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Winter Study Courses 2002

 

WINTER STUDY PROGRAM

REMINDERS ABOUT WSP REGISTRATION

All students who will be on campus during the 2001-2002 academic year must register for WSP. Registration will take place in the early part of fall semester. If you are registered for a senior thesis in the fall which must be continued through Winter Study by departmental rules, you will be registered for your Winter Study Project automatically. In every other case, you must complete registration. First-year students are required to participate in a Winter Study that will take place on campus; they are not allowed to do 99's.

Even if you plan to take a 99, or the instructor of your first choice accepts you during the registration period, there are many things that can happen between registration and the beginning of Winter Study to upset your first choice, so you must list five choices. You should try to make one of your choices a project with a larger enrollment, not that it will guarantee you a project, but it will increase your chances.

If you think your time may be restricted in any way (ski meets, interviews, etc.), clear these restrictions with the instructor before signing up for his/her project.

Remember, for cross-listed projects, you should sign up for the subject you want to appear on your record.

For many beginning language courses, you are required to take the WSP Sustaining Program in addition to your regular project. You will be automatically enrolled in this Sustaining Program, so no one should list this as a choice.

The grade of honors is reserved for outstanding or exceptional work. Individual instructors may specify minimum standards for the grade, but normally, fewer than one out of ten students will qualify. A grade of pass means the student has performed satisfactorily. A grade of perfunctory pass signifies that a student's work has been significantly lacking but is just adequate to deserve a pass.

If you have any questions about a project, see the instructor before you register.

Finally, all work for WSP must be completed and submitted to the instructor no later than Friday, January 25th. Only the Dean can grant an extension beyond this date.

WINTER STUDY 99'S

Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible to propose "99's," independent projects arranged with faculty sponsors, conducted in lieu of regular Winter Study courses. Perhaps you have encountered an interesting idea in one of your courses which you would like to study in more depth, or you may have an interest not covered in the regular curriculum. In recent years students have undertaken in-depth studies of particular literary works, interned in government offices, assisted in foreign and domestic medical clinics, conducted field work in economics in developing countries, and given performances illustrating the history of American dance. Although some 99's involve travel away from campus, there are many opportunities to pursue intellectual or artistic goals here in Williamstown.

99 forms are available online:

The deadline for submitting the proposals to faculty sponsors is Thursday, 27 September.

Winter Study Course Offerings

AFRICAN AND MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES

AMES 026 Experiencing Africa and the Middle East

CANCELLED!

AMES 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by candidates for honors by the thesis route in African and Middle Eastern Studies.

AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES

AAS 030 Senior Project

To be taken by students registered for Afro-American Studies 491 who are candidates for honors.

AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 030 Senior Honors Project

To be taken by students registered for American Studies 491 or 492.

ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

ANSO 011 Berkshire Farm Internship

A field placement at Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth in Canaan, New York. Berkshire Farm Center is a residential treatment facility for troubled, at-risk adolescent boys who have been remanded to the Farm by the Family Court. These youths come primarily from lower socio-economic strata, are very ethnically diverse, and hail from both urban and rural areas throughout New York State. The problems that they bring to Berkshire Farm are multiple. These include: the psychological scars of dysfunctional families, including those of physical, emotional, and sexual abuse; chemical dependency; juvenile delinquency; inability to function in school settings; and various other issues. Residential treatment is a multi-modal approach that includes anger-replacement training, social skills training, and behavioral modification.
Williams students will commute to Berkshire Farm and work under supervision in one of the following areas: school, cottage life, chemical dependency unit, research, recreation, performing arts, or in individual tutoring. Students will keep a journal reflecting on their experiences. A weekly seminar with the instructor will draw on service learning experience.
Prerequisite: Placement is only through interview with instructor before registering for course. Enrollment limit: 13. (All queries about this course should be directed to the instructor, who can be reached at 518-781-4567, ext. 322.)
Cost to student: none.

LARI BRANDSTEIN (Instructor)
D. EDWARDS (Sponsor)

Lari Brandstein is Director of Volunteer Services at Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth.
Budget: $600 in rental of college vehicles for students who need transportation to Berkshire Farm Center in Canaan, NY, approx. 50 miles from Williamstown.

ANSO 012 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

The incidence of reported child abuse and neglect has reached epidemic proportions and shows no signs of decreasing. Preventive and prophylactic social programs, court intervention, and legislative mandates have not successfully addressed this crisis. This course allows students to observe the Massachusetts Department of Social Services attorney in courtroom proceedings related to the care and protection of children. Students will have access to Department records for purposes of analysis and will also work with social workers who will provide a clinical perspective on the legal cases under study. The class will meet regularly to discuss court proceedings, assigned readings, and the students' interactions with local human services agencies.
Requirements: access to an automobile is desirable but not required; some transportation will be provided as part of the course. Evaluation will be based on keeping a journal and submitting a 10-page paper at the end of the course. Full participation in the course is expected.
Enrollment limit: 15. (All queries about this course must be directed to the instructor, Judge Locke. Phone messages may be left at 458-4833.)
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons.
Cost to student: $25 for books and photocopies.

JUDITH LOCKE (Instructor)
D. EDWARDS (Sponsor)

Judith Locke is Associate Justice of the Juvenile Court, Commonwealth of Massachusetts

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Anthropology 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Sociology 493-494.

ART

ART HISTORY

ARTH 010 What is New England?

Employing a variety of media, we will seek to answer the question of whether New England is: what it thinks it is, what others in America think it is, what it is that it is "documented" as being. Should this region be seen as being special, and even revered, and why? Is its main attribute simply "oldness" and of what does that consist? The hope is to "see" something that is multifarious, maybe even contradictory, and whether there is some kind of Puritan, colonial core-mythical or otherwise-and how its present day ripples may be made manifest. Towards this end we will explore a variety of sources, including Bennington tombstone inscriptions, Governor Bradford's diary, Sibley's Harvard Graduates, farmers' journals, Boston trustee's statements of what "corpus" is, letters from the Lowell girls and from Irish immigrants, several colleges' acts of incorporation, and bio-technology prospectuses (for the arguable world center of that nascent industry, near Kendall Square, Cambridge). Attention will be given to visual documents or artifacts (besides tombstones), in the works (inter alia) of Ralph Earl, Charles Sprague Sargent, Emma Coleman, John Marin, Paul Strand, and Neil Rappaport. From this welter of evidence, does New England seem old and spent or increasingly like the rest of America or something fragmented and disjunctive or even cutting-edge: whether the landscape or site be littoral or montane or interfluvial? An optional three-day field session during the third week will visit some sites or habitats at first-hand.
Requirements: a presentation and paper, by each class member, on a selected aspect of New England will conclude this course. Besides the final paper there will be notetaking assignments. A passing grade will be determined on the basis of assiduous class attendance and participation as well as the successful completion of written and oral assignments.
Enrollment limit: 15. (The class is especially intended for students from other regions of the United States, or abroad, and preference will be given to them. Natives, however, will not be shunted.)
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $250,texts, $10 local field sessions, and $150 for an optional three-day field session.

SATTERTHWAITE

ARTH 017 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography (Same as English 017)

(See under English for full description.)

ARTH 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for ArtH 493, 494.

ARTH 033 Honors Independent Study

To be taken by candidates for honors by the independent study route.

ART STUDIO

ARTS 011 Suburbia

CANCELLED!

ARTS 012 New York City Field Trip

This studio course will involve two day-long field trips to New York City to view and critique contemporary art at museums and galleries, and to make artwork in response to that critique. In addition to readings and discussions about the exhibitions, students are expected to keep visual journals as documentation/sketchbooks and to finish one drawing project that is related to the New York work in concept or style. This project will involve six or more extensive drawings. Although there is an element of "apprenticeship" in this approach, students are expected to create their own individual, unique works.
Evaluation will be based on attendance at the two field trips, participation in discussions, and the quality of the student's journal and month-long project.
We will meet once a week during the two weeks of field trips-we will leave Williamstown at 8:00 a.m. and return at 9:00 p.m. During the other two weeks of WSP, we will meet twice a week for three hours in the Spencer Studio Art Building on campus. Students are expected to work outside of class time to finish their journals and projects.
Prerequisite: ArtS 100. Enrollment limit: 10.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: $100 to help cover transportation costs (van rental, subways), dinners in New York, journal/drawing supplies, and reading packets.

TAKENAGA

ARTS 013 Figure Modeling

This course is designed as an introduction to the challenges of working with the figure in a sculptural context. The class will be structured as a working studio with the students sculpting in clay from a live model. The first half of the course will emphasize learning the technical and physiological aspects of the human figure; structure, proportion, gesture, and basic anatomy. The latter half of the course will be concerned with the creative aspects of working with the figure and of developing individual interpretations of the human form. In addition to working studio sessions, there will be two slide lectures on the human form in art. Each student will be evaluated on the success of their sculpture, attendance, participation, and effort. This course requires approximately 15 hours per week of individual investigations into the human form.
Prerequisite: ArtS 100. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: TR, 9 a.m.-noon.
Lab fee: $95.00.

PODMORE

ARTS 014 Trade and Artistic Exchange: An Introduction to the Archaeology of Global Process in the Third and Second Millennia B.C.

In the mid-second millennium B.C. the International Style was prevalent in the Eastern Mediterranean, incorporating iconographic and stylistic elements from the Aegean, Egypt and the Near East. Such an artistic environment is both diagnostic and an integral part of interaction among these different regions. This course will explore how these relationship grew up over time, discuss the role of polities, states and individuals in the demand and production of prestige goods, and investigate how art can act as a form of communication capable of crossing language, politically drawn geographic boundaries, and ethnic barriers. The exchange of raw materials and finished goods will be examined alongside the artistic relationships.
Classes will be a mixture of lecture and discussion. Students will participate in a hands-on experimental archaeology lab involving an ancient gold-smithing technique. This will emphasize production variability, skill, labor and time investments. In addition to the lab component, students will be expected to prepare reading prior to seminar style discussion once a week. A final 10- to 15-page paper will also be required.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to students: $30.

THEA POLITIS (Instructor)
M. LEWIS (Sponsor)

Thea Politis was a recent Joint Athens-Jerusalem Kress Fellow while researching her Ph.D. in archaeology on the early technology of gold granulation. She has lived and traveled extensively abroad. As a former member of the curatorial staff of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, she has been involved in researching Egyptian international relations during the Bronze Age. Her current research interests include Bronze Age iconographic systems, international relations in the period, and ancient materials and industries.

ARTS 015 Digital Drawing

This is a studio drawing course that will use computer to create a digital drawing. Unlike a conventional drawing medium, computer provides a unique drawing ground in which the physical relationship between the artist and art work seems somewhat distanced. It also carries an unfortunate burden of being looked at as something unreal to be an art object even today because of what we are so used to seeing on monitor (be it computer monitor or TV). What is fascinating about it is the fact that it is a drawing of lights.
This course will cover basic techniques of drawing using a digital drawing tablet with a software such as Adobe Photoshop. It will focus on not only a creation of a drawing but also the understanding of seeing the image on screen as something concrete as a
drawing on other materials. There will be discussion on net art through various web sites in class using a projector. The students will be assigned to explore other art on the web.
The class will also have prints made from the image students created on a monitor to examine and understand the transformation of one medium to another. This will enable students to see two images generated from the same source, yet entirely different pieces of art work. The class will end with an exhibition of drawings both on monitors and prints and a web site of the drawings created in the class.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, the body of drawings created and the final exhibition of the work.
No experience in drawing or computer knowledge is required. Enrollment limit: 10.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: $150 for printing.

HIDEYO OKAMURA (Instructor)
M. LEWIS (Sponsor)

Hideyo Okamura is a painter and has recently been working with digital imagery. His work has been exhibited throughout the United States, and in Germany and Mexico. His digital drawings can be viewed at www.williams.edu/CTAH.

ARTS 016 Fresco Painting

Fresco is one the oldest painting techniques in Western Art. Learn how to paint in the same medium that Michaelangelo used to paint the Sistine Chapel. In this course students will learn to paint in this ancient medium on portable panels. Students will slake lime, mix plaster, grind pigments and paint on the wet plaster. Projects will include copying a section of a Renaissance fresco as well as creating frescos of individual student's own design. This course will provide a greater understanding of the process of painting as well as enhance one's understanding of Renaissance Art. No prerequisites. Evaluation will be based on participation in all aspects of the workshop and completion of the projects.
Enrollment limit: 18. Preference given to art majors.
Meeting time: TW, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. All work will be completed during class time with the exception of the drawing notebook and some background readings.
Cost to student: $15.

WALTER O'NEILL (Instructor)
M. LEWIS (Sponsor)

Walter O'Neill, a fresco painter, has painted public and private commissions. He has conducted the fresco program at the Skowhegan School and The Cloisters, Medieval Collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and has been a visiting artist/lecturer on fresco at many institutions including The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, University of Southern California and Adelphi University.

ARTS 017 Structural Model Making

An introduction to the principal structural systems and how they are constructed, by means of making accurate, working, table-top models. These models of variously shaped arches, barrel and groin vaults, flying buttresses, domes on pendentives and squinches, truss and suspension bridges produced in this class are intended to serve in the future as teaching aids, and the emphasis will therefore be on making them both clear and accurate. Participants will design and build models that not only demonstrate how a variety of structural systems work, but how they were built as well; in the case of arches, vaults and domes, as much attention will be paid to the design of efficient and easily removable and reusable centering as to the space-spanning parts themselves. One of the primary issues to be considered is the relative strength-to-weight ratio of the model and the system it represents, and the problem of making structural models that accurately reflect the scale of weights and thrusts. Although models of centering will be constructed of wood, and probably most of the systems as well, the possibility of making effective models in other materials, particularly stone and plaster, will also be investigated.
Evaluation will be based on participation in class discussion, the quality of the models, and written manuals for their use as teaching devices.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: For the first week, class will meet every day for a two-hour morning session of the discussion of structural systems, brainstorming and model planning, as well as an introduction to the tools in the sculpture studio. Most of the remainder of the course will be spent in studio work. There will be three two-hour morning periods of supervised lab time a week, and discussion meetings for progress reports. It is expected that the projects will require a good deal more time than just the hours spent in class.

RALPH LIEBERMAN (Instructor)
M. LEWIS (Sponsor)

Ralph Lieberman is an art historian and photographer who lives in Williamstown. He has a PhD from the Institute of Fine Arts, and has taught history of architecture at many schools including Williams, Harvard and the Rhode Island School of Design. He made the structural models that are currently used in Art 101, and would like to see better ones available.

ARTS 018 Editorial Cartooning (Same as Political Science 018)

This course, taught by an editorial cartoonist for a major metropolitan daily newspaper, introduces students to the "Ungentlemanly Art" through discussion and an emphasis on the creation of their own work. It is not an art course so much as an exercise in disciplining the mind to distill abstract concepts and opinions into visual and verbal symbols that can be clearly, economically and persuasively communicated to the reader. Previous drawing experience, while helpful, is not a prerequisite for the course. In fact, non-art majors are particularly encouraged to enroll. The basics of perspective, proportion, and shading will be covered as needed to provide all students with the necessary skills to express themselves. What is much more important is that the prospective student have an inquisitive mind, a healthy interest in current events, a willingness to enter into spirited classroom discussion, and an appreciation of satire. Former students have indicated that they found the intellectual skills they acquired in this course to be useful in many different areas. In addition, several overcame fear to discover drawing abilities that they did not know they possessed. Class assignments will be critiqued in a non-threatening atmosphere. The instructor, who will be continuously producing daily cartoons for his newspaper, will also present his own work for criticism.
Evaluation of student performance will be based upon classroom participation and completion of assigned material.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: $75 for art materials.

CHAN LOWE '75 (Instructor)
M. LEWIS (Sponsor)

Chan Lowe, Williams '75 , is the editorial cartoonist for the South Florida Sun- Sentinel. His work is nationally syndicated and appears regularly in newspapers and magazines throughout the country. Most recently, he was given the National Press Foundation's Berryman Award for Cartoonist of the Year 2000.

ARTS 019 Digital Photography

A hybrid of video and photography, montage and painting, digital photography has changed our expectations and largely redefined "photography." This course is an introduction to digital, art photography. Students will learn to operate a digital camera and manipulate their files, in Photoshop, on a Macintosh computer. (All equipment will be provided by the college.) Students should be prepared to make a five day per week commitment to attending either labs or class meetings in order to complete the work required for this class.
No prerequisites, but ArtS 100 or other college level beginning drawing or design class highly recommended. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Lab fee: $100.

LALEIAN

ARTS 020 Stained Glass Workshop (Same as Biology 020)

(See under Biology for full description.)

ARTS 022 Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting and Design (CADD) (Same as Physics 011)

(See under Physics for full description.)

ARTS 023 Drawing to a Close: Illustrating Disappearing Farms (Same as Environmental Studies 011 and INTR 011)

(See under IPECS-INTR 011 full full description.)

ARTS 033 Honors Independent Project

Independent study to be taken by candidates for honors in Art Studio.

ARTS 035 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel (Same as Special 035)

(See under Special for full description.)

ASIAN STUDIES

ASST 013 Feng Shui

Feng shui is the study of the way in which our environments affect every aspect of our lives. The selection of a property site and the placement of buildings on a property, of rooms within a building and of furniture within a room influence us, sometimes in obvious ways, often in very subtle ways. The goal in this course is to give students a foundation in the history and concepts of feng shui that will lead to the practical application of feng shui. We will explore the origins and principles of this ancient Chinese discipline and analyze how this Eastern philosophy is applicable in our Western society. Our in-depth analysis of the many levels of feng shui, from the mundane to the transcendental, will include a comparison of feng shui to the similar architectural designs, traditions and rituals of other cultures and of the animal world. We will also consider the correlation between an environment and the individuals who inhabit that particular space. By the end of the course, we will analyze properties on or near the Williams campus, including spaces in which the students have a special interest. We will determine what changes can be made in those environments to improve the lives of the occupants.
We will meet five times a week for two-hour sessions. Field trips in the Williamstown, North Adams and Hancock area to analyze specific properties will be held during class.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, class assignments and a research paper or design analysis.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 18.
Meeting time: mornings
Cost to student: $50 for book, handouts, and materials.

VINCENT SMITH (Instructor)
CRANE (Sponsor)

Vincent Smith is a feng shui consultant, lecturer and author who is based in New York City. He was graduated from Harvard College and Yale Law School. He practiced law for 25 years before forming the VMS Feng Shui Design Co. Vincent Smith has traveled and studied with Professor Lin Yun, who is considered by many to be the leading feng shui master in the United States. He recently taught a course in feng shui at Berea College in Kentucky.

ASST 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Asian Studies.

CHINESE

CHIN S.P. Sustaining Program for Chinese 101-102

Students registered for Chinese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Chinese Sustaining Program.
Requirements: regular attendance and active class participation.
Prerequisite: Chinese 101.
Meeting time: Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9:00-9:50.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.

LANGUAGE FELLOW

CHIN 025 China for Tourists, China for Peasants

In this travel course to a remote mountain village and a tourist must-see in China, and two towns in between, we will explore the possibilities of mutual understanding in a variety of cross-cultural encounters. We will fly to Guilin and begin our journey on a boat down the scenic Li River to Yangshuo, where "West[ern] Street" offers an opportunity to investigate the ways the local landscape and Chinese and Western cultures are commodified for tourists from both China and abroad. Our destination is a village in Hunan, where we will spend a total of 10 days living in the homes of farming families and learning about the realities of their lives, to understand the concrete effects of national policy that focuses on development of cities at the expense of the countryside. Students will choose in advance a specific topic for investigation (rice farming, the raising of hogs, citrus growing, education, health care, care of the elderly, how the village got running water or electricity, the story of the pagoda, marriage or funeral practices, ghosts, etc.) and present an oral report to classmates and villagers, which we'll follow with a discussion in town about our research experiences. We will also visit the county seat, where we will conduct two day-long workshops for county English teachers, to give something back to the wider community that welcomes us. We'll have orientation sessions in the fall to choose topics, select readings on tourism studies and rural China, prepare English instruction materials, and prepare ourselves for the trip.
Requirements: a few preliminary readings, active participation, journal, oral report in Chinese, and a 5-page essay in English synthesizing what you have learned.
Prerequisite: Chinese 301, or comparable Mandarin speaking ability, or permission of instructor; students from urban China are encouraged to participate, for you will be surprised by what you learn. Good physical and mental health. A willingness and ability to endure more primitive living conditions than you are accustomed to. Qualified students already studying in China are welcome to join the course in Guilin.
Enrollment limit: 8. (Interested students should consult the instructor before registration.)

Cost to student: $1,995 (includes round-trip air fare from New York City, transportation in China, food and lodging; does not include gifts for host families, snacks, or incidental expenses.) Interested students on financial aid and concerned about cost should speak with the instructor.

SILBER

CHIN 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Chinese.

JAPANESE

JAPN S.P. Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102

Students registered for Japanese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Japanese Sustaining Program.
Requirements: regular attendance and active class participation.
Prerequisite: Japanese 101.
Meeting time: Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9:00-9:50.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.

LANGUAGE FELLOW

JAPN 010 Introduction to the Japanese Language and Culture (Same as Linguistics 010)

Have you ever studied Japanese or thought of studying Japanese? This is an ideal course for students who are curious about the Japanese language and culture. It will examine different aspects of the Japanese language through broader theoretical perspectives specifically, its history, lexicon, phonology, grammatical structures, sociolinguistics, and discursive-cultural dimension. For example, what is the origin of the Japanese language and how does it relate to Chinese or Korean? Why does Japanese have three different writing systems? (historical linguistics) How does Japanese differ from English? (typology, phonology and syntax) Why can children learn Japanese so easily? (psycholinguistics) Are there gender and generational differences in Japanese? (sociolinguistics)
Requirement: Class participation and reading, research project and presentation on selected issues on Japanese language.
No prerequisites.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $50 for books and printed materials.

YAMAMOTO

JAPN 011 Embodied Learning (Same as Theatre 011)

Performance has outgrown its rather narrow theatrical meaning and has come to serve as a paradigm for the means by which we participate in our culture and in our world. With that sea change in understanding comes a necessary rethinking of the roles of "learning" and "training". The notion of "embodied learning" describes the vivid interplay between the intellect and the viscera, necessary to successfully engage in any number of performances, from combat, to dance, to participating in the language and behavior of a target culture.
While the goals of the course (and the reading materials) are far-reaching, the methods of the studio activity are comparatively focused. The instructor will draw on experiences training with artists associated with the Japanese butoh dance movement. These exercises provide an intensive physical challenge, while inviting the imaginative release necessary to successfully improvise within a carefully defined subtextual structure. This is an experience-based course that explores ways in which the body participates in learning.
The class will meet 12 hours per week (in four 3-hour installments, or according to the availability of space). It will be a highly physical class, consisting of exercises that move through the space, and those that require direct physical interaction among students and between instructor and student. Assignments will include reading materials addressing issues of embodied learning from a variety of viewpoints, written summaries of one or more of those selections, and regular journal writing.
No prerequisites. Students are encouraged to make an honest assessment of their own health, conditioning and readiness to respond to the physical demands of the course. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings (12 hours a week).
Cost to student: $40 for materials and course packet.

TOM O'CONNOR (Instructor)
KAGAYA (Sponsor)

Tom O'Connor has been a professional actor and movement artist for twenty years. He developed and implemented a movement program for the West Virginia University Division of Theatre and Dance that included a curriculum of human movement, composition for movement-theatre performance, and other performance specializations. Recently he moved to the Berkshires where he hopes to establish a non-profit dance and theatre collective.

JAPN 012 Japanese Dyeing: Joy of Kusaki-zome

Kusaki-zome is the traditional Japanese art of dyeing with plant dye. Using a simple technique, it brings out the wonderful colors in vegetables, flowers, tree leaves and twigs. For instance, tea leaves provide a light brown. What color do you think onion skins would give? The most interesting thing is that the color is never the same since the hue of colors differs greatly depending on the season when the plants were harvested. The technique is simple; if you can boil eggs, you can enjoy Kusaki-zome. This class requires no previous artistic training. The course will include lectures on the history of Kusaki-zome as well as hands-on experience.
Evaluation will be based on the completion of two projects, with a journal describing the projects, as well as participation in the final class exhibition.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15 per section. (To accommodate student demand, two sections of this course will be offered.)
Meeting time: mornings.
Lab fee: $35.

KYOKO KABASAWA (Instructor)
CRANE (Sponsor)

Kyoko Kabasawa is a Japanese textile and dyeing artist who teaches at Hokkaido Women's College. In addition to a number of prizes awarded in Japan, she won an originality award in the Hawai'i Handweavers' Hui 45th Anniversary Biennial Exhibition in August 1998.

JAPN 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Japanese.

ASTRONOMY

ASTR 016 Observational Astronomy

This course, meant for non-majors, will focus on the most basic aspects of astronomy and will be observing-intensive, taking full advantage of various telescopes housed on the Williams College observing deck. Topics to be covered will include the constellations and night sky in general, planets, the moon, the sun, stars, and galaxies. Study of these topics will require a mix of both day and night class sessions during which students will make observations using binoculars, telescopes, and the naked eye. Observing will take place on all class dates during which the sky is clear. On those days when the sky is cloudy, we will do in-class exercises or discuss current topics in astronomy such as results from the Hubble Space Telescope. Student observations will be recorded in drawings, notes, and computer printouts and/or photographs. The class will take a field trip to the new Rose Center for Earth and Space at the Hayden Planetarium in New York City
Evaluation will be based on an oral presentation and detailed wrtieup of the student's observations (equivalent to a 10-page paper).
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25. Preference to students with no previous astronomy observing experience.
Meeting time: 3 two-hour EVENING observing sessions each week plus additional self-scheduled observing or World Wide Web work; separate daytime sessions for solar observing; and a few afternoon sessions, mainly to make arrangements for observing.
Cost to student: $75 for books, materials, and field trip.

STEPHAN MARTIN (Instructor)
KWITTER (Sponsor)

Stephan Martin is Instructor of Astronomy and Observatory Supervisor at Williams College.

ASTR 031 Senior Research

To be taken by students registered for Astronomy 493, 494.

ASTROPHYSICS

ASPH 031 Senior Research

To be taken by students registered for Astrophysics 493, 494.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 010 Electron Microscopy

Students will undertake an independent project in which they will learn the theory and practice of transmission and scanning electron microscopy. they will do their own sample preparation, operate the two electron microscopes, and take pictures of relevant structures, go digital and manipulate those images in Photoshop (do you want your erythrocytes red or blue?) or go conventional and do tried-but-true black and white photography. there will be brief reading assignments, a guest speaker and a 10-page paper with 6 really good micrographs required.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. No preference given.
Meeting time: afternoons. Class will meet for two hours, three times a week, plus scope time.
Cost to student: $40 for text and readings.

NANCY PIATCZYC (Instructor)
H. WILLIAMS (Sponsor)

Nancy Piatczyc received her B.S. in Biology from Tufts University. She attended the school of Electron Microscopy in Albany, NY. She is a trained electron microscopist who operates and maintains the electron microscope facility at Williams.

BIOL 011 Outbreak Investigations: An Introduction to Field Epidemiology

This course will introduce students to the practical and exciting science of epidemiology, as it relates to the control of communicable diseases. How do epidemiologists ("disease detectives") detect outbreaks of illness, and how do they investigate outbreaks to determine how to stop the spread of the disease? How can they determine if their interventions were helpful? Specific diseases and their control will be used as examples, such as polio, AIDS, tuberculosis, Lyme disease, West Nile Virus, and "mad-cow disease." Class activities will include a field data collection exercise, a computer lab using the CDC software program "Epi-Info", and discussion of assigned articles or book chapters. Two or three guest speakers will give first-hand accounts of epidemic investigations. Application of these tools to chronic disease epidemiology will also be discussed. Readings include textbook chapters introducing epidemiologic concepts, original classic articles from medical journals about specific outbreak investigations, and popular fictional and non-fictional accounts of epidemics and their control.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper on some aspect of infectious disease epidemiology, selected from a broad list of potential topics, and a brief class presentation on the same topic.
No prerequisites. Basic statistical methods will be introduced but no prior familiarity with statistics is assumed. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons. The course will meet two afternoons a week for three hours.
Cost to student: $50.00 for books and course reading packet.

MARGARET OXTOBY, MD (Instructor)
H. WILLIAMS (Sponsor)

Dr. Oxtoby received her B.A. from Harvard and her M.D. from Case Western Reserve University. She currently works in the Division of Epidemiology, NYS Department of Health, Albany, NY.

BIOL 012 Gene Quest (Cancelled)

This course offers the opportunity to participate in a research project whose aims are to identify highly conserved genes in diverse animals using polymerase chain reaction and other standard molecular biology techniques. The basic genetic mechanisms that define the types of cells in a body and those that define the shape of the developing animal are remarkably similar from flies to frogs. Although regulatory genes are shared between animal groups, their function may or may not be conserved. This is likely to account for the tremendous morphological variation observed in animals. The first step in understanding changing gene function in animals is to identify the highly conserved genes. In order to clone their gene of interest, students will examine sequence data, design primers, and amplify fragments from genomic DNA. The course will meet twice a week for three hours in addition to independent work outside of scheduled class.
Evaluation will be based on a laboratory notebook, poster, oral presentation, and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisite. Enrollment limit: 10.
Meeting time: mornings.

SAVAGE

BIOL 013 Infectious Disease: Causes and Cures

This course offers an introduction to the causes of infectious disease and to the drugs and vaccines that are used to limit their destructive power. The first half of the course will be devoted to a discussion of bacterial pathogens, antibiotics, and antibiotic resistance. The second half of the course will focus on viruses, in particular, poliovirus and HIV, and on the development and distribution of effective vaccines. Other sorts of infectious agents, such as prions and amoeboid parasites, will be briefly discussed.
Evaluation will be based on two 5-page papers and an oral presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference to Biology majors.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $40 includes book and photocopies.

KAREN PEPPER (Instructor)
H. WILLIAMS (Sponsor)

Karen Pepper received her Ph.D. from the University of Paris (Paris VII). Her thesis research was completed at the Pasteur Institute. She has published a number of scientific papers on antibiotic resistance.

BIOL 014 Social Justice Issues in Health Care Delivery (Cancelled)

Widening economic disparities, both domestic and global, threaten to derail the progress achieved over the last century in the arena of universal public health. Is basic health care a human right? How is the delivery of health care in the twenty-first century influenced by prejudice, inequality, and injustice? Readings and in-class discussions will focus on four case studies: perceptions of disability and access to reproductive technologies, distribution of AIDS drugs to resource-poor individuals and countries, health care provision to migrant farm workers, and the Dutch experience with euthanasia. This course includes a major experiential learning component, in which you will carry out an internship in a clinical or social service setting. Throughout the month, we will reflect individually and as a group on the field placement experiences and the social justice issues encountered in these settings.
Evaluation will be based upon a 10-page paper placing the internship experience in the broader context of social justice concerns.
Requirements: serious commitment to internship (15-20 hours/week), journal reflecting on field experience, one presentation on the social justice issues surrounding a specific infectious disease, active participation in classroom discussions (three two-hour meetings per week).
No prerequisites, but students will be asked to meet with their field placement supervisor once prior to Winter break to discuss expectations and potential contributions to be made by the student. Enrollment limit: 12. Student selection criteria: Interested students must consult instructor prior to registration.
Meeting time: mornings for in-class discussions, times for field placement to be arranged to best suit the needs of the host organization.
Cost to student: $30 for one book and reading packet.

BANTA

BIOL 015 Conservation of Songbirds in North America (Cancelled)

Songbird populations in North America are increasingly threatened from anthropogenic changes to the landscape they inhabit. Because they are an intensively studied taxa, birds provide a model system to explore issues in conservation. This course combines discussion, data analysis, and independent inquiry into the conservation status and population trends of North American birds, emphasizing songbirds. We will discuss past examples, analyze current status and population trends of birds by exploring data from the Breeding Bird Survey, and evaluate current institutional efforts to conserve songbirds in North America.
Evaluation will be based on the completion of course assignments including an independent project and presentation (equivalent to a 10-page paper). Attendance and participation will also be taken into account. Assignments and analysis will be completed outside of class.
No prerequisites, however previous courses in ecology are useful. Enrollment limit: 14. Priority given to Biology majors and Environmental Studies concentrators.
Meeting time: afternoons, two three-hour sessions each week.
Cost to student: $50.

SCHMIDT

BIOL 016 Tiny Footprint: Living Sustainably in the New Millennium (Same as Environmental Studies 016)

(See under Environmental Studies for full description.)

BIOL 020 Stained Glass Workshop (Same as ArtS 020)

This is a studio/workshop course designed to introduce the student to the techniques involved in working with stained glass. Lectures will describe the use and manufacture of stained glass windows from medieval to modern times. Demonstrations will illustrate how to design, cut and assemble stained glass forms using the copper foil technique. Techniques related to etching designs in glass will be demonstrated as well. Each student will complete a small assigned project during class to learn the basics of the technique. Students will then complete a larger independent project as their "journeyman piece." This may consist of a traditional window, a free-form mobile or a three dimensional form.
Evaluation will be based upon class participation as well as upon the design and execution of the journeyman piece. Attendance at all scheduled meetings is mandatory. Additional time outside of class will be necessary to design and complete the independent project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: afternoons, two three-hour sesssions each week.
Cost to student: $70 for materials.

ADLER

BIOL 021 Internships in Biology

Sophomores, juniors and seniors wishing to do internships with conservation organizations, national or state parks, field research, or laboratory research at other institutions should sign up for Biology 021 as their winter study course. Students must make all the arrangements for the internships directly with the sponsoring organization. The costs of travel and room and board must be borne by the student. In addition, the student must independently design the project and have it approved by Professor Swoap before October 5, 2001. The form for this proposal is on the biology web site (www.williams.edu/Biology/)-follow the "courses" link. Upon approval of the project, the student can register for the course.
Previous internships have included such diverse programs as working on the problem of introduced species with a local or national environmental organization, monkey census within Equitorial Guinea, working at a raptor rehabilitation center, and working with their home state's department of environmental management.
Evaluation will be based on a daily field notebook/daily journal and a 10-page summary paper or laboratory report.
Prerequisites: Depends on the program chosen. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: Will vary with the program.

SWOAP

BIOL 022 Introduction to Biological Research

An experimental research project will be carried out under the supervision of a member of the Biology Department. It is expected that the student will spend 20 hours per week in the lab at a minimum, and a 10-page written report is required. This experience is intended for, but not limited to, first-year students and sophomores, and requires the permission of the instructor. Interested students should contact Professor Swoap for more information before registering.

Prerequisites: Biology 101. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

SWOAP

BIOL 023 Introduction to Lipid Biochemistry -A Research Experience

This class will introduce students to techniques in lipidology through the scientific literature and working in the research lab. While the readings will include a range of topics exploring the structure and function of lipids in cells and organisms, the laboratory component will entail a research project and introduce students to techniques used to analyze lipid structure and composition and to assay procedures of enzymes involved in lipid metabolism. It is expected that the students will devote at least 20 hours per week to the projects.
Evaluation will be based on a short paper on the literature component of the course and a comprehensive report on the laboratory component of the course.
Prerequisite: Biology 101. Enrollment limit: 6.
Meeting time: MTWR, mornings and afternoons.
Cost to student: $5 for reading packet.

D. LYNCH

BIOL 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Biology 493, 494.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 011 Science for Kids (Same as Special 011)

(See under Special for full description.)

CHEM 012 How to Write Popular Science (Same as English 012 and Special 012) (Cancelled)

(See under Special for full description.)

CHEM 013 The Popular Culture of Football (Soccer) Around the World

Football, or, as erroneously called in the USA, soccer, is the most popular sport in the world. In many countries the sport goes beyond playing the game; it becomes part of your daily life. After losing the European cup, the fan's passion for the local or national teams has been criticized for the aggressive behavior in the stands and the rioting in the streets. Is this behavior part of football or just our human nature? The course looks at the women's NCAA basketball final four tournament and the riots by Purdue fans to answer the question.
In this course we explore the beauty, fanaticism, ethics and social change that football brings with it, and the differences and similarities of the culture of football in several parts of the world. Students learn of the culture through the assigned readings. Some of the readings include: The Miracle of Castel di Sangro, by J. McGinniss; Ethnic and Religious Identity in Modern Scotland: Culture, Politics, and Football, by J. M. Bradley; Passion of the People? Football in South America (Critical Studies in Latin American and Iberian Culture), by Tony Mason; British Football and Social Change: Getting in to Europe, by J. Williams; The Culture of Fear: Why Americans are Afraid of the Wrong Things, by B. Glassner; and Soccer Madness: Brazil's Passion for the World's Most Popular Sport, by Janet Lever. Finally, students explore the role of gender and the differences and similarities between football in the USA and other countries.
Format: lecture/discussion. Evaluation is based on two short papers (2 pages) relating to assigned readings, a third paper on a topic of personal interest and participation in class discussions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Meeting time: afternoons. The course will meet three times a week with occasional extra meetings for special projects.
Cost to student: $100 for books.

PEACOCK-LÓPEZ

CHEM 014 Emergency Medical Technician-Basic

A course designed to prepare students for the Massachusetts EMT exam and to provide training to become certified as an Emergency Medical Technician. The course teaches the new national standard curriculum which makes reciprocity with many other states possible. This is a time-intensive course involving approximately 130 hours of class time plus optional emergency room observation and ambulance work. Students will learn, among other skills, basic life support techniques, patient assessment techniques, defibrillation, how to use an epi-pen, safe transportation and immobilization skills, as well as the treatment of various medical emergencies including shock, bleeding, soft-tissue injuries, and child birth. In order to reduce the number of class meetings required during Winter Study Period, the course will hold a few meetings beginning in the fall semester. These class meetings, which are mandatory, are held on Sundays with the following schedule: 4 November (orientation), 11 November, and 18 November.
Format: lecture/laboratory. Evaluation is based upon class participation and performance on class exams, quizzes and practical exercises.
Prerequisite: recommended that students have American Heart Association Level C BLS Provider CPR Cards or American Red Cross BLS provider CPR cards before entering the EMT Class. A CPR class will be offered in October for those students wishing to take the EMT class who don't already have CPR cards. Enrollment limit: 24.
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons; schedule TBA in October.
Cost to student: $300/student plus approximately $75 for textbook, stethoscope, and BP cuff.

KEVIN GARVEY (Instructor)
D. RICHARDSON (Sponsor)

Kevin Garvey is a Massachusetts state and nationally approved EMT-I (Intermediate) and an EMT-IC (Instructor/Coordinator). He had been involved with Emergency Medical Services for 15-20 years. Mr. Garvey currently works for Baystate Health Systems as an RN (registered nurse) and EMT-I and also works as an EMT-I for Village Ambulance in Williamstown. Mr. Garvey is also an EMT training instructor at Greenfield Community College.

CHEM 015 Epidemiology, Epidemics, and Human Health

Epidemiology is about the distribution of, and determinants of disease in human populations. While the discipline first developed around epidemics of infectious diseases, its low technology approaches have been usefully employed to study most of the major acute and chronic non-infectious disease epidemics of the last 50-100 years, including pellagra, coronary heart disease, and lung cancer, and some of the minor epidemics, for example, occupational asbestos exposure and lung disease, and even the use (and misuse) of C-section in delivering babies.
The main purpose of this course is to stimulate critical thinking and impart an understanding of the logic and scientific methods of epidemiology in answering questions or hypotheses related to the etiology of specific human diseases, their prevention, their early detection, their prognoses, and the effectiveness of treatments used to cure or alleviate their effects. We will be interested primarily in the observational and experimental methods of epidemiological inquiry in human populations, and their application to new questions, rather than the acquisition of specialized information or arcane facts.
It has been said that at least 50% of the basic science you will learn as an undergraduate and in medical school will be proved wrong, perhaps within 10 years. While this might be a bit of an exaggeration, it is no exaggeration to suggest that no one really knows which 50%! For future health professionals, an understanding of epidemiologic methods will make it easier for you to keep up with the rapid pace of knowledge, and help you deliver the best, evidence-driven care.
By means of a few introductory lectures, and more class discussion, including unknown exercises (Whodunnits, in the New Yorker style of the late Burton Rouche), perhaps presented by groups of students working collaboratively, the review of current and some classical papers in the medical and public health literature, and the reading of selected chapters of a condensed, basic text in epidemiology, we will come to an appreciation of the rules of evidence in epidemiologic research. While some explanation of biostatistical applications will be necessary to understand the literature, this will not be a course in biostatistics.
This course is aimed towards students who are committed to the liberal arts and have an interest in health issues beyond the cellular level, including those with an interest in medicine, public health, other health-related careers, the law, economics, etc.
Format: lecture/discussion. Evaluation is based on class participation and a circa 10-page paper, perhaps done collaboratively, on a mutually agreeable health issue. We may ask that papers be presented to the whole group at the final sessions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: afternoons. The course will meet three times a week with occasional extra meetings for special projects. There will be several evening sessions where outside speakers will address issues related to the course. Unless excused, students are expected to attend these meetings.
Cost to student: $50 for books and copied materials.

NICHOLAS H. WRIGHT '57 (Instructor)
D. RICHARDSON (Sponsor)

Dr. Nicholas H. Wright (Williams Class of 1957), a medical epidemiologist with a longstanding interest in family planning/population and international health issues, recently retired from the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Jersey, and now lives in Williamstown.

CHEM 017 Introduction to Research in Archaeological Science

An independent experimental project in archaeological science is carried out in collaboration with Dr. Skinner whose research involves two types of studies: dating fossil material and establishing the sources of ancient artifacts.

Format: laboratory research. A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: Variable, depending on the project (at least Chemistry 101) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in a faculty research lab, interested students must consult Dr. Skinner and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

ANNE SKINNER (Instructor)
D. RICHARDSON (Sponsor)

Anne Skinner is a Senior Lecturer in Chemistry at Williams.

CHEM 018 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry

An independent experimental project in biochemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in biochemistry. Biochemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the molecular details of living systems including the interaction of biologically important molecules. In the Chemistry Department, studies are underway to investigate the structure/function relationship of proteins, the interaction between proteins and RNA and DNA, DNA structure and repair, and the molecular basis of gene regulation.
Format: laboratory research. A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: Variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 101) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

CHIHADE, KAPLAN, and LOVETT

CHEM 019 Introduction to Research in Environmental Science (Same as Environmental Science 019)

(See under Environmental Studies for full description.)

CHEM 023 Introduction to Research in Organic Chemistry

An independent experimental project in organic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in organic chemistry. One representative project involves isolation of the bioactive constituents of Southeast Asian dart poisons from their natural sources and the elucidation of their three-dimensional structures. Another line of investigation probes new and efficient methods for the creation of molecules of medicinal interest. Some targets include the kavalactones-the active principles of the herbal extract KAVA KAVA which is promoted as an alternative anti-anxiety remedy, and octalactin A-an interesting 8-membered ring compound isolated from marine microorganisms that has shown significant toxicity toward human cancer cells.
Format: laboratory research. A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: Variable, depending on the project (at least Chemistry 101) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

D. RICHARDSON

CHEM 024 Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry

An independent experimental project in physical chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in physical chemistry. Current research projects in the Department include computer modeling of non-linear, chaotic chemical and biochemical systems, molecular modeling of water clusters, laser spectroscopy of chlorofluorocarbon substitutes, and experimental studies of the oxidation of sulfur dioxide on atmospheric aerosols.
Format: laboratory research. A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: Variable, depending on the project (at least Chemistry 101) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

KOEHLER, PEACOCK-LóPEZ, THOMAN

CHEM 031 Senior Research and Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Chemistry 493, 494.

CLASSICS

CLAS 013 Biblical Hebrew in a Month (Same as Religion 013)

This course will enable students to read the Bible in the original Hebrew in a fast, fun, and focused way. Topics include the difference between BeGeD-KeFeT, BuMaF, K'MiNPaTS, and the Throaty Five. Meet sentences without verbs, the extra pronoun, and word pairs. Discover a word's three letter root and explore the mysteries of the Shwa and Dagesh. Learn the seven "buildings" of the Hebrew verb and find the missing letters. In addition to this intensive study of Hebrew vocabulary and grammar, attention will also be given to the polyvalence of biblical discourse. The paratactic and terse character of the TaNaKH produce narratives tantalizingly "fraught with background" that virtually cry out to the reader "interpret me". Thus, by the end of the course, students will have read the Book of Ruth with an understanding of both biblical language and biblical style.
Students will be evaluated on the basis of regular attendance, preparation, and class participation. In addition, students will be required to prepare a translation and grammatical commentary of 10-15 verses selected from the Book of Genesis as a final project. In order to facilitate the learning of Hebrew in a month, the course includes frequent quizzes and homework assignments. The course will meet three days a week for three hours a day covering three chapters/session. Students are expected to spend at least four hours preparing for each class. Because of the intensive nature of this course regular attendance and preparation is mandatory.
No prerequisites or previous experience in Hebrew required. Enrollment limited: 20.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $35.00 covering textbook and copies.

KRAUS

CLAS 026 Archaeological Tour of Greece (Same as Religion 026)

This trip offers a unique opportunity to see how material culture both enriches and complicates our understanding of ancient Greek culture and early Christianity as it emerges from the textual evidence. Our goal is to explore the various and diverse aspects of Greek culture as these are recorded in the physical space. Our additional goal is to experience the Greece of today, so that you can also reflect on the continuities and discontinuities of this culture. We will visit archaeological sites, museums, and churches on mainland Greece and the island of Crete.
Requirements: a travel journal; one brief oral presentation to group following a site visit; a 10-page paper.
NOTE: There will be two mandatory orientation sessions held during the fall semester. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: $3,500.

PANOUSSI and BUELL

CLAS 031 Senior Thesis

May be taken by students registered for Classics 493, 494.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

COMP 011 The Colonialist Vision (Same as English 024)

CANCELLED!

COMP 012 Roland Barthes: The Romance and Poetry of Criticism (Same as English 023 and French 012)

CANCELLED!

For most of his life the French philosopher and cultural critic Roland Barthes used critical theory as a substitute for the "novel" he never brought himself to write. One could call his theoretical and critical essays a fiction and a poetry by other means. In the course we will study the imaginative and metaphorical elements of Barthes's writing, especially in works concerning the mythification of culture (Mythologies, 1957), the primacy of textuality (The Death of the Author, 1968), the erotics of reading and writing (The Pleasure of the Text, 1973), the redefinition of subjectivity (Roland Barthes by Roland Barthes, 1975), the rhetoric of love (A Lover's Discourse, 1977), and the representation of death and loss (Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography, 1980). Discussion will be given as well to Barthes's theory of the sign, his fascination with the body, his investigation of the languages of desire, and his study of the imaginary (l'imaginaire) in literature, the plastic arts, society and popular culture (fashion, music, and advertising). All readings in English.
Requirements: class participation, one class oral presentation, one 12-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: mornings. The course will meet for three, 2-hour meetings per week.
Cost to students: $70 for books and reading packet.

STAMELMAN

COMP 014 Literature and Seduction (Same as English 014)

(See under English for full description.)

COMP 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Comparative Literature 493, 494.

LIT 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Literary Studies 493, 494.

 

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CSCI 010 C, UNIX and Software Tools

This course serves as a guided tour of programming methods in the UNIX operating system. The course is designed for individuals who understand basic program development techniques as discussed in an introductory programming course (Computer Science 134 or equivalent), but who wish to become familiar with a broader variety of computer systems and programming languages. Students in this course will work on UNIX workstations, available in one of the Department's laboratories. By the end of the course, students will have developed basic proficiency in the C programming language.
The increasing success of UNIX as a modern operating system stems from its unique ability to "prototype" programs quickly. Students will use prototyping tools, such as Awk and "shell scripts" to write "filters" for transforming data from a variety of sources. It will become clear that in many cases the overhead of programming in languages such as C, Pascal, or FORTRAN is unnecessary. Moreover, students will learn to effectively use software tools such as debuggers, profilers, and make files.
Evaluation will be based on several programming assignments and shell scripts due throughout the term. While none of the projects in the course will be particularly large, the successful student will develop a tool chest, which will extend their computing "effectiveness" in their particular field. Students with computing needs particular to their field are encouraged to advise the instructor before the first meeting.
Prerequisite: Computer Science 134 or equivalent programming experience. Enrollment limited to 20.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: texts.

LERNER

CSCI 031 Senior Honor Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Computer Science 493-494.

CONTRACT MAJOR

CMAJ 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Contract Major 493, 494.

ECONOMICS

ECON 010 The East Asian Miracle

This course is intended to help CDE fellows integrate the material they studied in the first semester by applying it to the circumstances of a particular group of countries. During the 2002 Winter Term session we will focus on a case study of what are widely perceived to be successful development experiences-those of the East and Southeast Asian "miracle" economies. We will consider issues such as the desirability of the economic transformations that have taken place in these countries, the conditions that may have made such transformations possible, the roles that specific policies may have played in bringing them about, the causes of the recent economic crisis in the region and its implications for future growth in the affected countries, as well as the lessons that the East and Southeast Asian experience may hold for other developing countries.

MONTIEL

ECON 011 Public Speaking

It has been said that most people fear public speaking more than death. In a world in which most of us are asked at one time or another to say something to a group, public speaking is a skill which everyone should learn. This course will help you become an organized and persuasive public speaker. You will create your own public speaking style that is comfortable, confident, and conversational. We will focus on organizational techniques, handling visual aids effectively, eye contact and body language. A supportive atmosphere will give each person an opportunity to receive feedback.
Students will be required to give five to six oral presentations to the class; most of these presentations will be videotaped. Students will also be required to review their videotapes and write a critique of their presentations.
Evaluation will be based on in-class presentations, class participation, and the written critique of presentations.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: $25.

BRAINERD

ECON 012 Business Risk Analysis: Inside the Mind of a Banker

So you think that business and finance are a big mystery and potentially boring? Discover how easy it is to understand how a company works and how interesting risk analysis can be. Do you feel that a career in business is not for you, but want to know enough to invest your millions wisely? Or are you, perhaps, considering business or finance as a career and would like a head start (not to mention a leg up in the interview process)? Or maybe you picture yourself as the boss someday, no matter what your field. Then this is the course for you! This experience will provide a basic overview of financial analysis with a particular emphasis on the banker's perspective. Among the topics that we will discuss are: the qualitative and quantitative aspects of risk analysis, understanding financial statements, how businessmen and bankers manage and mitigate the risks in their businesses, the principles of financing international trade and projects, and how bankers decide on the structure and pricing of loans. We will also explore some of the concepts used in determining a reasonable price to pay for a particular stock.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, classroom participation, and group and individual assignments, including a final project involving the written and/or oral analysis of a company.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference for juniors and seniors. Not intended for students with extensive prior financial experience.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to students: $40 for texts and reading packet.

JAMES SUTHERLAND (Instructor)
BRADBURD (Sponsor)

James Sutherland worked for The Chase Manhattan Bank for over 21 years including 17 in Latin America and 3 as an instructor in the credit training program in New York. For the last 7 years he has worked as an international consultant and trainer in finance and banking, in Asia, Africa, Eastern and Western Europe, and Latin America.

ECON 013 Real Estate and Community Development

Real estate development is an engine in urban environments and can be either destructive to existing neighborhoods or a powerful positive force for community development. For non-profit developers, public officials, lenders and investors, and nonprofit community development directors all need to know the same real estate development principles to make judgements and make new projects work. This course will examine the process and prospects of real estate development as an economic activity and how it can be a positive force for community development. The course will combine classroom meetings and extensive analysis and discussion of actual case histories of real estate development projects, along with examination of their community development impacts. The course will involve fieldwork in Boston with site visits to selected projects and meetings with principals involved in some of the developments studied.
Students will be expected to attend class sessions and site visits, and will work in small teams to prepare analyses and observations based on cases studied. A limited familiarity with Microsoft Excel will be expected.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: afternoons.

Cost to student: $85. Students will be responsible for their own accommodations and living expenses while in Boston.

B. MITCHELL and S. SHEPPARD

Bart Mitchell is the current President of Mitchell Properties in Boston, MA, a real estate development company which undertakes housing development projects in the Boston area and provides project management and advisory services for other large real estate ventures.

ECON 014 The Practice of Public Health

Dollar for dollar, improvements in public health measures are often more effective in improving health than traditional "medical" responses to illness, but the advantages of public health approaches are often overlooked. This course will introduce students to the field of public health and community health improvement. Topics for discussion will focus on important public health movements such as the campaigns to address smoking, fluoridation, global warming and AIDS. Students will examine the theory and practice of modern public health and will be able to conduct their own research projects and design interventions for health issues of interest to them.
Students will be evaluated at the end of each course component for a basic understanding of public health principles and they will also be evaluated on class participation. The major portion of a student's evaluation will come from a 10-page research paper in which students will identify an important health issue, analyze the issue and develop an intervention that addresses the issue from theoretical perspectives presented in class. Students will be expected to identify possible resources for this intervention, budget an intervention and receive the endorsement of a local health official or government officer for their proposed project.
Class will be held in an informal lecture setting. Readings will be assigned at each lecture.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: MWF, 2-4 p.m.
Cost to students: $40.

PAMELA NATHENSON, MPH (Instructor)
BRADBURD (Sponsor)

Pamela Nathenson is Coordinator of Research, Planning, Grant Writing and Evaluation at the REACH Community Health Foundation in North Adams, Massachusetts.

ECON 017 Business Economics

In this course, the class will carry out a real-time forecast of the U.S. economy and explore its implications for the bond and stock markets. The course will build upon principles of both macro and micro-economics. It will provide an introduction to the work done by business economists and the techniques they use. An economic database, chart-generating software and a statistical analysis program will be available to each student on the Jessup computers and, if necessary, on a disk for IBM-compatible computers.
The first week will focus on becoming familiar with the database, looking for relationships between key economic variables, and studying movements in interest rates over the period 1960-2000. Early in the first week, the class will be divided into teams of 2 students with each team choosing a particular aspect of the economy to forecast.
During the second and third weeks, the class will work with various leading indicators of economic activity and will prepare forecasts of the key components of gross domestic product and other key variables. The fourth week will feature a formal presentation of the economic forecast with invited guests from the Wall Street investment world.
To put the forecasting exercise in context, there will be class discussions of business cycles, credit cycles, long waves in inflation and interest rates and the impact of the Internet on the economy and the stock market.
There will also be a 3-page paper summarizing the result of the forecast project. Because essential concepts and tools are covered during the first week, all students are expected to attend the first class.
No prerequisites, but Economics 101 or another semester course in Economics is strongly recommended. Enrollment limit: 22.
Meeting time: mornings, 3 times per week. There will be two afternoons of workshops lasting approximately 30 minutes with hands-on instruction for each team. Each student should expect to spend a reasonable amount of time on homework, and to participate in short presentations of their analyses as the work progresses as well as in the formal presentation during the last week.
Cost to student: $25 for text and other materials.

THOMAS SYNNOTT (Instructor)
BRADBURD (Sponsor)

Thomas Synnott '58 is Chief Economist, U.S. Trust Company of New York

ECON 030 Honors Project

The "Specialization Route" to the degree with Honors in Economics requires that each candidate take an Honors Winter Study Project in January of their senior year. Students who wish to begin their honors work in January should submit a detailed proposal. Decisions on admission to the Honors WSP will be made in the fall. Information on the procedures will be mailed to senior majors in economics early in the fall semester.
Seniors who wish to apply for admission to the Honors WSP and thereby to the Honors Program should register for this WSP as their first choice.
Some seniors will have begun honors work in the fall and wish to complete it in the WSP. They will be admitted to the WSP if they have made satisfactory progress. They should register for this WSP as their first choice.

ECON 031 Honors Thesis

To be taken by students participating in year-long thesis research (ECON 493-W031-494).

ENGLISH

ENGL 010 Fan Cultures

This course will introduce the history of, and current interest in, fans of popular culture. We will read recent accounts of X-philes, Barbie collectors, soccer-supporters, Star Trekkers, romance novel readers, and Civil War battle reenactors, to name but a few. As well, we will examine some of the ways fans express their interest in popular cultures-through zines, in on-line discussion groups, at conventions, in the sampling techniques of rap and techno music, or in the retro styles of fashion. Chief among our concerns as a class will be: Are fans merely consumers of mass culture, or are they cultural producers in their own right? What kinds of television programs, sports events, films, or dance crazes spark fan interest? Why do fans identify with specific fictional characters? Are fans radically different from or entirely representative of "mainstream" society? In what ways do fans appropriate sub-cultural interests ("alternative" music, folk traditions)? In what ways do fans resist or reinterpret mass culture? Students will have the opportunity both to engage in critical analyses of popular culture as well as to document, either through autobiography or ethnography, a specific example of fan culture of their own choosing. Readings will include works by Roland Barthes, Walter Benjamin, Bill Buford, Michael De Certeau, Henry Louis Gates, Horkheimer and Adorno, Nick Hornby, Tony Horwitz, Wayne Koestenbaum, Henry Jenkins, George Lipsitz, Tania Modleski, Constance Penley, Jan Radway, Erica Rand, and Salman Rushdie.
Requirements: two papers (one 4-5 pages, one 6-8 pages).
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25. Preference will be given to seniors in any major, then English majors.
Meeting time: mornings. The course will meet twice a week for three hours.
Cost to student: $50.

BEN WEAVER (Instructor)
FIX (Sponsor)

Ben Weaver holds a Ph.D. in English from Duke University. He has taught at Williams and, most recently, in the English Department at Colorado College.

ENGL 011 Ireland in Film: Contemporary Irish Cinema

Ireland has long provided a rich subject for Hollywood fantasy, being represented in film as either a mythic space for emerald-green romanticism, or, more darkly, as a place of political terror and enduring internecine ideological rivalries. In this course we will view and discuss major films from the recently ascendant indigenous Irish cinema-works in which Irish directors have begun to offer their own distinctive critique of the country's political and cultural history, and to interrogate the master-myths of nationality which still animate the notion of "Irishness." To characterize the tradition that recent Irish films have sought to refute, we will start with a Hollywood movie: John Huston's The Quiet Man (1952), a populist classic which humorously exploits almost every cliche of Irish cultural tourism. Our subsequent viewing will be drawn from the following, as time allows: Jim Sheridan's The Field (1990), In the Name of the Father (1993), and (as writer) Into the West (1993); Neil Jordan's The Crying Game (1992), Michael Collins (1996), and The Boxer (1998); Pat O'Connor's The Ballroom of Romance (1982) and Cal (1984); Cathal Black's Pigs (1984) and Korea (1995); and Gillies MacKinnon's The Playboys (1992).
Requirements: regular attendance, active participation in class discussions, several short "response" papers, and one 6-page final paper.
Prerequisite: A prior film course (such as English 204, 364, 370, 371, or 395), or English 226, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limit: 18.
Meeting time: afternoons. The course will meet three times a week for two hours.
Cost to student: $5 for a reading packet.

PETHICA

ENGL 012 How to Write Popular Science (Same as Chemistry 012 and Special 012) Cancelled!

(See under Special for full description.)

ENGL 013 Your Favorite Author

Winter Study is a perfect time to read, and this is a class for people who would like to deepen their relationship with an author they have only "dated casually" in a classroom encounter. It will be run as a colloquium. In the first week, you will choose the author you want to explore, compile a list of the author's complete works, decide how much of it you want to read, and assign two or three items (poems, stories, chapters from novels, acts of plays, essays) to the rest of the class for reading and discussion. In the second week, you will compile a list of biographies and autobiography, and do some selective reading to discover how many "lives" your author had, what kinds of things the biographers agree and disagree about, whether and how your author's life illuminates or complicates an understanding of the works. In the third week, you will find out what's hot and controversial in critical and scholarly discussions of your author. In the fourth week, you will draw on your reading to write an imitation or parody of your author, complete with introductory commentary.
Evaluation will be based on annotated bibliographies and oral presentations in the first three weeks (60%), and a written 10-page parody-plus-commentary in the final week (40%).
Requirements: regular attendance is mandatory.
Prerequisite: A 100-level English course (except 150), or any literature class in the Literary Studies/Comparative Literature program or in any of the language departments. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference is given to upper-class literature majors.
Meeting time: mornings. The course will meet three times a week for two hours.
Cost to student: $25.

KNOPP

ENGL 014 Literature and Seduction (Same as Comparative Literature 014)

Can literature about seduction tell us something about the seductiveness of literature? This course will look at literary texts, and a few films, which involve erotic persuasion in various ways: some tell about seductions, some-love poetry, for instance-are intended to be seen as forms for seduction, some simply are seductive. Works will range from Ovid and Shakespeare to film noir and Cocteau's Beauty and the Beast. We will also read two novels-Nabokov's Lolita and J. G. Ballard's Crash-as well as essays by Jean Laplanche, a psychoanalytic theorist whose work focuses on the logic of seduction. We'll consider these works in their own rights, of course, but also for what they suggest about seduction's relationship to some fundamental issues concerning desire, the self, power, and representation.
Requirements: a 10-page final paper.
Prerequisite: A 100-level English course (except 150), or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limit: 18.
Meeting time: mornings. The course will meet three times a week for two hours.
Cost to student: $40.

PYE

ENGL 015 Lyric Voices: Subjects and Objects of Writing

When we think of lyric, so often what comes to mind is the singular, expressive voice of the writer. Whether about love, life, or politics, poems grab their readers by the timbre and tone of voice. Yet equally often, the "voices" poets and fiction writers adopt are radically not their own. In the form of personae, imaginative identifications and appropriations, lyric voices emerge from bodies and landscapes with an intensity that highlights but also confounds notions of identity-racial and regional, ethnic and sexual, gendered and economic. What guarantees the appeal of poetry so often is less authenticity than persuasive performance, which has consequences both aesthetic and political.
This course will explore from the inside how poetry and fiction lift themselves off the page, setting the objects of the world into a bizarre motion of their own. It will explore how we hear and how we project the voices that make poetry possible. Students will learn about how writers come to a distinct sense of voice-through critical and creative writings in prose and poetry. Half-seminar, half-workshop, this course will require students to complete frequent exercises and to keep a daily writing journal. In addition to becoming familiar with a range of contemporary writers, students will report to classmates on current sites of writing-in journals and anthologies, on-line alternatives, video and vocal recordings. We'll think about how poetry is represented in popular culture, such as in movies like Slam!, the documentary Slam Nation, or even Hal Hartley's recent Henry Fool. Finally, students will organize two readings-one for their own winter creations and one to feature an up-and-coming east coast writer, who will visit class and give a public reading. Featured writers may include: Russell Edson, Anne Carson, George Oppen, Dorianne Laux, Kim Addonizio, Terrence Hayes, Ai, Junot Diaz, Li-Young Lee, Wayne Koestenbaum, Frank Bidart, Crystal Williams, Sapphire, Melanie Rae Thon, Jack Gilbert, Dana Levin, Anne Marie Macari, James McCombs, and Reetika Vazirani.
Students will be evaluated based on a portfolio of writing and in-class participation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings. The course will meet three times a week for two-and-a-half hours.
Cost to student: $30.

JOSEPH CAMPANA '96 (Instructor)
FIX (Sponsor)

Joseph Campana '96 earned an M.A. from the University of Sussex and is now a doctoral candidate and instructor at Cornell University. His poems have appeared in Poetry, Seneca Review, Third Coast, and Marlboro Review.

ENGL 016 Bob Dylan on Film

Bob Dylan is most commonly thought of as a musician and songwriter. But ever since he first rose to fame on the Greenwich Village folk scene in the early 1960s, he has enjoyed a shadow career as a film artist: as an actor, director, editor, and composer. In this class, we will look at how Bob Dylan's image has been shaped in film and video, and how this work relates to Bob Dylan, musician. The class will view rare TV footage and rarely-viewed works of Dylan's own, like "Eat the Document" and "Renaldo and Clara," as well as Dylan-related works by feature filmmakers and documentarians, including Martin Scorsese, Sam Peckinpah, D. A. Pennebaker, Dennis Hopper, Stephen Frears, and Curtis Hanson.
Requirements: a 10-page paper or equivalent project. Some mandatory film screenings may occur outside of regularly-scheduled class times.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Priority given to seniors.
Meeting time: afternoons. This course will meet twice a week for three hours.
Cost to student: $75.

SETH ROGOVOY '82 (Instructor)
FIX (Sponsor)

Seth Rogovoy '82 is a rock critic who has written for numerous publications. He has written extensively about Bob Dylan. The author of The Essential Klezmer, his cultural criticism is heard weekly on WAMC's Northeast Public Radio Network.

ENGL 017 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography (Same as ArtH 017)

This course explores the evolution of modern documentary photography. We'll start with Robert Frank's The Americans, and consider how Frank's singular vision deeply shaped the next generation of photographers working the American streets and landscape. Diane Arbus, Bruce Davidson, William Klein, Lee Freidlander, Danny Lyon, Gary Winogrand are some of the photographers whose work we'll get to know well. We'll discuss the new wave of independent and Magnum photojournalists (Josef Koudleka, Susan Meiselas, Gilles Peress, Sebastio Salgado, and Alex Webb)-the wars they cover from Vietnam to Iraq to Bosnia, and the personal visions they explore. We'll explore the diverse currents of documentary photography through the work of Bill Burke, Larry Clark, Lois Conner, Linda Connor, Larry Fink, Nan Goldin, Emmet Gowin, Sally Mann, Mary Ellen Mark, Nicholas Nixon, and Abelardo Morell. We'll also explore the gray areas between photographic fact and personal fiction through the work of Duane Michaels, Joel Peter Witkin, and Carrie Mae Weems, and also the large-scale epic photographs of Gregory Crewdson, Jeff Wall, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, and Andreas Gursky. Slide presentations will occupy half of the first meetings and give way to discussion of issues in documentary photography.
Requirements: Students will be encouraged to work on individual projects of their own choice. Each student will make a brief presentation to the class on a documentary topic of their choice. A final paper expanding on this documentary topic will be due at the end of the course. Students will be evaluated on their classroom presentation, general participation, and their written work. The course involves a field trip to New York City to visit collections at the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the International Center of Photography, and to meet with curators of photography at these institutions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: mornings. The course will meet three days a week for two hours.
Cost to students: $30 for personal expenses for the New York field trip.

KEVIN BUBRISKI (Instructor)
FIX (Sponsor)

Kevin Bubriski has received photography fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, Fulbright Foundation, and National Endowment for the Arts. His photographic prints are in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris.

ENGL 018 English Rhymes and Rhythms

Blest be all metrical rules that forbid automatic responses,
Force us to have second thoughts, free from the fetters of self.
-W. H. Auden
This course is designed to increase awareness of the expressive possibilities of the traditional sounds of English verse, those established patterns of rhyme and rhythm from which "free verse" is free. We will not only read verse, but listen to it, speak it, and write it, in pursuit of a fuller experience of past and present poetry. Each student will also create a "memory anthology" of individually chosen poems. Our goal is to awaken the ear as well as the mind. Though the course should improve the ability to recognize and analyze poetic forms and prosodic effects, it will proceed through practical exercises rather than analytical essays, with a strong tilt toward the actual writing of verse. We will examine poems by such versifiers as Dr. Seuss, Shakespeare, Hopkins, Wilbur, and Larkin, with others suggested by the class, and verse written by class members. We'll end with a reading of Vikram Seth's brilliantly formal (and informal) novel in verse, The Golden Gate.
Students will be evaluated on the basis of their verse exercises, their regular and active attendance, and the care and commitment with which they present their anthologies, to be spoken from memory in the presence of the instructor.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Priority given to seniors, then to other students.
Meeting time: afternoons. The course will meet three or four times (as needed) each week for two hours.
Cost to student: $25.

CLARA CLAIBORNE PARK (Instructor)
FIX (Sponsor)

Clara Claiborne Park is Senior Lecturer Emerita at Williams. Over the years, she has taught writing, Shakespeare, Milton, Dante, and Homer. Her most recent book, Exiting Nirvana, has been widely acclaimed.

ENGL 019 Representing Jazz (Same as Music 019)

The music called "Jazz" has been, in substance and in its associations, a rich cultural signifier. This course will examine various attempts in written and visual media, in commentary and in style, to define "jazz" and its cultural significance. Texts will include essays, fiction, poetry, autobiographical works, interviews, journalism, film clips, photographs, and paintings. We will give particular attention to musicians such as Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Billie Holiday, and Charles Mingus. We will read texts by LeRoi Jones (Amiri Baraka), Ralph Ellison, Albert Murray, Bob Kaufman, Ntozake Shange, Whitney Balliett, and others.
Requirements: Students will be expected to contribute actively to the in-class analysis of texts and images. A class presentation and a final ten-page paper will also be required.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to students with prior course work in African-American Studies, jazz, or photography.
Meeting time: mornings. The course will meet three times a week.

Cost to student: $75.

D. L. SMITH

ENGL 020 Journalism

In this introduction to journalism, students will learn reporting, writing, and editing skills through written assignments and in-class exercises. We will examine how different styles of writing serve different needs, and the practical and legal limits within which journalists work. Assignments will include writing news stories, feature articles, a review, and an editorial. Students will also practice the essential art of rewriting.
Requirements: Each student will submit articles on deadline; read and discuss current newspapers and magazines; and attend all classes.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference given to first-year students.
Meeting time: mornings. This course will meet four times a week for two hours.
Cost to student: $30.

SALLY WHITE (Instructor)
FIX (Sponsor)

Sally White worked at Time Inc. magazines in New York and Washington for thirteen years. She is a graduate of Barnard College and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She now works as a freelance writer.

ENGL 022 Virginia Woolf (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 022)

This course explores Woolf's lyrical prose style and experimental form, her reexamination of traditional gender roles, and the ways in which her fiction transforms life into art. We will read and discuss Mrs. Dalloway and To The Lighthouse, two of Woolf's most innovative modern novels; A Room of One's Own, a revolutionary lecture on women and fiction; Moments of Being, two short memoirs which reminisce about her childhood and the reverberations of her parents' deaths; and selections from her private diary.
Requirements: regular attendance at class and a short written or oral response to each book.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to majors or potential majors in English or Women's and Gender Studies.
Meeting time: afternoons, three times a week for two hours.
Cost to student: $55.

I. BELL

ENGL 023 Roland Barthes: The Romance and Poetry of Criticism (Same as Comparative Literature 012 and French 012)

(See under Comparative Literature for full description.)

ENGL 024 The Colonialist Vision (Same as Comparative Literature 011)

CANCELLED!

ENGL 025 Documentary Video

CANCELLED!

ENGL 027 Humor Writing (Same as Mathematics 010)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

ENGL 028 Fantasy Novels of C.S. Lewis and Charles Williams (Same as Mathematics 014)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

ENGL 030 Honors Project: Specialization Route

Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the specialization route.

ENGL 031 Honors Project: Thesis

Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the thesis route.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

ENVI 010 Writing and Drawing-The Naturalist's Journal

This course will explore the tools for studying the natural world through various uses of writing, literature, and drawing. Students will spend time outdoors learning the ecosystem of the Williamstown area and time indoors doing observational drawing, reflective writing, and reading and discussions of nature literature. The month's work will be contained in a nature journal, to be displayed and discussed as part of a final project.
Designed for students with interests in environmental studies, natural history writing, and drawing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $50 for books and art supplies.

CLARE WALKER LESLIE and CHRISTIAN MCEWEN (Instructors)
K. LEE (Sponsor)

Clare Walker Leslie has written six books on nature drawing. She illustrated Prof. William T. Fox's At the Sea's Edge. Christian McEwen is the editor of Jo's Girls: Tomboy Tales of High Adventure, True Grit and Real Life (Beacon Press, 1997).

ENVI 011 Drawing to a Close: Illustrating Disappearing Farms (Same as ArtS 023 and INTR 011)

(See under IPECS-INTR 011 full full description.)

ENVI 012 Industrial Ecology

Incredible but true, at current rates by the year 2030 there will be 10 billion people living on this planet. If we assume each wanting high standards of living like the U.S. then we should expect the consumption of natural resources to produce 400 billion tons of solid waste every year. That is enough waste to bury greater Los Angeles 100 meters deep. Industrial ecology is a dynamic systems-based framework utilizing knowledge of ecological systems towards the design of economically wise industrial systems on every scale that minimizes the creation of waste and pollution. Our overly consumptive society has traditionally not paid adequate attention to issues of waste and pollution. As a result of this it is now highly important that future leaders in all fields have at least a basic understanding of what the practice of industrial ecology can bring to their organization and society as a whole. Journey on a voyage of discovery as we attempt to apply the waste and pollution free wisdom of natural systems towards the development of new ways of imagining industrial systems that mimic nature's efficiency and pollution free processes of production.
This course will utilize Williams College as an educational industrial site. We will create an ecological footprint of Williams that will help us to better understand resource consumption and waste production. We will further generate an input/output model of the college that will serve to help us track materials movement and energy use. Finally we attempt to pinpoint areas along the input/output model that are producing waste and pollution problems. Through group brainstorming, mind mapping, poems, field trips, and a game simulation activity, participants will learn creative ways of working towards solving problems of waste and pollution in an economical way.
Evaluation is based on the quality of the journal writing assignments and a 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16. If demand exceeds capacity, prospective students will be asked to describe their goals in a short e-mail application to the instructor.
Meeting time: mornings, TR from 10-1. Some reading material will be assigned prior to the first class.
Cost to student: $35 for book and reading packet.

ANTHONY SARKIS (Instructor)
K. LEE (Sponsor)

Anthony Sarkis is the creator and co-producer of a widely distributed video highlighting industrial ecology related practices of several New England Businesses. He served as project coordinator for Colorado during the National Town Meeting on Sustainability founded by the President's Council on Sustainable Development. Anthony recently presented a seminar on pollution prevention for the government of Nepal. He is currently Associate Director for a highly ranked M.S. level program in Environmental Management and Policy at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York.

ENVI 013 Global Climate Change

Global warming and the resulting climate change is considered by many to be the single most threatening environmental issue we will face in the coming century. While the processes that have led to the current crisis can be understood by the study of science, solutions to the problem must come from the intersection of science, economics, and policy.
Specific issues to be covered in this course include:
* What is the scientific basis of global warming?
* Is there consensus within the scientific community as to the severity of the problem?
* What evidence supports or refutes the claim that anthropogenic sources are to blame?
* What action is called for on the local, national, and international level, and is such action economically and politically feasible?
This course is designed to be an interdisciplinary overview of the issues surrounding global warming, including science, economics, policy, and politics. Classes will be a mixture of lecture, discussion, and presentations by guest speakers. We will learn to think critically about information on global warming that comes from different sources and interest groups. Readings for the course will include The Heat Is On, by Ross Gelbspan, scholarly publications, and articles from the mass media.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, a final paper, and a class presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons. The course will meet three times per week for two hours.
Cost to student: $50 for books and photocopies.

RACHEL LOUIS (Instructor)
K. LEE (Sponsor)

Rachel Louis works as the project coordinator at the Center for Environmental Studies. She holds a Master of Environmental Studies from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and an MA in International Relations from Yale University.

ENVI 016 Tiny Footprint: Living Sustainably in the New Millennium (Same as Biology 016)

How much of the earth's natural resource do you currently consume on a daily basis? What are some of the technologies, changes in mind-set, and cultural movements that will enable you (or force you!) to live in a more sustainable way in the near future? How will such changes affect your quality of life? In this course each participant will address the first question quantitatively by estimating his or her ecological footprint. An ecological footprint is the area of land required to sustainably regenerate the natural resources consumed by daily actions. In class, we will discuss selected sustainable technologies (e.g., natural building, renewable energy systems, and hydroponic/aquaponic food production) and social issues dealing with sustainability. We will also engage in a few hands-on group projects, and take field trips to see houses built with renewable materials and talk with sustainable living pioneers. Each participant will then investigate a selected topic in sustainability, evaluating current consumption patterns, ways in which technology and/or behavior change could reduce environmental impact, and hypothesizing how that change would affect quality of life. Findings will be published on a new sustainable living website (tinyfootprint.org), which this class will organize and launch. (Web authoring tools and techniques will be presented if needed.)
Evaluation is based on the research project, a web page design (10-page paper equivalent), and class participation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16. Preference will be given to Environmental Studies concentrators.
Meeting time: MWR, 10 a.m.-noon, with some Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. reserved for field trips or web authoring tutorials.
Cost to student: $15 for xeroxing reading packet and $20 for two field trips.

SILVIO EBERHARDT (Instructor)
K. LEE (Sponsor)

Silvio Eberhardt holds B.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Biology from Lehigh University (where he also pursued a minor in "Humanities Perspectives in Technology") and a Ph.D. degree from The Johns Hopkins University. For the past 10 years he has taught computer engineering at Swarthmore College and Villanova University. During that time, he has avidly researched sustainable technologies for renewable energy systems, home construction (he participated in building a straw-bale/cob medical clinic near Ontario last summer), and food production (he has been running indoor hydroponic systems for the last 3 years). He plans to dedicate the rest of his career to sustainability.

ENVI 019 Introduction to Research in Environmental Science (Same as Chemistry 019)

An independent experimental project in environmental science is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in environmental science. Current research projects include studies of atmospheric chemistry related to global warming and acid deposition, heavy metals in the local environment, and further development of laboratory techniques for Environmental Studies 102 Introduction to Environmental Science.
Format: laboratory research. A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: a one-semester science course and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.

Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

KOEHLER and THOMAN

ENVI 031 Senior Research and Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Environmental Studies 493-494.

GEOSCIENCES

GEOS 010 Geology of the National Parks

A vicarious trip through selected national parks of the U.S. and Canada with emphasis on the geological basis for their unique scenery. Areas to be studied will be chosen in order to illustrate a wide variety of geologic processes and products. The class will meet most mornings during the first two weeks for lectures and discussions, supplemented with lab work devoted to the interpretation of topographic and geologic maps and to the study of rock samples. Readings will include a paperback text as well as short publications of the U.S. Geological Survey and of various natural history associations. The second part of the month will involve independent study of topics chosen by the students in preparation for half-hour oral presentations during the last week. The oral reports will be comprehensive, well illustrated explanations of the geology of a particular national park or monument of the student's choice, using maps, slides, and reference materials available within the department and on the internet. A detailed outline and an accompanying bibliography will be submitted at the time of the oral presentation.
Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation and on the quality of the final report.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Open only to students with no previous college-level study of geology; preference will be given to first-year students.
Meeting time: most mornings, 10:00-noon.
Cost to student: approximately $60 for the text.

WOBUS

GEOS 015 Survival in a Winter Landscape

Cold, snow, ice, and extended darkness limit life in the winter season. In this class we use the winter landscape to explore the strategies that plants, wild animals, and humans use to survive and thrive in the season of deprivation. The winter you experience depends upon where you live. Extreme latitudes, high elevations, and exposed landforms create more severe conditions for living organisms. The Northeastern United States is an ideal classroom: we are north of the 42th parallel, peaks rise up to 6,000 feet, and many ridgelines experience intense weather. Yet sheltered valleys and a well-developed infrastructure provide safe avenues to study winter and the lifeforms (including humans) that have adapted to these challenging conditions. Much of the class will be conducted in the field; no previous winter outdoor experience is required. However, students should be enthusiastic about experiencing the cold-fun and laughter are required. A progression of outdoor sessions will culminate with a three-day winter camping trip in Northern New England. Class topics include: climate and winter weather, snow science, avalanche safety, cold and freezing tolerance of plants and animals, winter plant identification, tracking, observation skills, winter shelter building, human industrial response to winter, travel over snow, and winter camping.
Assignments include a daily field journal, preparation of a lesson designed to educate classmates about some aspect of the winter landscape and a 10-page paper (or equivalent).
Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: $90 for materials, equipment and field trip. Access to skis or snowshoes will be helpful. Meeting time: we will meet 4 days a wee for the first two weeks and less frequently thereafter.

WILLARD MORGAN '96 (Instructor) DETHIER (Sponsor)

Willard Morgan '96 (Geology, Environmental Studies) is a M.S. candidate in the Field Naturalist Program at the University of Vermont. He has taught courses in geology, botany, environmental science, and winter ecology. Willard instructed mountaineering courses for the Pacific Crest Outward Bound School as well as backcountry ski and avalanche courses for Alpine Skills International. CPR-C, WFR, Avalanche III certified.

GEOS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Geology 493-494.

GERMAN

GERM S.P. Sustaining Program for German 101-102

Something new and different for students enrolled in German 101-102. Practice in the use of German for everyday purposes; creation and performance of short dramatic sketches through group collaboration; games; songs; storytelling; reading. No homework.
Requirements: active participation and regular attendance earn a "Pass" grade.
Prerequisite: German 101 or equivalent. Limited to German 101-102 students.
Meeting time: 9:00-9:50 a.m. Class meets three times a week for 50 minutes.
Cost to student: approximately $5 for photocopied materials.

GERM 010 Marx and Nietzsche

Though radically opposed in their basic world views, Karl Marx (1818-83) and Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) exhibited striking similarities in their critiques of modern bourgeois society as it was emerging in the nineteenth century. Their analyses of the religious, economic, political, sexual and linguistic predilections of the rising middle class continue to exert enormous influence on social critics today, even as the middle class reigns triumphant. We will compare and contrast their ideas in the context of German society from the final defeat of Napoleon (1815) to the start of the First World War (1914). We will also consider whether their relevance today is more than academic. Among works to be read: by Marx, "Early Writings," "The Communist Manifesto," "Capital" (selections), and by Nietzsche, "On the Use and Abuse of History," "The Gay Science" (selections), and "The Anti-Christ."
Evaluation will be based on two short papers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings. We will meet three times a week for two-hour sessions.
Cost to student: $60 for books.

B. KIEFFER

GERM 025 German in Germany

Begin or continue study of the German language at the Goethe Institute in Germany. The Goethe Institute program attracts students from all over the world. A typical course meets for four weeks, 18 hours/week, generally providing the equivalent of one semester course at Williams. To earn a pass, the student must receive the Goethe Institute's Teilnahme-Bestätigung which denotes regular attendance at classes, completion of homework, and successful completion of a final test. Students wishing to apply must fill out an application, obtainable in the office of the Center for Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Cultures in Weston, and return it to the Goethe Institute as soon as possible (admission is on a first-come, first-served basis).
No prerequisites, but any student interested in beginning German with this course and then entering German 102 at Williams should contact Professor Newman by December 1, at the latest. Enrollment limit: 15. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: $1300 to $1800 for tuition and room and board, plus round trip travel costs. The Goethe Institute arranges for room and board at various levels upon students' request, but students must make their own travel arrangements. This course is not defined as a "trip" for financial aid purposes. The maximum reimbursement to financial aid students is $300.

G. NEWMAN

GERM 030 Honors Project

To be taken by honors candidates following other than the normal thesis route.

GERM 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for German 493-494.

HISTORY

HIST 010 J.R.R. Tolkien, Middle Earth, and Modern Medievalism

This Winter Study explores how an Oxford professor of medieval English and Scandinavian linguistics wrote the two most influential works of fantasy literature, The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. We will investigate how Tolkien's mastery of Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse literature, as well as the culture of post-war Britain, shaped the creation of his fantasy-universe known as Middle Earth. By examining the works of Tolkien within their larger intellectual, social, and cultural contexts, we will uncover how an author of children's fantasy came to define the image of the Middle Ages in modern British and American popular culture.
Format: seminar. Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10-30.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $40 for books and photocopies.

GOLDBERG

HIST 011 Film and Empire

This course examines the ways in which colonial categories of race, class, sexuality, and ethnicity are represented in film. We will also discuss colonial violence and resistances in Africa and Asia. Gandhi, The War of Algiers, Lawrence of Arabia, Zulu, Chocalat, Cry the Beloved Country, are some of the films we will discuss.
Format: seminar. Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: $40 for books and photocopies.

MUTONGI

HIST 012 Latina and Latino Migration Stories

Migration is often understood in the aggregate, as the mass movements of people. Yet migration is also an intensely personal experience. This course will explore how Latinas and Latinos have told their migration stories. After a brief historical overview of a particular group's migration history, we will read fictional and autobiographical accounts to address what life was like in the home country, the experience of the journey, and the challenges of adjusting to life in the United States.
Format: seminar. Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page essay.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings. This course will meet twice a week for three hours.
Cost to students: $30 for books and photocopies.

WHALEN

HIST 013 History of Sports in America

This course examines the development and explores the meanings of American sports from the colonial era through the twentieth century. Historically, sports have offered Americans an arena in which to play out many of the nation's most important and contentious cultural issues. Precisely because sports are largely seen as "apolitical," the meanings of race, gender, and class are worked out on the field with a candor not possible elsewhere. Through discussions of primary documents, both written and visual, and through an individual research project, we will examine the relationship between Americans and sports. In particular, we will focus on the links between sports and America's sense of itself as a nation, explore the effects of industrialization, urbanization, and immigration on sporting life and practice, and discuss the ways in which sports both reinforce and challenge historical meanings of racial and gender identity. We may even get in a game or two ourselves.
Format: seminar. Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page research paper on a topic approved by the instructor. Required film viewing outside of scheduled class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: afternoons. The course will meet twice weekly for three hours.
Cost to student: $45 for books and photocopies.

MATTHEW RAFFETY '94 (Instructor)
W. WAGNER (Sponsor)

Matthew Raffety '94 is a Doctoral Candidate in American History at Columbia University and an instructor at Barnard College and Columbia College.

HIST 014 Ethics, Journalism and American Society

Why did scores of reporters shove microphones at Monica Lewinsky, even after she made it clear she was not granting interviews? Under what conditions, if any, should journalists lie to get a story? Should news organizations publish nasty allegations from anonymous sources? Is it ever proper for investigative reporters to go undercover? When, if ever, should hidden cameras and secret recording devices be deployed? Should reporters take big bucks to appear on TV talk shows?
Journalism used to be considered an honorable profession. And now? Recent opinion polls indicate that Americans trust reporters no more so than they do lawyers. Of late, journalists have been portrayed in mainstream American movies as bumbling, arrogant fools. The question is: To what degree have media ethics gone astray? This course will examine contemporary ethics in American journalism. Special focus will be given to the undercurrents in our society that are shaping today's interactions between the public and the media. The course will involve case studies, outside reading, movies and visits from working journalists.
Requirements: one 10-page paper and active participation in class discussions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference to those who have taken History 015.
Meeting time: TR mornings.
Cost to student: $30 for reading packet.

WILLY STERN '83 (Instructor)
W. WAGNER (Sponsor)

Willy Stern, '83, has worked as an investigative reporter throughout the United States and around the world.

HIST 015 Hands-On Investigative Reporting

So, you've always been intrigued by investigative reporters-or at least wondered how they dig up all that stuff.
Students will learn how to obtain information-confidential and otherwise-in a moral, responsible and effective fashion. First, the course will provide a hands-on approach to how investigative reporters gather information. What methods are actually used?
Second, this course will first take a hard look at investigative reporting in the U.S. Increasingly, American journalists are delving into topics in politics, in business, and in the lives of individuals that previously have been off-limits. At what point will the media have gone too far? Do prying journalists make for a better or worse American society? The course will include case studies, movies, outside readings and visits from working investigative journalists and a media attorney.
Requirements: an investigative project. Working in groups, students will be required to go out and search for hard-to-locate information in Williamstown.
No prerequisites, other than an insatiably curious mind. Enrollment limit: 30.
Meeting time: MWF mornings.
Cost to student: $30 for reading packet.

WILLY STERN '83 (Instructor)
W. WAGNER (Sponsor)

Willy Stern, '83, has worked as an investigative reporter throughout the United States and around the world.

HIST 016 Social Justice and Mental Illness in America (Same as Psychology 016)

The historical and current treatment of mentally ill people in the United States reflects our social and political beliefs and values as much as it does the state of scientific knowledge. By studying the history of, and making intensive visits to, institutions for treating people who are mentally ill, we will seek to answer questions such as: how and why did "asylums" evolve? Why are so many people with mental illness found in jails today and why do some hospitals resemble jails? How are social justice and civil rights issues related to the practical issues facing mental patients and their families? Throughout the course, we will integrate historical and psychological perspectives.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page paper.
Prerequisites: At least one regular semester course in Psychology. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $30 for books and Xeroxes.

WILDER and HEATHERINGTON

HIST 017 History in Pieces

Burgoyne Surrounded, Mexican Cross, Log Cabin, Texas Star, Mariner's Compass, Storm at Sea, Drunkard's Path, Underground Railway are just a few of the many quilt patterns designed by our American ancestors, representing events, political or social, in this country in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In this course students will study American history through quilts. At the same time, they will learn traditional and contemporary methods of quilt making. Each student will select a traditional American quilt pattern and reproduce that pattern in the form of a "sampler" block. In addition, each student will design and translate a twentieth-century event into a quilted wall hanging or lap quilt. Both completed pieces will be the basis of a quilt show to be scheduled during the second semester.
Evaluation will be based on regular participation in class and completion of the two quilt projects. Students should understand that these are time consuming projects and they must be prepared to put in considerable time beyond actual class hours.
No prerequisites, but sewing experience is useful. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: MWR mornings.
Cost to student: $100 for quilting supplies and reading materials. Students need to supply their own portable sewing machines.

SYBIL SHERMAN (Instructor)
W. WAGNER (Sponsor)

Ms. Sherman has 28 years experience as a quilter. She taught Fabric Palette, Quilt Canvas for the Williams College Art Department in January 2000 and 2001.

HIST 018 American Strategy in World War II: War Plans and Execution

During the Second World War, the United States fought a global conflict. By late 1943, for example, American forces were in combat in Italy, New Guinea, the Solomon Islands and the Central Pacific. The war against the U Boat threat and the air war against Germany continued with increasing intensity, and the allied staffs were engaged in planning the 1944 invasion of France. To achieve the nation's basic political objective-the unconditional surrender of Germany and Japan-the United States devised a series of strategic and operational war plans for both the European and Pacific areas of operation. A number of factors including inter-allied and inter-service disputes, logistics, and enemy actions frequently led to results that were quite different from the planner's expectations. The course will examine the major US war plans using selected readings and a number of actual plans. The course will then explore the realities of battle and the differences between plans and execution.
Requirements: class participation, attendance and a 10-page essay.
No prerequisites.
Meeting time: afternoons. The course will meet twice a week for three hours.
Cost to student: $30 for books and xeroxes.

STEVEN ROSS '59 (Instructor)
W. WAGNER (Sponsor)

Steven Ross, '59, holds the Admiral William V. Pratt Chair of Military History at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island.

HIST 019 The Transnational Life of Food

This course will meet over meals, where we will discuss how issues of globalization-past, present, and future-are reflected in the food we eat (and don't eat, as the case may be). Topics will include the internationalization of cuisine at home and abroad, including the McDonaldization of Europe and Asia; histories of transnational food flows (think sugar, peanuts, and potatoes, among others); international food aid and its impact; and class-based food issues. Readings will include authors Watson, Braudel, Von Laue, and Bourdieu, among others. There will be two field trips to Boston and an ethnic cooking demonstration by a noted chef and food scholar. Requirements: active involvement, an ability to talk with your mouth full, and an imaginative final project. Evaluation will be based on class participation and the final project (equivalent to a 10-page paper), such as a narrated meal, a web presentation, or more conventional research paper reflecting a topic of your choosing (with instructor's permission). No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 15. Meeting time: afternoon and evenings. The course will meet at least 6 hours a week over lunch or dinner (or both, when a field trip is involved). Those who register for this course must have a fairly flexible schedule.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for food and materials.

REEVES

HIST 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for History 493-494.

HISTORY OF SCIENCE

HSCI 016 Ayurveda: Art of Healing (Same as Special 016)

This course will cover the history and roots of Ayurveda. We will study and discuss the cosmic evolution of this system as it is seen through Yoga. We will delve into ancient Vedic knowledge and discover how this science of health and longevity grew out of these ancient traditions. The students will be taught the basics of Ayurveda and its approach to health and balance through the study of the Doshas or biological humors and the four elements that govern them. The student will be exposed to pulse diagnosis, the use of herbs, the use of mantra in healing, jyotish ( eastern astrology) and meditation. The student should leave with an understanding of their own make-up and how to keep themselves balanced and an understanding of the inherent balances found in nature and how they are applied to humans.
Students will be required to complete readings, participate in class discussions, keep a journal and submit a 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons, 2 hours 3 times per week.
Cost to student: $50.00.

Hilary Garivaltis, D.Ay is an Ayurvedic Practitioner trained through the New England Institute of Ayurvedic Medicine in Worcester Massachusetts and the Rishikesh College of Ayurveda in Rishikesh, India. Ms. Garivaltis has also studied extensively with teachers in the US to further her training in the art of Pancha Karma and meditation. She has a Diplomat of Ayurveda status recognized by the WHO and is a member in good standing of the American Association of Ayurveda. Ms. Garivaltis maintains a practice in Florida, MA.

INTERDEPARTMENTAL PROGRAM FOR EXPERIMENTAL AND CROSS-DISCIPLINARY STUDIES

INTR 010 Corporate Leadership and Social Responsibility

(See under Leadership Studies for full description.)

INTR 011 Drawing to a Close: Illustrating Disappearing Farms (Same as ArtS 023 and Environmental Studies 011)

This studio/field course will illustrate, document, and interpret the abandonment of farms in the region over the past 50 years. In the 1950s there were dozens of dairy farms in Williamstown and now there are just two. The stories of why farms have disappeared are both intriguing and varied and will be explored through students using visual media (sketching, drawing, painting, and mixed media). Early in the course participants will study the landscape history of the region as well as learning drawing techniques. Then participants will be assigned to individual farms and farmers to interpret the past and present farmscapes and gain insights into the transitions out of agriculture. The course is taught by Mary Natalizia, a local artist and art teacher and Henry W. Art (ENVI/BIOL) who is a fellow of the Williams Center for Technology in the Arts and Humanities for the year. Professor Art is working on a project, Half a Century of Land Use Change in Williamstown, that explores the decline of farms through oral history, aerial and ground level photography. The creations of this course will be publicly displayed and may be included in a multi-media product on disappearing dairy farms that Prof. Art is producing.
Evaluation will be based on course participation, a journal, and creations.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Selection will be based on a short e-mail statement, should the course be over-enrolled.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to students: $45 for materials.

ART and MARY NATALIZIA

Mary E. Natalizia has been a visual artist for over twenty years. She received a B.F.A. from the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth and an M.A. from the Rhode Island School of Design. She has exhibited widely in the United States and has work in numerous collections. Her current work consists of large scale mixed media drawings which combine careful observation of nature with dreams and memories.

INTR 012 Philanthropy (Cancelled)

(See under Leadership Studies for full description.)

INTR 013 Managing Non-Profits: An Insider's Look

(See under Leadership Studies for full description.)

INTR 017 Presidential Leadership: From Washington to FDR (Same as Political Science 017)

(See under Leadership Studies for full description.)

INTR 018 Wilderness Leadership

(See under Leadership Studies for full description.)

INTR 021 Power, Authority and Decisionmaking in the Public Sector (Same as Political Science 021)

(See under Leadership Studies for full description.)

INTR 025 Williams In Washington: Leadership in Our Nation's Capital

CANCELLED!

INTR 026 Panama: Leadership at the Crossroads of the World (Same as Political Science 026)

(See under Leadership Studies for full description.)

LEADERSHIP STUDIES

INTR 010 Corporate Leadership and Social Responsibility

This course considers the responsibilities of leadership in corporate life through the perspectives of visiting alumni who hold leadership positions in American corporations. It examines the social obligations created by success in business, the risks versus rewards of corporate leadership, the benefits and the costs of fulfilling or exceeding expectations, and the range of professional, social, and personal dilemmas faced by leading figures in modern corporations and institutions. Readings will include material from philosophy and psychology, as well as relevant biography and autobiography.
Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation in class discussions and a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 22.
Cost to student: approximately $30 for books.
Meeting time: mornings.
(This course is part of the Leadership Studies cluster.)

ZIMMERMAN

INTR 012 Philanthropy (Cancelled)

This course will introduce students to the history of American philanthropy, its role in the support of cultural and social services, and its relevance to personal enrichment and fulfillment. Through a process that involves: (1) the identification and study of non-profit organizations in Berkshire County; (2) the evaluation of their missions and the effectiveness of their programs; and (3) the awarding of grants (with funds made available for that purpose), students will develop experientially-based knowledge of the non-profit organizations serving their community, the challenges of reconciling needs and resources, and the value of charitable giving as part of a balanced life.
Students enrolled in the course will be responsible for determining the structure of its grant-making process. The students will be responsible for discussing and deciding: (1) the types of organizations or activities they will consider for support; (2) the manner in which they will evaluate an organization's programs and needs; and (3) the number and size of grants. Each student will be responsible for choosing one non-profit organization to study and to present to the class for its consideration.
The students' deliberations will be shaped and informed by guest speakers with professional and personal experience as philanthropists and by readings in the history and impact of American philanthropy. The course instructor will not serve any determining role in the allocation of funds. There will be no limits placed on how the students choose to execute their duties except that: (1) all grants must be made to non-profit (501(c)(3)) organizations in the local Berkshire community and (2) no grants may be made for political purposes or to Williams College. After grants have been awarded, students will evaluate and summarize their grant-making process in a written document submitted as part of the course requirement.
Students' evaluations will be based on the quality of their presentations on the non-profit organizations selected for advocacy, the quality of contributions to the class's discussion of granting policies and decisions, and final papers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference is given to juniors and seniors.
Meeting time: variable days, in the morning.
Cost to student: $25.

ROBERT I. LIPP '60 (Instructor)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Robert I. Lipp '60 is the chairman of Travelers Property Casualty Corporation. He recently stepped down as vice chairman and CEO of the Global Consumer Business of Citigroup to devote more time to philanthropy. He is a trustee of Williams College, Carnegie Hall, and MASS MoCA, president of the New York City Ballet, and chairman of Dance-On, a philanthropy dedicated to preparing dancers for second careers.

INTR 013 Managing Non-Profits: An Insider's Look

This course will focus on the study of the particular skills needed to run a successful non-profit organization, which include administration, creative vision, financial management, fund raising, and public accountability. It will also consider, absent the profit motive, what spurs a non-profit's pursuit of excellence. The syllabus is based on a series of case studies and presentations by administrators and directors from arts, social service, educational, and environmental organizations. Notable institutions, such as the New York City Ballet, the Children's Aid Society, and MASS MoCA, will be represented. Class discussion will be informed by assigned readings and organizational materials. A two- or three-day mid-week trip to New York City to visit non-profits and to attend performances by non-profit companies is also planned.
Student evaluation will be based on class attendance (which is required) and acceptable preparation as evidenced by class participation and familiarity with the assigned readings and other materials. Two students will be assigned to each class to act as co-leaders of the class discussion. They will be responsible for: (1) familiarizing themselves with the materials about the organization and the guest speaker; (2) undertaking additional reading and research on the subject of the organization's mission, and (3) preparing questions and discussion points. Finally, a 10-page paper will be due by the last day of class in which the student: (1) evaluates the organizations and executives s/he has studied in terms of integrity of mission and effectiveness in forwarding its cause; and (2) identifies the common characteristics or traits shared by the non-profit executives whom s/he considers most successful.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: variable days, in the afternoon; also a 2-day field trip to New York City.
Cost to student: $50 for books and readings.

ROBERT I. LIPP '60 and MARY ELLEN CZERNIAK (Instructors)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Robert I. Lipp '60 is the chairman of Travelers Property Casualty Corporation. He recently stepped down as vice chairman and CEO of the Global Consumer Business of Citigroup to devote more time to philanthropy. He is a trustee of Williams College, Carnegie Hall, and MASS MoCA; president of the New York City Ballet; and chairman of Dance-On, a philanthropy dedicated to preparing dancers for second careers.
Mary Ellen Czerniak has served as director of corporate and foundation relations at Williams since 1988. Her professional career has been spent in the non-profit sector, working in public relations and development in health care and higher education.

INTR 017 Presidential Leadership: From Washington to FDR (Same as Political Science 017)

In this course we will focus on the leadership of three of the greatest American presidents -George Washington, Theodore Roosevelt, and Franklin D. Roosevelt. We will study and discuss their political philosophies and accomplishments and analyze different aspects of their leadership strategies. What do these presidents teach us about character, conviction, presidential power, political ideology, class warfare, "big government," the role of followers, and our constitutional system of checks and balances?
Requirements: In addition to three class meetings per week, students will write one 15-page research paper.
No prerequisites, but students with a background in American History and Political Science will be given preference. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: $60 for books and $24 for luncheons with the guest lecturers.

DUNN and JAMES MACGREGOR BURNS
Woodrow Wilson Professor Emeritus of Government

Dunn and Burns are co-authors of The Three Roosevelts: Patrician Leaders Who Transformed America. Professor Burns is also the author of Roosevelt: The Lion and the Fox and also Roosevelt: The Soldier of Freedom, which won the Pulitzer Prize.

INTR 018 Wilderness Leadership

This Winter Study project is for students who would like to participate in an off-campus experiential education opportunity. Students will be required to research an appropriate accredited program i.e. National Outdoor Leadership School, Outward Bound etc., that will provide a suitable learning environment and be at least 22 days in length. The Director of the Williams Outing Club will assist students in their search if necessary. Upon choosing a program and being accepted, students will meet with the Director in a pre-program meeting in December to create a framework for observing group dynamics and studying a variety of leadership styles. A required ten-page paper based on their journals will be required immediately after their return to campus for the start of third quarter. There will also be a follow up class to debrief the experience in the last week of February. All programs must meet with the approval of the Outing Club Director.
Requirements: course approval by WOC Director, daily journal writing with focus on leadership and group dynamics, 10-page paper and 2 class meetings pre and post trip. Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper and class discussions.

No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Not open to first-year students. Interested sophomores, juniors and seniors must consult with WOC Director before registration.
Cost to student: varies depending on the program selected-range is generally from $1,500-3,000.

S. LEWIS

INTR 021 Power, Authority and Decisionmaking in the Public Sector (Same as Political Science 021)

(See under Political Science for full description.)

INTR 025 Williams In Washington: Leadership in Our Nation's Capital

An on-site study of leadership in America's capital city. Students will spend two weeks in Washington, DC meeting with leaders in government, business, and the not-for-profit world. During the initial classes, students will study leadership theory, as well as participate in an assessment of their own leadership styles. While the focus of the course is leadership, the course also provides an overview of the political and public policy process, through the stories of guest speakers. The following issues are just some of those that will be considered: Is politics corrupt? What role does the media play in setting national policy? How do forces outside the nation's capital influence government? This course will be of interest to anyone who wants to understand Washington, D.C. and the people who live and work there.
Students will stay downtown, and will travel by metro to meeting locations around the district. A variety of activities will be available on both weekends and weekdays, including an informal meeting with D.C. area alumni. Travel to D.C. and housing is covered in the course fee-metro fares and most meals will be the responsibility of participants.
Requirements: three short essays and one final paper of five pages; active participation in daily discussions.
Prerequisites: Preference will be given to Leadership Studies students. All students should consult with the instructor prior to registering. Enrollment limit: 10 (10 students will also be admitted from UMD).
Meeting time: daily. Time will vary depending on speaker availability. Students can expect to have the occasional "full" day.
Cost to student: $800 includes travel (air and roundtrip van to Albany and BWI airport), course materials, and downtown lodging. Students will be responsible for local transportation via metro, most meals and other incidentals.

LISA CAREY MOORE and GEORGIA SORENSON (Instructors)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Dr. Sorenson is a Senior Scholar at The James MacGregor Burns Academy of Leadership at the University of Maryland. She is an established Leadership scholar, and has written a number of articles on the subject, and most recently, coauthored the book "Dead Center: Clinton-Gore Leadership and the Perils of Moderation" with James MacGregor Burns. Her undergraduate teaching includes courses on Presidential Leadership, Leadership Theory, Group and Organization Behavior, and Theories of Feminism. The course will be co-taught by Lisa Carey Moore, Leadership Programs Coordinator. Prior to joining the Leadership Studies program at Williams, Ms. Carey Moore was the Director of Public Policy for a regional non-profit group, and worked extensively in Washington as an advocate for issues pertaining to clean water and the environment.

INTR 026 Panama: Leadership at the Crossroads of the World (Same as Political Science 026)

At the "crossroads of the world," Panama provides an ideal venue from which students can study leadership in a multicultural and international context. As a gateway, Panama and its canal are symbols of globalization that can help students understand many of the forces affecting the contemporary world. Students will spend nearly the entire January term in Panama, where they will reside in newly renovated apartments at the Ciudad del Saber or the City of Knowledge, located near the Pacific entrance of the Panama Canal and within a short distance from Panama City (www.ciudaddelsaber.org.pa). A former military base for U.S. forces during their administration of the Canal Zone (and with all the recreational resources of a former command post of high import), the area now serves as a research center, technology park and residence for visiting universities from around the world.
During their stay, students will be engaged in classes and field trip with ample time for independent exploration. Topics include: Latin American History; Society and Politics; The New World Economy; The Social and Ecological Ramifications of Globalization; and New Technologies and Future Opportunities. The course is team-taught by Professors from Williams, professionals in Panama, and visiting experts from the Smithsonian Tropic Research Institute based in Panama. Field trips include such itineraries as a visit to Parliament and other government building in Panama City, a transit of the Panama Canal (and a visit to the Panama Canal Authority and Museum), an overnight to the archeological site Cerro Juan Diaz on the Pacific side of the country, and a visit to the new Galeta Marine Laboratory in Colon at the Atlantic entrance of the Canal. Opportunities for interaction with students from other universities will be offered, both in the classroom setting, and in less formal, social outings.
Evaluation will be based on class participation; completion of an interview of a Panamanian citizen, and a 10-page paper at the conclusion of the course.
No prerequisites, but while a working knowledge of Spanish isn't required, familiarity with the language will enhance a student's experience while in Panama. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference will be given to students with course work in Latin-American Studies, Leadership Studies, and/or Political Science.
Cost to student: $1,775.

G. GOETHALS, MAHON and CARLOS GUEVARA MANN, PhD

Dr. Guevara Mann was born in Panama City, Republic of Panama. He received his PhD in Government and International Studies from the University of Notre Dame. He has served in both the public and private sector in Panama. Between September 1999 and 2000, he was the Director-General of Foreign Policy, Secretary of the national Foreign Relations Council, and Political Advisor to the Foreign Minister. He has also worked as chief Credit Analysis and consultant at Lloyds TSB Bank Plc, and other financial institutions from 1993-1997. He serves on numerous boards and is currently working as a political and business consultant.

LINGUISTICS

LING 010 Introduction to the Japanese Language and Culture (Same as Japanese 010)

(See under Japanese for full description.)

MATHEMATICS and STATISTICS

MATH 010 Humor Writing (Same as English 027)

What is humor? The dichotomy inherent in the pursuit of comedic intent while confronting the reality of attempting to comprehend the transient nature of adversity can ratchet up the devolving psyche's penchant for explication to a catastrophic threshold, thwarting the ecstatic impulse and pushing the natural proclivity for causative norms beyond the possibility of pre-situational adaptation.
Do you know what that means? If so, this is not the course for you. No, we will write funny stuff, day in and day out. Or at the very least, we will think it's funny. Stories, essays, plays, fiction, nonfiction, we'll try a little of each. And we'll read some humor, too.
Is laughter the body's attempt to eject excess phlegm? Why did Plato write dialogues instead of monologues? Who backed into my car in the Bronfman parking lot on the afternoon of March 2, 2001? These are just a few of the questions we will not explore in this course. No, we won't have time because we will be busy writing. (But if you know the answer to the third question, there's a $10 reward.) Produce or become produce. We will publish the best student work to distribute on campus.
Requirements: reading, attendance, participation and writing at least 20 pages of material.
Prerequisites: Sense of humor (broadly interpreted). Enrollment limit: 15. (No slackers need apply.)
Meeting time: mornings. Plan to meet 6 hours a week, and to spend at least 20 hours a week on the course.
Cost to student: $30.

C. ADAMS

Colin Adams is the humor columnist for the Mathematical Intelligencer.

MATH 012 The Art of Chess

Chess is a beautiful and very inspiring game. No game has surpassed chess in its popularity in all countries for many centuries. One of the oldest games, it has a history spanning 1400 years and has offered inspiration to scientists, artists, and writers. Such is the subtlety of the game that no one has been able to determine whether it is an art, a science, a sport, or a combination of them all. This course will be an introduction to the beautiful and inspiring world of chess.
Topics include basic principles: openings, middle-game and endings; mathematical aspects of chess; general theory of a middle-game play; end-game strategies. We will look at some famous games, discuss chess problems and organize a tournament among students and computer programs.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and problem assignments.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: $30 for Xeroxed materials and miscellaneous supplies.

CHKHENKELI

MATH 013 Concealing, Stealing and Revealing Data: The Science and Politics of Encryption

Throughout history, wars have been won and lost based on a military's ability to successfully send secret messages and to break the enemy's secret codes. In fact, until the last century, most uses for encryption were related to the military. Since the invention of high-powered computers and the Internet, however, there has been an explosion in the need for and usage of encryption. In the 1970's, public-key encryption was invented, allowing two parties who want to communicate in a secure way to do so even without already sharing a secret "key". Today, there are numerous mathematical methods used for encryption - many which are surprisingly simple. In this course, we will study some of the more popular methods, including the Diffie-Hellman public-key exchange, RSA, and PGP. We will also discuss the increasing number of uses of encryption, including the securing of transactions on the Internet, "digital fingerprints," and recent attempts to digitally protect copyrighted text, music and video. Finally, we will discuss the opportunities and challenges that the invention of these cryptosystems has presented individuals, businesses and the United States government. Until about two years ago it was illegal to export "strong" encryption. Today companies with copyright concerns are attempting to literally remove certain simple and relatively well known decryption algorithms from the realm of public knowledge. In this course, we will study the history and political atmosphere surrounding these issues, and discuss some of the controversies that are shaping up for the years to come.
Evaluation will be based on daily homework, participation in class discussions and a project. Students should expect to spend at least 20 hours per week (not including class time) on the course.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings-six hours per week.
Cost to student: $40 for books.

LOEPP and IAN ROBERTSON (Instructors)
O. R. BEAVER (Sponsor)

Ian Robertson holds a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Chicago. He currently works for eZiba.com in North Adams as a software development engineer.

MATH 014 Fantasy Novels of C.S. Lewis and Charles Williams (Same as English 028)

Both Lewis and Williams were members of The Inklings, the remarkable group of British authors and thinkers who met regularly at "The Eagle and Child" Pub in Oxford, where writers (including Tolkien) read their works in progress to one another. Lewis is well-known; the works of Williams have received less recognition, but were admired by W.H. Auden, Dorothy L. Sayers, and T.S. Eliot. Both Lewis and Williams approached their work as staunch Anglican Christians, and their point of view will be respected in this course; however, their novels can speak to the lives of all readers who are sensitive to their own world and to human relationships.
Readings will include the Ransom Trilogy of Lewis: Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength (often called "the Charles Williams novel written by C.S. Lewis"), and Williams's War in Heaven and Descent into Hell (which Lewis listed as one of the ten books which most influenced his own thinking). The month will conclude with Lewis's final novel Till We Have Faces.
Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation in all discussions. The final project will be a 10- to 20-page short story in the style of, incorporating some ideas of, or using literary techniques of the novels read. Alternatively, students may choose to write an expository or critical paper of about 15 pages relating some or all of the novels read to other fiction by these two authors or to works of comparable writers such as George MacDonald, Madeleine l'Engle, or J.K. Rowling.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 14.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $40-50 for books.

V. HILL

MATH 017 Introduction to Acting (Same as Special 017)

In this course students will learn basic acting techniques and methods. Improvisation, theater games, script evaluation and characterization analysis will be used to explore and create characters in a given scene or monologue. No experience is required. At the end of the course, students will present a public performance.
Admission into the class will be based on interviews. Evaluation will be based on final performance and class participation. Course attendance is mandatory.
Enrollment limit: 15.

Meeting time: mornings, 10a.m.-noon., 3 times per week.
Cost to student: $25.

A. ADAMS (Instructor)
O. R. BEAVER (Sponsor)

Amelia Adams is a regional actor who has performed in a variety of theatrical and commercial venues over the last ten years. She is a member of the Actor's Equity Association and the American Federation of Radio and Television actors.

MATH 025 The San Diego Mathematics Meetings (Cancelled)

We will attend the Joint Annual Mathematics Meetings in San Diego, California, January 4-10, 2002, with some necessary preparations beforehand and follow-up activities back at Williams. At the meetings in San Diego, students will attend talks and other events, interview mathematicians, and possibly make presentations or organize events themselves. Back at Williams, they will pursue topics of interest, make presentations, write articles, and submit them to periodicals or other media, including my Math Chat column at MathChat.org.
Evaluation will be based on all activities and products.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 103 or high school calculus. Enrollment limit: 12. Students need to consult the instructor before registration.
Meeting time: mornings, MWF at Williams.
Cost to student: $1000 for travel expenses.

MORGAN

MATH 030 Senior Project

To be taken by candidates for honors in Mathematics other than by thesis route.

MATH 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Mathematics 493-494.

MUSIC

MUS 010 Chamber Music Performance

A project offering focused rehearsal and performance of chamber music for string and piano players (a few wind players might be accommodated). The repertoire might include, but is not limited to, string trios, quartets, quintets; piano trios, quartets, quintets; string quartets or quintets with one wind instrument; and piano plus one string instrument sonatas. Ensembles will explore various works from the repertoire at the beginning of the course and select a program for performance. Small ensembles may combine to perform works for larger ensembles. Small ensembles will rehearse daily, and large ensembles three times a week. Students are expected to maintain a regular schedule of individual practice.
During each of the second and third weeks, one two-hour class will be held for all participants to meet together in addition to ensemble coachings. Activities will include discussion of performance-related questions, guided listening to selected repertoire, and ensembles performing for each other. Performances of all ensembles will be scheduled, both on campus and off, during the final week of Winter Study.
Evaluation will be based on faithful attendance at rehearsals, classes, coaching sessions, and appropriate performances.
Prerequisites: approval of instructor. You must see Mr. Feldman during fall registration period. Previous participation in music department ensembles suggested; audition (in the fall) may be necessary for placing student with others of similar ability. Enrollment limit: 19.
Meeting time: MTWR, 1-3 p.m.
Cost to student: none, although students may prefer to purchase their own copies of the music.

RONALD FELDMAN
Artist in Residence in Orchestral and Instrumental Performance

MUS 011 Music and Film

This course will involve an intensive study of the history, theory, and interpretation of film music. We will begin by creatively considering how film and music might be united in the cinema and with introductory readings in film music theory and history. We will then focus our interpretive and analytical work and class discussions on selected films. While most of our attention will be devoted to the work of major composers and directors of American and European film (with possible examples from Japanese and Indian cinema), we will also consider more specialized subjects related to the instructor's research. Sample topics to be explored include: music and the silent film; Hollywood musicals; opera and film; Herrmann and Hitchcock; Rota and Fellini; music's role in cinematic propaganda; rock music video; Kubrick's musical decisions; psychoanalytic interpretations of film sound.
This course will meet for two hours three times a week in the morning. Students are also required to attend three 90-120 minute film screenings each week either in the late afternoon or early evening in addition to completing the assigned reading before each class meeting.
Evaluation will be based on active participation in class discussions and one 12- to 14-page paper or a creative film music project approved by the instructor.
No prerequisites, although prior experience in film studies or some musical background will enable students to engage more fully in the course's interpretive and analytical work.| Enrollment limit: 15. Preference will be given to those applicants with demonstrated successful experience in music, film, or theater courses or with documented experience in film or multimedia creative work.
Meeting time: TWR, 10 a.m.-noon. Film screenings, MTW either in the late afternoon or early evening.
Cost to student: $60 for two paperback books and photocopies.

A. SHEPPARD

MUS 012 The Art of Musical Storytelling (Cancelled)

How can music tell a story? How do composers convey shifts in time (e.g., flashbacks and foreshadowings), physical description, dramatic action, and point of view? This seminar will explore narrative techniques in a range of vocal and instrumental genres. Readings in literary and musical theory, criticism, and aesthetics. Musical works by Schubert, Bach, Verdi, Wagner, Berlioz, Chopin, and Beethoven, among others.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and several papers.
Prerequisites: ability to read music. Enrollment limit: 19.
Meeting time: MTWR, 10 a.m.-noon.
Cost to student: none.

HIRSCH

MUS 013 The Contemporary Singer/Songwriter

This course will focus on learning how to write and perform songs in a contemporary style. Topics addressed will include song structure, how to create a lyric that communicates, vocal and instrument presentation, performing techniques, publicity for events, and today's music industry. This class will culminate in a public performance of material written during the course.
In order to pass this course, each student will be expected to complete a minimum of two songs, both music and lyrics. One of these songs will be presented during the final performance, preferably by the student. If not, the student must arrange for someone else in the class to assist him or her. Also, a 2-page paper will be passed in on the last day of class.
No prerequisites, although students with musical backgrounds and the ability to play an instrument may be given preference for entry. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons,TWR for two-hour sessions.
Cost to student: $75 for books and xeroxing costs.

BERNICE LEWIS (Instructor)
D. MOORE (Sponsor)

Bernice Lewis is an accomplished singer and songwriter who has performed her work throughout the country. She lives in Williamstown.

MUS 014 Advanced Songwriting Workshop

This course will be a continuum of the WSP The Contemporary Singer/Songwriter. We will go deeper into the songwriting process here. Students will be responsible for completing at least one song per week. We will spend at least one session per week listening and critiquing recorded music. We will use the remaining time to listen to and critique each other. We will continue using journal writing as a creative tool.
Further vocal instruction will be provided as well as a deeper understanding of performing techniques.
Requirements: consistent class attendance is mandatory. Students will be expected to produce at least one song per week, to edit and re-write their work based on class feedback. They will also be required to arrange, promote, and perform in a public performance. They will be expected to present twenty minutes of original material, the bulk of which was created during this course.
Prerequisite: Only students who have successfully completed WSP course The Contemporary Singer/Songwriter will be accepted in the Advanced Songwriting Workshop. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference will be given to seniors and juniors who have taken The Contemporary Singer/Songwriter.
Meeting time: TWR, 10 a.m.-noon.
Cost to student: $75.00 for books and xeroxing costs.

BERNICE LEWIS (Instructor)
D. MOORE (Sponsor)

Bernice Lewis is an accomplished singer and songwriter who has performed her work throughout the country. She lives in Williamstown.

MUS 019 Representing Jazz (Same as English 019)

(See under English for full description.)

MUS 021 Individual Vocal and Instrumental Instruction (Can only be taken IN ADDITION to a regular WSP course.)

CONTACT THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT ABOUT SIGNING UP FOR THIS COURSE!!!
Individual lessons in voice, keyboard and most orchestral instruments offered during Winter Study. Four lessons, given at approximate one week intervals (TBA). Student is expected to practice at least two hours per day. All individual instruction involves an extra fee which is partially subsidized by the department. For further information and guidelines, or to secure a contract for lessons, see the Department Chair, Douglas Moore.
Prerequisite: Music 103 or permission of the Department Chair.
Cost to student: $100.

Staff

MUS 025 Cuban Music and Dance

In the form of salsa, Latin jazz, mambo, or rumba, Afro-Cuban music and dance has had a world-wide impact for more than seventy years. This intensive winter study course will take students to Cuba to study Afro-Cuban music and dance (primarily rumba and son) on one of two tracks-either as composers or as performers (musicians or dancers).
On Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, performers and composers will have 4 hours per day of instruction with members of Afro-Cuba, a renowned folkloric performing ensemble. Founded in 1957, members of this group trace their ancestry to Nigeria and the Congo, they perform religious and secular music derived from these traditions.
On Tuesdays and Thursdays, performers will practice and discuss what they have learned from Afro-Cuba and work with Prof. Ernest Brown and KweYao Agyapon, artist in residence in dance, learning about Cuban music and dance-their history, role in Cuban culture, and world-wide impact. On these days, composers will practice what they have learned from Afro-Cuba and work with Prof. Ileana Perez Velasquez on compositions inspired by their encounter with Afro-Cuban music and dance. Students who play guitar, bass, trumpet, or other instruments should bring them. A piano will be provided. Up to 8 student composers will work with Prof. Perez Velasquez and 12 musicians or dancers with Prof. Brown and Mr. Agyapon. If feasible, this course will culminate in a free public performance of materials learned.
Evaluation in both sections of the course will be based on participation, progress in the development of performance or compositional skills, and a 10-page paper or its equivalent. Students must attend every class and may not miss more than one class and pass this course.
No prerequisites, but experience and skill as a composer, musician, or dancer preferred. Fluency in Spanish is not required but is very helpful. For composers, write a letter to Prof. Perez Velasquez, explaining your experience and interest in this course. For dancers and musicians, write a letter to Prof. Brown explaining your experience and interest in this course. Enrollment limit: 8 composers, 12 musicians or dancers .

Cost to student: approximately $2800.

E. D. BROWN and PEREZ VELASQUEZ

MUS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Music 493, 494.

NEUROSCIENCE

NSCI 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Neuroscience 493-494.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 010 The Possibilities of Hypertext (Cancelled)

Text is linear: you read it in a straight line, from beginning to end. Hypertext is non-linear: you start reading somewhere, proceed until you encounter an interesting link, click, and poof - you're transported somewhere else. Some people claim this makes hypertext capable of changing the way we think. Traditional text, so the claim goes, can communicate only those thoughts or contents that are amenable to expression in a linear form. By employing the non-linear form of hypertext, then, we might be able to express thoughts that simply cannot be communicated in books or essays. This course will explore the possibilities of hypertext. We will read hypertexts and discussions of hypertext, and each student will create his or her own hypertext as a final project.
Evaluation will be based on the quality of the final hypertext project, and on attendance and participation. We will meet three times a week for two-hour sessions, with additional computer-lab times scheduled as needed. Most work on the hypertext projects will be completed outside of class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.Preference given to seniors.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $50-$100 for software and reading materials.

DUDLEY

PHIL 011 Why New Englanders Eat What They Eat

Have you ever wondered why the food of New England is sugary and bland: is it the people, the land, the economy? Do New Englanders like their diets or are they forced into them? This course will investigate these kinds of questions by looking at the political, economic, cultural, and climatic factors that have shaped the diet and culture of New Englanders.
We will begin our course by learning about the ecology and culture of food developed by Native Americans: how did they hunt, gather and farm, and how did their methods of procuring food form their relationship to nature and to each other? Then we will consider the diet of the first European settlers and their interaction with Native Americans. Issues such as differing uses of the land, what was considered by the term "property," and what was being sold by the Native Americans to the settlers will be considered. Next we will examine how food was used to try to socialize the next wave of immigrants to New England and how women used food to gain entrance to higher education, which also opened the door to science in food. Finally we will look at international issues such as genetically modified foods, the economic and cultural impact of agribusiness, over-fishing the seas and pollution as it relates to our food. We will enjoy a historically accurate demonstration of life in the 1700's at Historic Deerfield and a guest speaker.
Reading list: Change in the Land, William Cronon; Unredeemed Captive, John Demos; Cod, Mark Kurlansky; Perfection Salad, Laura Shapiro; Runaway World, Anthony Giddens.
Requirements: a 10-page essay on a topic of your choosing.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to students: $50-$100 for books.

ROBIN LENZ MACDONALD (Instructor)
A. WHITE (Sponsor)

Robin MacDonald received her B.A. and M.A. in Political Science from UC Berkeley. She has written several articles about "food and its history" and has extensive experience in her field.

PHIL 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Philosophy 493-494.

PHYSICS

PHYS 010 Light and Holography

This course will examine the art and science of holography. It will introduce modern optics at a level appropriate for a non-science major, giving the necessary theoretical background in lectures and discussion. Demonstrations will be presented and students will make several kinds of holograms in the lab. Thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation, we have 7 well-equipped holography darkrooms available for student use.
Students will be evaluated on the basis of regular attendance, completion of 4 laboratory exercises, and a holography laboratory project or a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 28. Preference will be given to students with no previous college course in physics more advanced than Physics 100.
Meeting time: At the beginning of WSP, the class will meet for lecture and discussion three mornings a week and for lab twice a week. Later classes will be mainly laboratory.
Cost to student: $50 for holographic film, chemicals, and photocopies.

STRAIT

PHYS 011 Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting and Design (CADD) (Same as ArtS 022)

Students will gain a fundamental knowledge of techniques used in two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) computer aided drafting. The course begins with an emphasis on CADD nomenclature as applied to drawing in 2D . We then become concerned with drawing in 3D and visualizing spatial relationships by creating wireframe entities of shapes found in everyday life. This will lead to 3D surface and solid modeling techniques including Boolean operations, mass recognition and shape manipulation. Following this introduction, the students will be challenged to explore creating objects of their choosing and develop photorealistic renderings with differing light sources and changing textures. Art, science, mathematics, and other students who are interested in communicating their design ideas in a 3D form will find this course interesting, as well as those students seeking exposure to an engineering point of view. Students will create a computer solid model of a design idea and develop the photorealistic rendering that optimizes their design's presentation. This rendering together with the student's 2D and 3D drawings will form the basis for evaluating his/her success.
No prerequisites other than a familiarity with the Windows operating system. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: 1-4 p.m. three times per week. This is a fast moving course. The creative renderings will reward the student's commitment to attendance and lab time.
Cost to student: $200 for the CADKEY Windows software package.

JOHN MUELLER (Instructor)
STRAIT (Sponsor)

John L. Mueller is Professor Emeritus at the City University of New York. His work encompasses a wide range of product design and Rapid Prototyping. He received his B.M.E. from the Cooper Union and M.M.E. from Columbia University.

PHYS 012 Meet the Right Side of Your Brain: Drawing as a Learnable Skill

Representational drawing is not merely a gift of birth or a magical ability granted by angels, but a learnable skill. If you ever wanted to draw, but doubted you had the ability or believed you could not learn, then this course is for you. This intensive course utilizes discoveries in brain research to teach representational drawing. By using simple techniques and extensive exercises you will discover and develop the perceptual shift from your symbol based left hemisphere to your visually based right hemisphere. This cognitive shift enables you to accurately see and realistically represent the physical world. You will learn to draw a convincing portrait, and a still life drawn from a plaster cast. This course is designed to develop your powers of observation and enhance your innate creative problem solving abilities, which are applicable in any field. Students need no previous artistic experience, just the willingness and desire to learn a new skill. Students will be expected to attend and participate in all sessions. They will also be required to keep a sketchbook recording their progress and complete a final project.
Evaluation will be based on participation, effort, and development.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference given to juniors and seniors. The course will meet in two sections of 15.
Meeting time: two times per week (3 hours a class) in the afternoon with substantial additional independent student work.
Cost to student: $30 for text and drawing materials.

FRED X. BROWNSTEIN (Instructor)
K. JONES (Sponsor)

Fred X. Brownstein is teaching part time at the Lyme Academy of Fine Arts in Old Lyme, CT. He teaches workshops in the summer at the Carving Studio in West Rutland, VT and one at the Scottsdale Artists' School in Scottsdale, AZ. He graduated from the San Francisco Art Institute with a B.F.A. in 1970 and then studied the figure with Signorina Nerima Simi at her studio in Florence, Italy. He also apprenticed in the marble studio of Enzo Pasquini in Querceta, Italy for four years to learn the Italian carving techniques.

PHYS 013 Automotive Mechanics

The purpose of this course will be to provide an understanding of the basic function of the major components of the modern automobile. Through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on experience, individuals will learn basic maintenance of an automobile. In addition, students will be expected to study in depth one of the major automotive systems which include carburetor or fuel-injection systems, the lubrication and cooling system, the electrical system, the steering, brake and suspension system, and the power train for both manual and automatic transmissions.
Students will be required to attend class regularly, read assigned material from the text, actively participate in work at the garage, and pass written midterm and final examinations.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. The class will be broken into three sections for lab work. Preference given to seniors.
Meeting time: two hours a day, three times a week in the morning for classroom instruction. In addition, students will meet at the Flamingo Motors in Williamstown one evening each week for practical demonstrations and hands-on activity.
Cost to student: $45 for text.

MICHAEL FRANCO (Instructor)
K. JONES (Sponsor)

Michael Franco is the owner of Flamingo Motors in Williamstown.

PHYS 014 The Making of the Atomic Bomb

We will delve into the science of the atomic bomb and its technological impact. Richard Rhodes' Pulitzer Prize winning account of the Manhattan Project plus movies, plays, and biographies of participants will form the basis for explosive discussions, posters, papers, presentations, and a few simple calculations. (1000 pages to read thoughtfully).
Prerequisites: High school physics. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: $50.

AALBERTS

PHYS 022 Research Participation

Several members of the department will have student projects available dealing with their own research or that of current senior thesis students. Approximately 35 hours per week of study and actual research participation will be expected from each student. Students will be required to keep a notebook and write a five-page paper summarizing their work. Those interested should consult with members of the department as early as possible in the registration period or before to determine details of projects then expected to be available.
Prerequisite: Permission of specific instructor. Enrollment limited to 1 or 2 per project.
Meeting time: to be arranged with instructor.
Cost to student: none.

K. JONES and members of the department

PHYS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Physics 493, 494.

POLITICAL ECONOMY

POEC 026 Healthcare in Havana: A Comparative Study of Resource Allocation and Public Health Policy (Same as Special 026)

The claim is frequently made that the American healthcare system is the best in the world. What constitutes a "good" healthcare system? What tools can we use to comparatively evaluate systems of healthcare delivery? By what measures can we gauge their abilities to meet the needs of their societies? Is there a role for principles of equity and distributive justice in prioritizing and allocating healthcare resources? This Winter Study course aims to explore these and many other questions by spending three weeks in Cuba investigating a healthcare system very different from our own. We plan to visit a number of sites to gain a deeper understanding of Cuban healthcare: hospitals; free clinics; pharmaceutical offices; government offices; and community health centers, among others. The course will focus on issues such as HIV and AIDS prevention and management in a developing country; maternal-child health and prenatal preventive care; the impact of a non-market, centralized economy on healthcare delivery; end-of-life care; and the unique ability of a nationalized healthcare system to promote a unified public health agenda. Our base will be in Havana, where we will stay in the dormitories of the National School of Public Health. From Havana, we will take several day and weekend trips to rural Cuban communities and points of interest around the island. We will involve ourselves in many aspects of Cuban culture, from history and politics to the local art and music scene. Readings, formal and informal discussions with Cuban citizens and healthcare professionals, small-group workshops, and sharing of journal reflections will complement our experiences. We have been coordinating with MEDICC, an organization that routinely organizes trips of this sort for American medical students.
No prerequisites, but previous Spanish language experience is preferred. Enrollment limit: 10-15.
Cost to student: $2000 per person (includes airfare, 3 weeks lodging, transportation, most expenses on the island, and most meals.)

MEGAN MOORE, JAMES MURA, DAVID ELPERN (Instructors)
MAHON (Sponsor)

Megan Moore (Williams '98 and Harvard Medical School '02), James Mura (Williams '97 and Albany Medical College '03), and David Elpern, MD.

POEC 031 Honors Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Political Economy 493.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

PSCI 010 Controversial Issues in Education

This seminar is designed to explore controversies in primary and secondary education in the United States. We will begin by considering the major challenges facing public education, including retaining qualified teachers and administrators, curbing school violence, and addressing inequities in funding. We then will consider the main proposals for and the likely consequences of various proposals for reform. In particular, the course will address debates about "high stake" testing, bilingual education, special and gifted education; charter schools, vouchers, and education-for-profit program; and curriculum theory and the role of character education. While evaluating the sides of each issue, students will consider the philosophy grounding each perspective and the political and social effects of the different methods of reform. Texts will include: James Wm. Noll, Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Controversial Educational Issues; Alfie Kohn, The Schools our Children Deserve; E.D. Hirsch, The Schools We Need and Why We Don't Have Them; and a reader of articles and essays.
Requirements: Students enrolled in the seminar are expected to complete reading assignments and engage actively in class discussions. Each student will select an educational issue to research in depth and present in a 10- to 12-page paper at close of the term.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: MW EVENINGS.
Cost to students: books and reading materials.

MARY ALVORD (Instructor)
JACOBSOHN (Sponsor)

Mary Alvord has extensive experience as a teacher and administrator within the New York City public school system. Currently, she is a doctoral candidate at Teachers College, Columbia University where she has an appointment in the Department of Arts and Humanities.

PSCI 011 The Development of Inuit Art

Inuit art (which includes the following genre of art: sculpture, graphic arts, as well as jewelry, wall hangings, pottery and other modes) is a very modern development. It can be dated very precisely to the early 1950s. Since that beginning it has gained world-wide attention. There are galleries of Inuit art not only through out Canada and the United States but also Europe and Asia. Inuit art is included in the collections of major museums throughout the world. The production of Inuit art developed in response to the sudden change in Inuit life from nomadic subsistence in the norther arctic regions of Canada to fixed settlements on Baffin Island and regions around Hudson Bay and the consequent need to create a cash based economy. The course will cover the development of Inuit art focusing on the major centers (Cape Dorset, Baker Lake, Arviat, etc.), the major artists (Kenojuak, Oonark, George Arlook, Latcholassie, Parr, Pauta, etc.) and the major forms of sculpture and print making. The changing character of Inuit life and governance (the Canadian government recently completed a major reconstitution granting much of the people of the arctic north autonomy as a self-governing region called Nunavut). In addition to the technical development of the art, its history and the biography of the major artists, we will be exploring the cultural context of Inuit art to the Inuit as well as to the international market. There will be assigned readings and a paper assignment with students choosing from the following topics: a study of a particular work of art, the work of a particular artist, some aspect of Inuit life or politics, or economic analyses (e.g., using Inuit art auction results over the years). There will be visiting lectures by major Inuit art dealers.
Evaluation will be based on the paper, class attendance and participation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25.
Meeting time: afternoons, three classes per week.
Cost to student: $50 for readings.

MARCUS

PSCI 012 Presidential Elections

This course traces the electoral problems of the presidential election of 2000 back to the root causes from the drafting of the U.S. Constitution to the U.S. Supreme Court decision of Bush v. Gore. This course includes a mix of political history, constitutional law, state elections laws, and the presidential electoral process. Guest speakers, subject to availability, involved with various aspects of the presidential electoral process will offer their perspectives regarding such elections.
Students will be required to prepare a 10-page paper on the topic of retaining or changing the presidential election system which in addition to being submitted to the Instructor, will also be sent by the students to their two respective U.S. Senators and their U.S. Representative.
No prerequisites, except for an interest in politics. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: reading packet.

ROBERT F. JAKUBOWICZ (Instructor)
JACOBSOHN (Sponsor)

Mr. Jakubowicz is a lawyer who has served in the Massachusetts legislature. He writes a monthly column on law and politics for the Berkshire Eagle. His articles have also appeared in the Boston Globe, Boston Herald, and Cape Cod Times.

PSCI 013 Assessing Race in Communities of Interest (Cancelled)

The class is concerned with an interesting convergence in the area of public policy (concerning the constitutional status of federal voting law) and political theory (pertaining to assessments of community in contemporary social relations). The key question involves the impact of minority race claims on community where the claims come under legal protection in civil rights laws. The issue is developing in sharp relief in the wake of the 2000 census and the redistricting of electoral offices. The U. S. Supreme Court, in a series of opinions associated with the Shaw cases, set the stage for consideration in the legal area as to how and whether "community" in the traditional sense, has been replaced by new, essentially "virtual," relationships and, if so, how traditional racial claims-racist or benign-may interact in the new settings. Readings will include key court opinions to set the problem and then move to writings that may help assess the outcomes through a review of alternative definitions of community and the evolution of relationships of identity that may be subsumed at a sub-national level.
Requirements: a short 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: reading packet.

A. WILLINGHAM

PSCI 014 Civil Rights Law

This course will examine contemporary civil rights law including application of constitutional and statutory law to modern civil liberties issues. The course will address discrimination, employment, privacy, sex harassment and police misconduct issues. The course will emphasize analysis of cases and related materials, as opposed to a historical perspective. Students will analyze appellate court decisions and related materials, mostly U.S. Supreme Court decisions and select federal statutes. A substantial portion of the class time will be devoted to discussion of the cases and students will be expected to participate in class discussion and will "argue" from positions taken in some of the cases. The course will also likely utilize a "model case" whereby students will be distributed a factual scenario at the inception of the class which will be discussed from time to time throughout the term as the class covers applicable legal principles and theories.
Requirements: one 8- to 10-page research paper, addressing a civil rights topic to be decided by student and instructor. Evaluation will be based on the analysis of a student paper and class participation. This course will necessitate reading of court decisions and statutes prior to class so there can be meaningful in-class discussion.
No prerequisites, although an interest in civil rights issues is recommended. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to juniors and seniors.
Meeting time: mornings, two or three times per week.
Cost to student: $65 for materials (copies of court decisions).

J. MICHAEL MCGUINNESS (Instructor)
JACOBSOHN (Sponsor)

J. Michael McGuinness is a practicing civil rights lawyer and has lectured and published heavily in the civil rights field. Mr. McGuinness has litigated a broad variety of civil rights cases before trial and appellate courts including the U.S. Supreme Court.

PSCI 015 Charismatic Leadership as a Democratic Virtue

CANCELLED!

PSCI 017 Presidential Leadership: From Washington to FDR (Same as INTR 017)

(See under IPECS-INTR 017 for full description.)

PSCI 018 Editorial Cartooning (Same as ArtS 018)

(See under ART-ArtS 018 for full description.)

PSCI 021 Power, Authority and Decisionmaking in the Public Sector (Same as INTR 021)

This course is an internship experience in which students both work in and analyze government and related nongovernmental organizations. The goal of the course is to develop student ability to analyze power, authority and decisionmaking in public organizations; in short, to better understand leadership. Students may have internships in government and nonprofit organizations. They may have internships in for-profit organizations if the internship involves significant involvement with public issues. Examples include: town government offices; state or federal administrative offices such as TANF, WIC, housing authorities; interest groups that lobby government such as Chamber of Commerce, NOW, or the Sierra Club; nonprofit agencies such as Parenting Partners. Internship arrangements are made in advance of the Winter Term during which the student serves as an intern. The instructor works with each student to arrange an internship. Students are expected to spend the better part of the day, five days a week, with the organization. Each student's internship mentor sends a confirmation letter to the instructor verifying the internship and describing the nature of the work to be performed by the intern. Students with Berkshire area internships will read a few short reading assignments in common and meet with the instructor once a week as a group to compare and analyze their experiences. Students whose internships are in their home community will meet as a group before and after winter study to discuss their experiences. During winter study, they are expected to maintain weekly contact with the instructor. Finally, students will write a 10-page paper on their experience.
Requirements: internship work and a 10-page paper analyzing issues of power, authority, and decisionmaking in the organization. Evaluation will be based on the mentor's evaluation, participation in the group discussions and the 10-page paper.
Enrollment limit: 15. At the time of registration, interested students should send a brief resume and letter of interest. Materials should be sent to the Leadership Programs Coordinator.

Cost to student: none, except for transportation.

PAULA CONSOLINI (Instructor)
JACOBSOHN (Sponsor)

Paula Consolini (Ph.D., Berkeley) teaches and manages local government internships at Union College in Schenectady.

PSCI 026 Panama: Leadership at the Crossroads of the World (Same as INTR 026)

(See under IPECS-INTR 026 for full description.)

PSCI 030 Senior Essay

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 491 or 492.

PSCI 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 493-494.

PSCI 032 Individual Project

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 495 or 496.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 010 The Popularization of Psychological Disorders

In the past decade, psychological disorders have been popularized to an unprecedented degree in Western societies. Syndromes like depression, attention deficit disorder, and panic disorder are now regularly featured on prime-time television, in best-selling books, in radio and television advertisements, and in magazines. We will explore these popularized accounts of psychological disorders and treatments, focusing on their accuracy, on the cultural assumptions and values expressed in them, and on the possible psychological consequences of their popularization. Each student will do library research on, and prepare a presentation about, popular depictions of a particular disorder or treatment.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, paper proposal, and minimum 10-page paper.
Prerequisites: Psychology 252 or permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $10 for reading packet.

A. SOLOMON

PSYC 011 From Segregation to Accommodation: Changing Perspectives on Disabilities

A radical shift in the laws and values shaping the participation of persons with disabilities in our society has led to motorized carts in Professional Golf Association tournaments and modified exam procedures for some students on our own campus. After a brief review of the history that brought us to the currently accepted principles of normalization and inclusion, each student will conduct an investigation through interviews and site visits into changing practices in a specific local context. Alternatively, a student may focus an inquiry on a personal experience with his or her own disability or that of a family member. The underlying aim of this course is to help students become better equipped to participate in our society's continuing dialogue about the nature of disabilities and what measures should be taken to accommodate those who have them. Reading selections will be drawn primarily from the writings of persons with disabilities and their families.
Evaluation will be based on oral participation and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: $60 for books and article reprints.

DALE BORMAN FINK (Instructor)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Dale Borman Fink earned his B.A. from Harvard and his Ph.D. in special education from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of School-Age Children With Special Needs: What Do They Do When School Is Out? (1988, Boston: The Exceptional Parent Press). and Making a Place for Kids with Disabilities (2000, Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers).

PSYC 012 Introduction to Counseling Skills

CANCELLED!

PSYC 013 Public Access Television Production

This course will focus on the development and use of public access television to educate the public on various issues of psychosocial interest. Students will learn the elements of TV show production and will work in small groups to create an educational show. Topics need to be well documented. Class time will include viewing of public access productions. Production will take place at Willinet Studio on Spring Street and will be aired on Channel 17. Students will use cameras, set, and editing equipment to produce one thirty minute show each.
Evaluation will be based on the content, effort and quality of one public access TV show and one 10-page paper evaluating the production.
Prerequisites: Students must be eligible for admission to Willinet Studio. Students must consult with instructor before registration. Enrollment limit: 12. (Preference will be given to seniors and members of the film guild at Williams.)
Meeting time: afternoons, TR, 1-3 p.m. Students will spend additional time in the Willinet studio creating their own productions at times to be arranged with the studio.
Cost to student: $50 plus cost of book.

SUSAN CONKLIN (Instructor)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Susan Conklin is a licensed independent clinical social worker, board certified diplomate, in private practice in Williamstown. She produces The Susan Conklin Show (stories of courage, creativity, commitment and compassion in the greater Berkshire area) for more than 3 years on Willinet.

PSYC 014 Science and Television Commercials

Television commercials often refer to the results of "scientific" experiments and surveys to promote products. An examination of the methods they use, however, suggests that T.V.'s rendition of science portrays the real world to about the same degree as the rest of its programming. The intent of this course is to use sound scientific methodology in replicating the experiments used as the basis for these commercials. The initial part of the course will consist of a brief overview of basic scientific methodology. Students will then divide into groups, select a commercial that is based on an experiment that uses "suspect" methodology, and replicate the study using proper procedures. Students will submit a written report of their findings and then present them orally to the class. A "Pass" will be contingent upon satisfactory completion of both oral and written presentations.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, paper proposal, and minimum 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16.
Cost to student: $40 for materials.

P. SOLOMON

PSYC 015 Principles of Psychotherapy

Outlining the principles underlying the "talking cure", this course represents the kind of overview of psychotherapy the instructor wishes he had received as an undergraduate. Topics covered will include the particular arrangements for therapy, how they differ from other social situations, the initiation of therapy, and principles of transference, counter-transference, personal history investigation and interpretation. Of particular interest will be to describe how, during psychotherapy, persons change. Using both imagined therapy dialogues and published student auto-biographies, efforts will be made at each stage to illustrate ways in which the general principles work out in practice. For the course paper, students will be asked to describe an issue of concern in the student's own experience and to imagine how a therapist might collaborate in working on that issue. At the end of the course the instructor will discuss each paper individually with each student.
Requirements: readings, class discussion, and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preferences given to juniors and seniors.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $25.

RICHARD Q. FORD (Instructor)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Richard Q. Ford received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Chicago in 1970. For twelve years, on the medical staff on the Austen Riggs Center in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, he has (for the past eighteen years) been in the private practice of psychotherapy in Williamstown. He is co-author with Sidney J. Blatt of Therapeutic Change: An Object Relations Perspective.

PSYC 016 Social Justice and Mental Illness in America (Same as History 016)

The historical and current treatment of mentally ill people in the United States reflects our social and political beliefs and values as much as it does the state of scientific knowledge. By studying the history of and making intensive visits to institutions for treating people who are mentally ill, we will seek to answer questions such as how and why did "asylums" evolve? Why are so many people with mental illness found in jails today and why do some hospitals resemble jails? How are social justice and civil rights issues related to the practical issues facing mental patients and their families? Throughout the course, we will integrate historical and psychological perspectives.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page paper.
Prerequisites: At least one regular semester course in Psychology. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $30 for books and Xeroxes.

WILDER and HEATHERINGTON

PSYC 017 Teaching Practicum

Students interested in teaching may submit applications for a Winter Study assignment as a teacher's aide at Mt. Greylock Regional High School or at the Williamstown Elementary School. Those accepted will work under the supervision of a regular member of the teaching staff and submit a report on their work at the end of the Winter Study Period. This project involves a four-week commitment to full-time affiliation with the school. Interested students should consult before winter study registration with Professor Friedman, 304 Bronfman. He will assist in arranging placements and monitor students' progress during the four-week period.
Criteria for pass include full time affiliation with the school and a final 10-page report. The final report should summarize the student's experiences and reflections as drawn from a daily journal. Prerequisite: Approval of Professor Friedman required. Enrollment limited to number of places available at the two participating schools.
Cost to student: none.

FRIEDMAN

PSYC 018 Institutional Placement

Students interested in a full time January placement in a mental health, social service or applied psychology (e.g., advertising, law) setting may consult with members of the Psychology Department to make appropriate arrangements. Students should first make their own contacts with an institution or agency. They should also arrange to obtain a letter from a sponsor at the institution who will outline and supervise the student's duties during January. The student must agree to keep a journal and to submit a final paper summarizing and reflecting upon the experiences outlined in the journal.
Requirements: satisfactory evaluation from the institutional sponsor and a 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: none.

FRIEDMAN

PSYC 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Psychology 493-494.

RELIGION

REL 010 Training the Body-Mind: Introduction to Traditional Karate

Cancelled!

REL 012 Tibetan Buddhism and the Practice of Meditation

CANCELLED!

REL 013 Biblical Hebrew in a Month (Same as Classics 013)

(See under Classics for full description.)

(See under Classics for full description.)

REL 014 Language of the Holocaust

How name what is unnameable, unthinkable, unimaginable? Is silence the only response to unspeakable acts? Or, if you can articulate a name, an authority, an identity, a reason for genocide, for the annihilation of the Jewish people, how do you express or represent the experience without the luxury of artifice? What are the terms of such expression? What claims does the experience make on those who wish to define it? Is there an ultimate fiction greater than fact that such an event requires? This course will concentrate on the relationships between historical/recorded (mimetic) interpretations (i.e., first person accounts, religious and historical texts, documentary footage) and constructed (poesis) interpretation of the Holocaust. The latter will include a sampling of films, novels, poems, art of victims and survivors and others using the material of genocide as primary source for the creation of a work of art. Within this framework questions regarding both the particular and universal nature of the Holocaust will be addressed. Course readings and material will offer provocative pairings to sharpen and question the necessary yet paradoxically unstable distinction between the mimetic and poetic mode: These might include Wiesel's Night; selections from the Old Testament (Akidah and Book of Job) and the Zohar, Borowski's This Way to the Gas Chambers, Ladies and Gentlemen and Scrap of Time and Other Stories; Charles Reznicoff's Holocaust and Artie Spiegelman's Maus I and Maus II ; Expressionistic and concentration camp art; various historical accounts; and selections form the work of Paul Celan, Nelly Sachs, A. Sutzkever, Edmund Jabes, Aharon Appelfeld, Andre Schwarz-Bart, Terrence Des Pres and Daniel Goldhagen. Films might include Europa Europa, Nasty Girl, Shop on Main Street, Shoah and Schindler's List.
Requirements: a 10-page paper, class participation and regular attendance.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week, two hours per class.
Cost to student: $60 for books and xeroxes.

DAVID RAFFELD (Instructor)
DREYFUS (Sponsor)

A poet and writer, David Raffeld has written widely on the themes to be developed in this course. In addition to offering this course several times, Raffeld has taught Winter Study term courses at Williams in the Departments of Religion, Philosophy, and English. He has also been a Writer-in-Residence in the Department of Theater for the production of his Isaac Oratorio, which was written in part in response to the Holocaust.

REL 025 Explorations in Solidarity: A Meeting of Minds and Hearts in Rural and Urban Nicaragua

This course will explore the lived realities of the hemisphere's second most impoverished nation, through the eyes of subsistence farmers, urban factory workers, and those working for progressive social change. The effects of an increasingly globalized economy, a series of natural disasters (most notably hurricane Mitch), and the changeable attentions of the developed world will be explored through conversations with ordinary people, using some of the methods of popular education and oral history. Significant attention will also be given to the effects on the material and spiritual well-being of people of liberation theology and the base Christian community movement as well as other influences, Christian and Marxist. The experience of the course will include approximately one week of living (with minimal amenities) in a subsistence farming community. Travels and encounters in Nicaragua will be facilitated by Elena Hendrick and Luis Aguirre of the Asociacion Kairos para la Formacion, an organization that links Christian communites north and south through solidarity toward the goal of transformed relationships. Throughout, students will be invited to enter as deeply as possible the story of Nicaraguans, and to reflect on their own stories as North Americans and the sometimes-volatile interaction between these stories. The goal is to begin to discover what it would mean to shape a relationship with the people of Nicaragua according to a paradigm of solidarity-contrasted with the more familiar paradigms of national self-interest, on the macro level, and charity on the micro level. The course will entail daily reflection sessions, for which a journal will be kept.
Requirements: attendance at three orientation sessions prior to departure; an oral presentation to the class at the conclusion of the experience; participation in a group presentation to the College community upon returning to Williamstown; and a final 10-page paper. Conversational knowledge of Spanish, though not required, will be helpful. Willingness to live in physically demanding situations is essential.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $1,800 (including all food, lodging and in-country transportation) plus round-trip airfare to Managua (approx. $450-700, depending on point of departure).

R. SPALDING (Instructor)
DREYFUS (Sponsor)

Rev. Richard Spalding is the Chaplain of the College.

REL 026 Archaeological Tour of Greece (Same as Classics 026)

(See under Classics for full description.)

REL 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Religion 493 or 494.

ROMANCE LANGUAGES

FRENCH

RLFR S.P. Sustaining Program for French 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study period. There are three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: 9:00-9:50 a.m.

CORLAY and DESLUS (Teaching Associates)

RLFR 010 Asterix the Gaul: French Culture through the Prism of the Comic

The longevity and popularity of the Asterix comic strip series over successive generations of French (and foreign) readers can be explained, in part, by its subtle and incisive rendering of Europeanism through caricature. This course will examine some of the most enduring texts in the Asterix saga as interpretations, first, of French culture and the way the French view themselves with respect to the rest of Europe and, second, of the way they view Europe in dialogue with French cultural norms. Such issues as "la patrie" (homeland), linguistic characteristics, the idea of France, French provincial distinctiveness, France's view of homogeneous national character seen through its own cultural diversity, and the relationship of France to other specific regional cultures will be studied as a way not only of defining the nation's historic legacy, but of coming to terms with the way it sees its place within the vision of the European Union. Among the texts to be studied will be Asterix the Gaul, Asterix and the Banquet, Asterix and the Normans, Asterix in Corsica , Asterix in Britain, Asterix and the Goths, Asterix in Belgium, Asterix in Switzerland. Analysis of the primary texts will be complemented by secondary cultural readings by prominent interpreters of French culture. The course will be conducted in English; readings will be in English, but those students who wish to read the texts in the original French should make arrangements in advance with the instructor. Three 2-hour meetings a week.
Requirements: class participation and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Meeting time: mornings, three 2-hour meetings a week.

Cost to student: books and reading packet only.

NORTON

RLFR 012 Roland Barthes: The Romance and Poetry of Criticism (Same as Comparative Literature 012 and English 023) (Cancelled)

(See under Comparative Literature for full description.)

RLFR 030 Honors Essay

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLFR 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for French 493-494.

ITALIAN

RLIT S.P. Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: 9:00-9:50

NICASTRO

SPANISH

RLSP S.P. Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: 9:00-9:50 a.m.

LÓPEZ and RODRÍGUEZ (Teaching Associates)

RLSP 030 Honors Essay

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLSP 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Spanish 493-494.

RUSSIAN

RUSS S.P. Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102

Required of all students enrolled in Russian 101-102. Three meetings per week, 50 minutes per session. Practice in speaking and comprehension based on material already covered as well as some new vocabulary and constructions. Designed to maintain and enhance what was acquired during fall semester, using new approaches in a relaxed atmosphere. No homework.
Regular attendance and active participation required to earn a "Pass." Open to all.
Meeting time: 9:00-9:50 a.m.

RUSS 013 Food on Film (Same as Special 013)

(See under Special for full description.)

RUSS 025 Williams in Georgia (Same as Special 025) (Cancelled)

Williams has a unique program in the Republic of Georgia, which offers students the opportunity to engage in three-week-long internships in any field. Last year's students worked in the Georgian Parliament, helped in humanitarian relief organizations like Save the Children, interned in journalism at The Georgian Times, taught unemployed women computer skills at The Rustavi Project, studied with a Georgian sculptor, did rounds at the Institute of Cardiology, and learned about transitional economies at the Georgian National Bank. In addition to working in their chosen fields, students experience Georgian culture through museum visits, concerts, lectures, meetings with Georgian students, and excursions. Visit the sacred eleventh-century Cathedral of Sveti-tskhoveli and the twentieth-century Stalin Museum, take the ancient Georgian Military Highway to ski in the Caucasus Range, see the birthplace of the wine grape in Kakheti and the region where Jason sought the Golden Fleece. Participants are housed in pairs with English-speaking families in Tbilisi, Georgia's capital city.
At the end of the course students write a 10-page paper assessing their internship experience. Knowledge of Russian or Georgian is NOT required.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8.
Cost to student: $2000.

GOLDSTEIN

RUSS 030 Honors Project

May be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RUSS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Russian 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY-See under ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

THEATRE

THEA 010 Shakespeare in Performance

Translating Shakespeare from the page to the stage has compelled centuries of actors. Responding to a play or a moment in a play and distilling that response into a performable one, accessible to an audience, is a process that is defined and redefined by theatre practitioners. In this course, students will take several scenes from Shakespearean plays and realize them for performance. Examining the text and the clues and signs offered by the structure of the poetry, students will direct and perform in these scenes. The final presentation will be fully mounted scenes presented to the college community entitled "SHAKESPEARE-SEX, DRUGS AND ROCK 'N ROLL!" Evaluation will be based on class participation, the final presentation and attendance.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Meeting times: TWR, 1 to 4 p.m.
Cost to students: $50 (one field trip to New York on Friday, January 4th through Saturday, January 5th)

EPPEL

THEA 011 Embodied Learning (Same as Japanese 011)

(See under ASST-Japanese for full description.)

THEA 012 Puppets and Puppet Traditions

Puppetry is one of the most fascinating, ancient and diverse forms of performance. This course will examine multiple styles of puppetry through readings, videos and hands-on practice. Students will study and create puppets in a variety of styles including shadow puppets, contemporary found-object theatre, toy theatre, (miniature proscenium performance), shadow puppetry, and large puppets that involve multiple operators and choral speaking. In addition to creating puppets and performing with them, students will complete a 10-page research paper on one aspect of puppetry and a presentation of their research to the class.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, paper presentations and attendance.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting times: MWR, 1-4 on the MainStage in the AMT.
Materials Fee: $40.

HAMILTON

THEA 025 Performance in New York City

New York City is recognized throughout the world as the nexus of the performance arts. Drawing upon Williams' proximity to New York, this course allows students to attend an expansive selection of theatre, dance, and other types of performance in New York City over the course of three trips of three days each accompanied by Professor Anna Bean of the Department of Theatre. In addition to attending performances, a three-hour seminar is scheduled in New York each week to discuss short critiques and readings students have prepared. There will be a mandatory preliminary class meeting on Monday, 10 December 2001 at 10:00 a.m. in the AMT Library. The first class trip to New York will commence on Tuesday, 8 January 2002.The format is to attend performances each Winter Study week at a Wednesday matinee, on Wednesday night, and on Thursday night. Students will be transported back and forth from NYC via van to the Metro North station in Wassaic. Accommodations will be at the Williams Club. Meal locations will occur in various locations throughout the city, and will be geared toward exploring New York's gastronomic diversity
Evaluation will be assessed through the generation of three 5-page critiques and participation in class discussion. Attendance to all performances is mandatory.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference will be given to theatre majors.
Costs to student:$1552.

BEAN

THEA 030 Senior Production

May be taken by students registered for Theatre 491, 492 but is not required.

THEA 031 Senior Thesis

May be taken by students registered for Theatre 493, 494 but is not required.

WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES

WGST 022 Virginia Woolf (Same as English 022)

(See under English for full description.)

WGST 030 Honors Project

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

SPECIALS

SPEC 010 Quest for College: Early Awareness in Berkshire County Schools

Today's extremely competitive higher education market places significant pressure on students nationwide to start planning for college at an increasingly early age while simultaneously demanding ever-higher standards of excellence for admission to top schools. "Early Awareness" initiatives aim to educate middle school students as to what lies ahead on the college horizon, empowering them to make sound academic and extracurricular choices that will keep open a maximum of options. The first week of this course will be spent in the classroom, exploring and discussing problems and issues germane to the national trends towards greater (and earlier) college-related pressures. Students will respond to a series of readings dealing with such issues as tracking, paid test preparation and untimed testing, early decision, parental and peer pressures, special interests, misrepresentation of information, independent counseling, and others. Class time will also be devoted to familiarizing students with both the nuances of the college admission process and the administration of the early awareness game, Quest for College. Students will spend the next two weeks visiting 10-12 Berkshire County middle schools, administering the game and inviting students to the culminating College Day. All 8 students will then work together to plan and run College Day activities for students and their parents. This day will include a) campus tours, b) general higher education info sessions, and c) financial aid/scholarship info for the parents. If student and community interest is sufficient, the course may culminate in a public presentation and open forum early second semester.
Evaluation will be based on completion of field work (school visits), organization and execution of project to bring local middle school students to the Williams Campus for a day of early-awareness related activities and a final paper (approxiamately 10 pages) reflecting on a course-related issue of the student's choosing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Preference given to a) students with prior education/admission experience, b) students with access to transportation c) juniors and seniors. Interested students must consult with instructors prior to registration. Students will be selected according to the following criteria: a) experience in teaching or admission, b) access to transportation, and c) seniority. Provision will be stated that interested students must consult the instructors before registration, that instructors may determine depth of experience and focus of interest.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: transportation to field work sites and purchase of text.

GINA COLEMAN '90 and MATTHEW SWANSON '97 (Instructors)
DREYFUS (Sponsor)

Gina Coleman '90, is Associate Director of Admission, Director of Multicultural Recruitment, and in her fifth year as women's rugby coach. Coleman, who holds an MA in education from MCLA, designed the game, Quest for College. Matthew Swanson '97 is in his third year as Assistant Director of Admission. Swanson has spent the past seven summers teaching/leading in various educational environments. Both Gina and Matthew have been involved with Early Awareness initiatives in Berkshire County schools.

SPEC 011 Science for Kids (Same as Chemistry 011)

Are you interested in teaching? Do you enjoy working with kids? Do you like to experiment with new things? Here is a chance for you to do all three! The aim of this Winter Study Project is to design a series of hands-on science workshops for elementary school children and their parents. Working in teams of 2-4, students spend the first two and a half weeks of Winter Study planning the workshops. This involves deciding on a focus for each workshop (based on the interests of the students involved) followed by choosing and designing experiments and presentations that will be suitable for fourth-grade children. On the third weekend of Winter Study (January 19, 20) we bring elementary school kids with their parents to Williams to participate in the workshops. You get a chance to see what goes into planning classroom demonstrations as well as a sense of what it's like to actually give a presentation. You find that kids at this age are great fun to work with because they are interested in just about everything and their enthusiasm is infectious. You also give the kids and their parents a chance to actually do some fun hands-on science experiments that they may not have seen before, and you are able to explain simple scientific concepts to them in a manner that won't be intimidating. It is a rewarding experience for all involved.
Lecture/discussion/laboratory. Evaluation is based on participation in planning and running the workshops. Each group is expected to prepare a handout with descriptions of the experiments for the kids, parents, and teachers.
No prerequisites. You need not be a science major; all that is needed is enthusiasm. Enrollment limit: 25.
Meeting time: Because the calendar this year allows only a brief preparation time for the workshops, classes meet as necessary until the workshops are completed. A "dress rehearsal" will be on January 16. The workshop is run on the third weekend of Winter Study (January 19, 20) and attendance from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. is mandatory that weekend. There are also one or two brief meetings held in the fall term for preliminary planning.
Cost to student: none.

KAPLAN

SPEC 012 How to Write Popular Science (Same as Chemistry 012 and English 012) (Cancelled)

Science writers' work is important because they are the chief conduits between scientists and the public, responsible for covering fields that are experiencing some of the most rapid advances in history. Their reporting must translate scientific subjects into clearly understandable ones and attempt to objectively put science news into personal, historical, political, economic, and social context. In this course, you will analyze examples of successful science writing for the general reader-science writing that entertains people while fascinating them. You will master library research methods. And, you will develop your talents for writing clearly, accurately, and with an interesting flair. We will read a lot, and by emulating good writing about science, you will develop skill in the art of explanation, which will serve you well in other courses. There will be numerous short writing assignments, including a longer final article popularizing a topic in science or technology of your choosing.
Format: discussion. Evaluation is based on class participation and completion of all reading and writing assignments.
Prerequisite: One Division III course prior to this course or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limit: 10.
Meeting times: MWF mornings.
Cost to student: $30 for books.

JO PROCTER (Instructor)
D. RICHARDSON and ROSENHEIM (Co-Sponsors)

Jo Procter is news director at Williams College. She has a B.S. in communications from Boston University. Her media experience includes Popular Science Magazine, Mutual Broadcasting, and WGBH-TV (Boston); she has written about science for Harvard University and Bostonia Magazine.

SPEC 013 Food on Film (Same as Russian 013)

Food figures prominently in many great films, provoking not only the senses but also the appetite. This course will explore the use of food as both sustenance and metaphor in a variety of international films, from the serious to the comic, from documentary to fantasy, from short to full-length feature. Films viewed will likely include La Grande Bouffe; The Cook, The Thief, His Wife, and Her Lover; Like Water for Chocolate; Woman on Top; Delicatessen; The Blood of the Beasts; A Touch of Spice; Tampopo; and Henry Jaglom's Eating. We'll also look at cooking-show clips from the TV Food Network to see how they reflect contemporary culture.
Requirements: active class participation and a final project involving research and food preparation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: Students are required to attend 3 evening film screenings a week and 3 morning discussion sessions (75 minutes each).

GOLDSTEIN

SPEC 014 Winter Emergency Care, CPR, Ski Patrol Rescue Techniques

The course is in three parts. When successfully completed it can lead to a certification as a National Ski Patrol member and certification in Professional Rescue CPR. It will also be designed to teach wilderness and outdoor emergency techniques. The Winter Emergency Care Course designed by the National Ski Patrol is the main ingredient. It will be supplemented by the Red Cross CPR for the Professional Rescuer. An additional 18-hour outdoor course in Ski Patrol rescue techniques will be taught. Passing all three courses will certify the student as a National Ski Patrol member if he/she is a competent skier. The course will deal with and teach how to treat wounds of all types, shock, respiratory emergencies, poisoning, drug and alcohol emergencies, burns, frostbite and other exposures to cold, also bone, joint, and back injuries, and sudden illnesses such as heart attacks, strokes, convulsions, etc. It will also teach the use of all splints, backboards, bandages, and other rescue equipment. It will teach extrication and unusual emergency situations and the use of oxygen. The outdoor course will include rescue toboggan handling, organization of rescues, and outdoor practical first aid. Classroom work will include lectures, seminars, and practical work.
Requirements : There will be a mid-term and a final exam which will be both written and practical. Each week there will be 17 hours of classroom work plus 8 hours of practical outdoor work at Jiminy Peak ski area. Attendance at all classes is mandatory.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 18. Students will be chosen on the basis of skiing interest and ability and prior first aid experience.
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons.
Cost to student: $100 which will include all materials, books and registration fees.

JAMES BRIGGS (Instructor)
SHEEHY (Sponsor)

Jim Briggs was the Outing Club director at Williams for many years. He has led trips to the Alps on a number of occasions. He is both a certified OEC instructors and a certified CPR instructor.

SPEC 015 Deaf and Proud: An Introduction to Deaf Language and Culture

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the world of deafness. Although it is not a sign language course, we will learn about the differences between American Sign Language (A.S.L.) and invented sign systems such as Signed English. Students should expect to develop a basic understanding of the linguistic status of American Sign Language (A.S.L.), a language in which the grammar is expressed on the face and which does not share the grammatical structures of English. We will give specific attention to the social and economic status of the deaf community at large and to the social and political constraints imposed upon them by a hearing community which denies them education in their own language. Three approaches to deaf education will be addressed: oral, signed English, and A.S.L. Several native signers will be invited to lecture and engage in dialogue with students about deaf politics and culture. The course will be taught by an instructor with extensive experience as an interpreter in the deaf community. In addition to exploring deafness from the perspectives of deaf people, students will learn about the role of the interpreter in both deaf and hearing communities. Major texts for the course may include the following: In This Sign by Joanna Greenberg, a child of deaf adults, The Mask of Benevolence by Harlan Lane, Voices from a Culture by Padden and Humprhies, and a collection of articles and videos.
Evaluation will be based on brief journal entries which record responses to videos, discussions and readings following each class, a 5-page critical response essay to an assigned topic, class participation, and a final project (i.e., oral presentation, performance, essay, etc.).
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: Students will be required to attend two afternoon class meetings per week from 1-4 p.m.
Cost to student: $30 for books.

LAURIE BENJAMIN (Instructor)
SAWICKI (Sponsor)

Laurie Benjamin is a graduate from the University of Massachusetts in multicultural and international education. Ms. Benjamin has taught deaf students at the secondary level. She is a nationally certified A.S.L. interpreter for the deaf with extensive experience in a wide range of interpreter settings including mental health and performance interpreting.

SPEC 016 Ayurveda: Art of Healing (Same as History of Science 016)

(See under History of Science for full description.)

SPEC 017 Introduction to Acting (Same as Mathematics 017)

(See under Mathematics and Statistics for full description.)

SPEC 018 Sports Writing

In this introduction to Sports Writing, students will learn the fundamentals of sports writing and how it differs from news writing. Students will explore different reporting, interviewing and editing techniques; learn how to develop leads and approach feature articles. Students will examine the differences in sports writing styles of newspaper and magazine publications (i.e., Sports Illustrated, New York Post, Boston Globe). Skills will be developed through in-class and on-campus writing assignments and discussion.
Requirements will include submission of articles for deadline and written text on the craft of interviewing and reporting.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons, twice per week.
Cost to student: approximately $20.

KRIS DUFOUR (Instructor)
SHEEHY (Sponsor)

Kris DuFour is a graduate of SUNY Old Westbury and has an M.A. from the Syracuse School of Communication. He has been the Sports Editor of the North Adams Transcript for the last 6 years after previous positions in New York, Georgia and Texas.

SPEC 019 Medical Apprenticeship

A student is assigned to a local physician, dentist, or veterinarian to observe closely his or her practice in the office and/or at the North Adams Regional Hospital, Berkshire Medical Center (Pittsfield, MA), or Southwestern Vermont Medical Center (Bennington, VT). It is expected that a student will spend the better part of the day, five days a week, with the physician or a period mutually agreed upon by the student and the physician as being educationally significant. The program has proven to be extremely successful in giving interested students a clear picture of the practice of medicine in a non-urban area. An effort is made to expose the student to a range of medical specialties. A 10-page report written on some aspect of the month's experience is required.
Prerequisite: Interested students must attend a mandatory information meeting in early October, prior to applying for this course. Enrollment limited to 44. (Preference is given to juniors, and then sophomores, whose course work has been suggestive of a firm commitment to preparation for medical school.)
Cost to student: none, except for local transportation and vaccinations.

TEACHING ASSOCIATES (Instructors)

DEBORAH AUGUST, M.D. GORDAN KUHAR, M.D.
TIM J. BAISCH, M.D. ANDRE LANGLOIS, M.D.
DANIEL I. BECKER, M.D. IRA LAPIDUS, D.M.D.
JAMES BOVIENZO, D.O. JOAN E. LISTER, M.D.
PEGGY CARON, D.V.M. PAUL MAHER, M.D.
BRIAN CUNNINGHAM, M.D. JEFFREY MATHENY, M.D.
RUTLEDGE CURRIE, M.D. RONALD S. MENSH, M.D.
PAUL DONOVAN M.D. JOANNE MORRISON, D.V.M
STUART DUBUFF, M.D. PAMELA NATHENSON
DAVID ELPERN, M.D. STEVE NELSON, M.D.
ROBERT FANELLI, M.D. CHARLES O'NEILL, M.D.
STUART FREYER, M.D. JUDY H. ORTON, M.D.
ERIC SCOTT FROST, M.D. NORMAN PARADIS, M.D.
MICHAEL L. GERRITY, M.D. MICHAEL C. PAYNE, M.D.
CYNTHIA GEYER, M.D. FERNANDO PONCE, M.D.
HENRY M. GOLD, M.D. RICHARD PROVENZANO, M.D.
DAVID M. GORSON, M.D. DANIEL S. ROBBINS, M.D.
AMY GRIFFIN, M.D. OSCAR RODRIQUES, M.D.
BONNIE H. HERR, M.D. CHARLES SILBERMAN, M.D.
DOUGLAS V. HERR, M.D. JULIE SILBERSTEIN, M.D.
ROBERT HERTZIG, M.D. ANTHONY M. SMEGLIN, M.D.
JUDITH HOLMGREN, M.D. ERWIN A. STUEBNER, JR., M.D.
ROBERT C. JANDL, M.D. KATHERINE URANECK, M.D.
LAURA JONES, D.V.M. KATHRYN WISEMAN, M.D.
THOMAS KAEGI, M.D. RICHARD WISEMAN, M.D.
COLLEEN KELLEY, M.D. CHARLES I. WOHL, M.D.
JOSHUA KLEEDERMAN, D.M.D. JEFFREY A. YUCHT, M.D.
JONATHAN KRANT, M.D. MARK ZIMPFER, M.D.

SUSAN SALKO, Health Professions Advisor

SPEC 024 Justice and Public Policy

The course will examine four or five significant public policy matters which have been resolved by the court system. These might include abortion, affirmative action, death penalty, election laws, free speech/obscenity. The focus of the course will be on the process involved in resolving the issues in the courts, the competing interests involved, the public impact of the decisions and, in most cases, the difficulty of resolution. This will not be a course in Constitutional Law because students won't be expected to master the many substantive areas of Constitutional Law. Students will have an opportunity to make oral presentations during class periods. Students will spend two to three days in Boston where they will have the opportunity to witness activities at the Middlesex County District Attorneys Office and meet with representatives of the federal and state judiciary.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper, an oral presentation, and regular participation in class.
No prerequisites Enrollment limit: 12. If the course is overenrolled, students will be asked to write a short essay to determine selection.
Meeting time: MR mornings (all day while in Boston). Students will meet in December prior to the break to discuss logistics and expectations for the course.
Cost to student: $150 for hotel accommodations in Boston and course materials.

MICHAEL B. KEATING '62 and MARTHA COAKLEY '75 (Instructors)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Michael B. Keating '62 is a trial lawyer with the Boston law firm of Foley, Hoag and Eliot. Martha Coakley is District Attorney for Middlesex County.

SPEC 025 Williams in Georgia (Same as Russian 025)

(See under Russian for full description.)

SPEC 026 Healthcare in Havana: A Comparative Study of Resource Allocation and Public Health Policy (Same as Political Economy 026)

(See under Political Economy for full description.)

SPEC 027 Teaching and Writing at Theodore Roosevelt High School

Students choosing this Winter Study project will live in New York and travel daily to Roosevelt, a large comprehensive high school in the Bronx. A typical day includes: conducting small group work in selected classes (mostly English and Social Studies, but others are possible), working one-on-one with selected students, working in school departments (e.g., college guidance office, tutoring center), and seminar-style meetings in which we discuss and write on issues that emerge from the work with students and teachers.
Requirements: active and reliable participation in tutoring and discussion during January; participation in several brief orientation meetings before January (possibly including a half-day trip to TRHS), a journal during the program, a written report in a format of the student's choice at the end.
Prerequisites: Strong interest in working with young people. Enrollment limit: 15 sophomores, juniors and seniors.
Cost to student: $350 for transportation and food. We will attempt to provide housing for tutors. Consult with instructor.

G. NEWMAN (Instructor)
German and Russian Departments (Sponsor)

SPEC 028 Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan

Participating sophomores, juniors and seniors will be expected to pursue a full day's program of observing, teaching, tutoring, and mentoring at Christopher Columbus HS in the Bronx or at A. Philip Randolph HS in Manhattan. Each of the schools will provide a resident supervisor for the Williams teaching interns who will meet regularly to assist with questions and to monitor individual schedules.
Criteria for a pass include full-time affiliation with the school for the entire winter study, keeping a daily journal, participating in the weekly after school seminars held for all of the NYC teaching practicums, and submitting a 5- to l0-page report at the end of Winter Study reflecting upon and summarizing the month's learning experience. Orientation meetings and a visit to the high school prior to the start of winter study will be arranged.
Cost to student: $400 for food and transportation. Housing in NYC will be arranged where necessary.

P. SMITH Coordinator of High School/College Partnerships

SPEC 029 Junior High School Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan

Participating sophomores, juniors, and seniors will be expected to pursue a full day's program of observing, teaching, tutoring and mentoring at PS 45 in the Bronx (a feeder school to Roosevelt HS) or at Roberto Clemente Junior High School in Manhattan (a feeder school to A. Philip Randolph HS). Each of the schools will provide a resident supervisor for the Williams teaching interns who will meet regularly to assist with questions and to arrange individual schedules.
Criteria for a pass include full-time association with the school for winter study, keeping a daily journal, participating in the weekly meetings for all of the Williams Teaching Interns, and submitting a 5- to l0-page report at the end of Winter Study reflecting upon and summarizing the month's learning experience. An orientation program and a visit to the school will be arranged prior to January.
No prerequisites.
Cost to student: $400 for food and transportation while in NYC. Housing will be arranged for those needing it.

P. SMITH Coordinator of High School/College Partnerships

SPEC 035 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel (Same as ArtS 035)

Each class will begin with a lecture-demonstration, followed by practice on the potter's wheel. Each student will have the use of a potter's wheel for each class. We will work on mugs, bowls, pitchers, plates, jars, lids, vases, and bottles, and will finish these shapes as required by trimming and adding handles, lugs, lids, spouts, and knobs. We will also work on several different handbuilding projects. After the tenth class session, all class work will be biscuit-fired. The eleventh class will be devoted to glazing the biscuited pieces. Glazing techniques will include pouring, dipping, layering, brushing, and stamping, and using wax resist and other masking techniques to develop pattern and design. The completed work will then be glaze-fired. The last meeting will be devoted to a "final exam" gallery show of your best work. Woven into lecture-demonstrations will be presentations on various topics relating to the science and history of pottery making.
The two most important requirements for this course are attendance at all class sessions and enthusiasm for learning the craft of pottery making.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 9.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $145 plus makeup class fees ($30 per class) if applicable.

RAY BUB (Instructor)
FILIPCZAK (Sponsor)

Ray Bub is a ceramic artist and potter at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery in Pownal, Vermont.

SPEC 036 Teaching Practicum: St. Aloysius School, Harlem

An opportunity for up to five sophomore, junior or senior students to observe, tutor, teach and mentor at St Aloysius School in Harlem under the direction of Principal Laurel Senger. An orientation session and a visit to the school in December will be arranged prior to Winter Study.
Criteria to pass include full-time participation at St Aloysius for the month, keeping a daily journal, participating in the weekly meetings of all NYC practicum students, and submitting a 5- to l0-page report at the end of WSP reflecting upon and summarizing the month's learning experience.
Enrollment limit: 5 sophomores, juniors or seniors interested in teaching.

Cost to student: $400 for food and transportation. Housing in NYC will be arranged where necessary.

P. SMITH Coordinator of High School/College Partnerships

SPEC 039 Composing A Life: Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams

To be at Williams you have learned to be a successful student, but how do you learn to be successful in life? How will you define success in both your career and in your personal life? How will you resolve the inevitable tradeoffs and achieve balance between the two? In short, what will constitute the "good life" for you? We will borrow the concept of "composing a life", from a book by Mary Catherine Bateson, as a very apt metaphor for the ongoing process of defining success and balance in life. This course is designed: (1) To offer college students, on the threshold of entering adulthood, and opportunity to examine and define their beliefs, values, and assumptions about their future personal and professional lives, and to consider how they might achieve a successful balance; (2) To encourage students to gain a better understanding of how culture, ideology, and opportunity affect their life choices; (3) To provide an opportunity for students to consider different models of success and balance through an emphasis on case studies and "living cases" (in the form of guests from various professions who have made different life choices); and (4) To aid students in contemplating their career options through individual advising and introducing various career and life planning resources. Through the use of selected readings, cases, guest speakers and field interviews, we will explore both the public context of the workplace as well as the private context of individuals and their personal relationships in determining life choices.
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance, class participation, field interview, and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. (If you have questions about the course, please contact Michele Moeller Chandler at 458-8106 or chandler@bcn.net.)
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $30 for case materials and photocopied course packets.

MICHELE MOELLER CHANDLER and CHIP CHANDLER (Instructors)
TOOMAJIAN (Sponsor)

Michele Moeller Chandler ('73) and Chip Chandler ('72) have taught this Winter Study course for the past five years. They have been both personally and professionally engaged in the course topic. Michele's career has been in college administration, and she has an M.A. from Columbia, and a Ph.D. from Northwestern. Her Ph.D. dissertation focused upon the career/family decisionmaking of professional women who altered their careers because of family obligations. Chip is a senior partner with McKinsey & Company, an international management consulting firm, and he has an M.B.A. from Harvard. He will share the teaching load on a part-time basis.

WILLIAMS PROGRAM IN TEACHING

Students interested in exploring one or more of the following courses related to teaching and/or working with children and adolescents should contact Susan Engel, Director of Education Programs, who will be able to help you choose one that best suits your educational goals.

WILLIAMS-MYSTIC PROGRAM IN AMERICAN MARITIME STUDIES

An interdisciplinary one-semester program co-sponsored by Williams College and Mystic Seaport which includes credit for one winter study. Classes in maritime history, literature of the sea, marine ecology, oceanography, and marine policy are supplemented by field seminars: offshore sailing, Pacific Coast and Nantucket Island. For details, see "Williams-Mystic Maritime Studies Program" or our website: www.williamsmystic.org.


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