photoshop used to manipulate images digitally, and will work on their own pictures with this program. The film used will be color slide film, but students will learn to scan their slides and produce prints using a digital printer.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, two quizzes and a final project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 10.
Cost to student: $120 for purchase and processing of film and a text.
Meetings time: afternoons.

SILVA

MATH 030 Senior Project

To be taken by candidates for honors in Mathematics other than by thesis route.

MATH 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Mathematics 493-494.

MUS 010 Chamber Vocal Ensemble

An intensive performance Winter Study project, the vocal ensemble will consist of interested members of the current Chamber Choir and from other interested students by audition with Professor Wells. Repertoire will be eclectic, sophisticated and demanding and rehearsals will occur daily for two hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. in Bernhard Music Center. A final performance at the end of the semester will conclude the study.
Evaluation will be based on attendance and successful completion of assigned performance projects.
Enrollment limited to 30. Open to all students by audition, to be waived for current members of the Chamber Choir.
Cost to student: none.

WELLS

MUS 012 Music Composition

CANCELLED!

MUS 013 Jazz Ensemble Intensive

This jazz performance Winter Study will consist of a month of intensive rehearsals and workshops of a jazz ensemble. Open to all students by audition and to current members of the Williams Jazz Ensemble without audition. All rehearsals will be held during the daytime in Bernhard Music Center.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation, progress in performance of assigned music, and an informal end of semester performance.
Enrollment limited to 30. New talent strongly encouraged to audition. Please contact Andy Jaffe during registration period to schedule an audition.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: ?.

JAFFE

MUS 014 Nights at the Opera

In January 2001, the Metropolitan Opera will commemorate the 100th anniversary of Giuseppi Verdi's death. In this course, we'll also observe this anniversary by considering Verdi's musical achievement. We'll explore three of his most popular operas: La Traviata, Il Trovatore, and Aida. We will study each of these works in class and see each of them live at the Metropolitan Opera.
Requirements: there will be one 2-3 hour class meeting on the day before each opera, and a shorter meeting on a day following the performance. In the pre-performance meetings I will lecture on the work we will attend, and in the post-performance meetings we will discuss what we have seen. There may also be short readings for the post-performance meetings. Class will meet for the first time on January 3rd and our first trip will take place on January 4th. Students are expected to attend all the classes and all the opera performances; the details of the schedule will be announced at the first class meeting.
Evaluation will be based on three 5-page concert reports.
Enrollment limited to 10.
Cost to student: approximately $300 for tickets and partial cost of travel.
Meeting time: afternoons for classes; field trips to Metropolitan Opera for nighttime or Saturday afternoon performances in New York, NY.

MCGRADE

MUS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Music 493, 494.

NSCI 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Neuroscience 493-494.

PHIL 010 Philosophy of Romantic Love

What is love? What is the connection between romantic love and morality, power, gender and society? This Winter Study course explores these questions through a critical reading and discussion of some of the key philosophical texts from Plato to Freud and more contemporary thinkers. These ideas will be applied to film, poetry and literature.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page essay due at the end of the course, and one class presentation.
No prerequisites. Preference to first-year and second-year students. Attempts will be made to gender balance this course. Enrollment limited to 18.
Cost to student: $25.
Meeting time: mornings.

PAUL VOICE (Instructor)
WHITE (Sponsor)

PHIL 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Philosophy 493-494.

PHYS 010 Light and Holography

This course will examine the art and science of holography. It will introduce modern optics at a level appropriate for a non-science major, giving the necessary theoretical background in lectures and discussion. Demonstrations will be presented and students will make several kinds of holograms in the lab. Thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation, we have 7 well-equipped holography darkrooms available for student use.
At the beginning of WSP, the class will meet for lecture and discussion three times a week and for lab twice a week. Later classes will be mainly laboratory. Students will be evaluated on the basis of regular attendance, completion of 4 laboratory exercises, and a holography laboratory project or a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 30. Preference will be given to students with no previous college course in physics more advanced than Physics 100.
Cost to student: about $50 for holographic film, chemicals, and photocopies.

K. JONES

PHYS 012 Meet the Right Side of Your Brain: Drawing as a Learnable Skill

Representational drawing is a not merely a gift of birth or a magical ability granted by angels, but a learnable skill. If you ever wanted to draw, but doubted you had the ability or believed you could not learn, then this course is for you. This intensive course utilizes discoveries in brain research to teach representational drawing. By using simple techniques and extensive exercises you will discover and develop the perceptual shift from your symbol based left hemisphere to your visually based right hemisphere. This cognitive shift enables you to accurately see and realistically represent the physical world. You will learn to draw a convincing portrait, self-portrait, and still life. This course is designed to develop your powers of observation and enhance your innate creative problem solving abilities, which are applicable in any field. Students need no previous artistic experience, just the willingness and desire to learn a new skill. Students will be expected to attend and participate in all sessions. They will also be required to keep a sketchbook recording their progress and complete a final project.
Evaluation will be based on participation, effort, and development. The class will meet three times per week (about 10 hours lecture and group group drawing exercises). In addition, every week students are required to complete 2-3 drawing assignments of approximately 3-4 hours each.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 30, with preference given to juniors and seniors. The course will meet in two sections of 15.
Cost to student: text and drawing materials (approximately $30).

WILLIAM ZIEMER (Instructor)
K. JONES (Sponsor)

William Ziemer is a multimedia artist living in Williamstown and in Berkeley, California.

PHYS 013 Automotive Mechanics

The purpose of this course will be to provide an understanding of the basic function of the major components of the modern automobile. Through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on experience, individuals will learn basic maintenance of an automobile. In addition, students will be expected to study in depth one of the major automotive systems which include carburetor or fuel-injection systems, the lubrication and cooling system, the electrical system, the steering, brake and suspension system, and the power train for both manual and automatic transmissions.
The course will meet two hours a day, three times a week for classroom instruction. In addition, students will meet at the Flamingo Motors in Williamstown one evening each week for practical demonstrations and hands-on activity. Students will be required to attend class regularly, read assigned material from the text, actively participate in work at the garage, and pass written midterm and final examinations.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 30. The class will be broken into three sections for lab work. Preference given to seniors.
Cost to student: approximately $45 for text.

MICHAEL FRANCO (Instructor)
K. JONES (Sponsor)

Michael Franco is the owner of Flamingo Motors in Williamstown.

PHYS 014 Experiences of Women in Science (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 014)

Do women do science differently from men? Will science change as more women enter it? Why do some scientific fields continue to attract very few women? Science has had relatively few women practitioners in the past. Although this situation is now changing in some fields, in others women continue to be very rare. Our course will focus on the experiences of women scientists, both past and present. We will study the writings of Evelyn Fox Keller and others to gain an understanding of the complexities of being a woman in a predominantly male profession. We will also explore possible causes for women's continued under representation in science, extending from childhood through professional life. Student projects can follow any number of routes. Examples include studying the experiences of girls and boys in science education, researching the life of a forgotten or not so forgotten woman scientist, interviewing a contemporary woman scientist, or researching recent events such as the finding and subsequent correction of systematic bias at MIT. A symposium of prominent women in several fields of science will be presented in conjunction with this course.
Requirements: three meetings (discussions and informal lectures) per week, participation in the symposium of visiting scientists, and a 10 page paper or alternative project approved by the instructor.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 30.
Cost to student: readings (approximately $30.)

S. BOLTON

PHYS 015 Electronics

Electronic instruments are an indispensable part of modern laboratory work throughout the sciences. This course will cover the basics of analog electronic circuits, including transistors and operational amplifiers, and will briefly introduce digital circuits. Students will build and test a variety of circuits chosen to illustrate the kinds of electronic devices and design problems a scientist is apt to encounter. Class will meet afternoons for a mixture of lab, lecture, and discussion, providing ample opportunity for hands-on experience. In the last week, students will design and build a final project, or will write a 10-page paper.
Evaluation will be based on participation, completion of both laboratory work and occasional homework, and the quality of the final project or paper.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 or equivalent calculus. No prior experience with electronics is required.
Enrollment limited to 16.
Cost to student: $95 for two textbooks.
Meeting time: afternoons.

MAJUMDER

PHYS 022 Research Participation

Several members of the department will have student projects available dealing with their own research or that of current senior thesis students. Approximately 35 hours per week of study and actual research participation will be expected from each student.
Students will be required to keep a notebook and write a five-page paper summarizing their work. Those interested should consult with members of the department as early as possible in the registration period or before to determine details of projects then expected to be available.
Prerequisite: permission of specific instructor. Enrollment limited to 1 or 2 per project.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: to be arranged with instructor.

K. JONES and members of the department

PHYS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Physics 493, 494.

POEC 031 Honors Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Political Economy 493.

PSCI 010 Daoism (Same as Asian Studies 010)

We will read two classics of the ancient Chinese naturalist philosophy of Daoism: the inner chapters of the Zhuang Zi and the Dao Dejing. We will contemplate such notions as: "do nothing and nothing will be left undone"; and "no one lives longer than a child who dies young, and the seven-hundred-year-old man died an infant.
Requirements: students will write two 5- to 7- page papers applying the sensibilities gleaned from these texts to the world at large.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: two books.
Meeting time: mornings.

CRANE

PSCI 011 The Roosevelt Century (Same as EXPR 012)

(See under EXPR for full description.)

PSCI 012 Judicial Biography

One of the great uncertainties about the nature and growth of the law concerns the influence of personality and personal experience in explaining legal development. That judges are a part of the law-making process is now generally, if grudgingly, accepted. Yet the democratic presumption that the formation of law should be directly constrained by a process of electoral accountability means that the legitimacy of this judicial activity will always remain in some doubt. This in turn means that we must examine closely the lives of the judges who govern us through their constitutional and statutory interpretations. How much of judicial behavior follows directly from the life experiences of the judges? How accurately can we predict judicial outcomes from judicial biography? What biographical details are related to judicial greatness? In this course we examine the genre of judicial biography for the insights that can be generated about the evolution of law in this and other societies. Among the many judicial biographies in print are wonderful studies of such giants as Oliver Wendell Holmes, John Marshall, Benjamin Cardozo, William Brennan, Learned Hand, and Joseph Story. But lesser known jurists have also been amply chronicled, and their stories will be just as important in assisting us in formulating impressions about the work of appellate judges and its impact on the nature and growth of the law.
Requirements: evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper and on participation in class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: books and offset packet.
Meeting time: mornings.

JACOBSOHN

PSCI 013 Justice in America: Race Relations, Sexual Harassment and the Role of the Courts

The U.S.Constitution has changed little; yet at fifty-year intervals, the Supreme Court upheld slavery, ruled that the law requires equal public facilities that can be racially separate, required integration, and now prohibits consideration of race as a factor. What has caused this changing interpretation of the law? In recent years, the courts have interpreted laws to prohibit sexual harassment. Why have the courts ruled that gender-based harassment is illegal only if the harassment is sexual? In America, the judicial system is available to individuals and groups asserting claims that their rights have been violated and that they have been injured by injustice or inequality. With an emphasis on race relations and sexual harassment, this course will examine the strengths and limits of the American court system in addressing adversarial positions expressed as rights and claims for justice. We will consider the following questions: Are judicial decisions shaped by the Constitution and statutes, judicially-created rules of law, political concerns, social norms, the "facts" as proven through litigation, or the beliefs of judges? Is the judicial branch primarily an enforcement mechanism for the executive branch, a defense against the tyranny of the majority, or a neutral arbitrator of disputes? Is the judicial branch an agent for social change, a force for societal stability, a defender of the status quo, or a dispenser of justice? The course will have a seminar format. Students are responsible for reading the material and preparing for class discussion.
Evaluation will be based on submitted papers and class participation.
Requirements: three (3- to 4-page) response papers to the readings and class participation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20. Selection criteria is by random draw.
Cost to student: books and a reading packet.
Meeting time: mornings.

ALAN M. KATZ, J.D. (Instructor)
MACDONALD (Sponsor)

Alan Katz is a practicing civil rights attorney with more than twenty years experience representing claimants in discrimination cases.

PSCI 017 The Politics of New England Food: Why New Englanders Eat What They Eat

Have you ever wondered why the food of New England is bland: is it the people, the land, the economy? Do New Englanders like their diets or are they forced into them? This course will investigate these kinds of questions by looking at the political, economic, cultural, and climactic factors that have shaped the diet and culture of New Englanders.
We will begin our course by learning about the ecology and culture of food developed by Native Americans: how did they hunt, gather and farm, and how did their methods of procuring food form their relationship to nature and the division of labor? Then we will consider the diet of the first white settlers, the interaction between Puritan and Native American cultures of food, the role of Puritan asceticism in shaping diets, and the consequent impact on family and social structures. Next we will examine how food was used to socialize Catholic immigrants from Europe, looking particularly at the pioneers of nutritional science (home economics), such as Fannie Farmer and her Boston Cooking School, and why they struggled to convince immigrants to reject their traditional foods in favor of their less nutritional -but more bland -"American" substitutes. Finally, we will conclude with a look at how the change in the production of food from the family farm to agribusiness has touched families, communities, and the role of women. We will enjoy an historically accurate demonstration of life in the 1700's at Historic Deerfield, a tour of the Bennington Museum and farm life in the 1800's, a visit to a community supported farm in our time, a guest speaker and several movies.
Requirements: a 10-page paper, reading and class participation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: $20 for museum entrance fees.
Meeting time: afternoons.

ROBIN LENZ MACDONALD (Instructor)
MACDONALD (Sponsor)

Robin MacDonald received her B.A. and M.A. in Political Science from UC Berkeley. She has written several articles about "food and its history" and has extensive experience in her field. She owns "Robin's Restaurant" on Spring Street, Williamstown.

PSCI 019 Service Learning Internships (Same as Geosciences 019 and EXPR 019)

This course is designed to help students look beyond Williams to observe first-hand how service organizations help communities and to examine questions of volunteerism, interactions between agencies and clients, and definitions of communities. A student works closely with an organization dedicated to improving the quality of life within a community. The organization may be located near Williams College or in the student's home community. Examples include: child care centers; nursing homes and hospitals; shelters for the homeless or victims of domestic violence; schools and youth centers; conservation and environmental advocacy groups.
Internship arrangements are made in advance of the Winter Term during which the student serves as an intern. The instructor works with each student to arrange an internship. Students are expected to spend the better part of the day, five days a week, with the organization. Each student's internship mentor sends a confirmation letter to the instructor verifying the internship and describing the nature of the work to be performed by the intern. Students with Berkshire area internships will read a few short reading assignments in common and meet with the instructor once a week as a group to compare and analyze their experiences. Students whose internships are in their home community will meet as a group before and after Winter Study to discuss their experiences. During Winter Study, they are expected to maintain weekly contact with the instructor. Finally, students will write a 10-page paper on their experience.
Requirements: internship work and a 10-page paper discussing the organization's relationship with and contributions to the community. Grades will be based on the mentor's evaluations, participation in group discussions (or weekly contacts for students away from Williams), and the 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. At the time of registration, interested students should send a brief resume and a letter of interest. Materials should be sent to the Leadership Programs Coordinator. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to students: none except for transportation.

C. JOHNSON and KARABINOS

PSCI 021 Public Affairs Internships: Power, Authority and Decisionmaking in the Public Sector (Same as EXPR 021)

This course is an internship experience in which students both work in and analyze government and related nongovernmental organizations. The goal of the course is to develop student ability to analyze power, authority and decisionmaking in public organizations; in short, to better understand leadership. Students may have internships in government and nonprofit organizations. They may have internships in for-profit organizations if the internship involves significant involvement with public issues. Examples include: town government offices; state or federal administrative offices such as TANF, WIC, housing authorities; interest groups that lobby government such as Chamber of Commerce, NOW, or the Sierra Club; nonprofit agencies such as Parenting Partners.
Internship arrangements are made in advance of the Winter Term during which the student serves as an intern. The instructor works with each student to arrange an internship. Students are expected to spend the better part of the day, five days a week, with the organization. Each student's internship mentor sends a confirmation letter to the instructor verifying the internship and describing the nature of the work to be performed by the intern. Students with Berkshire area internships will read a few short reading assignments in common and meet with the instructor once a week as a group to compare and analyze their experiences. Students whose internships are in their home community will meet as a group before and after Winter Study to discuss their experiences. During Winter Study, they are expected to maintain weekly contact with the instructor. Finally, students will write a 10-page paper on their experience.
Requirements: internship work and a 10-page paper analyzing issues of power, authority, and decisionmaking in the organization. Grades will be based on the mentor's evaluations, participation in group discussions (or weekly contacts for students away from Williams), and the 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. At the time of registration, interested students should send a brief resume and a letter of interest. Materials should be sent to the Leadership Programs Coordinator. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to students: none except for transportation.

PAULA CONSOLINI and C. JOHNSON

Paula Consolini (PhD., Berkeley) teaches and manages local government internships at Union College in Schenectady.

PSCI 025 Experiencing Guatemala: Politics, and Society

The course explores the complex political and social realities of contemporary Guatemala. The signing of peace accords in 1996 brought four decades of large-scale political violence and civil war to an end, but the social struggle over the nation's future continues. Our class will study that struggle, particularly the basic problem of vast inequalities of wealth, the question of human rights, and the efforts of indigenous people to claim a larger share of political, economic, and cultural power. Although we will do some readings in Guatemalan history, politics, and literature before and during our travels, our primary approach for our 21 days in the country will be the field study method: the course aims to provide an intense educational encounter with the material conditions of everyday Guatemalan life, to foster critical reflections on the paths to "development" available in this culturally and socially diverse country, and to come to terms with the experiences and effects of tourism. Most of the course will take place in the Mayan highlands: after a brief introduction to Guatemala City and Antigua, the bulk of our time will be spent in Panajachel, Quetzaltenango (Xela), and the villages surrounding these two towns. Early on, each student will spend several days living with a Mayan family and studying in an intensive Spanish program. We will then extend our inquiries through a combination of seminar discussions, field exercises (e.g. observation and analysis at local markets), and scheduled meetings with some of the activists who are seeking to shape Guatemala's future. Small teams of students will also investigate one significant issue or local organization, and will make an oral presentation to the whole group. Our schedule will also provide sufficient unstructured time for enjoying the remarkable natural and cultural environment of the highland region. To conclude the course, we will visit the lowland rainforest and explore several archeological sites, including Tikal, the most remarkable of ancient Mayan cities.
Requirements: students must attend all class meetings and site visits,participate in and write up several exercises in the field, keep a travel journal, and make one oral presentation.
Evaluation will be based upon performance in these areas.
Prerequisites: at least one semester of college-level Spanish, or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 12 students.
Cost to student: $1,200 (in-country transportation, meals, lodging, incidental fees, and language instruction included) plus airfare to and from Guatemala City (approximately $400 to $750, depending on point of departure). In addition to the standard trip financial aid provided by the College, some additional aid may be available, through the Gaudino Fund, in cases of special need.

REINHARDT and MOLLY MAGAVERN (Instructors)

Molly Magavern, Coordinator of Special Academic Programs at Williams, has lived and taught in Central America.

PSCI 030 Senior Essay

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 491 or 492.

PSCI 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 493-494.

PSCI 032 Individual Project

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 495 or 496.

PSCI 033 Advanced Study in American Politics

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 481-482.

PSYC 010 Biographical Story Telling

In this course, we will learn about famous people's biographies by methods of conducting research, acting, and story telling. During class time, students will assume the personality of their chosen historical figure and will be expected to share their personal and cultural histories with the rest of the group (e.g., by reading from actual and made-up diaries, etc.). We will meet twice a week at the instructor's house from 1PM to 4PM. Costumes and props will be strongly encouraged. The goals of this course are to develop (a) biographical research skills by doing library research; (b) writing skills by devising a biographical sketch and or a fictitious diary etc. (c) acting skills through the enactment of a chosen persona; and (d) insights into oneself, through a process, which is a form of psychodrama.
Requirements: each student will have to write two biographical sketches a week and be prepared to enact them with costume and dialogue. At the end of the course, participants will be asked to hand in a 10-page paper that will provide an in depth analysis of one or more of the characters they have chosen to enact. This paper will require historical and literary scholarship.
Prerequisite: willingness to work hard. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons-1-4 p.m.-twice a week.

BEN-ZEEV

PSYC 012 Play

The meaning of play in the young child's life will be considered, both through readings and practical experience. The group will discuss several theoretical approaches to play, and each student will work mornings or afternoons with children in natural play settings, e.g. nursery school or day-care center.
A journal relating readings and experience will be kept, and a final 10-page paper, relating theories of play to the student's observations of children at play will be written.
No prerequisites, but interested students must consult with the instructor prior to registration. Enrollment limited to number of available placements in children's programs.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings or afternoons.

CRAMER

PSYC 013 Mental Illness in Film

This course examines the depiction of mental illness and the therapeutic process on the silver screen. How do films influence our perceptions of normality and abnormality? How do they shape our beliefs about the causes of mental illness, as well as our expectations about the content and process of treatment? Films have the potential to serve a variety of functions, ranging from a form of advocacy for the mentally ill to a mechanism for furthering stigma and intolerance. In this course, we will sample a variety of powerful films (both contemporary and classic) representing multiple perspectives on mental illness. During the first half of the course we will view films as a group, explore their explicit and implicit messages about mental illness, and contrast their media portrayal with empirically based clinical research. In the second half of the course, students will focus their attention on a clinical disorder of personal interest. Students will view two films that pertain to that disorder, and compare the cinematic depiction with more "real-world" clinical manifestations as described in current research literature. Students will present their projects to the larger group during the final week of Winter Study.
Requirements: class participation, project presentation, 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

M. SANDSTROM

PSYC 015 Principles of Psychotherapy

Outlining the principles underlying the "talking cure," this course represents the kind of overview of psychotherapy the instructor wishes he had received as an undergraduate. Topics covered will include indications for treatment, the particular arrangements for therapy, how they differ from other social situations, the initiation of therapy, and principles of transference, counter-transference, personal history investigation, and interpretation. Of particular interest will be to describe how, during psychotherapy, persons change. By using both imagined therapy dialogues and published student autobiographies, efforts will be made at each stage to illustrate ways in which the general principles work out in practice. For the course paper, students will be asked to describe an issue of concern in the student's own experience and to imagine how a therapist might collaborate in working on that issue. At the end of the course the instructor will discuss each paper individually with each student.
Requirements: readings, class discussion, and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 10. Preferences given to juniors and seniors.
Cost to student: approximately $25.
Meeting time: mornings.

RICHARD Q. FORD (Instructor)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Richard Q. Ford received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Chicago in 1970. He was for twelve years on the medical staff on the Austen Riggs Center in Stockbridge, Massachusetts and has for the past eighteen years been in the private practice of psychotherapy in Williamstown. He is co-author with Sidney J. Blatt of "Therapeutic Change: An Object Relations Perspective."

PSYC 016 Gender in Psychology and Society (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 016)

This course will begin with several theories of gender identity development. From there, we will move to an exploration of socio-culture aspects of gender, including stereotypes, expectations of "masculinity" and "femininity," and current controversies. Through class discussion, readings, experiential activities, and films, we will create dialogue on the meanings of gender. Students will be expected to conduct their own creative observational study of gender and present findings during a classroom poster presentation session. The presentation will focus on a relevant central question of interest to the student, a rationale for asking the question, method of observation, findings, and discussion. Observations may consist of human behavior, or perhaps an analysis of some aspect of our popular culture, medica, etc.
Requirements: readings, class participation, observational research study with accompanying research paper.
No prerequisites, though Psychology 101 is recommended. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for books and materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

DARIA PAPALIA (Instructor)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Daria Papalia received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the State University of New York at Buffalo. She is Director of Counseling at Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts in North Adams, Massachusetts.

PSYC 017 Teaching Practicum

Students interested in teaching may submit applications for a Winter Study assignment as a teacher's aide at Mt. Greylock Regional High School or at the Williamstown Elementary School. Those accepted will work under the supervision of a regular member of the teaching staff and submit a report on their work at the end of the Winter Study Period. This project involves a four-week commitment to full-time affiliation with the school. Interested students should consult before Winter Study registration with Professor Fein, 376 Bronfman. He will assist in arranging placements and monitor students' progress during the four-week period.
Requirements: full-time affiliation with the school and a final 10-page report. The final report should summarize the student's experiences and reflections as drawn from a daily journal.
Prerequisite: approval of Professor Fein required. Enrollment limited to number of places available at the two participating schools.
Cost to student: none.

FEIN

PSYC 018 Institutional Placement

Students interested in a full-time January placement in a mental health, social service or applied psychology (e.g., advertising, law) setting may consult with members of the Psychology Department to make appropriate arrangements. Students should first make their own contacts with an institution or agency. They should also arrange to obtain a letter from a sponsor at the institution who will outline and supervise the student's duties during January. The student must agree to keep a journal and to submit a final paper summarizing and reflecting upon the experiences outlined in the journal.
Requirements for a passing grade are a satisfactory evaluation from the institutional sponsor and a 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: none.

FEIN

PSYC 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Psychology 493-494.

REL 010 Training the Body-Mind: Introduction to Traditional Karate

This course will introduce students to the basic routines and movements of traditional Okinawan Karate (Shohei-ryu/Uechi-ryu) and will also explore the history, theory, and philosophy behind the routines and movements. Class will meet three times a week for two hours. One session each week will include discussion, video viewing, and experiments in learning styles. Readings to be assigned will cover martial arts history, Zen thought and Eastern energy theory. Handouts will also be included with Japanese terminology and sequences. The other two will be dojo (training hall) sessions, focused on learning and practicing the techniques and routines. One of the eight sessions will take place at the dojo in Pittsfield so that students will experience a karate class in a more traditional setting and interact with students on other levels. By the end of the month, all students should be ready for the first promotion; some may be ready for promotion to the second level. Final class will be a performance and exhibit.
Evaluation based on regular attendance, active participation, completion of assigned readings, submission of three journal entries of 2 or more pages, participation in final performance, contribution to final display.
Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: a small fee for photocopies; purchase of gi (uniform) optional ($30-35)
Meeting time: mornings-three times a week, for two hours each session.

LISKEN VAN PELT DUS (Instructor)
DARROW (Sponsor)

Lisken Van Pelt Dus began her own training in karate twenty years ago as a first-year student at Williams. She is now co-owner of the Okinawan Karate School in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, where she teaches full-time. She holds the rank of Renshi Rokudan (1st degree master, 6th degree black belt) and is a certified Shikan Master Instructor.

REL 012 Women and Religion in Contemporary Chinese Society (Same as Asian Studies 012 and Women's and Gender Studies 012)

(See under Asian Studies for full description.)

REL 014 Language of the Holocaust

How name what is unnameable, unthinkable, unimaginable? Is silence the only response to unspeakable acts? Or, if you can articulate a name, an authority, an identity, a reason for genocide, for the annihilation of the Jewish people, how do you express or represent the experience without the luxury of artifice? What are the terms of such expression? What claims does the experience make on those who wish to define it? Is there an ultimate fiction greater than fact that such an event requires? This course will concentrate on the relationships between historical/recorded (mimetic) interpretations (i.e., first person accounts, religious and historical texts, documentary footage) and constructed (poesis) interpretation of the Holocaust. The latter will include a sampling of films, novels, poems, art of victims and survivors and others using the material of genocide as primary source for the creation of a work of art. Within this framework questions regarding both the particular and universal nature of the Holocaust will be addressed. Course readings and material will offer provocative pairings to sharpen and question the necessary yet paradoxically unstable distinction between the mimetic and poetic mode: These might include Wiesel's Night; selections from the Old Testament (Akidah and Book of Job ) and the Zohar, Borowski's This Way to the Gas Chambers, Ladies and Gentlemen and Scrap of Time and Other Stories; Charles Reznicoff's Holocaust and Artie Spiegelman's Maus I and Maus II ; Expressionistic and concentration camp art; various historical accounts; and selections form the work of Paul Celan, Nelly Sachs, A. Sutzkever, Edmund Jabes, Aharon Appelfeld, Andre Schwarz-Bart, Terrence Des Pres and Daniel Goldhagen. Films might include Europa Europa, Nasty Girl, Shop on Main Street, Shoah and Schindler's List.
Requirements: a 10-page paper, class participation and regular attendance.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 25.
Cost to student: $60 for books and xeroxes.
Meeting time: mornings-three times a week, two hours per class.

DAVID RAFFELD (Instructor)
DARROW (Sponsor)

A poet and writer, Williamstown resident David Raffeld has written widely on the themes to be developed in this course. In addition to offering this course several times, Raffeld has taught Winter Study term courses at Williams in the Departments of Religion, Philosophy, and English. He has also been a Writer-in-Residence in the Department of Theater for the production of his Isaac Oratorio, which was written in part in response to the Holocaust.

REL 024 The Ramayana, Epic in Art (Same as Art History 024)

(See under Art History for full description.)

REL 025 Israel and Jordan: Intercultural Interchange, Ancient and Modern (Same as Classics 025)

(See under Classics for full description.)

REL 026 God and the Gods in the City of the Angels

Los Angeles is the Disneyland of the Gods; in no other city in the world do they have so much room to play. According to recent polls, some 95 percent of the American population profess belief in God. But in Los Angeles only 55 percent of the population identifies itself as Protestant, Catholic, or Jewish. The birthplace of both pentecostalism and Scientology, the city boasts over 120 Buddhist temples, 70 Mosques and other Islamic Institutions, 25 Hindu temples, and innumerable spirituality centers. In LA, one finds Santería supply shops and kosher restaurants on the same block, a Zoroastrian fire temple in the heart of Little Saigon, an ornate Chola-style Hindu temple complex in the Malibu hills, and the largest evangelical megachurch in the world. But LA is not totally unique: thanks to increasing globalization, every major US city is becoming similarly diverse. Los Angeles is a microcosm of America's future.
In this class, a field course in religious pluralism, we will examine the social processes that will determine the trajectory of religion in the United States: assimilation, fundamentalism, syncretization, and social differentiation. Joined by veteran religion reporter Monique Parsons, we will travel every day from our base at the California State University to meet adherents of religious communities throughout LA county: Pentecostal preachers, Zen monks, Thai priests, Kabbalah instructors, and devotees of Krishna, Ogun, Ra-Hoor-Khuit, and the Virgin of Guadalupe. Throughout, we'll ask a single overarching question: how do individuals forge their religious identities in an increasingly complex spiritual landscape?
Requirements: students will be responsible for at least 20 hours of class meetings and site visits per week in Los Angeles (roughly January 3 to January 19). Upon return, class will meet three times a week to discuss the trip. Each student must also attend two planning meetings to be held in the fall. Persons who fail to attend those meetings will not be accepted into the course.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and attendance, and a 10-page final paper or multimedia project.
No prerequisites; Religion 101, 221, 225, or 273 recommended. Enrollment limited to 13.
Cost to student: $1400 plus airfare to and from Los Angeles.

VERTER and MONIQUE PARSONS

Monique Parsons is an award-winning journalist who has covered the religion beat for the a number of newspapers, including the Chicago Tribune, the Home News Tribune, and beliefnet.com. She is writing a book on religion in Hollywood.

REL 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Religion 493 or 494.

RLFR S.P. Sustaining Program for French 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study period. There are three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: 9:00-9:50 a.m.

Teaching Associates NGUYEN and RAHBAR

RLFR 012 Surrealist Women (Same as Literary Studies 012)

Before the advent of modern feminism there were, from the 1920s to the 1960s, surrealist women, who as writers, painters, photographers, and filmmakers contributed to the revolt against rationalism, order, sexual constraint, and bourgeois values that became the mission of the surrealist movement. Women artists and writers in concert with-and sometimes in opposition to-their male surrealist counterparts fought to privilege dream experience, to insist on the creative power of sensuality and the unconscious, and to give pride of place to intuition, imagination, and the irrational in artistic experience and social action. The course will examine the central place of women in avant-garde surrealism. It will focus on the representation of love by female and male surrealists, the formative influence of surrealist theory on women's surrealism, the reality of surrealist misogyny, the image of the female body in surrealist works of literary and visual art, the unique nature of women's surrealist writing, the experience of madness, the differences in point-of-view and imagistic figuration between male and female artists and photographers, and the sense of otherness so evident in dream images and dream narratives created by the female imagination. Authors and artists to be studied will include Joyce Mansour, Unica Zurn, Leonora Carrington, Kay Sage, Dorothea Tanning, Frida Kahlo, Claude Cahun, Lee Miller, André Breton, Paul Eluard, Max Ernst, Robert Desnos, and others. The course will be conducted in English and the reading will be in English. However, students wishing to read the texts in the original French should indicate their desire to the instructor so that French texts can be ordered for their use.
Requirements: class participation, one class oral presentation, one 15-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 12.
Cost to student: $50-$60 for books and a reading packet.
Meeting time: three 2-hour meetings per week, in the mornings.

Stamelman

RLFR 030 Honors Essay

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLFR 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for French 493-494.

RLIT S.P. Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: 9:00-9:50

NICASTRO

RLSP S.P. Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: 9:00-9:50

Teaching Associates AGUILERA and YÁÑEZ

RLSP 030 Honors Essay

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLSP 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Spanish 493-494.

RUSS 025 Williams in Georgia (Same as Special 025)

Williams has a unique program in the Republic of Georgia, which offers students the opportunity to engage in three-week-long internships in any field. Last year's students worked in the Georgian Parliament, helped in humanitarian relief organizations like Save the Children, interned in journalism at The Georgian Times, taught unemployed women computer skills at The Rustavi Project, studied with a Georgian sculptor, did rounds at the Institute of Cardiology, and learned about transitional economies at the Georgian National Bank. In addition to working in their chosen fields, students experience Georgian culture through museum visits, concerts, lectures, meetings with Georgian students, and excursions. Visit the sacred eleventh-century Cathedral of Sueti-tskhoveli and the twentieth-century Stalin Museum, take the ancient Georgian Military Highway to ski in the Caucasus Range, see the birthplace of the wine grape in Kakheti and the region where Jason sought the Golden Fleece. Participants are housed in pairs with English-speaking families in Tbilisi, Georgia's capital city.
Evaluation: at the end of the course students write a 10-page paper assessing their internship experience.
No prerequisites but students interested in participating should contact Professor Goldstein by September 30. Knowledge of Russian or Georgian is NOT required. Enrollment limited to 8.
Cost to student: approximately $2000.

GOLDSTEIN

RUSS 030 Honors Project

May be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RUSS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Russian 493-494.

THEA 010 Scene Studies-Comedy (Same as Mathematics 010)

(See under Mathematics and Statistics for full description.)

THEA 012 Renewal and Transformation (Same as Classics 012 and Literary Studies 011)

(See under Classics for full description.)

THEA 017 Introduction to Theatrical Mask-making (Same as ArtS 017)

This course offers an introduction to theatrical mask-making. Students will begin by creating casts of their own faces, in both plaster bandage and prosthetic alginate. These casts form the base for sculpted molds using plasticine clay, from which masks will be built using two techniques: 1) Millinery buckram (a starched mesh fabric) draped over a positive mold, and 2) liquid neoprene (a synthetic latex) poured into a negative mold. All materials are non-toxic and require no previous experience. Students will also receive instruction in sculpting and creating characters through mask design. We will also address theatrical mask traditions and techniques of physical acting to bring masks to life. Class will meet three times a week for two hours, with extra supervised studio sessions available as per student request. The instructor will be sculpting in the studio outside of class, and will welcome students to observe or work on their own projects. We will also be showing films and videos that use masks. These screenings will be outside of regular class hours and will be open to students not enrolled in the class.
A successful "pass" will be based on attendance, participation in presentations and workshops, and completion of two masks. A final exhibition will display students' work. Effort and enthusiasm will be the criteria for evaluation as opposed to sculpting ability.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons.

BECKIE KRAVETZ (Instructor)
EPPEL (Sponsor)

Beckie Kravetz received her B.A. in Theater from Williams in 1982. She then studied mask-making at the Yale School of Drama, the Centro Maschere e Strutture Gestuali in Italy, the Taller de Madera in Guatemala and the Instituto Allende in San Miguel, Mexico. In 1989, she became the resident mask-maker for the Los Angeles Opera, where she also works as the assistant wig master and a principal makeup artist. She has created masks for numerous regional and university theaters, and for international Pepsi, Nike, and Max Factor commercials. Her fine art sculptures have been exhibited at the Tucson Museum of Art, The Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles and other national galleries and museums. Beckie has recently been named a Fulbright Fellow to study mask carving in Spain this coming year.

THEA 030 Senior Production

May be taken by students registered for Theatre 491, 492 but is not required.

THEA 031 Senior Thesis

May be taken by students registered for Theatre 493, 494 but is not required.

WGST 010 Hollywood Feminism

How has feminism been represented in Hollywood cinema? We attempt to answer this question by analyzing the continuities and discontinuities in cinematic representations of women's roles and cinematic narrative strategies in selected films from the 1940's through the 1990's. Images (proto-feminist?) of femme fatales, strong mothers, independent women, working women, and lesbians from the pre-Second Wave (c. 1968) will be compared to their counterparts in the post-Second Wave U.S. We may also address changing representations of the victimized woman. Films may include: His Girl Friday, Mildred Pierce, Adam's Rib, Faster Pussycat, Kill, Kill, Kill, The Stepford Wives, Gloria, She's Gotta Have It, Waiting to Exhale, 9 to 5, The Accused, Thelma and Louise, and Bound.
Final evaluations will be based upon class participation and a final paper or project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20.
Meeting time: students will attend morning screenings of three feature length films each week and attend three afternoon discussions (75 minutes each). They will also be assigned readings from classic feminist texts that represent the era or issue being addressed. Students must screen all films and attend all discussions.

CASSIDAY and SAWICKI

WGST 012 Women and Religion in Contemporary Chinese Society (Same as Asian Studies 012 and Religion 012)

(See under Asian Studies for full description.)

WGST 014 Experiences of Women in Science (Same as Physics 014)

(See under Physics for full description.)

WGST 016 Gender in Psychology and Society (Same as Psychology 016)

(See under Psychology for full description.)

WGST 030 Honors Project

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

SPEC 010 Quest for College: Early Awareness in Berkshire County Schools

Today's extremely competitive higher education market places significant pressure on students nationwide to start planning for college at an increasingly early age while simultaneously demanding ever-higher standards of excellence for admission to top schools. "Early Awareness" initiatives aim to educate middle school students as to what lies ahead on the college horizon, empowering them to make sound academic and extracurricular choices that will keep open a maximum of options.
The first week of this course will be spent in the classroom, exploring and discussing problems and issues germane to the national trends towards greater (and earlier) college-related pressures. Students will respond to a series of readings dealing with such issues as tracking, paid test preparation and untimed testing, early decision, parental and peer pressures, special interests, misrepresentation of information, independent counseling, and others. Class time will also be devoted to familiarizing students with both the nuances of the college admission process and the administration of the early awareness game, Quest for College. Students will spend the next two weeks visiting 10-12 Berkshire County middle schools, administering the game and inviting students to the culminating College Day. All 8 students will then work together to plan and run College Day activities for students and their parents. This day will include a) campus tours, b) general higher education info sessions, and c) financial aid/scholarship info for the parents. If student and community interest is sufficient, the course may culminate in a public presentation and open forum early second semester.
Evaluation will be based on completion of field work (school visits), organization and execution of project to bring local middle school students to the Williams Campus for a day of early-awareness related activities and a final paper (approxiamately 10 pages) reflecting on a course-related issue of the student's choosing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 8. Preference given to a) students with prior education/admission experience, b) students with access to transportation c) juniors and seniors. Interested students must consult with instructors prior to registration. Students will be selected according to the following criteria: a) experience in teaching or admission, b) access to transportation, and c) seniority. Provision will be stated that interested students must consult the instructors before registration, that instructors may determine depth of experience and focus of interest.
Cost to students includes transportation to field work sites and purchase of text.
Meeting time: afternoons.

GINA COLEMAN and MATTHEW SWANSON (Instructors)
DARROW (Sponsor)

Gina Coleman '90, is Associate Director of Admission, Director of Multicultural Recruitment, and in her fifth year as women's rugby coach. Coleman, who holds an MA in education from MCLA, designed the game, Quest for College.
Matthew Swanson '97 is in his third year as Assistant Director of Admission. Swanson has spent the past seven summers teaching/leading in various educational environments.
Both Gina and Matthew have been involved with Early Awareness initiatives in Berkshire County schools.

SPEC 011 Science for Kids (Same as Chemistry 011 and Environmental Studies 011)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

SPEC 012 Reporting and Writing About Science and Technology (Same as Chemistry 012 and English 012)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

SPEC 014 Winter Emergency Care, CPR, Ski Patrol Rescue Techniques

The course is in three parts. When successfully completed it can lead to a certification as a National Ski Patrol member and certification in Professional Rescue CPR. It will also be designed to teach wilderness and outdoor emergency techniques.
The Winter Emergency Care Course designed by the National Ski Patrol is the main ingredient. It will be supplemented by the Red Cross CPR for the Professional Rescuer. An additional 18-hour outdoor course in Ski Patrol rescue techniques will be taught. Passing all three courses will certify the student as a National Ski Patrol member if he/she is a competent skier.
The course will deal with and teach how to treat wounds of all types, shock, respiratory emergencies, poisoning, drug and alcohol emergencies, burns, frostbite and other exposures to cold, also bone, joint, and back injuries, and sudden illnesses such as heart attacks, strokes, convulsions, etc. It will also teach the use of all splints, backboards, bandages, and other rescue equipment. It will teach extrication and unusual emergency situations and the use of oxygen. The outdoor course will include rescue toboggan handling, organization of rescues, and outdoor practical first aid.
Classroom work will include lectures, seminars, and practical work.
Requirements: there will be a mid-term and a final exam which will be both written and practical. Each week there will be 17 hours of classroom work plus 8 hours of practical outdoor work at Jiminy Peak ski area. Attendance at all classes is mandatory.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 18, chosen on the basis of skiing interest and ability and prior first aid experience.
Cost to student: $100 which will include all materials, books and registration fees.
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons.

JAMES BRIGGS (Instructor)
PECK (Sponsor)

Jim Briggs was the Outing Club director at Williams for many years. He has led trips to the Alps on a number of occasions. He is both a certified OEC instructors and a certified CPR instructor.

SPEC 015 Deaf and Proud: An Introduction to Deaf Language and Culture

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the language and community/culture of deaf people. Representations of deafness as a disability will be challenged from the perspective of those who argue that deaf people comprise a linguistic minority. Students should expect to develop a basic understanding of the linguistic status of American Sign Language (A.S.L.), a language in which the grammar is expressed on the face and which does not share the grammatical structures of English. We will give specific attention to the social and economic status of the deaf community at large and to the social and political constraints imposed upon them by a hearing community which denies them education in their own language. Three approaches to deaf education will be addressed: oral, signed English, and A.S.L. Several native signers will be invited to lecture on ASL and to engage in dialogue with students about deaf politics and culture.
The course will be taught by an instructor with extensive experience as an interpreter in the deaf community. In addition to exploring deafness from the perspectives of deaf people, students will learn about the role of the interpreter in both deaf and hearing communities.
Major texts for the course may include the following: In This Sign by Joanna Greenberg, a child of deaf adults, The Mask of Benevolence by Harlan Lane, Voices from a Culture by Padden and Humprhies, and a collection of articles and videos.
Evaluations will be based on the following: brief journal entries which record responses to videos, discussions and readings following each class, a 5-page critical response essay to an assigned topic, class participation, and a final project (i.e., oral presentation, performance, essay, etc.).
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: $30 for books.
Meeting time: Students will be required to attend two afternoon class meetings per week from 1 p.m. to 3:30 and to attend an all day field trip.

LAURIE BENJAMIN (Instructor)
SAWICKI (Sponsor)

Laurie Benjamin is a graduate from the University of Massachusetts in multicultural and international education. Ms. Benjamin has taught deaf students at the secondary level. She is a nationally certified A.S.L. interpreter for the deaf with extensive experience in a wide range of interpreter settings including mental health and performance interpreting.

SPEC 019 Medical Apprenticeship

A student is assigned to a local physician, dentist, or veterinarian to observe closely his or her practice in the office and/or at the North Adams Regional Hospital, Berkshire Medical Center (Pittsfield, MA), or Southwestern Vermont Medical Center (Bennington, VT). It is expected that a student will spend the better part of the day, five days a week, with the physician or a period mutually agreed upon by the student and the physician as being educationally significant. The program has proven to be extremely successful in giving interested students a clear picture of the practice of medicine in a non-urban area. An effort is made to expose the student to a range of medical specialties.
A 10-page report written on some aspect of the month's experience is required.
Prerequisite: interested students must attend a mandatory information meeting in early October, prior to applying for this course. Preference is given to juniors, and then sophomores, whose course work has been suggestive of a firm commitment to preparation for medical school. Enrollment limited to 44.
Cost to student: none, except for local transportation and vaccinations.

SUSAN SALKO
Health Professions Advisor

SPEC 021 Documentary Photography: Public Documents and Personal Narratives (Same as English 024)

(See under English for full description.)

SPEC 022 Color Photography: People and Places (Same as Mathematics and Statistics 022)

(See under Mathematics and Statistics for full description.)

SPEC 025 Williams in Georgia (Same as Russian 025)

(See under Russian for full description.)

SPEC 027 Teaching and Writing at Theodore Roosevelt High School

Students choosing this Winter Study project will live in New York and travel daily to Roosevelt, a large comprehensive high school in the Bronx. A typical day includes: conducting small group work in selected classes (mostly English and Social Studies, but others are possible), working one-on-one with selected students, working in school departments (e.g., college guidance office, tutoring center), and seminar-style meetings in which we discuss and write on issues that emerge from the work with students and teachers.
Requirements: Active and reliable participation in tutoring and discussion during January; participation in several brief orientation meetings before January (possibly including a half-day trip to TRHS), a journal during the program, a written report in a format of the student's choice at the end.
Prerequisites: Strong interest in working with young people. Enrollment limited to approximately 15 sophomores, juniors and seniors.
Cost to student: Approximately $350 for transportation and food. We will attempt to provide housing for tutors. Consult with instructor.

G. NEWMAN
Sponsored by the German and Russian Departments

SPEC 028 Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan

Participating sophomores, juniors and seniors will be expected to pursue a full day's program of observing, teaching, tutoring, and mentoring at Christopher Columbus HS in the Bronx or at A. Philip Randolph HS in Manhattan. Each of the schools will provide a resident supervisor for the Williams teaching interns who will meet regularly to assist with questions and to monitor individual schedules.
Criteria for a pass include full-time affiliation with the school for the entire winter study, keeping a daily journal, participating in the weekly after school seminars held for all of the NYC teaching practicums, and submitting a 5- to l0-page report at the end of Winter Study reflecting upon and summarizing the month's learning experience. Orientation meetings and a visit to the high school prior to the start of winter study will be arranged.
Cost to student: approximately $400 for food and transportation. Housing in NYC will be arranged where necessary.

P. SMITH
Coordinator of High School/College Partnerships

SPEC 029 Junior High School Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan

Participating sophomores, juniors, and seniors will be expected to pursue a full day's program of observing, teaching, tutoring and mentoring at PS 45 in the Bronx (a feeder school to Roosevelt HS) or at Roberto Clemente Junior High School in Manhattan (a feeder school to A. Philip Randolph HS). Each of the schools will provide a resident supervisor for the Williams teaching interns who will meet regularly to assist with questions and to arrange individual schedules.
Criteria for a pass include full-time association with the school for winter study, keeping a daily journal, participating in the weekly meetings for all of the Williams Teaching Interns, and submitting a 5- to l0-page report at the end of Winter Study reflecting upon and summarizing the month's learning experience. An orientation program and a visit to the school will be arranged prior to January.
No prerequisites.
Cost to student: approximately $400. for food and transportation while in NYC. Housing will be arranged for those needing it.

P. SMITH
Coordinator of High School/College Partnerships

SPEC 034 The Contemporary Singer/Songwriter

This course will focus on learning how to write and perform songs in a contemporary style. Topics addressed will include song structure, how to create a lyric that communicates, vocal and instrument presentation, performing techniques, publicity for events, and today's music industry. This class will culminate in a public performance of material written during the course.
In order to pass this course, each student will be expected to complete a minimum of two songs, both music and lyrics. One of these songs will be presented during the final performance, preferably by the student. If not, the student must arrange for someone else in the class to assist him or her. Also, a 2-page paper will be passed in on the last day of class.
There are no prerequisites for this course, although students with musical backgrounds and the ability to play instruments may be given preference for entry. Enrollment limited to 15.
Cost to student: approximately $75 for books and xeroxing costs.
Meeting time: afternoons (Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursdays for two-hour sessions).

BERNICE LEWIS (Instructor)
KECHLEY (Sponsor)

Bernice Lewis is an accomplished singer and songwriter who has performed her work throughout the country. She lives in Williamstown.

SPEC 035 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel (Same as ArtS 035)

(See under Art for full description.)

SPEC 036 Teaching Practicum: St. Aloysius School, Harlem

An opportunity for up to five sophomore, junior or senior students to observe, tutor, teach and mentor at St Aloysius School in Harlem under the direction of Principal Laurel Senger. An orientation session and a visit to the school in December will be arranged prior to Winter Study.
Criteria to pass include full-time participation at St Aloysius for the month, keeping a daily journal, participating in the weekly meetings of all NYC practicum students, and submitting a 5- to l0-page report at the end of WSP reflecting upon and summarizing the month's learning experience.
Enrollment limited to 5 sophomores, juniors or seniors interested in teaching
Cost to student: approximately $400. for food and transportation. Housing in NYC will be arranged where necessary.

P. SMITH
Coordinator of High School/College Partnerships

SPEC 039 Composing A Life: Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams

To be at Williams you have learned to be a successful student, but how do you learn to be successful in life? What will be your definition of a successful career? What will be your definition of a successful personal life? How will you resolve the inevitable tradeoffs between your personal and professional lives? In short, what will constitute the "good life" for you? We borrow the concept of "composing a life," from a book of that title by Mary Catherine Bateson, as a very apt metaphor for the counterpoint and resolution of issues in defining success and in balancing a personal and a professional life. This course is designed: (1) To offer college students, on the threshold of entering adulthood, an opportunity to examine and define their beliefs, values, and assumptions about their future personal and professional lives, in the broader context of life planning and composition, and to consider how they might achieve a successful balance; (2) To encourage students to gain a better understanding of how culture, ideology, and opportunity affect their life choices; and 3) To provide an opportunity for students to "try on" different models of success and balance. An emphasis on case studies and "living cases" (in the form of guests from various professions who have made different life choices) will enable students to simulate real life without the actual risks of reality. We will look at the choices and tradeoffs, the consequences, and adaptations to the various models with the assumption that there is no one right answer to the dilemmas one might face in life after Williams. Through the use of selected readings, case studies, guest speakers and field interviews, we will explore both the public context of the workplace and institutions as well as the private context of individuals and their personal relationships in determining life choices.
Evaluation: students will complete a survey at the beginning of the course to explore their attitudes about defining success and balancing a personal and a professional life in the future. They will also conduct one field interview with a couple who has dealt with career/family issues to explore further the life choice decisionmaking process and its consequences. A major requirement of the course will be to write a final paper (10 pages) where students will be asked to discuss how the course materials, class discussions, interviews, and guest speakers have informed, validated, or challenged their personal thinking on defining success and achieving balance in life after Williams. The final paper, we would hope, might become the foundation of a personal decisionmaking framework for future life choices.
Requirements: regular attendance, class participation, field interview, and a 10-page final paper
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20. Questions about the course: please contact Michele Moeller Chandler at 458-8106 or by e-mail at chandler@bcn.net.
Cost to student: photocopied articles, cases, and/or books.
Meeting time: mornings.

MICHELE MOELLER CHANDLER and CHIP CHANDLER (Instructors)
TOOMAJIAN (Sponsor)

Michele Moeller Chandler '73 and Chip Chandler '72 have taught this Winter Study course for the past four years. They have been both personally and professionally engaged in the course topic. Michele's career has been in college administration, and she has an M.A. from Columbia, and a Ph.D. from Northwestern. Her Ph.D. dissertation focused upon the career/family decisionmaking of professional women who altered their careers because of family obligations. Chip is a senior partner with McKinsey & Company, an international management consulting firm, and he has an M.B.A. from Harvard. He will share the teaching load on a part-time basis. Guest speakers will address related topics.

SPEC 040 Reading in the Content Area

This course focuses on how to teach students literacy through specific subject matter. Through a combination of seminar activities and discussions as well as student teaching in local schools, participants will learn how to help middle and high school students develop reading and critical thinking skills in the context of specific topics: social studies, science, and literature for instance. This course is required for those students
hoping to gain teacher certification.
Enrollment limited to 15. Questions about the course, please contact Susan Engel at x4522 or sengel@williams.edu.
Cost to student: none.

SHARON TOOMEY CLARK (Instructor
SUSAN ENGEL (Sponsor)

Susan Toomey Clark is a lecturer at California State University, San Bernardino. She has fifteen years of teaching experience in junior high, high school, community college and university settings. She also serves on the Education Issues and Practices Committee for the Governor's School-to-Career Advisory Council as the nominee of the Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities.

WILLIAMS PROGRAM IN TEACHING

Students interested in exploring one or more of the following courses related to teaching and/or working with children and adolescents should contact Susan Engel, Director of Education Programs, who will be able to help you choose one that best suits your educational goals.

ANSO 012 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse
(See under Anthropology/Sociology for full description.)

ARTH 016 Museums and Culture
(See under Art History for full description.)

CHEM 011 Science for Kids (Same as Environmental Studies 011 and Special 011)
(See under Chemistry for full description.)

PSCI 019 Service Learning Internships (Same as Geosciences and EXPR 019)
(See under Political Science for full description.)

PSYC 012 Play
(See under Psychology for full description.)

PSYC 017 Teaching Practicum
(See under Psychology for full description.)

PEC 010 Quest for College: Early Awareness in Berkshire County Schools
(See under Special for full description.)

SPEC 015 Deaf and Proud: An Introduction to Deaf Language and Culture
(See under Special for full description.)

SPEC 027 Teaching and Writing at Theodore Roosevelt High School
(See under Special for full description.)

SPEC 028 Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan
(See under Special for full description.)

SPEC 029 Junior High School Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan
(See under Special for full description.)

PEC 036 Teaching Practicum: St. Aloysius School, Harlem
(See under Special for full description.)

PEC 040 Reading in the Content Area
(See under Special for full description.)

 

WILLIAMS-MYSTIC PROGRAM IN
AMERICAN MARITIME STUDIES

An interdisciplinary one-semester program co-sponsored by Williams College and Mystic Seaport which includes credit for one winter study. Classes in maritime history, literature of the sea, marine ecology, oceanography, and marine policy are supplemented by field seminars: offshore sailing, Pacific Coast, Nantucket Island, and New York harbor. For details, see "Williams-Mystic Maritime Studies Program" or our website: www.williamsmystic.org.


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