Office of The RegistrarWilliams College

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Winter Study Courses 2003

 

WINTER STUDY PROGRAM

REMINDERS ABOUT WSP REGISTRATION

All students who will be on campus during the 2002-2003 academic year must register for WSP. Registration will take place in the early part of fall semester. If you are registered for a senior thesis in the fall which must be continued through Winter Study by departmental rules, you will be registered for your Winter Study Project automatically. In every other case, you must complete registration. First-year students are required to participate in a Winter Study that will take place on campus; they are not allowed to do 99's.

Even if you plan to take a 99, or the instructor of your first choice accepts you during the registration period, there are many things that can happen between registration and the beginning of Winter Study to upset your first choice, so you must list five choices. You should try to make one of your choices a project with a larger enrollment, not that it will guarantee you a project, but it will increase your chances.

If you think your time may be restricted in any way (ski meets, interviews, etc.), clear these restrictions with the instructor before signing up for his/her project.

Remember, for cross-listed projects, you should sign up for the subject you want to appear on your record.

For many beginning language courses, you are required to take the WSP Sustaining Program in addition to your regular project. You will be automatically enrolled in this Sustaining Program, so no one should list this as a choice.

The grade of honors is reserved for outstanding or exceptional work. Individual instructors may specify minimum standards for the grade, but normally, fewer than one out of ten students will qualify. A grade of pass means the student has performed satisfactorily. A grade of perfunctory pass signifies that a student's work has been significantly lacking but is just adequate to deserve a pass.

If you have any questions about a project, see the instructor before you register.

Finally, all work for WSP must be completed and submitted to the instructor no later than Thursday, January 30th. Only the Dean can grant an extension beyond this date.

WINTER STUDY 99'S

Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible to propose "99's," independent projects arranged with faculty sponsors, conducted in lieu of regular Winter Study courses. Perhaps you have encountered an interesting idea in one of your courses which you would like to study in more depth, or you may have an interest not covered in the regular curriculum. In recent years students have undertaken in-depth studies of particular literary works, interned in government offices, assisted in foreign and domestic medical clinics, conducted field work in economics in developing countries, and given performances illustrating the history of American dance. Although some 99's involve travel away from campus, there are many opportunities to pursue intellectual or artistic goals here in Williamstown.

99 forms are available online:

http://www.williams.edu/Registrar/winterstudy/99direct.html

The deadline for submitting the proposals to faculty sponsors is Thursday, 26 September.

Winter Study Course Offerings

AMES 031 Senior Thesis
AAS 011 African American History Through Film (Same asHistory 011)
AAS 030 Senior Project
AMST 011 Why New Englanders Eat What They Eat (Same as History 019 and Philosophy 011)
AMST 015 Uncle Eph in his Youth: Old Williams in Thought and Form (Same as ArtH 015, English 024 and Special 015)
AMST 030 Senior Honors Project
ANSO 010 Intellectual Property
ANSO 011 Berkshire Farm Internship
ANSO 012 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse
ANSO 013 Subsistence and Development: Special Issues in Alaska Native Economy and Society (Same as Environmental Studies 021)
ANTH 017 Introduction to Research in Archaeological Science (Same as Chemistry 017)
ANTH 031 Senior Thesis
SOC 031 Senior Thesis
ARTH 010 To Outwit Time Is No Small Feat: Exploring Regional Museums
ARTH 012 The Ramayana in Art (Same as Asian Studies 012)
ARTH 015 Uncle Eph in his Youth: Old Williams in Thought and Form (Same as American Studies 015, English 024 and Special 015)
ARTH 016 Buddhist Art of Asia (Same as Asian Studies 016 and Religion 016)
ARTH 017 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography (Same as English 017)
ARTH 031 Senior Thesis
ARTH 033 Honors Independent Study
ARTS 010 Marble Carving
ARTS 011 Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting and Design (CADD) (Same as Physics 011)
ARTS 012 Japanese Traditional Art: Kusaki-Zome and Weaving (Same as Japanese 012)
ARTS 013 Pastel: A Study of Color and the Figure
ARTS 014 Artforum Summer 1967: An Exhibition
ARTS 015 Large-Format Photography
ARTS 016 Natural Science Illustration (Same as Biology 016)
ARTS 017 History in Pieces (Same as History 017
ARTS 018 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as Chemistry 016)
ARTS 019 Meet the Right Side of Your Brain: Drawing as a Learnable Skill (Same as Physics 012)
ARTS 020 Writing, Illustrating, and Publishing Children's Books (Same as English 015)
ARTS 022 Goddesses, Confucius, Heroines, and Beauties: Chinese Dance
ARTS 024 Greenhouse Drawing (Same as Biology 024)
ARTS 033 Honors Independent Project
ARTS 035 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel (Same as Special 035)
ASST 010 Writing Chinese Lives: Memoir, Biography, History (Same as Political Science 010)
ASST 011 Gain & Loss: Classics of Mountaineering Literature
ASST 012 The Ramayana in Art (Same as ArtH 012)
ASST 016 Buddhist Art of Asia (Same as ArtH 016 and Religion 016)
ASST 026 Introduction to Zen Training for Pre-medical Students (Same as Religion 026 and Special 026)
ASST 031 Senior Thesis
CHIN 088 China for Tourists, China for Peasants
CHIN 031 Senior Thesis
JAPN 088 Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102
JAPN 011 Embodied Learning (Same as Theatre 011)
JAPN 012 Japanese Traditional Art: Kusaki-Zome and Weaving (Same as ArtS 012)
JAPN 031 Senior Thesis
ASTR 010 Cosmology: The History of the Universe
ASTR 011 Leadership in Astronomy: From Copernicus and Galileo to Hubble and the Age of the Universe (Same as History of Science 011 and INTR 011
ASTR 031 Senior Research
ASPH 031 Senior Research
BIOL 010 Electron Microscopy
BIOL 011 Envisioning a Sustainable Future (Same as Environmental Studies 011)
BIOL 012 Science in the Media (Same as Chemistry 012)
BIOL 013 Mapping the Natural Landscape (Same as Environmental Studies 013 and Geosciences 013)
BIOL 014 Orchids! (Same as Environmental Studies 014)
BIOL 015 Epidemiology, Epidemics, and Human Health (Same as Chemistry 015)
BIOL 016 Natural Science Illustration (Same as ArtS 016)
BIOL 017 The New England Forest (Same as Environmental Studies 017)
BIOL 018 Human Nature, Natural Limits and the Human Predicament (Same as Environmental Studies 018)
BIOL 019 Food Security and Agriculture in the Northeastern U.S. (Same as Chemistry 015)
BIOL 020 Evolution and Creationism (Same as History of Science 020 and Religion 020)
BIOL 022 Introduction to Biological Research
BIOL 023 Science Through Technology in an Elementary School Classroom
BIOL 024 Greenhouse Drawing (Same as ArtS 024)
BIOL 031 Senior Thesis
CHEM 011 Science for Kids (Same as Special 011)
CHEM 012 Science in the Media (Same as Biology 012)
CHEM 013 Drugs
CHEM 014 Emergency Medical Technician-Basic
CHEM 015 Epidemiology, Epidemics, and Human Health (Same as Biology 015)
CHEM 016 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as ArtS 018)
CHEM 017 Introduction to Research in Archaeological Science (Same as Anthropology 017)
CHEM 018 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry
CHEM 019 Introduction to Research in Environmental Science (Same as ENVI 020)
CHEM 020 Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry
CHEM 023 Introduction to Research in Organic Chemistry
CHEM 024 Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry
CHEM 031 Senior Research and Thesis
CLAS 010 Gender in Talmud and Midrash (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 010)
CLAS 011 Writing With Wedges: Language and Literature of Mesopotamia
CLAS 012 Love and Sex in the Ancient World
CLAS 031 Senior Thesis
COMP 010 Living by Words: Surviving and Thriving in the Art and Sport of Rhetoric (Same as ENGL 010, INTR 014, and SPEC 016)
COMP 011 Contemporary Israeli Film (Same as Religion 011)
COMP 013 Introduction to Indian Cinema (Same as Economics 013)
COMP 031 Senior Thesis
LIT 031 Senior Thesis
CSCI 010 C, UNIX and Software Tools
CSCI 011 The Dynamic Duo: Cold Fusion and SQL Server
CSCI 031 Senior Honor Thesis
CMAJ 031 Senior Thesis
ECON 010 East Asia: Miracle and Crisis
ECON 011 Surveys and Polls
ECON 012 Business Risk Analysis: Inside the Mind of a Banker
ECON 013 Introduction to Indian Cinema (Same as Comparative Literature 013)
ECON 014 Finance Using Excel
ECON 015 Philanthropy and the Social Entrepreneur
ECON 016 Entrepreneurism
ECON 017 Business Economics
ECON 018 Development Finance
ECON 025 The Razor-Edged Path to South Africa's Socio-Economic Transformation
ECON 030 Honors Project
ECON 031 Honors Thesis
ENGL 010 Living by Words: Surviving and Thriving in the Art and Sport of Rhetoric (Same as INTR 014 and Special 016)
ENGL 011 Queer Literatures: The Lesbian Tradition (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 011)
ENGL 012 Writing Non-Fiction
ENGL 013 Going to Extremes (Same as Special 013)
ENGL 014 Hardboiled
ENGL 015 Writing, Illustrating, and Publishing Children's Books (Same as ArtS 020)
ENGL 016 Critiquing the Critics
ENGL 017 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography (Same as ArtH 017)
ENGL 018 Artist of Empire: Rudyard Kipling Now
ENGL 019 Science-Fiction and Fantasy Workshop
ENGL 020 Hands-On Investigative Reporting (Same as History 015)
ENGL 022 Sylvia Plath's Ariel
ENGL 023 Investigative Reporting Seminar (Same as History 016)
ENGL 024 Uncle Eph in his Youth: Old Williams in Thought and Form (Same as American Studies 015, ArtH 015 and Special 015)
ENGL 027 Sports Writing (Same as Special 018)
ENGL 028 Fantasy Novels of C.S. Lewis and Charles Williams (Same as Mathematics 014)
ENGL 029 The News Business
ENGL 030 Honors Project: Specialization Route
ENGL 031 Honors Project: Thesis
ENVI 010 Writing and Drawing-The Naturalist's Journal
ENVI 011 Envisioning a Sustainable Future (Same as Biology 011)
ENVI 012 Environmental Risk Assessment: Risk Perception, Reality and Assessment
ENVI 013 Mapping the Natural Landscape (Same as Biology 013 and Geosciences 013)
ENVI 014 Orchids! (Same as Biology 014)
ENVI 015 Land Conservation in Massachusetts
ENVI 016 Landscape as History in the American West (Same as History 013)
ENVI 017 The New England Forest (Same as Biology 017)
ENVI 018 Human Nature, Natural Limits and the Human Predicament (Same as Biology 018)
ENVI 019 Food Security and Agriculture in the Northeastern U.S. (Same as Biology 019)
ENVI 020 Introduction to Research in Environmental Science (Same as Chemistry 019)
ENVI 021 Subsistence and Development: Special Issues in Alaska Native Economy and Society (Same as ANSO 013)
ENGL 023 Bové, 'malbouffe,' McWorld (Same as Political Science 013)
ENVI 031 Senior Research and Thesis
GEOS 010 Creating Maps...and Lying!
GEOS 011 Dinosaurs and the Mesozoic World
GEOS 013 Mapping the Natural Landscape (Same as Biology 013 and Environmental Studies 013)
GEOS 031 Senior Thesis
GERM 088 Sustaining Program for German 101-102
GERM 030 Honors Project
GERM 031 Senior Thesis
HIST 010 Hollywood and American Political Life
HIST 011 African American History Through Film (Same as African-American Studies 011)
HIST 012 Imagining the Shtetl: Jewish Life and Culture in Nineteenth-Century Eastern Europe
HIST 013 Landscape as History in the American West (Same as ENVI 016)
HIST 014 The Evolution of the Women's Counseling Movement (Same as Psychology 019 and Women's and Gender Studies
014)
HIST 015 Hands-On Investigative Reporting (Same as English 020)
HIST 016 Investigative Reporting Seminar (Same as English 023)
HIST 017 History in Pieces (Same as ArtS 017
HIST 018 American Strategy in World War II: War Plans and Execution
HIST 019 Why New Englanders Eat What They Eat (Same as American Studies 011 and Philosophy 011)
HIST 023 The Williams Jewish History Project: Archives and History
HIST 031 Senior Thesis
HSCI 011 Leadership in Astronomy: From Copernicus and Galileo to Hubble and the Age of the Universe (Same as Astronomy 011 and INTR 011)
HSCI 020 Evolution and Creationism (Same as Biology 020 and Religion 020)
INTR 010 Corporate Leadership and Social Responsibility
INTR 011 Leadership in Astronomy: From Copernicus and Galileo to Hubble and the Age of the Universe (Same as Astronomy 011 and History of Science 011)
INTR 012 Justice and Public Policy (Same as Political Science 019)
INTR 014 Living by Words: Surviving and Thriving in the Art and Sport of Rhetoric (Same as INTR 014 and Special 016)
INTR 017 Presidential Leadership: From Washington to FDR (Same as Political Science 020)
INTR 018 Wilderness Leadership
INTR 026 Panama: Leadership at the Crossroads of the World (Same as Political Science 026)
INTR 010 Corporate Leadership and Social Responsibility
INTR 011 Leadership in Astronomy: From Copernicus and Galileo to Hubble and the Age of the Universe (Same as Astronomy 011 and History of Science 011)
INTR 012 Justice and Public Policy (Same as Political Science 019)
INTR 017 Presidential Leadership: From Washington to FDR (Same as Political Science 020)
INTR 018 Wilderness Leadership
INTR 026 Panama: Leadership at the Crossroads of the World (Same as Political Science 026)
MATH 012 The Dance of Primes
MATH 013 Beginning Modern Dance (Same as Special 023)
MATH 014 Fantasy Novels of C.S. Lewis and Charles Williams (Same as English 028)
MATH 015 What Was Fido Thinking?!
MATH 017 Onstage! (Same as Special 017)
MATH 018 Modern Dance-Muller Technique (Same as SPEC 020)
MATH 030 Senior Project
MATH 031 Senior Thesis
MUS 010 Isn't it Good, Norwegion Wood?: Storytelling in Music
MUS 012 Music of Charles Mingus
MUS 013 Handbell Choir
MUS 014 From Avant Garde to Popular Culture: The Theatre Songs of Kurt Weill (Same as Theatre 014)
MUS 031 Senior Thesis
NSCI 031 Senior Thesis
PHIL 010 The Philosophy of Chess
PHIL 011 Why New Englanders Eat What They Eat (Same as American Studies 011 and History 019)
PHIL 012 Berkeley and Skepticism
PHIL 013 Legal Realism and the Search for the Law (Same as Political Science 023)
PHIL 014 Native American Philosophies
PHIL 031 Senior Thesis
PHYS 010 Light and Holography
PHYS 011 Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting and Design (CADD) (Same as ArtS 011)
PHYS 012 Meet the Right Side of Your Brain: Drawing as a Learnable Skill (Same as ArtS 019)
PHYS 013 Automotive Mechanics
PHYS 015 Electronics
PHYS 016 Teaching with Technology
PHYS 022 Research Participation
PHYS 031 Senior Thesis
POEC 031 Honors Thesis
PSCI 010 Writing Chinese Lives: Memoir, Biography, History (Same as Asian Studies 010)
PSCI 011 The Political Writings of George Orwell
PSCI 012 Vietnam and the Origins of the New Left
PSCI 013 Bové, `malbouffe,' McWorld (Same as Environmental Studies 023)
PSCI 014 The Work of the Supreme Court: A Simulation
PSCI 015 Objective Journalism During Times of Conflict
PSCI 016 Satire and Parody
PSCI 017 International Ifs
PSCI 018 IDPs and Refugees
PSCI 019 Justice and Public Policy (Same as INTR 012)
PSCI 020 Presidential Leadership: From Washington to FDR (Same as INTR 017)
PSCI 023 Legal Realism and the Search for the Law (Same as Philosophy 013)
PSCI 026 Panama: Leadership at the Crossroads of the World (Same as INTR 026)
PSYC 010 The Psychology of Superstition and Belief in the Paranormal
PSYC 011 From Segregation to Accommodation: Changing Perspectives on Disabilities
PSYC 012 Children's Play
PSYC 013 Gender and the Media: Images of Women and Their Effects on Identity and Achievement (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 013)
PSYC 014 Sleep and Dreams
PSYC 015 Principles of Psychotherapy
PSYC 016 The Examined Life
PSYC 017 Teaching Practicum
PSYC 018 Institutional Placement
PSYC 019 The Evolution of the Women's Counseling Movement (Same as History 014 and Women's and Gender Studies 014)
PSYC 020 Eating Disorders
PSYC 031 Senior Thesis
REL 010 Training the Body-Mind: Introduction to Traditional Karate
REL 011 Contemporary Israeli Film (Same as Comparative Literature 011)
REL 012 The Spirit and Practice of Yoga: Coming into Alignment
REL 014 Language of the Holocaust
REL 016 Buddhist Art of Asia (Same as ArtH 016 and Asian Studies 016)
REL 020 Evolution and Creationism (Same as Biology 020 and History of Science 020)
REL 026 Introduction to Zen Training for Pre-medical Students (Same as Asian Studies 026 and Special)
REL 031 Senior Thesis
RLFR 088 Sustaining Program for French 101-102
RLFR 010 Acting French (Same as Theatre 010)
RLFR 030 Honors Essay
RLFR 031 Senior Thesis
RLIT 088 Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102
RLSP 088 Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102
RLSP 012 Cooking with Don Quixote: The History and Culture of Spanish Food
RLSP 030 Honors Essay
RLSP 031 Senior Thesis
RUSS 088 Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102
RUSS 025 Williams in Georgia (Same as Special 025)
RUSS 030 Honors Project
RUSS 031 Senior Thesis
THEA 010 Acting French (Same as French 010)
THEA 011 Embodied Learning (Same as Japanese 011)
THEA 012 Stage Management
THEA 014 From Avant Garde to Popular Culture: The Theatre Songs of Kurt Weill (Same as Music 014)
THEA 030 Senior Production
THEA 031 Senior Thesis
WGST 010 Gender in Talmud and Midrash (Same as Classics 010)
WGST 011 Queer Literatures: The Lesbian Tradition (Same as English 011)
WGST 013 Gender and the Media: Images of Women and Their Effects on Identity and Achievement (Same as Psychology 013)
WGST 014 The Evolution of the Women's Counseling Movement (Same as History 014 and Psychology 019)
WGST 030 Honors Project
SPEC 010 Quest for College: Early Awareness in Berkshire County Schools
SPEC 011 Science for Kids (Same as Chemistry 011)
SPEC 012 What is Williams?
SPEC 013 Going to Extremes (Same as English 013)
SPEC 014 Winter Emergency Care, CPR, Ski Patrol Rescue Techniques
SPEC 015 Uncle Eph in his Youth: Old Williams in Thought and Form (Same as ArtH 015)
SPEC 016 Living by Words: Surviving and Thriving in the Art and Sport of Rhetoric (Same as INTR 014 and Special 016)
SPEC 017 Onstage! (Same as Mathematics 017)
SPEC 018 Sports Writing (Same as English 027)
SPEC 019 Medical Apprenticeship
SPEC 020 Modern Dance-Muller Technique (Same as Mathematics 018)
SPEC 022 Deaf and Proud: An Introduction to Deaf Language and Culture
SPEC 023 Beginning Modern Dance (Same as Mathematics 013)
SPEC 024 Eye Care and Culture in Caribbean Nicaragua
SPEC 025 Williams in Georgia (Same as Russian 025)
SPEC 026 Introduction to Zen Training for Pre-medical Students (Same as Asian Studies 026 and Religion 026)
SPEC 027 Teaching and Writing at Theodore Roosevelt High School
SPEC 028 Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan
SPEC 029 Junior High School Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan
SPEC 035 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel (Same as ArtS 035)
SPEC 036 Teaching Practicum: St. Aloysius School, Harlem
SPEC 039 Composing A Life: Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams

 

AFRICAN AND MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES

AMES 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by candidates for honors by the thesis route in African and Middle Eastern Studies.

AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES

AAS 011 African American History Through Film (Same as History 011)

(See under History for full description.)

AAS 030 Senior Project

To be taken by students registered for Afro-American Studies 491 who are candidates for honors.

AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 011 Why New Englanders Eat What They Eat (Same as History 019 and Philosophy 011)

(See under Philosophy for full description.)

AMST 015 Uncle Eph in his Youth: Old Williams in Thought and Form (Same as ArtH 015, English 024 and Special 015)

(See under Special for full description.)

AMST 030 Senior Honors Project

To be taken by students registered for American Studies 491 or 492.

ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

ANSO 010 Intellectual Property

An introduction to the history and social significance of intellectual property. We will consider the origin of laws that protect trademarks, patents, and copyright, the ways in which they create new forms of property, and their contemporary crisis of legitimacy in the face of resistance to globalization. The first half of the course will consist of regular class meetings, the latter half of directed independent study of some aspect of intellectual property. Readings will include works by legal scholars, sociologists, anthropologists, and activists in indigenous rights and environmental conservation.
Requirements: 10- to 15-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: approximately $40.

M.F. BROWN

ANSO 011 Berkshire Farm Internship

A field placement at Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth in Canaan, New York. Berkshire Farm Center is a residential treatment facility for troubled, at-risk adolescent boys who have been remanded to the Farm by the Family Court. These youths come primarily from lower socio-economic strata, are very ethnically diverse, and hail from both urban and rural areas throughout New York State. The problems that they bring to Berkshire Farm are multiple. These include: the psychological scars of dysfunctional families, including those of physical, emotional, and sexual abuse; chemical dependency; juvenile delinquency; inability to function in school settings; and various other issues. Residential treatment is a multi-modal approach that includes anger-replacement training, social skills training, and behavioral modification.
Williams students will commute to Berkshire Farm and work under supervision in one of the following areas: school, cottage life, chemical dependency unit, research, recreation, performing arts, or in individual tutoring. Students will keep a journal reflecting on their experiences. A weekly seminar with the instructor will draw on service learning experience. Students will also be required to submit a final 10-page paper at the end of the course.
Prerequisites: placement is only through interview with instructor before registering for course.
Enrollment limit: 13. (All queries about this course should be directed to the instructor, who can be reached at 518-781-4567, ext. 322.)
Meeting time: TBA
Cost to student: none.

LARI BRANDSTEIN (Instructor)
D. EDWARDS (Sponsor)

Lari Brandstein is Director of Volunteer Services at Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth.
Budget: $600 in rental of college vehicles for students who need transportation to Berkshire Farm Center in Canaan, NY, approximately 50 miles from Williamstown.

ANSO 012 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

The incidence of reported child abuse and neglect has reached epidemic proportions and shows no signs of decreasing. Preventive and prophylactic social programs, court intervention, and legislative mandates have not successfully addressed this crisis. This course allows students to observe the Massachusetts Department of Social Services attorney in courtroom proceedings related to the care and protection of children. Students will have access to Department records for purposes of analysis and will also work with social workers who will provide a clinical perspective on the legal cases under study. The class will meet regularly to discuss court proceedings, assigned readings, and the students' interactions with local human services agencies.
Evaluation will be based on the journal and a final 10-page paper. Full participation in the course is expected.
Requirements: access to an automobile is desirable but not required; some transportation will be provided as part of the course.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. (All queries about this course must be directed to the instructor, Judge Locke. Phone messages may be left at 458-4833.)
Meeting time: TBA.
Cost to student: $25 for books and photocopies.

JUDITH LOCKE (Instructor)
D. EDWARDS (Sponsor)

Judith Locke is Associate Justice of the Juvenile Court, Commonwealth of Massachusetts

ANSO 013 Subsistence and Development: Special Issues in Alaska Native Economy and Society (Same as Environmental Studies 021)

CANCELLED!

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 017 Introduction to Research in Archaeological Science (Same as Chemistry 017)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

ANTH 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Anthropology 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Sociology 493-494.

ART

ART HISTORY

ARTH 010 To Outwit Time Is No Small Feat: Exploring Regional Museums

This course will introduce the holdings of selected regional museums through weekly museum excursions. All aspects of museums will be discussed, though an emphasis will be on discussing the delicate balance between preservation of, and access to, museum objects. Art conservation and preservation methods will be described, and at least one tour of an art conservation laboratory will be included in the class. The class will begin with a tour of the Williams College Museum of Art, and will continue with four, weekly day-long museum excursions. Tours will include exhibitions, and behind-the scenes views at MASS MoCA, the Chapin Library, the Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery, the Clark Art Institute, Historic Deerfield, and the Albany Institute of History and Art. The class will travel to New York; the museums selected will depend on the current exhibition schedules.
Evaluation will be based on participation in all museum visits and one researched presentation and accompanying 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to student: $100-$125, for books, handouts, costs associated with admission to museums, and possibly one overnight field trip. The cost and schedule of the museum visits will be available during enrollment and at the first class.

LORI K. VAN HANDEL (Instructor)
LEWIS (Sponsor)

Lori van Handel is a conservation specialist who directs Heritage Conservation Services, a local conservation firm. From 1994 to 2000 she was Associate Conservator at the Williamstown Arts Conservation Center.

ARTH 012 The Ramayana in Art (Same as Asian Studies 012)

The Ramayana, or "Travels of Rama," is one of the most popular epics of Idia. It is a heroic tale involving romance, sacrifice, villainy, and warfare on both the human and the cosmic or heavenly scales. To know the Ramayana is to grasp the essentials of Hindu religion, culture, and values. This course will explore the exciting visual and performing arts inspired by the Ramayana in India, where the story originated, as well as the lands of Southeast Asia where it spread. Arts to be explored will include the great temple sculptures in stone and bronze, large scale and miniature painting, plays, dance and musical drama, batik, puppet shows, even modern day comic books, and film and television productions of the Ramayana. Social and aesthetic issues to be considered may include the role played by the arts in society; methods and aims of artistic expression; ideals of beauty and of virtue; social status and gender; the various transformations of the Ramayana in both literature and art in various parts of India and by various levels of society ("folk" art vs. "high" art), as well as the various different cultures of southeast Asia. The course will consist partly of art history lectures, and partly of studio art practice.
Evaluation will be based on attendance (mandatory), participation in class discussions based on readings, and the production of painted illustrations to the story.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings, two three-hour sessions per week.
Cost to student: $50.

GARY SMITH (Instructor)
JANG (Sponsor

Gary Smith is a local historian specializing in Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, and in the art of southeast Asia. His graduate work was done at the University of California, Berkeley.

ARTH 015 Uncle Eph in his Youth: Old Williams in Thought and Form (Same as American Studies 015, English 024 and Special 015)

(See under Special for full description.)

ARTH 016 Buddhist Art of Asia (Same as Asian Studies 016 and Religion 016)

(See under Religion for full description.)

ARTH 017 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography (Same as English 017)

(See under English for full description.)

ARTH 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for ArtH 493, 494.

ARTH 033 Honors Independent Study

To be taken by candidates for honors by the independent study route.

ART STUDIO

ARTS 010 Marble Carving

The marble carving workshop introduces the student to the tools and traditional techniques of marble sculpture. This course is suitable for students of all levels of ability. The instructor will demonstrate the techniques and then help each student with their work. Instruction will include roughing out the work in planes, modeling with tooth chisels, carving the final form and finishing the surface. There will be demonstrations on the use of the diamond saw and air hammer (if a compressor is available. We will work with hand tools and each student should bring a model (maquette) of the sculpture they wish to carve. We will use local Vermont marble for the workshop.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, effort, attendance, the quality of work produced and the final exhibition of work.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: afternoons, 6 hours of instruction and additional lab hours.
Cost to student: $75 for tools. All students are responsible for their own tools.

FRED X. BROWNSTEIN (Instructor)
PODMORE (Sponsor)

Fred X. Brownstein is a sculptor who creates contemporary figurative work in marble and bronze. He received his B.F.A. at the San Francisco Art Institute and worked for 16 years in Italy.

ARTS 011 Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting and Design (CADD) (Same as Physics 011)

CANCELLED!

ARTS 012 Japanese Traditional Art: Kusaki-Zome and Weaving (Same as Japanese 012)

(See under Asian Studies-JAPN for full description.)

ARTS 013 Pastel: A Study of Color and the Figure

A studio course for those who have a keen interest in exploring their artistic potential. The instruction will be individualized but all will benefit from gentle but constructive group critiques. Pastel is one of the best media for learning about color as it can only be mixed directly on the painting surface; the range of color and hue that results from the mixing of just a few pastels is remarkable. The class will focus primarily on drawing and painting the figure. With the use of fabrics we will partially clothe the figure and the background in a variety of colors from neturals to brilliant hues in order to explore the range of colors that pastel accommodates. Students will need to purchase or provide a medium-sized set of pastels. Other items that are needed are easels, drawing boards, 1" to 2" wide bristle brushes, pastel paper, glassine paper and a simple portfolio.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, effort, attendance, the quality of work produced and the final exhibition of work.
No prerequisites. Some studio experience is helpful but not required. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: mornings, six hours per week.
Cost to student: $110 lab fee.

JULIA MORGAN (Instructor)
PODMORE (Sponsor)

Julia Morgan is a local artist who works in the education department of the Williams College Museum of Art. She received her M.A. in Studio Art from Mt. Holyoke and studied at the Leo Marchutz School of Painting and Drawing in Aix-en-Provence, France.

ARTS 014 Artforum Summer 1967: An Exhibition

This course will consider a moment in recent art history from the point of view of a studio artist. Like anthropologists from another planet, students in this class will look for meaning in every inch of a cultural artifact, in this case, an Artforum magazine from the summer of 1967. What was so special about the summer 1967 issue of Artforum? The issue contains a dramatic clash between two distinct critical points of view: the critic Michael Fried contributed a landmark essay, "Art and Objecthood" and the artist Sol LeWitt published his now famous, "Paragraphs on Conceptual Art." In this issue we see the end of one modernist view of art, and the beginnings of the many mixed art practices to come. We will consider everything between the covers: essays, reviews, projects by artists, even advertisements as we consider this hinge moment in contemporary art practice. Our goal is to create a comprehensive (yet physically small) exhibition based on the art depicted between these pages. Students will build scale models, make drawings and paintings or otherwise engage art on view in the magazine.
No particular aptitude for these techniques is required, though a willingness to learn is essential.
Evaluation will be based on journal entries, class participation, and the successful completion of artwork for the end-of-class exhibition.
Prerequisite: any 100 level art history or studio art course. Enrollment limit: 16. Open to all, but preference will be given to Art majors.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: approximately $75 for materials.

DEREK STROUP '92 (Instructor)
GLIER (Sponsor)

Derek Stroup '92 is an artist based in New York City. His sculpture, photographs and paintings are in numerous public and private collections. Recent exhibitions include the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, The Contemporary Museum in Honolulu, and the Roy Boyd Gallery.

ARTS 015 Large-Format Photography

The course is designed to introduce students to studio/view cameras, to processing the sheet-film negatives made in them, and to making contact and projection prints. Studio exercises will include careful analysis of camera movements to teach their use, and a consideration of lighting techniques; dark room exercises will include the tray development of sheet film, determination of effective film speed, and control of contrast through development time. The subject matter of the photographs produced in the course will not be prescribed; it is limited only by the participants' imagination and the weather in January. Working with subjects of their own choosing, students will be instructed in the principles of traditional photographic image making by producing large-format negatives and translating them into effective black-and-white prints in 4x5 and 8x10 formats.
Each student will be expected to make exhibition-quality prints, which may be enlargements or contact prints from 4x5 negatives, or contract prints from 8x10 negatives. The prints will be exhibited in a group show at the end of Winter Study.
Evaluation will be based on commitment to the course, participation in discussion sessions, and the quality of the prints.
No prerequisites (although camera and darkroom experience a plus). Enrollment limit: 10.
Meeting time: mornings; there will be six hours weekly for lectures, demonstrations and crits. At least 20 hours weekly in the darkroom are expected, under the supervision of a photo technician.
Cost to student: $175 lab fee.

RALPH LIEBERMAN (Instructor)
M. LEWIS (Sponsor)

Ralph Lieberman is an art historian and photographer who lives in Williamstown. He has a Ph.D. from the Institute of Fine Arts. His photographs have appeared in many publications and are to be found in major American and European art historical study collections.

ARTS 016 Natural Science Illustration (Same as Biology 016)

(See under Biology for full description.)

ARTS 017 History in Pieces (Same as History 017)

(See under History for full description.)

ARTS 018 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as Chemistry 016)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

ARTS 019 Meet the Right Side of Your Brain: Drawing as a Learnable Skill (Same as Physics 012)

(See under Physics for full description.)

ARTS 020 Writing, Illustrating, and Publishing Children's Books (Same as English 015)

(See under English for full description.)

ARTS 022 Goddesses, Confucius, Heroines, and Beauties: Chinese Dance

This course consists of two components, practice and history. For the latter, the instructor will use visual materials, such as ancient Chinese paintings and murals, which are rich in this regard, and videotapes. Students will be given reading materials related to the mythology and sociopolitical and cultural context and significance of the dances to be taught. The dances include, for instance, fan dance, ribbon dance, and the Bayi, a ritual dance performed at the temples of Confucius since ancient times, which is still performed in Taiwan on Confucius' birthday.
Requirements: class participation and a final public performance at the end of Winter Study.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: three afternoons a week.

LIANG CHEN (Instructor)
JANG (Sponsor)

Liang Chen was Assistant Professor at National Tawian Normal university and International Judge for Women's Gymnastics before she came to this country in 1970's. She specializes in Chinese dance and has taught it since.

ARTS 024 Greenhouse Drawing (Same as Biology 024)

The college has a beautiful new greenhouse that is full of light, scented with earth, and filled with the reassuring form and color of plants. These appealing qualities are all the more inspiring during the month of January when we need signs of renewal. "Greenhouse Drawing" will meet for nine hours a week in this campus oasis to draw the plants and architecture. We will also use studio space in Spencer to enlarge and abstract our life studies into large scale compositions that involve pattern and color. Beginning and advanced students are welcome, since the small class size allows for personalized instruction. The class will focus on the careful observation of nature and should be of interest to both the scientist and the artist.
Evaluation is based on successful in-class projects and weekly homework and participation in an exhibition in the Wilde Gallery.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. (Since most drawing classes give priority to first years, this class will reverse the order and accept seniors first, then juniors, sophomores and first years.)
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: $100 lab fee.

GLIER

ARTS 033 Honors Independent Project

Independent study to be taken by candidates for honors in Art Studio.

ARTS 035 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel (Same as Special 035)

(See under Special for full description.)

ASIAN STUDIES

ASST 010 Writing Chinese Lives: Memoir, Biography, History (Same as Political Science 010)

(See under Political Science for full description.)

ASST 011 Gain and Loss: Classics of Mountaineering Literature

When George Mallory was asked many years ago why he wanted to climb Mt. Everest, he simply replied, "Because it's there." This winter study course explores what motivates people to risk their lives to achieve such lofty goals by examining representative works of mountaineering literature. Ample consideration will also be given to what climbers learn from their extreme experiences and how survivors deal with death. Works to be read include Harrer's The White Spider, Herzog's Annapurna, and Krakauer's Into Thin Air.
Evaluation is based on attendance and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: cost of books.

STAHL

ASST 012 The Ramayana in Art (Same as ArtH 012)

(See under ArtH for full description.)

ASST 016 Buddhist Art of Asia (Same as ArtH 016 and Religion 016)

(See under Religion for full description.)

ASST 026 Introduction to Zen Training for Pre-Medical Students (Same as Religion 026 and Special 026)

(See under Special for full description.)

ASST 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Asian Studies.

CHINESE

CHIN S.P. Sustaining Program for Chinese 101-102

Students registered for Chinese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Chinese Sustaining Program.
Requirements: regular attendance and active class participation.
Prerequisite: Chinese 101.
Meeting time: mornings; 9a.m.-9:50a.m., Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.

LANGUAGE FELLOW

CHIN 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Chinese.

JAPANESE

JAPN S.P. Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102

Students registered for Japanese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Japanese Sustaining Program.
Requirements: regular attendance and active class participation.
Prerequisite: Japanese 101.
Meeting time: Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9:00-9:50.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.

LANGUAGE FELLOW

JAPN 011 Embodied Learning (Same as Theatre 011)

CANCELLED!

JAPN 012 Japanese Traditional Art: Kusaki-Zome and Weaving (Same as ArtS 012)

In this class, students will learn traditional Japanese thread dyeing techniques using vegetable dyes. After dyeing the threads, students will make two tapestries with cardboard looms. The first tapestry will be a small wall tapestry, using basic techniques. The second one will be a wall tapestry using the free technique. The pattern for the second one will be an original design from the students. At the end of the class, a show will be held where students will display their works. This class requires no previous artistic training. The technical exercises will be done through several projects under the instructor's supervision.
Grading will be based on the completion of three projects, with a journal describing the project, and participation in the final class exhibition.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings, 10a.m. -12p.m., three times a week.
Cost to student: $40 lab fee.

KYOKO KABASAWA (Instructor)
CRANE (Sponsor)

Kyoko Kabasawa, a Japanese textile and dyeing artist, teaches at Asai Gakuen University in Hokkaido. In addition to a number of prizes awarded in Japan, she won an originality award in Hawaii's Hand weavers' Hui 45th Anniversary Biennial Exhibition in 1998, temari award in Hawaii's Hand weavers' Hui 46th Biennial Exhibition in 2000.

JAPN 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Japanese.

ASTRONOMY

ASTR 010 Cosmology: The History of the Universe

Every culture has a creation story about the beginning (and often the end) of the Universe. Over the last 50 years, scientists have developed a modern story, involving the Big Bang, the creation of the elements, the formation of stars and galaxies, and the expansion of the cosmos. The great advantage of the modern story is that it is based on solid and specific evidence. In this introductory course, meant for non-majors, we will recount the history of the Universe as a whole, from its fiery beginning to its possible fate over billions of years. Our emphasis will be on understanding the evidence. How do we know the age of the Universe? How do we measure the distance to the galaxies? We will discuss the concepts of space-time and radiation, and phenomena such as quasars and gravitational lenses, using no mathematics beyond basic algebra and trigonometry. We will also discuss those parts of the modern creation story that are still mysterious, such as the nature of "dark matter," the
apparent acceleration of the Universe's expansion, and the reason why the Big Bang banged.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference will be given to non-majors.
Meeting time: 3 mornings per week for 2 hours.
Cost to student: $35 for book and reading packet.

JOSHUA WINN (Instructor)
PASACHOFF (Sponsor)

Joshua Winn holds a Ph.D. in physics from MIT. He is currently a NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University, where his research focuses on gravitational lenses.

ASTR 011 Leadership in Astronomy: From Copernicus and Galileo to Hubble and the Age of the Universe (Same as History of Science 011 and INTR 011)

Progress in understanding our Universe has undergone major steps as the result of sweeping new ideas introduced by major scientists. Copernicus, in his book of 1543, shook the foundations of ancient science; Tycho, a few decades later, revolutionized the idea of observing the heavens; and Kepler, in 1603-1618, completed the Copernican Revolution by removing the ancient idea that perfect circles were necessary for orbits. Galileo's discoveries endorsed Copernicanism observationally. Halley and Newton, starting in the 1680's, led the world to comprehend the universality of gravity and linked comets with planets in obeying the law of gravity. In the twentieth century, Shapley moved the Sun out of its central place in the Universe and Hubble, in the 1920's, found that our galaxy was only one out of many and that the Universe is expanding all around us. In addition to studying the contributions of these leaders, we will see how Hubble's law of the expanding Universe was studied as a Key Project of the Hubble Space Telescope and how astronomers know more accurately the cosmic distance scale and the age of the Universe. We will investigate various observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and other telescopes on the ground and in space to show how they help us understand the universe. We will consider the cosmic distance scale back to its roots in Captain Cook's expedition to the South Pacific in 1769 to study the transit of Venus and discuss plans for observing the forthcoming transit of Venus, a rare event that has not been viewed by anyone now alive on Earth but that will occur in 2004. We will consider the role of NASA, the space shuttle, and astronaut/astronomers in shaping scientific goals. Biographies and other readings, videos, and visitors will help shape the discussion. In the rare book library, we will examine first editions of epochal books by the authors listed above, from Copernicus's 1543 volume on upward toward the present, and some students may wish to make their reports or carry out other projects with those volumes.
Evaluation will be based on a final 10-page paper and presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. If over-enrolled, selection will be made on the basis of interest expressed in e-mail or in person.
Cost to student: $15 for readings
Meeting time: one to three mornings a week for lectures and discussions plus occasional sessions with special visitors.
This is a course in the program of Leadership Studies and counts as one of the two prerequisites to INTR 402 - Topics in Leadership.

PASACHOFF

ASTR 031 Senior Research

To be taken by students registered for Astronomy 493, 494.

ASTROPHYSICS

ASPH 031 Senior Research

To be taken by students registered for Astrophysics 493, 494.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 010 Electron Microscopy

Students will undertake an independent project to investigate a topic of their choice using the transmission and scanning electron microscopes. They will do their own sample preparation, operate the two electron microscopes, and take micrographs of relevant structures. Class time will give a brief overview of the theory and operation of the microscopes and microtomes. In addition, students will learn how to develop and print their film from the TEM, and learn how to manipulate the digital images from the SEM in Adobe Photoshop. (Do you want your erythrocytes red or blue?) There will be brief reading assignments, a guest speaker and a 10-page paper with 8 well focused micrographs required. The lab is scheduled to receive a new SEM this summer that will allow observation of wet samples as well as conventional dried samples , and will extend the limits of research potential for the scope.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. No preference given.
Meeting time: afternoons. Class will meet for two hours, three times week, plus scope time.
Cost to student: $40 for text and readings.

NANCY PIATCZYC (Instructor)
H. WILLIAMS (Sponsor)

Nancy Piatczyc received her B.S. in Biology from Tufts University. She attended the school of Electron Microscopy in Albany, NY. She is a trained electron microscopist who operates and maintains the electron microscope facility at Williams.

BIOL 011 Envisioning a Sustainable Future (Same as Environmental Studies 011)

If humanity is to survive the next century, a massive movement towards ecological sustainability must occur. What is a sustainable lifestyle like? Will we have to sacrifice? How do we get there from here? In this course, we will first look at key technologies and resource management issues required for (and also driving!) the movement towards sustainability, including energy, water and agricultural practices. By considering the ramifications of these issues, it will be possible to envision in some detail what a sustainable lifestyle must be like. We will then consider how the mindset and practices of the developed world must evolve to allow the sustainability movement to truly take hold. Students will read several short background papers before each class.
Each student will write a 10-page paper or complete an equivalent project on a topic of their choice, and, in the last week of Winter Study present a 15-minute summary of this independent research.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16. Preference will be given to Environmental Studies concentrators.
Meeting time: Monday, Wednesday and Thursdays from 10a.m.-12p.m., and Tuesdays should be held open for all-day field trips.
Cost to student: $15 for purchasing a packet of photocopies papers, and may need to subsidize field trip costs.

SILVIO EBERHARDT (Instructor)
H. WILLIAMS (Sponsor)

Silvio Eberhardt holds B.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Biology from Lehigh University where he also pursued a minor in "Humanities perspectives in Technology") and a Ph.D. degree from The Johns Hopkins University. For the past 10 years he has taught computer engineering at Swarthmore College and Villanova University. During that time, he has avidly researched sustainable technologies for renewable energy systems, home construction (he participated in building a straw-bale/cob medical clinic near Ontario last summer), and food production (he has been running indoor hydroponic systems for the last 3 years). He plans to dedicate the rest of his career to sustainability.

BIOL 012 Science in the Media (Same as Chemistry 012)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

BIOL 013 Mapping the Natural Landscape (Same as Environmental Studies 013 and Geosciences 013)

Cartography, while rooted in the rigors of science, is very much an aesthetic exercise. A map that is successful aesthetically provides the best medium for communicating information to the user. Natural landscapes provide some of the most compelling and rewarding material for a cartographer to practice with. This project-oriented course will address both the scientific and aesthetic domains of cartography, while developing maps of natural areas of interest to individual students. Introductory material will include the cartographic fundamentals of geodesy and projections, geographic data research, and the compilation and manipulation of data. We will then turn our attention to cartographic design, with an emphasis on depicting natural landscapes as exemplified in the work of the great mountain cartographers of Switzerland as well as some closer to home. We will explore and utilize techniques that have become widely accessible with modern technology, such as digital elevation model manipulation and shading, and multi-layered artwork composition in raster and vector graphics environments. Students will design and complete a project involving the depiction of a landscape (with or without overlaid thematic content) on a map or cartographic illustration which may be static, animated or interactive.
Evaluation will be based on the completed project and a final exhibition.
Prerequisite: familiarity with computers-graphics experience recommended but not required. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference should be given to students already already having some familiarity with mapping and computer graphics.
Meeting time: three class meetings per week-two 10a.m. classroom sessions and one 1p.m. lab session.

PAT DUNLAVEY (Instructor)
H. WILLIAMS (Sponsor)

Pat Dunlavey is a free-lance cartographer who specializes in maps that emphasize landscape and offer a passionate view of the natural world. His credits range from orienteering maps, including those for 1993 World Orienteering Championships, to award-willing recreation maps such as the 2001 map of Chugach State Park in Alaska. His highly technical and interdisciplinary approach to cartography has been recognized in journals from Communication Arts to Cartographic Perspectives.

BIOL 014 Orchids! (Same as Environmental Studies 014)

This course explores the world of orchids. First we will consider the aesthetics of orchids and how this fueled both the exploration for new species in the nineteenth century and the production of modern hybrids. Next we will study the biology of orchids particularly the structural and physiological adaptations that have permitted these plants to inhabit sites as diverse as the treetops of tropical forests and the frozen meadows of New England. The complex relationship between flower structure and the behavior of pollinators is of special interest. The fascinating world of the orchid hybridizer will be examined. How is it possible to combine four genera to make one plant? The commercialization of orchids led to the destruction of many natural populations. Is it possible to protect and possibly reestablish endangered species through the cultivation and propagation of orchids from seed? Orchid hybridization and the discovery of methods for the tissue culture of rare plants have revolutionized the commercial availability of orchids. Globalization has affected the orchid industry. We will discuss these recent trends and what it means for those hoping for a career with orchids.
Students will be given the opportunity to examine living plants and flowers of various orchid genera. We will demonstrate the techniques for growing the plants in the greenhouse and within the home. Mature specimens will be repotted and students will deflask seedlings and set up community pots.
Students will be required to write a 10-page paper or develop an equivalent presentation on the orchid topic of their choice, to be shared with the class during a final session o the last day of Winter Study.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 14.
Meeting time: mornings, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 10a.m.-12p.m.; two field trips are planned-one to J&L Orchids in Easton, CT., a leader in growing species orchids from seed and the second to Conway Orchids in Conway, MA., a grower of championship Cattleya hybrids.
Cost to student: approximately $50, which includes field trips and textbook.

C.J. GILLIG (Instructor)
H. WILLIAMS (Sponsor)

C.J. Gillig, Technical Assistant in the Department of Psychology at Williams College, received his B.A. in Biology from St. Mary's Universty of San Antonio, Texas and his Ph.D. in Zoology from UMass, Amherst. Although he now works in the Department of Psychology he has remained interested in biology and specializes in orchids. He has a mixed collection representing numerous genera. He is a member of the American Orchid Society and the Amherst Orchid Society.

BIOL 015 Epidemiology, Epidemics, and Human Health (Same as Chemistry 015)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

BIOL 016 Natural Science Illustration (Same as ArtS 016)

Natural science illustration combines art with careful attention to the details of plant and animal life. Drawing or painting biological subjects is an important way to discover the true nature of an organism or habitat. In publications, illustrations clarify information and draw attention to the text. In this course, the instructor will present demonstrations and examples of natural science illustration, but the students will spend the bulk of their time creating their own illustrations. The goal will be for each student to research, illustrate, and write text for one comprehensive illustration about an aspect of natural science such as habitat, ecology, pollution or life-cycle. The class will meet twice a week in the morning for three hours and students will be expected to spend significant time outside class working on their illustrations and research.
Students will be evaluated on the basis of their class participation and the effort they put into their illustration for the final show. This course is open to anyone with a comfortable level of drawing ability.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 14.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: approximately $75.

ROBIN BRICKMAN (Instructor)
H. WILLIAMS (Sponsor)

Robin Brickman received her Bachelor's degree in graphic arts and botany from Bennington College. She is an award-winning illustrator with over twenty-five years of professional experience. She has illustrated books for Simon & Schuster, HarperCollins, Charlesbridge, The Millbrook Press, Rodale Press. Her works are shown and collected nationally.

BIOL 017 The New England Forest (Same as Environmental Studies 017)

This field-oriented course explores (first-hand and through readings and discussions) the ecology, natural history, utilization and conservation of New England's most abundant natural resource: the forest. A comparative approach to forest communities will be taken: we will visit different forest types across the New England landscape delving into some of the reasons why they may vary. Specific topics will include community dynamics, tree and shrub identification, adaptation, wildlife, threats to the forest, forest management and conservation issues. There will be up to four meetings per week, at least two of which will be in the field (some field trips may require that students are engaged in the class beyond normal WSP class hours). The course will culminate in a two to three day trip to more thoroughly investigate a remote forest region. Accordingly, students should be prepared to spend many hours in the outdoors coping with the elements.
Evaluation: a 10-page paper, technical report or comparable creative product on a topic relevant to the course.
No prerequisites: this course is appropriate for any student who possesses a healthy interest in natural history and the outdoors. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: mornings, with occasional all-day field trips.
Cost to student: approximately $185 (covers field trips, equipment, readings, etc.)

DREW JONES (Instructor)
H. WILLIAMS (Sponsor)

Drew Jones, Manager of the Hopkins Memorial Forest, has a Master of Forestry degree from Duke University. He has worked as a wildlife biologist and naturalist from the Southern Appalachians to the North Woods.

BIOL 018 Human Nature, Natural Limits and the Human Predicament (Same as Environmental Studies 018)

(See under Environmental Studies for full description.)

BIOL 019 Food Security and Agriculture in the Northeastern U.S. (Same as Environmental Studies 019)

(See under Environmental Studies for full description.)

BIOL 020 Evolution and Creationism (Same as History of Science 020 and Religion 020)

CANCELLED!

BIOL 022 Introduction to Biological Research

An experimental research project will be carried out under the supervision of the Biology Department. It is expected that the student will spend 20 hours per week in the lab at a minimum, and a 10-page written report is required. This experience is intended for, but not limited to, first-year students and sophomores, and requires the permission of the instructor.
Prerequisites: Biology 101. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

THE DEPARTMENT

BIOL 023 Science Through Technology in an Elementary School Classroom

CANCELLED!

BIOL 024 Greenhouse Drawing (Same as ArtS 024)

(See under ArtS for full description.)

BIOL 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Biology 493, 494.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 011 Science for Kids (Same as Special 011)

Are you interested in teaching? Do you enjoy working with kids? Do you like to experiment with new things? Here is a chance for you to do all three! The aim of this Winter Study Project is to design a series of hands-on science workshops for elementary school children and their parents. Working in teams of 2-4, students spend the first two and a half weeks of Winter Study planning the workshops. This involves deciding on a focus for each workshop (based on the interests of the students involved) followed by choosing and designing experiments and presentations that will be suitable for fourth-grade children. On the third weekend of Winter Study (January 25, 26) we bring elementary school kids with their parents to Williams to participate in the workshops.
You get a chance to see what goes into planning classroom demonstrations as well as a sense of what it's like to actually give a presentation. You find that kids at this age are great fun to work with because they are interested in just about everything and their enthusiasm is infectious. You also give the kids and their parents a chance to actually do some fun hands-on science experiments that they may not have seen before, and you are able to explain simple scientific concepts to them in a manner that won't be intimidating. It is a rewarding experience for all involved.
Format: lecture/discussion/laboratory. Evaluation is based on participation in planning and running the workshops. Each group is expected to prepare a handout with descriptions of the experiments for the kids, parents, and teachers.
No prerequisites: You need not be a science major; all that is needed is enthusiasm. Enrollment limit: 25.
Meeting time: mornings. Classes meet three times a week for approximately three hours each session. The workshop is run on the third weekend of Winter Study (January 25, 26) and attendance from 9a.m. to 3p.m. is mandatory that weekend. There are also one or two brief meetings held in the fall term for preliminary planning.
Cost to student: none.

JENNA MACINTIRE and L. PARK

Jenna MacIntire is a Laboratory Instructor for both the Biology and Chemistry Departments at Williams.

CHEM 012 Science in the Media (Same as Biology 012)

A good science writer takes specialized technical material and makes it clear, understandable, and compelling. A great science writer may even make it beautiful. In this course we will read examples of the best science writing for the general public in newspapers, magazines, books, museums, TV, and radio. In addition to discussing the science that informs each, we will talk about what the public needs to know about science and why, and look at the variety of ways scientific ideas are communicated to the public. We will investigate how good science writers interweave narrative and exposition, and how individual writers develop unique voices. In addition to a lot of reading, we also will do a lot of writing. By emulating good science writers in your own writing, and by discussing your own work as well as others, you will develop skills in the art of explanation, skills that will serve you well outside the class.
In addition to a number of short essays, each class member will write a longer essay popularizing a scientific topic of his or her choosing.
The goals of the course, in short, are to develop an appreciation of good writing about science, and by practicing the techniques of the masters, to help students develop skills in communicating scientific ideas to a variety of audiences.
Format: discussion. Evaluation is based on class participation and completion of all reading and writing assignments.
Prerequisite: One Div. III course at Williams prior to this course or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limit: 8.
Required reading: "The Best American Science Writing 2002"; Science Tuesday, NYTs. In addition, selections from newspapers, magazines, and books will be handed out in class and/or placed on reserve as readings for specific classes.
Meeting time: afternoons, three times a week for two hours each session.
Cost to student: $25 for book and newspapers.

JO PROCTER (Instructor)
J. EDWARDS and L. PARK (Sponsors)

Jo Procter, news director at Williams College, has a master of science in communication from Boston University. She also has worked for Popular Science Magazine, WGBH-TV, and Mutual Radio.

CHEM 013 Drugs

CANCELLED!

CHEM 014 Emergency Medical Technician-Basic

A course designed to prepare students for the Massachusetts EMT exam and to provide training to become certified as an Emergency Medical Technician. The course teaches the new national standard curriculum which makes reciprocity with many other states possible. Students will learn, among other skills, basic life support techniques, patient assessment techniques, defibrillation, how to use an epi-pen, safe transportation and immobilization skills, as well as the treatment of various medical emergencies including shock, bleeding, soft-tissue injuries, and child birth. In order to reduce the number of class meetings required during Winter Study Period, the course will hold the following mandatory meetings in the fall semester: 1 November (orientation), 3 November, 17 November, and 1 December.
Format: lecture/laboratory. Evaluation is based on class participation and performance on class exams, quizzes and practical exercises.
Prerequisite: It is recommended that students have American Heart Association Level C BLS Provider CPR Cards or American Red Cross BLS provider CPR cards before entering the EMT Class. A CPR class will be offered in October for those students wishing to take the EMT class who don't already have CPR cards. Enrollment limit: 24.
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons; schedule TBA in October. This is a time-intensive course involving approximately 130 hours of class time plus optional emergency room observation and ambulance work.
Cost to student: $350/student, plus approximately $75 for textbook.

KEVIN GARVEY (Instructor)
L. PARK (Sponsor)

Kevin Garvey is a Massachusetts state and nationally approved EMT-I (Intermediate) and an EMT-IC (Instructor/Coordinator). He had been involved with Emergency Medical Services for 15-20 years. Mr. Garvey currently works for Baystate Health Systems as an registered nurse and EMT-I and also works as an EMT-I for Village Ambulance in Williamstown. Mr. Garvey is also an EMT training instructor at Greenfield Community College.

CHEM 015 Epidemiology, Epidemics, and Human Health (Same as Biology 015)

Epidemiology is about the distribution of and determinants of disease in human populations. While the discipline first developed around epidemics of infectious diseases, its low technology approaches have been usefully employed to study most of the major acute and chronic non-infectious disease epidemics of the last 50-100 years, including pellagra, coronary heart disease, and lung cancer, and some of the minor epidemics, for example, occupational asbestos exposure and lung disease, and even the use (and misuse) of C-section in delivering babies.
The main purpose of this course is to stimulate critical thinking and impart an understanding of the logic and scientific methods of epidemiology in answering questions or hypotheses related to the etiology of specific human diseases, their prevention, their early detection, their prognoses, and the effectiveness of treatments used to cure or alleviate their effects.
For future health professionals, an understanding of epidemiologic methods will make it easier for you to keep up with the rapid pace of knowledge, and help you deliver the best, evidence-driven care. For others, the course will deepen their understanding of the forces that affect human health.
By means of lectures, individual meetings, and class discussion, including unknown exercises presented by groups of students working collaboratively, the review of current papers in the medical and public health literature, and readings, we will come to an appreciation of the rules of evidence in epidemiologic research. While some explanation of biostatistical applications will be necessary to understand the literature, this will not be a course in biostatistics.
Format: lecture/discussion. Evaluation is based on class participation and a circa 10-page paper centered on a mutually agreeable health issue in the current public health and medical literature. Students will present their conclusions to the whole group at the final sessions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons. The course will meet three times a week with occasional extra meetings for special projects.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for books and copied materials.

NICHOLAS H. WRIGHT '57 (Instructor)
L. PARK (Sponsor)

Dr. Nicholas H. Wright '57, a medical epidemiologist with a longstanding interest in family planning/population and international health issues, recently retired from the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Jersey, and now lives in Williamstown.

CHEM 016 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as ArtS 018)

This course provides an introduction to both a theoretical consideration of the glassy state of matter and the practical manipulation of glass. We do flameworking with hand torches for at least 12 hours per week. While no previous experience is required, students with patience, good hand-eye coordination, and creative imagination will find the course most rewarding. The class is open to both artistically and scientifically oriented students.
Format: lecture/discussion. Evaluation is based on class participation, exhibition of glass projects, a 10-page paper, and a presentation to the class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference is given to juniors and sophomores. Interested students should contact Professor Thoman by e-mail prior to registration.
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons, five days per week.
Cost to student: $50 for supplies.

THOMAN

CHEM 017 Introduction to Research in Archaeological Science (Same as Anthropology 017)

CANCELLED!

CHEM 018 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry

An independent experimental project in biochemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in biochemistry. Biochemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the molecular details of living systems including the interaction of biologically important molecules. In the Chemistry Department, studies are underway to investigate the structure/function relationship of proteins, the interaction between proteins and RNA and DNA, DNA structure and repair, and the molecular basis of gene regulation.
Format: laboratory research. A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least Chemistry 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

LOVETT

CHEM 019 Introduction to Research in Environmental Science (Same as Environmental Studies 020)

An independent experimental project in environmental science is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in environmental science. Current research projects include studies of atmospheric chemistry related to global warming and acid deposition, heavy metals in the local environment, and further development of laboratory techniques for Environmental Studies 102 (Introduction to Environmental Science).
Format: laboratory research. A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: a one-semester science course and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

THOMAN

CHEM 020 Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry

An independent experimental project in inorganic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in inorganic chemistry. Opportunities for research in inorganic chemistry at Williams include the study of transition metals in biological systems (enzymes, proteins), and as building blocks for new materials with interesting electronic (magnetic, conducting) and optical properties. Students working in this area will gain expertise in the synthesis of new compounds and their characterization by modern spectroscopic techniques.
Format: laboratory research. A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least Chemistry 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

L. PARK, SCHOFIELD

CHEM 023 Introduction to Research in Organic Chemistry

An independent experimental project in organic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in organic chemistry. One representative project involves isolation of the bioactive constituents of Southeast Asian dart poisons from their natural sources and the elucidation of their three-dimensional structures. Another line of investigation probes new and efficient methods for the creation of molecules of medicinal interest. Some targets include the kavalactones-the active principles of the herbal extract KAVA KAVA which is promoted as an alternative anti-anxiety remedy, and octalactin A-an interesting 8-membered ring compound isolated from marine microorganisms that has shown significant toxicity toward human cancer cells.
Format: laboratory research. A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least Chemistry 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

J. HODGE MARKGRAF '52, RICHARDSON, SMITH

J. Hodge Markgraf '52, Professor of Chemistry emeritus, taught organic chemistry at Williams for four decades. His current research interests include the synthesis of pharmacologically active compounds that have been identified as antitumor, antiviral, antiprotozoan, antirheumatism, or anti-inflammation agents. He has previously taught a WSP course on combinatorial chemistry.

CHEM 024 Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry

An independent experimental project in physical chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in physical chemistry. Current research projects in the Department include computer modeling of non-linear, chaotic chemical and biochemical systems, molecular modeling of water clusters, laser spectroscopy of chlorofluorocarbon substitutes, and experimental studies of the oxidation of sulfur dioxide on atmospheric aerosols.
Format: laboratory research. A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least Chemistry 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

PEACOCK-LÓPEZ, THOMAN

CHEM 031 Senior Research and Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Chemistry 493, 494.

CLASSICS

CLAS 010 Gender in Talmud and Midrash (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 010)

CANCELLED!

CLAS 011 Writing with Wedges: Language and Literature of Mesopotamia

This course will present an introduction to cuneiform writing, including overviews of Sumerian, the language for which the script was invented around 4000 BCE, and Akkadian, the Semitic language written on millions of clay tablets and stone monuments from 2500 BCE until the turn of the era. Forgotten for two millennia, cuneiform was rediscovered in the nineteenth century and deciphered by a painstaking process. We will recreate that process and look at examples of the major literary genres of Mesopotamia. Texts will include myths (the Epic of Gilgamesh and the Babylonian Creation Story), legal material (the Code of Hammurapi and signed contracts), omens and rituals (such as procedures to avert the evil portended by the appearance of a ghost), and royal inscriptions and correspondence (including King Sennacherib's description of the siege of Jerusalem, also described in the Bible). We will see how a basic understanding of the original languages can enhance our ability to understand the texts-and therefore the culture-that were fundamental to the later development of Western civilization.
Requirements: weekly written assignments and a 6- to 8-page research paper.
Prerequisites: love of language, an affinity for puzzles, and a lively imagination. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: afternoons, six hours per week.
Cost to student: $40.

SALLY MOREN FREEDMAN (Instructor)
KRAUS (Sponsor)

Sally Moren Freedman received her PhD in Assyriology in 1977 from the University of Pennsylvania and continued at the university as a research associate in the Babylonian section of the University Museum while lecturing in the Oriental Studies Department. She went on to teach Old Testament Studies at Princeton Theological Seminary.

CLAS 012 Love and Sex in the Ancient World

Are the ways we feel and express romantic emotions natural and diachronic, or are they conditioned by specific historical, social and cultural circumstances? What are the ancients' and our attitudes towards homosexuality, extramarital affairs, and pederasty? This course addresses such questions through a survey of Ancient Greek and Latin literary works which feature love relationships, including works by Homer, Sappho, Plato, Vergil and Ovid. Students will get an insight into the depiction of romantic feelings and practices in antiquity, and will be asked to explore topics like: the objectification of the female as beloved and Muse, the identification of an author with the tormented lover speaking in the first person, the supposed emasculation of men in homosexual relationships etc. Students will be expected to attend all classes and to make use of discussion topics and visual material on the Blackboard web page.
Evaluation will be based on class attendance and participation, and on a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites but a genuine enthusiasm for the Classics. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday) for two hours each session.

Cost to student: $45.

MANOLARAKI

CLAS 031 Senior Thesis

May be taken by students registered for Classics 493, 494.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

COMP 010 Living by Words: Surviving and Thriving in the Art and Sport of Rhetoric (Same as English 010, INTR 014, and Special 016)

Whether dealing in the realms of public life, commerce, or academe, the speaker who can clearly and cogently define or defend a policy, product, or theoretical position is usually the most successful. Depending on the venue and the aim of the speaker, the words might be artful and poetic, cajoling and competitive, formally read from the page or seemingly delivered impromptu. This course will briefly examine some of the classic styles of oratory from Aristotle's Rhetoric to MTV's advertising campaigns, make visits to a variety of venues that employ a special style of professional discourse, and give participants a range of methods and ample practice in the basics of effective spoken communication. The practical intent of the course is for participants to develop confident, cogent, and dynamic presentation styles, to reinforce tight organizational focus and relaxed, natural delivery, and to develop creative approaches to speaking in front of a group. The course will guide participants through the presentation process from conception, outlining, and devising the message, to development of visual aids, message delivery, and handling question and answer sessions. Methods employed will include vigorous pursuit of improvisational theater techniques and some athletic training. Participants will receive intensive personal coaching and a videotaped record of their personal progress. The final project will be a group presentation at a public forum.
Evaluation will be based on active participation in the class, a written evaluation of a public presentation the student has attended, and successful completion of mini-presentations during Winter Study and the final group presentation at the end of term.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: mornings, three meetings of two hours each and 2-3 field trips outside of Williamstown.
Cost to student: $10-20 for course materials.

PETER BUBRISKI (Instructor)
CASSIDAY (Sponsor)

Peter Bubriski has been coaching leaders in communication skills for twelve years. A founding partner of the Cambridge-based communications consulting firm of B&B Associates, where he has been designing and leading workshops in presentation skills since 1991, he is also a senior associate with MEWS/Customer Communications 2000, a Boston consulting firm catering to the insurance industry. He has taught at The Boston Conservatory, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's Executive MBA Program, and he lectures regularly at Boston University's School of Management. He is also a professional actor with twenty years of credits in theater, film, and television ranging from ABC's All My Children to The King and I with Yul Brynner and independent films with Katharine Ross and Tyne Daly.

COMP 011 Contemporary Israeli Film (Same as Religion 011)

(See under Religion for full description.)

COMP 013 Introduction to Indian Cinema (Same as Economics 013)

(See under Economics for full description.)

COMP 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Comparative Literature 493, 494.

LIT 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Literary Studies 493, 494.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CSCI 010 C, UNIX and Software Tools

This course serves as a guided tour of programming methods in the UNIX operating system. The course is designed for individuals who understand basic program development techniques as discussed in an introductory programming course (Computer Science 134 or equivalent), but who wish to become familiar with a broader variety of computer systems and programming languages. Students in this course will work on UNIX workstations, available in one of the Department's laboratories. By the end of the course, students will have developed basic proficiency in the C programming language.
The increasing success of UNIX as a modern operating system stems from its unique ability to "prototype" programs quickly. Students will use prototyping tools, such as Awk and "shell scripts" to write "filters" for transforming data from a variety of sources. It will become clear that in many cases the overhead of programming in languages such as C, Pascal, or FORTRAN is unnecessary. Moreover, students will learn to effectively use software tools such as debuggers, profilers, and make files.
Evaluation will be based on several programming assignments and shell scripts due throughout the term. While none of the projects in the course will be particularly large, the successful student will develop a tool chest, which will extend their computing "effectiveness" in their particular field. Students with computing needs particular to their field are encouraged to advise the instructor before the first meeting.
Prerequisite: Computer Science 134 or equivalent programming experience. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: texts.

FREUND

CSCI 011 The Dynamic Duo: Cold Fusion and SQL Server

CANCELLED!

CSCI 031 Senior Honor Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Computer Science 493-494.

CONTRACT MAJOR

CMAJ 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Contract Major 493, 494.

ECONOMICS

ECON 010 East Asia: Miracle and Crisis

This course is intended to help CDE fellows integrate the material they studied in the first semester by applying it to the circumstances of a particular group of countries. During the 2003 Winter Term session we will focus on a case study of what are widely perceived to be successful development experiences-those of the East and Southeast Asian "miracle" economies. We will consider issues such as the desirability of the economic transformations that have taken place in these countries, the conditions that may have made such transformations possible, the roles that specific policies may have played in bringing them about, the causes of the recent economic crisis in the region and its implications for future growth in the affected countries, as well as the lessons that the East and Southeast Asian experience may hold for other developing countries.
Requirements: two 10-page papers.
Undergraduate enrollment is by permission of the instructor.
Meeting time: mornings, Mondays and Wednesdays.
Cost to student: approximately$60 for the purchase of textbook and reading packet.

MONTIEL

ECON 011 Surveys and Polls

We are bombarded on a daily basis with assertions based on data, opinion polls, and statistical analyses. From soft drink commercials, to political speeches, to economic and political reporting, data are used (and sometimes misused) to sway our opinion, earn our dollar, and set public policy. As responsible citizens and consumers, we need to be able to evaluate the data and statistics presented to us in order to make informed decisions. How are data collected and how is public opinion measured? How do policymakers and researchers learn facts about social and economic activity? This course will offer the basic tools needed for evaluating data and will explore the issues and controversies surrounding its myriad uses. Topics to be covered will include the basics of data collection and survey methods, issues and problems policymakers face when collecting and using data (representativeness, response rates, confidentiality), the politics of data collection, and public opinion polls and their use. Working in groups, students will use what they learn to field their own survey or poll of the local or college community.
Evaluation will be based on active participation in class discussions and a data collection and analysis project. This project will include construction of a survey instrument, selection of an appropriate sample, implementation of the survey or poll, and analysis of the results in a 10-page paper. Students will present their results to the college community in a poster session on the last day of Winter Study.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings. The class will meet every day during the first week of Winter Study to provide students with the tools necessary to get their surveys into the field. Meetings in the second and third weeks will be less frequent as students implement and analyze their surveys.
Cost to student: approximately $60 for books and photocopies.

SHORE-SHEPPARD

ECON 012 Business Risk Analysis: Inside the Mind of a Banker

So you think that business and finance are a big mystery and potentially boring? Discover how easy it is to understand how a company works and how interesting risk analysis can be. Do you feel that a career in business is not for you, but want to know enough to invest your millions wisely? Or are you, perhaps, considering business or finance as a career and would like a head start (not to mention a leg up in the interview process)? Or maybe you picture yourself as the boss someday, no matter what your field. Then this is the course for you! This experience will provide a basic overview of financial analysis with a particular emphasis on the banker's perspective. Among the topics that we will discuss are: the qualitative and quantitative aspects of risk analysis, understanding financial statements, how businessmen and bankers manage and mitigate the risks in their businesses, and how bankers decide on the structure and pricing of loans.
Attendance in class is important for this course, as a lot of material is covered, and the class will meet about 10 hours per week. Required readings, however, are minimal.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, classroom participation, and group and individual assignments, including a final group project and presentation involving the analysis of a company.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to juniors and seniors. Not intended for students with extensive prior financial experience.
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons, Mondays and Tuesdays.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for texts and reading packet.

JAMES SUTHERLAND (Instructor)
ZIMMERMAN (Sponsor)

James Sutherland worked for The Chase Manhattan Bank for over 21 years including 17 in Latin America and 3 as an instructor in the credit training program in New York. For the last 7 years he has worked as an international consultant and trainer in finance and banking, in Asia, Africa, Eastern and Western Europe, and Latin America.

ECON 013 Introduction to Indian Cinema (Same as Comparative Literature 013)

Though the Indian film industry is the world's most prolific, American audiences have little exposure to it. This course provides an introduction, focusing on Hindi cinema, and showing how its themes have evolved in response to broader changes in Indian society. In particular, we will examine ways in which Hindi films reflect the threats perceived by the nation, and the resolutions attempted. We will also compare its norms and conventions with those used in Hollywood cinema.The films will be sub-titled in English.
We will meet twice a week for three-hour sessions. Some film viewing will be required outside class hours. Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: $50 for readings.

SWAMY

ECON 014 Finance Using Excel

This course gives an introduction to the Excel spreadsheet software, with applications in economics and finance. The various commands in Excel (setting up a spreadsheet, presenting graphs, "what-if" scenarios, etc.) will be applied using basic examples from finance and economics (e.g., budgeting and break-even analysis).
Evaluation will be based on a number of hands-on problem sets.
Prerequisites: Preference will be given to students with no prior experience with Finance and with Excel (students who have taken Economics 317 Finance and Capital Markets are not admitted). Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: afternoons, twice a week for 3 hours each (half of which is "lecture-time," and the other half is "lab-time").

GEIREGAT

ECON 015 Philanthropy and the Social Entrepreneur

When one hears the word "philanthropy," it likely conjures up the stereotype of rich people, families or foundations who donate their money to worthwhile causes, but it is only the beginning of today's modern philanthropic world. Indeed, there are two sides to philanthropy, donating and receiving, and a myriad of ways in which individuals and organizations can be philanthropic. This Winter Study Course will focus on both sides of the philanthropic world, with the goal of educating students to consider careers or involvement in either the donating side of the equation or as social entrepreneurs, using traditional capitalistic and business principles to start, sustain, and/or expand non-profit organizations and charitable endeavors.
The class will be broken down into two basic components. The first will be about the donor side of philanthropy. We will discuss the various types of foundations and funds that exist, the processes by which they make grants, the importance of volunteerism as philanthropy, and individual philanthropy. As part of this section, the class will break up into three or four different "foundations," and have to decide what their funding priorities are, how they would solicit grant proposals from worthwhile organizations, and then go through the process of reviewing grant proposals to decide which receive funding. The students will have homework assignments that require them to research philanthropic organizations on the internet, to write sample "Requests for Proposals" for the money their foundations have to donate, and to evaluate sample grant proposals.
The second half of the class will have the students switch gears and look at philanthropy from the view of the social entrepreneur who starts and runs a non-profit organization. The students will break into groups of one, two or three, decide what type of organization they want to start, write a business plan, a needs assessment statement and a mission statement, research philanthropic organizations, endeavors and individuals who would be likely funders, prepare grant proposals, and go through simulated interviews for the grants.
Many of the class materials will be actual grant proposals, business plans, and requests for proposals. There is also a wealth of information on the internet from which many assignments will be fashioned, and there will be additional articles about philanthropy for the students to read.
Students will be evaluated on their overall efforts and contributions to the class, as well as their written work products described above.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.

Meeting time: three times per week, for approximately two hours per session.

Cost to student: none.

JUDITH M. CONTI'91 (Instructor)
ZIMMERMAN (Sponsor)

Judith M. Conti '91 received her law degree from the College of William and Mary where she was named the Outstanding Trial Advocate in the graduating class of 1994. After serving as a law clerk on the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Judy moved to Washington, D.C. and spent five years in private practice at the law firm of James & Hoffman. During that time, Judy represented labor unions, their members, and individuals in employment law cases. In 2000, Judy co-founded the D.C. Employment Justice Center, a non-profit organization devoted to securing and enforcing the workplace rights of low-income workers throughout the D.C. metropolitan area. She is also a member of the adjunct faculty at William and Mary Law School, where she teaches Labor Law.

ECON 016 Entrepreneurism

This course will use interactive case studies, guest appearances from those in the trenches, and extensive discussion to learn about entrepreneurism, how small business operates, and the different stages and issues small businesses face as they move forward. "Small" means start-up companies up to sales of $30 million. Emphasis will be on the role of the entrepreneur and the different issues he/she faces in starting, focusing, directing, and managing a small business through its different stages, but attention will also be given to the position of the firm in the middle of the network of supporting organizations-banks, venture capitalists, consultants, investment bankers, lawyers, accountants, etc.
Students should expect to make a significant time commitment to the course. Classes will meet an average of three times per week for three hours in the morning. For those who desire, discussion and conversations will continue over lunch. Guests will be involved with the day's cases and will arrive the night before class to socialize with students over dinner, and stay through lunch after class the next day to discuss their professions and their daily work lives.
Students will be evaluated 85% discussion, 15% final 10-page paper or equivalent.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $50-$75 which covers the costs of books and cases.

MICHAEL STEVENS '73 (Instructor)
ZIMMERMAN (Sponsor)

Michael Stevens '73 is President of New England Capital Management, Inc., an acquisition company in Boston that he co-founded in 1989. He is a 1976 graduate from Stanford Business School.

ECON 017 Business Economics

In this course, the class will carry out a real-time forecast of the U.S. economy and explore its implications for the bond and stock markets. The course will build upon principles of both macro and micro-economics. It will provide an introduction to the work done by business economists and the techniques they use. An economic database, chart-generating software and a statistical analysis program will be available to each student on the Jessup computers and, if necessary, on a disk for IBM-compatible computers.
The first week will focus on becoming familiar with the database, looking for relationships between key economic variables, and studying movements in interest rates over the period 1960-2001. Early in the first week, the class will be divided into teams of 2 students with each team choosing a particular aspect of the economy to forecast.
During the second and third weeks, the class will work with various leading indicators of economic activity and will prepare forecasts of the key components of gross domestic product and other key variables. The fourth week will feature a formal presentation of the economic forecast with invited guests from the Wall Street investment world.
To put the forecasting exercise in context, there will be class discussions of business cycles, credit cycles, long waves in inflation and interest rates and the impact of the Internet on the economy and the stock market.
There will also be a 3-page paper summarizing the result of the forecast project. Because essential concepts and tools are covered during the first week, all students are expected to attend the first class.
No prerequisites, but Economics 110 or another semester course in Economics is strongly recommended. Enrollment limit: 22.
Meeting time: mornings, 3 times per week. There will be two afternoons of workshops lasting approximately 30 minutes with hands-on instruction for each team. Each student should expect to spend a reasonable amount of time on homework, and to participate in short presentations of their analyses as the work progresses as well as in the formal presentation during the last week.
Cost to student: $25 for text and other materials.

THOMAS SYNNOTT '58 (Instructor)
ZIMMERMAN (Sponsor)

Thomas Synnott '58 is Chief Economist, U.S. Trust Company of New York

ECON 018 Development Finance

This course will provide a banker's approach to international financial dealings related to developing countries. The first half of the course will introduce core concepts and require the demonstration of particular skills. Subjects for these classes will include: the roles of financial intermediaries in developed and developing countries, sources of financial information, payment and settlement systems, making lending decisions, managing a financial institution's balance sheet, the role of capital markets, and the workings of specific markets (foreign exchange, credit, and equity). In the second half of the course, the emphasis will shift to current topics in international finance including: sovereign debt restructuring, issuing new sovereign debt, sovereign ratings, project finance, trade finance, and financial risk management. It is hoped that the course will have guest speakers from different fields of expertise.
Format: lecture/discussion. Evaluation to be on the basis of class participation, two problem sets in the first half of the course, and two papers in the second half.
The course will be open to CDE students and to undergraduates with instructor permission (as a minimum, undergraduates must be eligible for upper-level economics electives).
Meeting time: three days a week for three hours, with possible re-arrangement to accommodate guest speakers.

THOMAS POWERS '81 (Instructor)
ZIMMERMAN (Sponsor)

Thomas Powers '81 is the Director of the Center for Development Economics at Williams.

ECON 025 The Razor-Edged Path to South Africa's Socio-Economic Transformation

This travel course will explore the dilemma facing South Africa as the nation grapples with the process of democratic transformation. Apartheid grossly skewed the distribution of social investment (housing, health care, education, job opportunities). Yet addressing this problem requires careful attention to the economic resources available for fostering economic growth and improving social equity. Unsustainable spending on social investment undermines confidence and deters needed investment, yet too much fiscal constraint fuels social and political instability. How can South Africa redress the inequities created by apartheid while expanding economic opportunities, thus mobilizing further resources for redistribution?
Since South Africa's first democratic elections eight years ago, the country has implemented a remarkable political transition. Socio-economic progress, however, has been much more difficult. This project will explore how public policy shapes the distribution of social investment as the nation grapples with the imperatives of equity and growth while maintaining political and economic stability. South Africa is a country of contrasts: international polls rank Cape Town as one of the world's three most pleasant cities, yet minutes from the central business district smolder huge pockets of abject urban poverty. This course will investigate how such a skewed distribution of resources has been perpetuated, and why redressing the problem has been so difficult. The learning process will involve visiting poor townships created as economically nonviable entities, investigating inequities in the provision of education and health care, and comprehending the predicament of the rural poor. The paucity of public resources for the majority stands in stark contrast to the abundance provided by the apartheid-era policies to the privileged minority: a health care system that achieved the world's first heart transplant, public schools comparable to the world's best private educational institutions, and first-rate urban amenities.
The course will examine why one of the world's most unequal societies is so resistant to change, and what role public policy can serve in fostering redistribution and growth. Meetings-with policy-makers and community activists, with teachers and labor leaders, with economic researchers and social workers, with public health advocates and bankers-will provide insight into the historical and structural causes of the extreme inequality that characterizes South African society, and the options available for redressing past imbalances and inequities while promoting economic growth and job creation. The theme of social investment unifies the course: how apartheid created one of the world's most skewed distributions of human capital, whose inertial force resists substantive change, and the critical role that public investment in social infrastructure must serve in transforming the economy. First-hand experiences combined with education presentations and discussions will illuminate the challenges, opportunities, and policy options facing South Africa as the country rebuilds political, social, and economic institutions.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page research paper and an oral presentation.

No prerequisites. Interested students must consult the instructor before registration (email michael.samson@williams.edu). Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: $3,480 (includes round-trip airfare from New York City to Cape Town, hotel accommodations, all meals, local transportation, and miscellaneous expenses).

SAMSON

ECON 030 Honors Project

The "Specialization Route" to the degree with Honors in Economics requires that each candidate take an Honors Winter Study Project in January of their senior year. Students who wish to begin their honors work in January should submit a detailed proposal. Decisions on admission to the Honors WSP will be made in the fall. Information on the procedures will be mailed to senior majors in economics early in the fall semester.
Seniors who wish to apply for admission to the Honors WSP and thereby to the Honors Program should register for this WSP as their first choice.
Some seniors will have begun honors work in the fall and wish to complete it in the WSP. They will be admitted to the WSP if they have made satisfactory progress. They should register for this WSP as their first choice.

ECON 031 Honors Thesis

To be taken by students participating in year-long thesis research (ECON 493-W031-494).

ENGLISH

ENGL 010 Living by Words: Surviving and Thriving in the Art and Sport of Rhetoric (Same as Comparative Literature 010, INTR 014 and Special 016)

(See under Comparative Literature for full description.)

ENGL 011 Queer Literatures: The Lesbian Tradition (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 011)

This course will introduce you to lesbian/queer women's writing in English in the twentieth century, with an emphasis on the post-Stonewall (post-1969) period. Questions we will explore will include: Why is the "happy ending" such a conflicted question in lesbian/queer writing? Do representations of "transgressive" desires require "transgressive" literary forms? Or should queer literature seek to represent queer life as "realistically" as possible? What does it mean to create a "positive" or "negative" image of lesbians? We will also debate the difference that race/ethnicity, class, and gender might make in representing lesbian/queer women's sexualities, as well as the ways in which contemporary queer writing seeks to trouble gender itself as a category. Readings may include works by the following authors: Gertrude Stein, Radclyffe Hall, Ann Bannon, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, Cherríe Moraga, Jeannette Winterson, Aleída Rodriguez, Monique Wittig, Minnie Bruce Pratt and Achy Obejas
Requirements: In addition to the reading, students will be expected to turn in regular journal/list-serv assignments, lead class discussion once, and write a 8- to 10-page final paper.
Prerequisites: a 100-level English course other than English 150. Enrollment limit: 18. Preference given to seniors.
Meeting time: mornings, two times a week for three hours.
Cost to student: approximately $80 for books.

KENT

ENGL 012 Writing Non-Fiction

This is a course for students interested in writing a long, non-fiction essay. We shall begin by reading together the work of some contemporary practitioners such as David Foster Wallace, Adam Gopnik and Janet Malcolm and by considering the distinctive styles of several general-interest magazines including Harper's, Rolling Stone and The New Yorker. Throughout the course, students will work independently on their essays, which should run between 2,500 and 3,000 words and reflect extensive research or reporting. Students will be expected to have selected a topic before the first class meeting.
Requirements: completion of a long, researched, non-fiction essay.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 14. Priority to English majors.
Meeting time: afternoons, three times a week for two hours.
Cost to student: $50-$75.

KLEINER

ENGL 013 Going to Extremes (Same as Special 013)

(See under Special for full description.)

ENGL 014 Hardboiled

They took murder out of the country house and gave it back "to the kind of people that commit it for reasons," as Raymond Chandler said. With the Continental Op and Sam Spade, Dashiell Hammett invented the tough, spare, hardboiled detective novel. In Philip Marlowe, Raymond Chandler created the genre's battered poet laureate. This course will examine three novels by Hammett (The Maltese Falcon, The Thin Man, and either The Dain Curse or The Glass Key), and three by Chandler (The Big Sleep, The Long Goodbye, and either The Little Sister or The High Window). We'll read criticism and short stories by Ernest Hemingway, Jorge Luis Borges, Ross Macdonald, W. H. Auden, Steven Marcus, and others. And we'll look at several films, including Howard Hawks' The Big Sleep, John Huston's The Maltese Falcon, and W. S. Van Dyke's The Thin Man.
Requirements: regular attendance and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference will be given to English majors and those more interested in style than in crime.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week for two hours.
Cost to student: approximately $65 for books.

RAAB

ENGL 015 Writing, Illustrating, and Publishing Children's Books (Same as ArtS 020)

This seminar is for those fascinated with children's books, those who want to learn about this old and distinguished genre, and those who want to create a children's book. Since it is often the same person who writes and illustrates a children's book (or a team of two people working closely together) the seminar explores all aspects of children's literature-writing, illustrating, and publishing. Why do certain books endure and become classics while others enjoy only a brief lifespan? What is the difference between writing for and writing about children? How does one approach writing a children's picture book or a book for teenagers? Are fairy tales important? How does one connect words and images? Through lectures, discussions and assignments, writers and illustrators develop the skills to start a book project or continue a project they have already started. Practical aspects such as author-publisher-agent relationships, book financing, and the realities of the current market will be explored.
Requirements: either completion of the draft for a children's book text or of illustrations for a picture book dummy.
Prerequisite: serious enthusiasm for writing and/or visual arts. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference to juniors and seniors.
Meeting time: mornings, twice a week for three hours.
Cost to student: none.

LEON STEINMETZ (Instructor)
PYE (Sponsor)

Leon Steinmetz is an author, illustrator, and painter. He is a former instructor of children's literature at Harvard University Graduate School of Education, Wellesley College, and Massachusetts College of Art. He has been awarded first prize at the Biennale of European Artists and Sculptors, a CRRT Book Award, and a Pen short story grant. He is author/illustrator of The Dangerous Journey of Doctor McPain (1993), Pip Stories (1981), Clocks in the Woods (1979) and other books.

ENGL 016 Critiquing the Critics

CANCELLED!

ENGL 017 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography (Same as ArtH 017)

This course explores the evolution of modern documentary photography. We will start with Robert Frank's The Americans, and how Frank's singular vision deeply shaped the next generation of photographers working the American streets and landscape. Diane Arbus, Bruce Davidson, Lee Freidlander, Danny Lyon, Gary Winogrand are some of the photographers whose work we will get to know well. Discussions will include the new wave of independent and Magnum photojournalists (Phillip Jones Griffiths, Josef Koudleka, Susan Meiselas, Gilles Peress, Sebastio Salgado, & Alex Webb) and the wars from Vietnam to Iraq to Bosnia they cover as well as the personal visions they explore. Insight into the diverse currents of documentary photography will be explored through the work of Robert Adams, Bill Burke, Larry Clark, Lois Conner, Linda Connor, Larry Fink, Nan Goldin, Emmet Gowin, Sally Mann, Mary Ellen Mark, Nicholas Nixon, and Abelardo Morell. We will also explore the gray areas between photographic fact and personal fiction through the work of Duane Michaels, Joel Peter Witkin, Josef Saudek, and Carrie Mae Weems and the large scale epic photographs of Gregory Crewdson, Jeff Wall, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, and Andreas Gursky. The class will meet three mornings a week for two hours. Slide presentations will occupy half of the first meetings and give way to discussion of issues in documentary photography. Students will be encouraged to work on individual projects of their own choice.
Each student will be required to make a brief presentation to the class on a documentary topic of their choice. A final 10-page paper expanding on this documentary topic will be due at the end of the course. Students will be evaluated on their classroom presentation, general participation and their written work. A field trip to New York will let us see first hand works from the collections at the Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American Art and the International Center of Photography and meet with curators of photography at these institutions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Priority by lottery.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week for two hours.
Cost to student: $30 (for NYC fieldtrip personal expenses).

KEVIN BUBRISKI (Instructor)
PYE (Sponsor)

Kevin Bubriski has received photography fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the Fulbright Foundation, the Asian Cultural Council, and the National Endowment for the Arts. His photographic prints are in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, and the International Center of Photography in New York, and the Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris.

ENGL 018 Artist of Empire: Rudyard Kipling Now

CANCELLED!

ENGL 019 Science-Fiction and Fantasy Workshop

This writing workshop is intended for a small group of dedicated students. Participants will be expected to produce short stories, in a number of styles-a minimum of two stories a week for the length of the course. Together we will puzzle out a schedule of assignments that depends partly on your interest and taste, but the idea is to produce work in a range of subjects and techniques, some of which will not have naturally occurred to you. Possible examples are high fantasy, world-building, cyberpunk, horror, space opera, technobabble, and steampunk. Everyone should write at least one parody. Students will read their work aloud in class, and I will lead discussions. Genre writers are known for their productivity, and the goal here is to produce a volume of words and ideas. My hope is that each student will end the class with a half-dozen or so workshopped drafts, which can then be polished at leisure. At the end of the course, I'll throw in an optional class to discuss the SF marketplace, submission guidelines, etc. This is an intensive schedule and a lot of work, for students who are serious about writing.
Requirements: frequent workshop drafts.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons, three times a week for two hours.
Cost to student: $30.

PAUL PARK (Instructor)
PYE (Sponsor)

Paul Park is the author of seven novels and a collection of short stories. He is a regular instructor at the Clarion Science Fiction Workshop in Seattle.

ENGL 020 Hands-On Investigative Reporting (Same as History 015)

CANCELLED!

ENGL 022 Sylvia Plath's'Ariel
CANCELLED!

ENGL 023 Investigative Reporting Seminar (Same as History 016)

CANCELLED!

ENGL 024 Uncle Eph in his Youth: Old Williams in Thought and Form (Same as American Studies 015, ArtH 015 and Special 015)

(See under Special for full description.)

ENGL 027 Sports Writing (Same as Special 018)

(See under Special for full description.)

ENGL 028 Fantasy Novels of C.S. Lewis and Charles Williams (Same as Mathematics 014)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

ENGL 029 The News Business

Economics and journalism intersect in more than audience ratings for 60 Minutes. The commercial and technological context of news media shapes, bends and even twists the message in ways that go far beyond simple measures of circulation and ratings. History majors may find special interest in the notion of journalistic objectivity; English majors may focus on the origins of various story-telling models; philosophy majors may have a lot to say about the ethics of journalism. Together we'll examine these numerous strands and their woven pattern. This is not a primer for would-be reporters, although we will talk a lot about what they do. It's not a practicum for writing style, although that topic fits in as well. Instead, our focus will be on the molding of the news media, in the past and today. They are often accused of shaping us, current affairs, world politics and even the "facts" and "truth." But what's shaping them? Maybe they cannot help themselves. Maybe we will learn why complaint and exhortation do so little to change them.
Requirements: final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Priority given to seniors, then to other students.
Meeting time: mornings. Monday-Thursday, 1 1/2 hrs each class.
Cost to student: $40.
PAUL NEELY '68 (Instructor)
PYE (Sponsor)

Paul Neely '68 is the former editor and publisher of The Chattanooga Times. He previously worked at newspapers in Riverside, California, Louisville, Kentucky, and St. Petersburg, Florida. He holds master's degrees in journalism and business administration from Columbia University.

ENGL 030 Honors Project: Specialization Route

Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the specialization route.

ENGL 031 Honors Project: Thesis

Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the thesis route.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

ENVI 010 Writing and Drawing-The Naturalist's Journal

This course will explore the tools for studying the natural world through various uses of writing, literature, and drawing. Students will spend time outdoors learning the ecosystem of the Williamstown area and time indoors doing observational drawing, reflective writing, and reading and discussions of nature literature. The month's work will be contained in a nature journal, to be displayed and discussed as part of a final project. Designed for students with interests in environmental studies, natural history writing, and drawing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $50 for books and art supplies.

CLARE WALKER LESSEE and CHRISTIAN MCEWEN (Instructors)
ART (Sponsor)

Clare Walker Leslie has written eight books, six on drawing nature including, Keeping a Nature Journal. Christian McEwen is the editor of Jo's Girls: Tomboy Tales of High Adventure, True Grit & Real Life, and co-editor of The Alphabet of the Trees: A Guide to Nature Writing.

ENVI 011 Envisioning a Sustainable Future (Same as Biology 011)

(See under Biology for full description.)

ENVI 012 Environmental Risk Assessment: Risk Perception, Reality and Assessment

Risk is a fact of life. However, we have different perceptions and reactions to various types of risk. Some of our reactions are rational, some are not. How do we put risk into perspective? Can we make rational decisions, or quantitative assessments? Is it possible to "manage" risk? How can we translate what we have learned about risk into good practices and policies? The course will focus on environmental risk assessment, but in the context of the many risks we deal with as individuals and a society. Course meetings will emphasize group activities and projects. Selected handouts from a variety of sources will be used for reading assignments. Students will be encouraged to evaluate the risks in their lives and how they deal with them. Group exercises will also be used to consider the role of risk in society and our collective responses to threats ranging from pesticides in food to terrorism. The main elements of quantitative risk assessments for exposure to radioactivity and chemicals in the environment will be developed and utilized.
Evaluation based on a paper of at least 10 pages and an oral presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: $20 for reading materials.

ALAN ELZERMAN '71 (Instructor)
ART (Sponsor)

Alan Elzerman '71 is Director of the School of the Environment at Clemson University.

ENVI 013 Mapping the Natural Landscape (Same as Biology 013 and Geosciences 013)

(See under Biology for full description.)

ENVI 014 Orchids! (Same as Biology 014)

(See under Biology for full description.)

ENVI 015 Land Conservation in Massachusetts

CANCELLED!

ENVI 016 Landscape as History in the American West (Same as History 013)

(See under History for full description.)

ENVI 017 The New England Forest (Same as Biology 017)

(See under Biology for full description.)

ENVI 018 Human Nature, Natural Limits and the Human Predicament (Same as Biology 018)

CANCELLED!

ENVI 019 Food Security and Agriculture in the Northeastern U.S. (Same as Biology 019)

CANCELLED!

ENVI 020 Introduction to Research in Environmental Science (Same as Chemistry 019)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

ENVI 021 Subsistence and Development: Special Issues in Alaska Native Economy and Society (Same as ANSO 013)

(See under Anthropology and Sociology-ANSO for full description.)

ENVI 023 Bové, 'malbouffe,' McWorld (Same as Political Science 013)

(See under Political Science for full description.)

ENVI 031 Senior Research and Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Environmental Studies 493-494.

GEOSCIENCES

GEOS 010 Creating Maps...and Lying!

CANCELLED!

GEOS 011 Dinosaurs and the Mesozoic World

Dinosaurs are forever popular with children and college students alike. Movies such as the "Jurassic Park, I, II, and III" and Disney's "Dinosaur" have changed the image of these animals in the public eye. Never again will a student volunteer the definition that dinosaurs are huge, slow-witted, extinct animals. How do we actually define a dinosaur? What do we factually know about them and what is merely interpretation?
This course will consider the various facts and interpretations of how dinosaurs functioned-their reproduction, digestive system, metabolism, locomotion, defense and attack systems, and intelligence. To understand dinosaurs better, we will also consider their world-the plants and animals they lived among and interacted with and a geography and climate radically different from our own.
Students are expected to pair up and do research from the paleontological and geological literature on one type of dinosaur in its environment and present the result as a 15-page paper for evaluation and group discussion. There will be a course packet with relevant scientific articles that the students are expected to read and discuss in class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week for two hours each session.
Cost to student: approximately $5-$10 for reading packet.

GUDVEIG BAARLI (Instructor)
M. JOHNSON (Sponsor)

Gudveig Baarli is a research associate in the Geosciences Department at Williams College. She received her Doctor of Philosophy degree from the University of Oslo in 1988.

GEOS 013 Mapping the Natural Landscape (Same as Biology 013 and Environmental Studies 013 013)

(See under Biology for full description.)

GEOS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Geology 493-494.

GERMAN

GERM S.P. Sustaining Program for German 101-102

Something new and different for students enrolled in German 101-102. Practice in the use of German for everyday purposes; creation and performance of short dramatic sketches through group collaboration; games; songs; storytelling; reading. No homework.
Requirements: active participation and regular attendance earn a "Pass" grade.
Prerequisite: German 101 or equivalent. Limited to German 101-102 students.
Meeting time: mornings, 9a.m.-9:50 a.m. three times a week.
Cost to student: approximately $5 for photocopied materials.

GERM 030 Honors Project

To be taken by honors candidates following other than the normal thesis route.

GERM 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for German 493-494.

HISTORY

HIST 010 Hollywood and American Political Life

CANCELLED!

HIST 011 African-American History Through Film (Same as African-American Studies 011)

This course will address some of the major themes in African-American History through film. We will focus on how certain films have addressed such issues as African-American urbanization, political activism, and everyday social life. Viewing the work of filmmakers from Oscar Micheaux to Julie Dash, the course will pay particular attention to how the political and social context of particular eras influenced films made by, for, and about African Americans.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, an oral presentation, and a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings, twice a week for three hours.
Cost to student: $30 for Xeroxes.

HICKS

HIST 012 Imagining the Shtetl: Jewish Life and Culture in Nineteenth-Century Eastern Europe

CANCELLED!

HIST 013 Landscape as History in the American West (Same as Environmental Studies 016)

America's most dramatic river, the Colorado, begins in the snow-capped mountains of the Wind River Range in Wyoming and ends 1,700 miles distant in the hot sands of the delta at the head of the Sea of Cortez. Along the way the river both drains and gives life to the American West. Most of the water is diverted to agricultural and urban users in California, whose fractured landscape has been punctuated by racial conflicts and natural disasters. By evoking the landscape of the Colorado River, the essential aridity of the West, and coastal California's history of natural and human disasters with films, readings, and discussions, an argument will be made that the natural environment has determined, to a great extent, the human history of this region. In a final project or paper, students will choose an area to describe, evoke, explain, and come to their own conclusions about the power of place in the American West and the usefulness of this type of environmental history to evaluate other landscapes.
Format: seminar. Evaluation will be based on class participation and a final project that can be either an imaginative oral/visual presentation to the class or the more traditional 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $30 for books and photocopies.

PHILIP FRADKIN, '57 (Instructor)
WAGNER (Sponsor)

Philip Fradkin '57, shared in a Pulitzer Prize as a journalist, was the first environmental writer for the Los Angeles Times, assistant secretary of the California Resources Agency, western editor of Audubon magazine, and is the author of nine books on the American West and Alaska.

HIST 014 The Evolution of the Women's Counseling Movement (Same as Psychology 019 and Women's and Gender Studies 014)

This course will explore the women's counseling movement, from grassroots efforts to establish women's services in the 1960's and 1970's to present-day organization efforts. The course will begin with a brief overview of the counseling movement in historical context, focusing on the history of the women's movement from the mid-nineteenth century to the 1960's and the history of counseling in the United States from World War I to the 1960's. Subsequent classes will explore the issues of violence towards women and the goals of the women's counseling movement towards addressing domestic violence and sexual assault. To connect the theoretical and historical background of the course with practical experience, students will gain exposure to domestic violence and rape crisis counseling in Berkshire County through attendance at clinical and administrative staff meetings at a local women's services agency.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, 2 short reflective papers, and a 5- to 7-page final paper.
No prerequisites, but it is recommended that students have taken at least one regular semester course in Psychology or one course in Women's and Gender Studies. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings; Mondays, Tuesdays and Fridays.
Cost to student: approximately $30 for reading packet.

SUZANNE WINTNER '95 (Instructor)
WAGNER (Sponsor)

Suzanne Wintner '95, MSW, LCSW, is a sexual assault and domestic violence counselor at the Elizabeth Freeman Center in Berkshire County. She has been involved with women's services agencies since 1998.

HIST 015 Hands-On Investigative Reporting (Same as English 020)

CANCELLED!

HIST 016 Investigative Reporting Seminar (Same as English 023)

CANCELLED!

HIST 017 History in Pieces (Same as ArtS 017)

Burgoyne Surrounded, Mexican Cross, Log Cabin, Texas Star, Mariner's Compass, Storm at Sea, Drunkard's Path, Underground Railway are just a few of the many quilt patterns designed by our American ancestors, representing events, political or social, in this country in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.
In this course, students will study American history through quilts. At the same time, they will learn traditional and contemporary methods of quilt making. Each student will select a traditional American quilt pattern and reproduce that pattern into a 45" x 60" quilt. In addition, each student will design either an original pattern representing an event in late-twentieth- early-twenty-first-century history or keep a January journal of life as a twenty-first-century quilter. The completed quilts will be the basis of a quilt show to be scheduled during the second semester.
Evaluation will be based on regular participation in class and completion of the quilt and original design or journal. Students should understand that these are time-consuming projects and they must be prepared to put in considerable time beyond actual class hours.
No prerequisite, but sewing experience is useful. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings; Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays.

Cost to student: $120 for quilting supplies and reading materials. Students need to supply their own portable sewing machines.

SYBIL SHERMAN (Instructor)
WAGNER (Sponsor)

Sybil Sherman has 29 years of experience as a quilter. She taught Fabric Palette, Quilt Canvas for the Williams College Art Department in January 2000 and 2001 and History in Pieces in January 2002 for the History Department.

HIST 018 American Strategy in World War II: War Plans and Execution

During the Second World War, the United States fought a global conflict. By late 1943, for example, American forces were in combat in Italy, New Guinea, the Solomon Islands and the Central Pacific. The war against the U-Boat threat and the air war against Germany continued with increasing intensity, and the allied staffs were engaged in planning the 1944 invasion of France.
To achieve the nation's basic political objective-the unconditional surrender of Germany and Japan-the United States devised a series of strategic and operational war plans for both the European and Pacific areas of operation. A number of factors including inter-allied and inter-service disputes, logistics, and enemy actions frequently led to results that were quite different from the planner's expectations.
The course will examine the major U.S. war plans using selected readings and a number of actual plans. The course will then explore the realities of battle and the differences between plans and execution.
Requirements: class participation and attendance. Class will meet once a week on Friday mornings and afternoons for a total of six hours. A 10-page essay will be required.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25.
Meeting time: six hours on Fridays, three hours in the morning and three hours in the afternoon (schedule for last week of winter study to be determined).
Cost to student: $30 for books and Xeroxes.

STEVEN ROSS '59 (Instructor)
WAGNER (Sponsor)

Steven Ross '59 holds the Admiral William V. Pratt Chair of Military History at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island.

HIST 019 Why New Englanders Eat What They Eat (Same as American Studies 011 and Philosophy 011)

(See under Philosophy for full description.)

HIST 023 The Williams Jewish History Project: Archives and History

Williams College has produced numerous illustrious alumni involved in Jewish causes-Herbert Lehman, Carl Austrian, Jacob Stone, and Edgar Bronfman, to name a few. How did Jews experience the intimate academic and social community of a small liberal arts college in New England? The Williams Jewish History Project investigates and gathers data about Jews and Judaism at Williams with the ultimate goal of a published work on the subject. Studying the history of Jews at Williams promises to add to the familiar story of assimilation and accommodation nuanced insight into the formation of both religious and collegiate identity. The Williams Jewish History Project will shed light on the ways in which the College managed to cultivate school spirit among students while affirming their sense of distinctiveness, allowing them to be simultaneously both children of Abraham and sons (and daughters) of Eph. This winter study course seeks to involve students in the early stages of this project by having them engage in archival research and conduct oral interviews. Students will be instructed in the techniques of archival research and conducting interviews of faculty and alumni and then will be assigned to investigate various topics in the Williams Archives or through oral interviews. Travel to other archives may also be necessary and the Winter Study may include field trips to archival collections in Boston, Mt. Holyoke, and Worcester. Thus, students will both develop general skills in archival research and oral history and contribute to a specific and fascinating chapter in the history of Williams. The research conducted by students will be used in a published history of Jews and Judaism at Williams.
Students are expected to spend at least 20 hours/week on research and attend weekly meetings to discuss their work. Also required for the course is a final project presenting the results of individual research-such as an 8- to 10-page paper, a poster, a web-page and/or a public presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.

CARRIE GREENE (Instructor)
KRAUS (Sponsor)

Carrie Greene is currently coordinating the History of Jews at Williams Project.

HIST 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for History 493-494.

HISTORY OF SCIENCE

HSCI 011 Leadership in Astronomy: From Copernicus and Galileo to Hubble and the Age of the Universe (Same as Astronomy 011 and INTR 011)

(See under Astronomy for full description.)

HSCI 020 Evolution and Creationism (Same as Biology 020 and Religion 020)

(See under Biology for full description.)

INTERDEPARTMENTAL PROGRAM FOR EXPERIMENTAL AND CROSS-DISCIPLINARY STUDIES

INTR 010 Corporate Leadership and Social Responsibility

(See under Leadership Studies for full description.)

INTR 011 Leadership in Astronomy: From Copernicus and Galileo to Hubble and the Age of the Universe (Same as Astronomy 011 and History of Science 011)

(See under Astronomy for full description.)

INTR 012 Justice and Public Policy (Same as Political Science 019)

(See under Leadership Studies for full description.)

INTR 014 Living by Words: Surviving and Thriving in the Art and Sport of Rhetoric (Same as Comparative Literature 010, English 010 and Special 016)

(See under Comparative Literature for full description.)

INTR 017 Presidential Leadership: From Washington to FDR (Same as Political Science 020)

(See under Leadership Studies for full description.)

INTR 018 Wilderness Leadership

(See under Leadership Studies for full description.)

INTR 026 Panama: Leadership at the Crossroads of the World (Same as Political Science 026)

(See under Leadership Studies for full description.)

LEADERSHIP STUDIES

INTR 010 Corporate Leadership and Social Responsibility

This course considers the responsibilities of leadership in corporate life through the perspectives of visiting alumni who hold leadership positions in American corporations. It examines the social obligations created by success in business, with special emphasis on the social and environmental duties of contemporary business. We will also explore the organizational, professional, social, and personal dilemmas faced by leading figures in modern corporations and institutions. Readings will include material from organizational sociology and economics, as well as relevant biography and autobiography. Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation in class discussions, and a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 22. (This course is part of the Leadership Studies program)
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: approximately $30 for reading materials.

K. LEE and JOHN CHANDLER, President emeritus

INTR 011 Leadership in Astronomy: From Copernicus and Galileo to Hubble and the Age of the Universe (Same as Astronomy 011 and History of Science 011)

(See under Astronomy for full description.)

INTR 012 Justice and Public Policy (Same as Political Science 019)

The course will examine four or five significant public policy matters which have been resolved by the court system. These might include abortion, affirmative action, death penalty, election laws, free speech/obscenity. The focus of the course will be on the process involved in resolving the issues in the courts, the competing interests involved, the public impact of the decisions and, in most cases, the difficulty of resolution. Students will spend two-three days in Boston where they will have the opportunity to witness activities at the Middlesex County District Attorneys Office and meet with representatives of the federal and state judiciary.
Evaluation: 10-page paper and regular participation in class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16. If the course is overenrolled, students will be asked to write a short essay to determine selection.
Meeting time: mornings, Monday and Thursday -all day while in Boston. Students will meet in December prior to the break to discuss logistics and expectations for the course.

Cost to student: none, but students will be responsible for obtaining lodging for two nights in Boston, Massachusetts.

MICHAEL B. KEATING '62 and MARTHA COAKLEY '75
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

The course will be taught by Michael B. Keating '62, a trial lawyer with the Boston law firm of Foley, Hoag & Elliot, LLP, and Martha Coakley '75, District Attorney for Middlesex County.

INTR 017 Presidential Leadership: From Washington to FDR (Same as Political Science 020)

In this course we will focus on the leadership of three of the greatest American presidents-George Washington, Theodore Roosevelt, and Franklin D. Roosevelt. We will study and discuss their political philosophies and accomplishments and analyze their leadership strategies. What do these presidents teach us about Presidential power, political ideology, character, conviction, class warfare, "big government," the role of followers, and our constitutional system of checks and balances?
Requirements: in addition to three class meetings per week, students will write one 15-page research paper.
No prerequisites, but students with a background in American History, Leadership Studies or Political Science will be given preference. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: afternoons.

Cost to students: $45 for books and $24 for luncheons with the guest lecturers.

DUNN and JAMES MACGREGOR BURNS, Woodrow Wilson Professor Emeritus of Government
(Instructors)

Dunn and Burns are co-authors of The Three Roosevelts: Patrician Leaders Who Transformed America. Professor Burns is also the author of Roosevelt: The Lion and the Fox and also Roosevelt: The Soldier of Freedom, which won the Pulitzer Prize.

INTR 018 Wilderness Leadership

This Winter Study project is for students who would like to participate in an off-campus experiential education opportunity. Students will be required to research an appropriate accredited program i.e. National Outdoor Leadership School, Outward Bound etc., that will provide a suitable learning environment and be at least 22 days in length. The Director of the Williams Outing Club will assist students in their search if necessary. Upon choosing a program and being accepted, students will meet with the Director in a pre-program meeting in December to create a framework for observing group dynamics and studying a variety of leadership styles. There will also be a follow up class to debrief the experience in the last week of February. All programs must meet with the approval of the Outing Club Director.
Requirements: course approval by WOC Director, daily journal writing with focus on leadership and group dynamics, a 10-page paper and 2 class meetings pre and post trip. Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper and class discussions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Not open to first-year students. Interested sophomores, juniors and seniors must consult with WOC Director before registration.
Cost to student: varies depending on the program selected-range is generally from $1,500-3,000.

WILLARD MORGAN, WOC Director

INTR 026 Panama: Leadership at the Crossroads of the World (Same as Political Science 026)

At the "crossroads of the world," Panama provides an ideal venue from which students can study leadership in a multicultural and international context. As a gateway, Panama and its canal are symbols of globalization that can help students understand many of the forces affecting the contemporary world. Students will spend nearly the entire January term in Panama, where they will reside in newly renovated apartments at the Ciudad del Saber or the City of Knowledge, located near the Pacific entrance of the Panama Canal and within a short distance from Panama City (www.ciudaddelsaber.org.pa). A former military base for U.S. forces during their administration of the Canal Zone (and with all the recreational resources of a former command post of high import), the area now serves as a research center, technology park and residence for visiting universities from around the world.
During their stay, students will be engaged in classes and field trip with ample time for independent exploration. Topics include: Latin American History; Society and Politics; The New World Economy; The Social and Ecological Ramifications of Globalization; and New Technologies and Future Opportunities. The course is team-taught by Professors from Williams, professionals in Panama, and visiting experts from the Smithsonian Tropic Research Institute based in Panama. Field trips include such itineraries as a visit to Parliament and other government building in Panama City, a transit of the Panama Canal (and a visit to the Panama Canal Authority and Museum), an overnight to the archeological site Cerro Juan Diaz on the Pacific side of the country, and a visit to the new Galeta Marine Laboratory in Colon at the Atlantic entrance of the Canal. Opportunities for interaction with students from other universities will be offered, both in the classroom setting, and in less formal, social outings.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page paper at the conclusion of the course.
No prerequisites, and while a working knowledge of Spanish isn't required, familiarity with the language will enhance a student's experience while in Panama. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference will be given to students with course work in Leadership Studies. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: $1,375 (includes airfare). Students will be responsible for most meals.

G. GOETHALS, FRED GREENE and CARLOS GUEVARA MANN, PhD

Dr. Guevara Mann was born in Panama City, Republic of Panama. He received his PhD in Government and International Studies from the University of Notre Dame. He has served in both the public and private sector in Panama. Between September 1999 and 2000, he was the Director-General of Foreign Policy, Secretary of the national Foreign Relations Council, and Political Advisor to the Foreign Minister. He has also worked as chief Credit Analysis and consultant at Lloyds TSB Bank Plc, and other financial institutions from 1993-1997. He serves on numerous boards and is currently working as a political and business consultant.

A. Barton Hepburn Professor of Government Emeritus Fred Greene taught in the Political Science department at Williams for over 40 years. He continues to be especially interested in the politics of international relations.

MATHEMATICS and STATISTICS

MATH 012 The Dance of Primes

Prime numbers are the building blocks for all numbers. Though there are an infinite number of primes, how they are spread out among the integers is still quite a mystery. Even more mysterious and surprising is that the current tools for investigating prime numbers involve the study of infinite series. Somehow function theory tells us about the primes. We will be studying one of the most amazing functions known: The Riemann Zeta Function. Finding where this function is equal to zero is the Riemann Hypothesis and is viewed as one of the great open problems in mathematics. Somehow where these zeros occur is linked to the distribution of primes. We will be concerned with why anyone would care about this conjecture. More crassly, why should solving the Riemann Hypothesis be worth one million dollars (which is what you will get if you solve it, beyond the eternal fame and glory). This course is aimed for people who want to get a feel for some current mathematics.
Evaluation will be based on problem sets and/or a ten page paper.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 105. Enrollment limit: 30.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $20.

GARRITY

MATH 013 Beginning Modern Dance (Same as Special 023)

CANCELLED!

MATH 014 Fantasy Novels of C.S. Lewis and Charles Williams (Same as English 028)

Both Lewis and Williams were members of The Inklings, the remarkable group of British authors and thinkers who met regularly at "The Eagle and Child" Pub in Oxford, where writers (including Tolkien) read their works in progress to one another. Lewis is well-known; the works of Williams have received less recognition, but were admired by W.H. Auden, Dorothy L. Sayers, and T.S. Eliot. Both Lewis and Williams approached their work as staunch Anglican Christians, and their point of view will be respected in this course; however, their novels can speak to the lives of all readers who are sensitive to their own world and to human relationships.
Readings will include the Ransom Trilogy of Lewis: Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength (often called "the Charles Williams novel written by C.S. Lewis"), and Williams's War in Heaven and Descent into Hell (which Lewis listed as one of the ten books which most influenced his own thinking). The month will conclude with Lewis's final novel Till We Have Faces.
Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation in all discussions. The final project will be a 10- to 20-page short story in the style of, incorporating some ideas of, or using literary techniques of the novels read. Alternatively, students may choose to write an expository or critical paper of about 15 pages relating some or all of the novels read to other fiction by these two authors or to works of comparable writers such as George MacDonald, Madeleine l'Engle, or J.K. Rowling.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 13.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $40-50 for books.

V. HILL

MATH 015 What Was Fido Thinking?!

In this class, we will take a look at dog behavior. How do dogs perceive the world around them? How do they see you, a human? Are dogs really adoring, unconditionally loving creatures, or manipulative con-artists?
We will explore the social, evolutionary and physiological aspects which influence dog behavior and dog-human interactions. Class will involve both discussions of readings and hands-on experiences, including trips to animal shelters, and working with/observing dogs.
Readings will include 2-3 books per week. Possible selections include: The Dog Who Loved Too Much by Dr. Nicholas Dodman; The Dog's Mind by Dr. Bruce Fogel; Good Owners, Great Dogs by Brian Kilcommons; The Truth About Dogs by Stephen Budiansky; Dog Behavior by Dr. Ian Dunbar; How to Speak Dog by Stanley Coren; and Man Meets Dog by Konrad Lorenz.
Evaluation will be based on participation and a 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Meeting time: morning, twice a week for two hours in a class room setting; one or more fieldtrips a week during the hours of 10a.m.-4p.m. will also be required.
Cost to student: approximately $80.

WITTWER

MATH 017 Onstage! (Same as Special 017)

If you like to perform on the stage or if you have always wanted to find out what it would be like-this is your opportunity! In this course we will explore basic acting techniques and methods. Improvisation and theater games will be used as a foundation to create characters in scenes and monologues. Participants will also investigate the basics of script analysis. The final will include a public presentation of the works in progress.
Requirements: class attendance is mandatory; contact hours will increase as rehearsals progress towards final performance. Evaluation will be based on participation and assignments.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15 (a selection process will include a brief essay).
Meeting time: mornings; 10a.m.-12p.m., three times per week.
Cost to student: $20 for text.

AMELIA ADAMS (Instructor) O.R. BEAVER (Sponsor)

Amelia Adams is a regional actor who has performed in a variety of theatrical and commercial venues over the last thirteen years. She is a member of the Actor's Equity Association, the American Federation of Radio and Television actors, and the Screen Actors Guild.

MATH 018 Modern Dance-Muller Technique (Same as Special 020)

This dance class will be based on the modern dance technique developed by Jennifer Muller, with whom the instructor danced professionally for 5 years in New York City and in Europe. Jennifer Muller was a soloist in the dance company of José Limòn before she started her own company in 1974. She has added her own style of movement to the Limòn technique, creating an expansive, free-flowing dance that is wonderful to do and to watch.
Students will have the opportunity to choreograph a short piece either as a soloist or in small groups.
We will finish the course with a short lecture-demonstration illustrating what we have learned.
No prerequisites. The class is open to beginners as well as to those who have previous experience with modern dance or ballet. It will be multi-leveled and open to both men and women alike. Enrollment limit: 24.
Meeting time: 10 a.m.-12 p.m., Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday. The class will meet six hours per week.
Cost to student: Under $20.

SYLVIA LOGAN (Instructor)
O. R. BEAVER (Sponsor)

Sylvia Logan received her B.A. in Slavic Literature from Stanford University. She danced professionally with the Jennifer Muller Dance Company, a modern company based in New York, for five years.

MATH 030 Senior Project

To be taken by candidates for honors in Mathematics other than by thesis route.

MATH 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Mathematics 493-494.

MUSIC

MUS 010 Isn't it Good, Norwegion Wood?: Storytelling in Music

The Beatles song "Norwegian Wood" tells the story of a mysterious encounter between a man and a woman that either does or doesn't culminate in sex and/or arson. How does the music underpinning the lyrics communicate the dramatic events, emotions, and characters? How do the text and music interact? More generally, how have stories been told in music through the centuries, and why do some narratives retain a grip on our imagination? Even without text, music can communicate compelling narratives, such as the heroic struggle for transcendence suggested by Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. What purely musical means do composers employ to tell stories?
This course explores a range of archetypal narratives communicated in music: star-crossed lovers; heroes and heroines; Faustian bargains; revenge, murder, and suicide; and humorous parables. Genres covered include medieval morality plays, madrigals, opera, song cycles, tone poems, and ballet, as well as popular ballads from country and western, the blues, and rock 'n roll.
Evaluation based on class presentations, participation, and a final project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20, with preference given to seniors and juniors.
Meeting time: mornings. three times a week.
Cost to student: no more than $100 for at least 2 required field trips.

BLOXAM and HIRSCH

MUS 012 Music of Charles Mingus

Students will take part in an ensemble course primarily devoted to studying and playing the music of Charles Mingus. Instrumentalists needed include piano, bass, drums, trumpet, saxophone, trombone, etc. as well as voice, but all are welcome. In addition to performing the music, the course will give students an in-depth look at the life of Charles Mingus as a composer and bassist. Each composition will be explored as to its structure and improvisational concepts. The focus of improvisation will be from an historical point of view (taking in the music of Dixieland, New Orleans traditional jazz, etc.) and will lead to collective improvising, using the Mingus Jazz Workshop as an example. Music to be presented and performed will include: "Better Get Hit In Your Soul," "Goodbye Porkpie Hat," "Haitian Fight Song," "Nostalgia in Times Square" and "Duke Ellington's Sound Of Love." "Triumph of the Underdog," a video by filmmaker Don McGlynn, will be shown and discussed.
Evaluation will be based on faithful attendance at rehearsals, classes, coaching sessions, and appropriate performances.
Permission of instructor: Students must audition to be admitted to the class. In this audition they will need to demonstrate a level of musical literacy and aural skills sufficient to be able to perform the music competently. Open to all instrumentalists and vocalists. Enrollment limit: 19.
Meeting time: three times a week for 2.5 hour sessions. Outside listening assignments and preparation of individual parts will also be required. There will be a field trip to New York to hear the Mingus Big Band. Participation in a concluding concert during last week of Winter Study required.
Cost to student: $100, including the transportation to NYC.

JOHN MENEGON (Instructor)
KECHLEY (Sponsor)

John Menegon is Adjunct Teacher of Jazz Bass at Williams College, and a professional bassist, composer and arranger.

MUS 013 Handbell Choir

A performance Winter Study project, the Handbell Choir will rehearse two hours per day, four days a week, from 10:15 a.m. until noon. A five-octave set of English handbells will be used. Repertoire will be wide-ranging, from the classics to popular music, from original compositions to arrangements. Difficulty of repertoire will depend on the skill of the ensemble as it develops.
The final week of Winter Study will consist of several performances of materials mastered during the previous three weeks of rehearsals. This will include a final concert on the last afternoon of Winter Study.
A "Pass" will be earned by attendance at all rehearsals unless excused only for reason of illness. A "High Pass" may be earned by completing a written arrangement for handbells of a tune of the student's choice. The instructor will approve that choice and assist in arranging if necessary. These arrangements will be read by the choir, and may be performed on the final concert.
Ringers must be able to read music, but no prior experience playing handbells is required. Bells are quite easy to play; ringers will be taught various handbell ringing techniques, and go on to experience the process and teamwork necessary to build a musical ensemble. Current ringers welcome, as are others willing to learn. Enrollment limit: 11.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

D. MOORE

MUS 014 From Avant Garde to Popular Culture: The Theatre Songs of Kurt Weill (Same as Theatre 014)

(See under Theatre for full description.)

MUS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Music 493, 494.

NEUROSCIENCE

NSCI 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Neuroscience 493-494.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 010 The Philosophy of Chess

Chess is one of the noblest and most fascinating of human endeavors. We will examine chess in many of its facets: its history, philosophy, literature and psychology. We will look at the art of chess and the art that chess has inspired. Above all, we will work together on improving our playing skills: we will study chess openings, middle games and endgames, and engage in continual tournament play.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and problem assignments.
Prerequisites: All students should know the rules of chess and be able to read chess notation. Enrollment limit: 20. If the class is overenrolled, students will be selected according to playing strength, as indicated by United States Chess Federation ratings, results in the College chess club, or other measures.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: approximately $75 for books.

GERRARD

PHIL 011 Why New Englanders Eat What They Eat (Same as American Studies 011 and History 019)

Have you ever wondered why the food of New England is sugary and bland: is it the people, the land, the economy? Do New Englanders like their diets or are they forced into them? This course will investigate these kinds of questions by looking at the political, economic, cultural, and climatic factors that have shaped the diet and culture of New Englanders.
We will begin our course by learning about the ecology and culture of food developed by Native Americans: how did they hunt, gather and farm, and how did their methods of procuring food form their relationship to nature and to each other? Then we will consider the diet of the first European settlers and their interaction with Native Americans. Issues such as differing uses of the land, what was considered by the term "property," and what was being sold by the Native Americans to the settlers will be considered. Next we will examine how food was used to try to socialize the next wave of immigrants to New England and how women used food to gain entrance to higher education, which also opened the door to science in food. Finally we will look at international issues such as genetically modified foods, the economic and cultural impact of agribusiness, over-fishing the seas and pollution as it relates to our food. We will enjoy a historically accurate demonstration of life in the 1700's at Historic Deerfield and a guest speaker.
Reading list: Change in the Land, William Cronon; Unredeemed Captive, John Demos; Cod, Mark Kurlansky; Perfection Salad, Laura Shapiro; Runaway World, Anthony Giddens.
Requirements: a 10-page essay on a topic of your choosing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: $50-$100 for books.

ROBIN LENZ MACDONALD (Instructor)
A. WHITE (Sponsor)

Robin MacDonald received her B.A. and M.A. in Political Science from UC Berkeley. She has written several articles about "food and its history" and has extensive experience in her field.

PHIL 012 Berkeley and Skepticism

The course will take seriously the philosopher often dismissed as crazy. We will closely read his texts, texts of some of his predecessors, followers, opponents and contemporary interpreters, and try to evaluate whether Berkeley's philosophy flies in the face of the common sense it purports to articulate. We will examine his response to skepticism through his accounts of perception, cognition, philosophy of science and mathematics, and his conception of `common sense.' Finally, we will discuss the immaterialist position he is famous for in light of the epistemic problems he was trying to solve.
Requirements: four short assignments and one longer (5-7 pages) paper.
Prerequisites: Philosophy 102, or consent of the instructor. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: approximately $80 for books.

MLADENOVIC

PHIL 013 Legal Realism and the Search for the Law (Same as Political Science 023)

From the 1920s-1940s, a movement called Legal Realism assailed the notion of an objective and impartial legal system. According to the Realists, the outcomes of legal disputes depend on the values, backgrounds, and idiosyncrasies of decision-makers (usually judges and juries). In the most extreme formulation, what a judge eats for breakfast has a greater effect on the outcome of a case than the rules or laws that ostensibly govern the case. Modern-day descendents of Legal Realism proclaim that "law is politics." Is this radical skepticism on the mark? Insightful but exaggerated? Fundamentally flawed? This course will probe the Realist perspective in the context of major legal controversies, including Roe v. Wade, Bush v. Gore, the O.J. Simpson trial, the impeachment of Bill Clinton, and the fight over the Supreme Court nominations of Robert Bork and Clarence Thomas.
Requirements: attendance, reading, participation, several 1- to 2-page papers and one 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: $50-100 for books.

ALAN HIRSCH (Instructor)
A. WHITE (Sponsor)

PHIL 014 Native American Philosophies

CANCELLED!

PHIL 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Philosophy 493-494.

PHYSICS

PHYS 010 Light and Holography

This course will examine the art and science of holography. It will introduce modern optics at a level appropriate for a non-science major, giving the necessary theoretical background in lectures and discussion. Demonstrations will be presented and students will make several kinds of holograms in the lab. Thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation, we have 7 well-equipped holography darkrooms available for student use. At the beginning of WSP, the class will meet for lecture and discussion three mornings a week and for lab 2 afternoons a week. Later classes will be mainly laboratory.
Students will be evaluated on the basis of regular attendance, completion of 4 laboratory exercises, and a holography laboratory project or a 10-page paper. Attendance at all classes and labs is required for a passing grade.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference will be given to students with no previous college course in physics more advanced than Physics 100.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for holographic film, chemicals, and photocopies.

JONES and FORKEY

PHYS 011 Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting and Design (CADD) (Same as ArtS 011)

CANCELLED!

PHYS 012 Meet the Right Side of Your Brain: Drawing as a Learnable Skill (Same as ArtS 019)

Representational drawing is not merely a gift of birth or a magical ability granted by angels, but a learnable skill. If you ever wanted to draw, but doubted you had the ability or believed you could not learn, then this course is for you. This intensive course utilizes discoveries in brain research to teach representational drawing. By using simple techniques and extensive exercises you will discover and develop the perceptual shift from your symbol based left hemisphere to your visually based right hemisphere. This cognitive shift enables you to accurately see and realistically represent the physical world. You will learn to draw a convincing portrait, self-portrait, and still life. This course is designed to develop your powers of observation and enhance your innate creative problem solving abilities, which are applicable in any field. Students need no previous artistic experience, just the willingness and desire to learn a new skill. Students will be expected to attend and participate in all sessions. They will also be required to keep a sketchbook recording their progress and complete a final project.
Evaluations will be based on participation, effort, and development. The class will meet three times per week (about 10 hours lecture and group exercises) with substantial additional independent student work.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30, with preference given to juniors and seniors.
Meeting time: afternoons. The course will meet in two sections of 15.
Cost to student: approximately $30 for text and drawing materials.

STELLA EHRICH (Instructor)
JONES (Sponsor)

Stella Ehrich is a painter who resides in North Bennington, Vermont. She received her BFA from Memphis Academy of Art and her MFA from Bennington College.

PHYS 013 Automotive Mechanics

The purpose of this course will be to provide an understanding of the basic function of the major components of the modern automobile. Through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on experience, individuals will learn basic maintenance of an automobile. In addition, students will be expected to study in depth one of the major automotive systems which include carburetor or fuel-injection systems, the lubrication and cooling system, the electrical system, the steering, brake and suspension system, and the power train for both manual and automatic transmissions.
The course will meet two hours a day, three times a week in the morning for classroom instruction. In addition, students will meet at the Flamingo Motors in Williamstown one evening each week for practical demonstrations and hands-on activity. Students will be required to attend class regularly, read assigned material from the text, actively participate in work at the garage, and pass written midterm and final examinations.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. The class will be broken into three sections for lab work. Preference given to seniors.
Cost to student: approximately $45 for text.

MICHAEL FRANCO (Instructor)
JONES (Sponsor)

Michael Franco is the owner of Flamingo Motors in Williamstown.

PHYS 015 Electronics

Electronic instruments are an indispensable part of modern laboratory work throughout the sciences. This course will cover the basics of analog electronic circuits, including transistors and operational amplifiers, and will briefly introduce digital circuits. Students will build and test a variety of circuits chosen to illustrate the kinds of electronic devices and design problems a scientist is apt to encounter. In the last week, students will design and build a final project, or will write a 10-page paper.
Evaluation will be based on participation, completion of both laboratory work and occasional homework, and the quality of the final project or 10-page.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 or equivalent calculus. No prior experience with electronics is required. Enrollment limit: 16.
Meeting time: afternoons for a mixture of lab, lecture, and discussion, providing ample opportunity for hands-on experience.

Cost to student: $95 for two textbooks

WHITAKER

PHYS 016 Teaching with Technology

Explore the use of technology in the classroom using a variety of multimedia including Photoshop, Dreamweaver, iMovie, Flash, presentation software, multimedia hardware, and data projection to communicate and teach ideas and concepts effectively. Other topics include copyright issues in education, project planning, and developing alternative presentation plans in case of hardware failure. This course will include practical hands on workshops, assignments, and readings, leading to the development of a professional electronic portfolio. Supervised lab sessions and group critiques will provide feedback on student work. The final products will be publicly presented at the end of the course.
Evaluation will be based on the completion of assignments and a class presentation of the electronic portfolio with attention to content, effort, and development of the work. Attendance and participation will also be taken into account.
We will meet three times a week for two-hour blocks with extra supervised-lab times scheduled in accordance with our needs. Most of the development of the electronic portfolio will be completed outside of class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to students who have an interest in teaching.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

TREVOR MURPHY and MIKA HIRAI (Instructors)
KEVIN JONES (Sponsor)

Trevor Murphy and Mika Hirai are Instructional Technology Specialists for the Office for Information Technology at Williams College. Trevor Murphy has a MS in Scientific and Technical Communication from Oregon State University. Mika Hirai has an MA in Japanese Pedagogy and also in Instructional Design and Technology from the University of Iowa. Together they have 12 years of teaching experience.

PHYS 022 Research Participation

Several members of the department will have student projects available dealing with their own research or that of current senior thesis students. Approximately 35 hours per week of study and actual research participation will be expected from each student.
Students will be required to keep a notebook and write a five-page paper summarizing their work. Those interested should consult with members of the department as early as possible in the registration period or before to determine details of projects then expected to be available.
Prerequisite: permission of specific instructor. Enrollment limit: 1 or 2 per project.
Meeting time: to be arranged with instructor.
Cost to student: none.

K. JONES and members of the department

PHYS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Physics 493, 494.

POLITICAL ECONOMY

POEC 031 Honors Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Political Economy 493.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

PSCI 010 Writing Chinese Lives: Memoir, Biography, History (Same as Asian Studies 010)

CANCELLED!

PSCI 011 The Political Writings of George Orwell

George Orwell was a noted critic, political commentator, activist, and satirist in the middle of the twentieth century. He wrote about political language, trade unions, the Spanish civil war, totalitarianism and deceit, and political ideals gone bad, among other things. This course will read several of his books and a number of his essays, partly to look for relevance to our age, mostly to learn why his manner of thought is enduring.
Requirements: a 10-page paper and active participation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: books.

MACDONALD

PSCI 012 Vietnam and the Origins of the New Left

This course will examine the origins and development of the antiwar movement in the 1960's. Contrary to what is popularly believed, the antiwar movement did not stop the war in Vietnam. Nevertheless, the antiwar movement and New Left did have an important impact on American politics and society in the 1960's and 1970's. Drawing on a variety of sources, including primary documents, films and memoirs, this course will pay particular attention to the rise and fall of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), the Weathermen, and the Black Panther Party.
Evaluation: weekly short papers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: $50 for books.

MCALLISTER

PSCI 013 Bové, `malbouffe,' McWorld (Same as Environmental Studies 023)

In August 1999 a small band of farmers led by José Bové dismantled a McDonald's restaurant in southern France and coined a new French word at the same time: `malbouffe' (loosely translated as `junk food'). While no one knew it at the time, this event has become a `shot heard round the world' in the current political struggle over globalization. Since 1999 Bové has come to symbolize the anti-globalization movement (for example, hundreds of attendees of the first World Social Forum meeting sported badges stating "We are all José Bové"), just as McDonald's has become the dominant symbol of globalization (its golden arches are among the most recognizable images in the world). One result: when anti-globalization protestors take to the streets, the local McDonald's becomes-only after the politicians themselves-the most protected site in the city.
More than globalization in a vague sense, this course explores the current struggle best symbolized by José Bové and McDonald's: the global politics of industrial agriculture. We will learn about the evolution of agricultural production from family/peasant farming to concentrated animal feeding operations; the importance of immigrant labor in the production of cheap industrial food; the recent incorporation of agriculture into global free trade agreements; the debate over biotechnology; and the politics and political activism of Bové himself. Texts will include José Bové's The World is Not for Sale and Eric Schlosser's Fast Food Nation as well as shorter pieces from E.F Schumacher, Wendell Berry and others.
Format: seminar. Evaluation based on class participation and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites, but a reading knowledge of French will be helpful. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings, plus one field trip outside normal class hours.
Cost: $100 for books, reading packet and field trip to a Vermont factory farm.

PAUL

PSCI 014 The Work of the Supreme Court: A Simulation

The aim of this course is to provide a sense of the personal, theoretical, and institutional characteristics of judicial decision making at the highest level. At the beginning of the course, all students will be furnished with a set of the briefs for an actual pending Supreme Court case. Four students (two per side) will be assigned to make oral arguments to the "Court," which will be composed of eight students, each playing the role of a sitting justice, and the instructor, who will act as chief justice for purposes of coordination. After hearing arguments, the "Court" will confer and prepare majority and other opinions and announce them in "open court" at the conclusion of the term.
Evaluation will be based on the overall credibility in assigned role; effective argument, questions, performance in conference, drafting, etc. and a 3- to 5-page "reflective" essay in which students will be expected to identify and comment on some aspect of the work of the Court.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference to students who have completed one or more courses in related areas or have background in speech, debate or drama.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: materials fee, approximately $33.

JAY NELSON '70 (Instructor)
JACOBSOHN (Sponsor)

Jay Nelson '70 is a member of the Texas and District of Columbia bars and has taught at the University of Texas School of Law.

PSCI 015 Objective Journalism During Times of Conflict

Can a newspaper editor or reporter from a nation fighting terror separate their patriotism and be members of a medium whose goal it is to reveal the truth, report objectively and let the reader judge for him or herself? This class will follow personal experiences of two Israeli journalists, Aviva Lori and Shlomo Papirblat, through major recent events in the Middle East such as the current Intifada, the war in Lebanon, military reserve duty and many other current topics. Students will examine actual journalistic dilemmas of the instructors and discuss their perspective vis-à-vis the reality of the situation. Topics for discussion include whether a governing body can require journalists, during times of national peril, to favor national interest and potentially compromise their journalistic integrity. Can a true democracy restrict and regulate press coverage during times of emergency? What is the influence of the international media on the political developments in a contiguous region? And how much should political leaders consider the influence of the media on the success or failure of their planned political strategy? A central question will be whether journalism is just another profession or is a journalist an intermediary between the public and the decision-makers and thus partake in the evolution of national events? In addition, the course will address the foreign press coverage of events and will question whether a foreign correspondent, who is not familiar with the local language and culture and the complexities of the local realities, can report in a manner that conveys the whole picture.
Evaluation will be based on a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Meeting time: afternoons, 2p.m.-4 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
Cost to student: none.

AVIVA LORI and SHLOMO PAPIRBLAT (Instructors)
JACOBSOHN (Sponsor)

Aviva Lori is a senior journalist at Haaretz daily newspaper. Shlomo Papirblat is the International News Editor-In-Chief at the daily Yediot Acharonot newspaper.

PSCI 016 Satire and Parody

Americans rarely use satire to comment on politics. MAD magazine now has The Onion as company, and that's about it. The British are masters of it. (Americans have a hard time being not-nice in public, whereas the British don't mind.) This class will look at political satire, see what works and what doesn't, and decide which types should be encouraged. Students will produce works of satire, which will be displayed publicly. Projects will have to meet the following criteria: they must be political, that is, deal with power and its legitimate distribution; they have to work, to have bite-if they are stupid, they will fail; they have to be original, more than simple variations of standard satires; and they have to be based on social facts, on actuality rather than assertion, hence likely require a little research. Finally, they cannot take the form of the 10-page paper, even if the ten pages are full of a supposedly funny dialogue. Final projects will have to be in a traditional satirical/parodic form, e.g. cartoons, limericks, diaramas, skits, that sort of thing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: none, depending on materials you choose for your final product.

SHANKS

PSCI 017 Diplomacy and War in International Relations: What if?"

The phrase "What if?" has begun many a passionate discussion in faculty lounges, dorm rooms, bars and, increasingly, in a scholarly literature examining historical events in international relations. This course will examine two such what-ifs and associated questions, some of which are military but most of which involve other aspects of politics:
(1) What if one or more nations -Great Britain? Czechoslovakia?-had stood up to Hitler and Germany at Munich in 1938? Could such actions have averted World War II? How plausible would the occurrence of such actions have been? (2) What if the People's Republic of China were to attack Taiwan? What might precipitate such a conflict? Would the PRC succeed? Would the U.S. intervene?
The course will involve not only readings and discussion but also a variety of policy-oriented simulations of diplomacy and war in the form of board games, computer games, or role-playing. (Rules will be taught.)
Requirements: a final 10-page paper.
Prerequisites: Intellectual engagement, imagination, and one course in either international relations or twentieth-century history. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: either mornings or afternoons, three times per week on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for reading materials.

JOHN SETEAR '81 (Instructor)
JACOBSOHN (Sponsor)

John Setear is a Professor of Law at the University of Virginia.

PSCI 018 IDPs and Refugees

Do you really know who is a Refugee or an Internally Displaced Person (IDP)? How many are there in the world? Where are they located? How did they end up there? How are they dealing with daily life? What is their future? What kind of support do governments, civil society, and the international community provide, in the short or the longer run? How relevant and efficient is this support? Discover the ground issues of one of the most burning international and human problems that the planet is facing in the beginning of the twenty-first century, and make your own assessment.
The first week will cover a presentation and discussion of the overall condition of refugees and IDPs in the world, and the nature and degree of involvement of the international community in rehabilitation programs. Each following week we will focus on a national case study, starting with the Gaza Strip, continuing with Timor Island and ending with the conflict over Nagorno Karabach between Armenia and Azerbaijan.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, classroom participation, and individual assignments, including a final project involving the written analysis on an assessment of international support to a case of your choice, including your own proposals for next steps.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings, 3 times a week for 2 hours.
Cost to students: $15 for photocopy handouts.

NICOLAS MATHIEU (Instructor)
JACOBSOHN (Sponsor)

Nicolas Mathieu is Senior Country Officer at the World Bank in Washington DC, currently assigned to the South Caucasus Region.

PSCI 019 Justice and Public Policy (Same as INTR 012)

(See under INTR for full description.)

PSCI 020 Presidential Leadership: From Washington to FDR (Same as INTR 017)

(See under INTR for full description.)

PSCI 023 Legal Realism and the Search for the Law (Same as Philosophy 013)

(See under Philosophy for full description.)

PSCI 026 Panama: Leadership at the Crossroads of the World (Same as INTR 026)

(See under INTR for full description.)

PSCI 030 Senior Essay

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 491 or 492.

PSCI 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 493-494.

PSCI 032 Individual Project

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 495 or 496.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 010 The Psychology of Superstition and Belief in the Paranormal

We live in a technologically advanced age, and yet superstition and belief in the paranormal abound. The purpose of this course is to better understand why people believe in things most scientists do not, from alien abductions and astrology to "past-life" regression, bogus medical claims, and phantom Elvis sightings-as well as more mundane, "everyday" examples of superstition. Our chief resource in understanding the origins of people's beliefs will be cognitive and social psychological research on the errors, biases, and shortcomings of human inference and decision making.
Requirements: readings, active class participation and attendance, 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

SAVITSKY

PSYC 011 From Segregation to Accommodation: Changing Perspectives on Disabilities

CANCELLED!

PSYC 012 Children's Play

The meaning of play in the young child's life will be considered both through readings and practical experience. The group will discuss several theoretical approaches to play, and each student will work mornings or afternoons with children in natural play settings, e.g., nursery school or day-care center. A journal relating reading and experience will be kept, and a final 10-page paper, relating theories of play to the student's observations of children at play will be written.
No prerequisites, but interested students must consult with the instructor prior to registration. Enrollment limited to number of available placements in children's programs.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

CRAMER

PSYC 013 Gender and the Media: Images of Women and Their Effects on Identity and Achievement (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 013)

This course will explore some of the ways in which women tend to be portrayed in the media, with a particular focus on the dimensions of beauty and intelligence. We also will examine methodological issues involved in how to study these tendencies and trends systematically and objectively. This course will emphasize social psychological theory and research concerning the potential role of such portrayals in women's and men's personal, social, and academic identities and achievement. We will discuss these issues in class, and students will conduct original, archival research and write a report of the results of this research.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page research paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $20.

STEVEN SPENCER (Instructor)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Dr. Steven Spencer is an Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Waterloo. He is one of the world's leading researchers on the effects of stereotypes and media images on women's identity and academic achievement. He worked with Claude Steele to develop the theory and the first empirical investigations of the role of stereotype threat in the underperformance of women and minorities in educational settings, and he and Steele developed the innovative "21st Century Program" at the University of Michigan which has been credited with improving the retention rates and grades of students of color there.

PSYC 014 Sleep and Dreams

While metaphors of sleep and the meaning of dreams have permeated literature and folklore for centuries, the advent of psychological sleep labs, the electroencephalograph (EEG), and advances in neuroscience have allowed a scientific perspective to emerge regarding the functions and mysteries of behavior that occupies one-third of our lives. This course explores the psychology of sleep, beginning with emphasis on a neuroscience understanding. Readings, discussion, and lab exercises in the first half of the course include circadian/ultradian rhythms, dyssomnias, parasomnias, and sleep deprivation. A field trip to a local hospital's Sleep Lab to observe firsthand a sleeping subject's EEG patterns is planned next. We then go on to consider various perspectives on dreams, including Piagetian, psychoanalytic, evolutionary, cognitive problem-solving, Buddhist, Gestalt, interpersonal, activation-synthesis, and dreams-as-garbage views. Students will anonymously submit and evaluate dreams, applying one or more of these theories.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and discussion of student's commentary on readings, submission and evaluation of anonymous dream journals, and a 10-page research paper.
Prerequisite: A basic understanding of scientific method is necessary to critically read assigned research articles.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to students: $15 for text, articles, and thermometer (for lab exercise on circadian rhythms).

PEGGY R. BROOKS (Instructor)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Peggy Brooks received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Florida. While in graduate school, she studied with sleep researcher Wilse Webb. She is a member of the American Academy of Psychotherapists and practiced privately for 11 years in Atlanta, GA before moving to the Berkshires. She taught previously at Emory University and Mount Holyoke College and is currently Professor of Psychology and Women's Studies at MCLA.

PSYC 015 Principles of Psychotherapy

CANCELLED!

PSYC 016 The Examined Life

This course will introduce students to the concepts of mindfulness, self awareness and stress reduction to educate students on the ideas of wellness. Through a variety of readings, presentations, demonstrations, and self-administered psychological batteries, each student will learn about their personality and coping styles, their career interests and aptitudes, awareness of mindfulness and information on stress reduction. The course will be taught by staff and guest presenters under the direction and supervision of the Health Center and Psychology Department. The learning from this course should help each student become more educated about the concepts of self awareness and examined living in their present and future life.
Evaluation: a paper (10 page minimum) on the topic of examined living and wellness.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference will be given to sophomores as some aspects of the course will help with the declaration of a major, junior year abroad decisions, etc.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week for 2 hours. A field trip to Kripalu Yoga center will be required.
Cost to students: $50 for books and psych test batteries.

JOHN MINER and MARGARET WOOD (Instructors)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

John Miner, M.D., is currently Co-Director of the Psychological Counseling Service at Williams College. He received his M.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1975 and then trained in Family Practice in Duluth, Minnesota. He then worked as an emergency room physician in Rapid City, South Dakota from 1977-1982. He then did his Psychiatric Residency at Yale and came to the Berkshires in 1985 when he did a fellowship at the Austen Riggs Center, where he remained on the full-time staff until 1994. He has been working at Williams for the past 5 years. He and the staff at the Psychological Counseling Service are very interested in promoting wellness and stress reduction within the campus community.

Margi Wood, LICSW, is Co-Director of the Psychological Counseling Service at Williams College. She has been a staff psychotherapist since 1993 and worked as a staff psychotherapist at Bennington College from 1988-1996. She has an MSW from SUNY-Albany and an M.A. in philosophy from Emory University. She and the staff of the Psychological Counseling Service are interested in fostering the values of psychological well-being and self-awareness within the college community.

PSYC 017 Teaching Practicum

Students interested in teaching may submit applications for a Winter Study assignment as a teacher's aide at Mt. Greylock Regional High School or at the Williamstown Elementary School. Those accepted will work under the supervision of a regular member of the teaching staff and submit a report on their work at the end of the Winter Study Period. This project involves a four-week commitment to full-time affiliation with the school. Interested students should consult before winter study registration with Professor Kassin, 311 Bronfman. He will assist in arranging placements and monitor students' progress during the four-week period.
Criteria for pass include full time affiliation with the school and a final 10-page report. The final report should summarize the student's experiences and reflections as drawn from a daily journal.
Prerequisite: approval of Professor Kassin required. Enrollment limited to number of places available at the two participating schools.
Cost to student: none.

KASSIN

PSYC 018 Institutional Placement

Students interested in a full time January placement in a mental health, social service or applied psychology (e.g., advertising, law) setting may consult with members of the Psychology Department to make appropriate arrangements. Students should first make their own contacts with an institution or agency. They should also arrange to obtain a letter from a sponsor at the institution who will outline and supervise the student's duties during January. The student must agree to keep a journal and to submit a final paper summarizing and reflecting upon the experiences outlined in the journal.
Requirements for a passing grade are a satisfactory evaluation from the institutional sponsor and a 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: none.

KASSIN

PSYC 019 The Evolution of the Women's Counseling Movement (Same as History 014 and Women's and Gender Studies 014)

(See under History for full description.)

PSYC 020 Eating Disorders

What are eating disorders? Why do individuals develop eating disorders? What psychological and cultural theories explain the emergence of eating disorders? Are eating disorders culture-bound syndromes affecting primarily women in the West? What is a culture-bound syndrome? What types of treatment are available to help individuals suffering from eating disorders?
This course seeks to answer the above questions and many more as it investigates the manifestation of eating disorders in both western and non-western cultures. Eating disorders involve a severe disturbance in eating behavior, maladaptive attempts to restrict body weight, and abnormal attitudes about weight and shape (e.g., Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and Binge-Eating Disorder). It has been hypothesized that eating disorders have sharply risen in the Unites States since the 1950's and taken on the quality of a social epidemic, affecting primarily adolescent and young adult female populations.
In the course, we will seek to understand the nature of eating disorders and the psychological meaning of the symptom complex for the individual sufferer. We will also look at the cultural factors theorized to be implicated in the emergence of eating disorders in western culture: the value of beauty, weight control, thinness, the emphasis on exercise and fitness, the glamorization of anorexia in the mass media, and the role conflict experienced by many women in contemporary society.
Additionally, we will seek to identify cultural factors that these theories might have missed (revolving around issues of power and control) and look at the ways in which eating disorders affect women from non-western backgrounds both in the United States and beyond. In doing so, we will critique the culture-bound theory of eating disorders and suggest other possible frameworks for understanding eating disorders.
Finally, we will examine the treatment options available to individuals suffering from eating disorders. Possible readings include: A Hunger So Wide and Deep by Becky Thompson, Eating Disorders: Anatomy of a Social Epidemic by Richard A. Gordon, and Feminist Perspectives on Eating Disorders edited by Patricia Fallon, Susan Wooley, and Melanie A. Katzman. Excerpts drawn from Adios Barbie: Young Women Write about Body Image and Identity edited by Ophira Edut, Culture and Weight Consciousness by Mervat Nassar, The Beauty Myth by Naomi Wolf, Food and Culture edited by Carole Counihan and Penny Van Esterik, and The Handbook for the Treatment of Eating Disorders by Garner and Garfinkel will also be used to complement assigned readings, lectures, and class discussion.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $50 for books and article reprints.

HALLIE D'AGRUMA '97 (Instructor)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Hallie D'Agruma graduated from Williams College in 1997 with a major in Religion. She received an M.A. in Religion and Modern Culture from Boston University and M.A. in Counseling Psychology from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Currently, she is pursuing a Ph.D. in Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology from the University of California, Santa Barbara, with a specialization in cross-cultural issues in the manifestation of eating disorders, women's issues in psychology, psychological theory, counseling, social psychological status, power, military psychology, PTSD, addiction, health psychology, spirituality, and forensic psychology.

PSYC 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Psychology 493-494.

RELIGION

REL 010 Training the Body-Mind: Introduction to Traditional Karate

This course will be an introduction to traditional Okinawan Karate (Shohei-ryu/Uechi-ryu) and an investigation of the modes of learning involved in its study. Class will meet for two hours, three times a week. One meeting each week will be a classroom session exploring the history, theory, and philosophy behind karate, and will include discussions, video viewing, and experiments in learning styles. The other two classes will be training sessions, spent learning and practicing the fundamnetal routines and techniques of the system. Required readings will cover martial arts history, Zen thought, and Eastern energy theory. Handouts will also include Japanese terminology and sequences. All students will be required to attend one class at the Okinawan Karate School in Pittsfield to experience a more traditional setting and to interact with students on other levels. A rank promotion test will be held at the end of the month. Final class will be a performance and exhibit.
Evaluation: attendance at all classes, active participation, completion of assigned readings, submission of three journal entries of 2 or more pages, participation in final evening performance, contribution to final display.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week for two hours.
Cost to student: none, but the purchase of a gi (uniform) is optional ($30-35).

LISKEN VAN PELT DUS '84 (Instructor)
DREYFUS (Sponsor)

Lisken Van Pelt Dus '84 began her own training in karate twenty-two years ago as a first-year student at Williams. She is now Renshi Rokudan (1st degree master, 6th degree black belt), a certified Shihan Master Instructor, and Shodan (1st degree black belt) in Okinawan Kobudo (weapons). She is Senior Technical Advisor to the Okinawan Karate School in Pittsfield, Massachusetts.

REL 011 Contemporary Israeli Film (Same as Comparative Literature 011)

This course will explore issues in contemporary Israeli culture through the lens of recent films. We will look at film (documentary and dramatic) by both Israelis and Palestinians, as well as films about Israel and Palestine from other contexts. The conflicts of religion, territory, and nationality will be given prominent consideration, though we will also look at issues of connections between religious life in Israel and America. In addition to films, the course will also look at selected poems and essays on Israeli life. The class will consist of viewing and discussing films, a limited amount of reading, and a final written assignment.
Evaluation will be based on participation and the final paper (10 pages).
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to majors and potential majors in religion.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $50 for books.

LEVENE

REL 012 The Spirit and Practice of Yoga: Coming into Alignment

This class provides an orientation to yoga and builds a foundation for an effective and rewarding personal yoga practice. Each class will begin with a half-hour discussion of selected readings on yoga philosophy and schools of yoga, including Patanjali's Yoga Sutras, The Bhagavad Gita, and Tantra: The Yoga of Ecstasy, followed by a 90-minute yoga practicum where students will be introduced to the principles of alignment and how they apply in the major types of yoga poses: posture flow, standing poses, inversions, abdominals, hip-openers, backbends, twists, forward bends, and restoratives. In this way the class builds strength, flexibility, and awareness. Sanskrit and English names of poses will be taught. Students will receive individualized attention on how to work with the principles of alignment in their particular bodies. Yoga training is complementary to sports/athletics, aids classroom and study, and cultivates a sense of well-being, balance and spiritual connection to oneself.
Evaluation: attendance at all classes including a mandatory field trip to Kripalu Center, class participation, informed discussion of short readings, three two-page journal entries, demonstration of principles of alignment, and final exhibit (equivalent to a 10-page paper).
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16.
Meeting time: afternoons; three times a week for two hours, each including a substantial yoga posture class as well as discussion.
Cost: $20 for books and articles.

NATASHA JUDSON (Instructor)
DREYFUS and SHEEHY (Sponsors)

Natasha Judson, M.Ed., has been practicing yoga for over twenty years and meditation for fifteen. She is a graduate of both the Iyengar Yoga intensive two-year training and the Anusara Yoga one-year teacher training programs. She practices meditation in Thai and Tibetan traditions. She began teaching yoga in 1999 and currently offers individual and group classes through her business Sunflower Yoga in Williamstown, and at various locations including Frog Lotus Yoga in North Adams, Massachusetts and Sun Yoga in Bennington, Vermont.

REL 014 Language of the Holocaust

How name what is unnameable, unthinkable, unimaginable? Is silence the only response to unspeakable acts? Or, if you can articulate a name, an authority, an identity, a reason for genocide, for the annihilation of the Jewish people, how do you express or represent the experience without the luxury of artifice? What are the terms of such expression? What claims does the experience make on those who wish to define it? Is there an ultimate fiction greater than fact that such an event requires? This course will concentrate on the relationships between historical/recorded (mimetic) interpretations (i.e., first person accounts, religious and historical texts, documentary footage) and constructed (poesis) interpretations of the Holocaust. The latter will include a sampling of films, novels, poems, art of victims and survivors and all of which use the material of genocide as primary source for the creation of a work of art. Within this framework questions regarding both the particular and universal nature of the Holocaust will be addressed. Course readings and material will offer provocative pairings to sharpen and question the necessary yet paradoxically unstable distinction between the mimetic and poetic mode: Those might include Wiesel's Night; Borowski's This Way To The Gas Chambers Ladies and Gentlemen; Primo Levi's Survival in Auschwitz; Charlotte Delbo's None of Us Will Return; Ida Fink's A Scrap of Time and Other Stories; Charles Reznicoff's Holocaust; Artie Spiegelman's Maus I and Maus II; Expressionistic and concentration camp art; various historical accounts; and selections from the work of Paul Celan, Nelly Sachs, A. Sutzkever, Edmond Jabes, Emanuel Levinas, Zvi Kolitz. Films might include, Nasty Girl, Shop On Main Street, Life is Beautiful, Shoah, Shindler's List.
Requirements: a 10-page paper, class participation, and regular attendance
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25.
Meeting time: two times a week for three hours.
Cost to student: $60 for books and xeroxes.

DAVID RAFFELD (Instructor)
DREYFUS (Sponsor)

A poet and writer, David Raffeld has written widely on the themes to be developed in this course. In addition to offering this course several times, Raffeld has taught Winter Study term courses at Williams in the Departments of Religion, Philosophy, and English. He has also been a Writer-in-Residence in the Department of Theater for the production of his Isaac Oratorio, which was written in part in response to the Holocaust.

REL 016 Buddhist Art of Asia (Same as ArtH 016 and Asian Studies 016)

In the sixth century BCE, Siddhartha Gautama, the historical Buddha, was born on the Indian subcontinent. Over the next millennia, his teachings spread from the foothills of the Himalayas to locations as far-flung as Tibet and Indonesia, Korea and Sri Lanka, China and Nepal. This seminar will explore the world of Buddhist art from its rise and development in India to its transmission and transformation in China and pre-modern and modern Tibet.
Our examination is grounded on the understanding that Buddhist images and architecture not only communicated religious values and philosophical beliefs, but served pivotal ritual, social and institutional aims. Only by discerning the inter-relationship between these varied dimensions in specific cultural contexts can we begin to appreciate the spiritual efficacy and social power of Buddhist artistic creations. Toward that end, we will draw on a range of resources, including key primary texts, secondary works, audio-visual tools, a field trip, and a guest speaker.
Requirements: class participation, weekly discussion papers and a final 8- to 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to students: $25-30 for books.

LAURA HARRINGTON (Instructor)
DREYFUS (Sponsor)

Laura Harrington (B.A., Wesleyan University, 1986; Ph.D. in Religion, Columbia University, 2002) has taught courses in Asian religions, art and medical systems at Eugene Lang College of the New School University, and in comparative Asian philosophies at Columbia University. She is the editor and co-author of two books-Kalacakra Tantra and Tibetan Astro-Science. She presently lives in Ashfield, Massachusetts.

REL 020 Evolution and Creationism (Same as Biology 020 and History of Science 020)

(See under Biology for full description.)

REL 026 Introduction to Zen Training for Pre-Medical Students (Same as Asian Studies 026 and Special 026)

(See under Special for full description.)

REL 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Religion 493 or 494.

ROMANCE LANGUAGES

FRENCH

RLFR S.P. Sustaining Program for French 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study period. There are three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: 9a.m.-9:50 a.m.

MOURIÈS and MISTYCKI (Teaching Associates)

RLFR 010 Acting French (Same as Theatre 010)

Have you secretly dreamed of becoming the next Gerard Depardieu or the next Catherine Deneuve? If so, Acting French is the place for you. In this course, phonetic practice, poetry recitation, skits, improvisation, and memorization of dramatic texts will help students gain confidence in their use of the French language. Emphasis will be placed on pronunciation, intonation, expression, and body language as we read, discuss, and perform scenes from plays by dramatists such as Molière, Beaumarchais, Musset, Sartre, and Ionesco.
Evaluation will be based on overall participation and effort as well as on a final project in the form of a (solo or group) dramatization of a text. A performance of student work will take place on the last day of Winter Study.
Prerequisites: intermediate level oral proficiency in French. Interested students must see the instructor for an oral interview prior to enrolling in the course. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons, three times a week for 2-hours, with extra rehearsal time scheduled for the final week.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for books.

ROCHE

RLFR 030 Honors Essay

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLFR 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for French 493-494.

ITALIAN

RLIT S.P. Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: 9a.m.-9:50a.m.

NICASTRO

SPANISH

RLSP S.P. Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: 9a.m.-9:50a.m.

MARTINEZ and RIOBÓO (Teaching Associates)

RLSP 012 Cooking with Don Quixote: The History and Culture of Spanish Food

This course offers students an introduction to Spanish history, geography and culture by tracing the evolution and characteristics of Spanish cooking. We will consider how cuisine has intersected with different religious and socio-economic contexts in Spain through the centuries. We will examine, among others, the enduring Roman, Arab, and Jewish influences on Spanish cooking. Finally, students will learn about the basic distinguishing features of the uniquely different cuisines of the autonomous regions that make up Spain today, including Castilla-La Mancha, Madrid, the Basque Country, Galicia, Cataluña, Valencia, the Balearic Islands, Andalucía.
Materials will include slides, historical and literary readings, recipes, and food.
Requirements: Students will be required to submit a final project (equivalent to a 10-page paper) and to prepare one recipe.
Prerequisites: some basic knowledge of Spanish is highly recommended though not necessary. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $15.

FOX

RLSP 030 Honors Essay

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLSP 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Spanish 493-494.

RUSSIAN

RUSS S.P. Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102

Required of all students enrolled in Russian 101-102. Three meetings per week, 50 minutes per session. Practice in speaking and comprehension based on material already covered as well as some new vocabulary and constructions. Designed to maintain and enhance what was acquired during fall semester, using new approaches in a relaxed atmosphere. No homework.
Regular attendance and active participation required to earn a "Pass." Open to all.
Meeting time: 9:00-9:50 a.m.

RUSS 025 Williams in Georgia (Same as Special 025)

Williams has a unique program in the Republic of Georgia, which offers students the opportunity to engage in three-week-long internships in any field. Last year's students worked in the Georgian Parliament, helped in humanitarian relief organizations like Save the Children, interned in journalism at The Georgian Times, taught unemployed women computer skills at The Rustavi Project, studied with a Georgian sculptor, did rounds at the Institute of Cardiology, and learned about transitional economies at the Georgian National Bank. In addition to working in their chosen fields, students experience Georgian culture through museum visits, concerts, lectures, meetings with Georgian students, and excursions. Visit the sacred eleventh-century Cathedral of Sveti-tskhoveli and the twentieth-century Stalin Museum, take the ancient Georgian Military Highway to ski in the Caucasus Range, see the birthplace of the wine grape in Kakheti and the region where Jason sought the Golden Fleece. Participants are housed in pairs with English-speaking families in Tbilisi, Georgia's capital city. At the end of the course students write a 10-page paper assessing their internship experience. Knowledge of Russian or Georgian is NOT required.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: approximately $2,000.

GOLDSTEIN

RUSS 030 Honors Project

May be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RUSS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Russian 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY-See under ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

THEATRE

THEA 010 Acting French (Same as French 010)

(See under Romance Languages for full description.)

THEA 011 Embodied Learning (Same as Japanese 011)

(See under Japanese for full description.)

THEA 012 Stage Management

The stage manager is a pivotal member of the collaborative process. He or she builds the creative environment that supports the work of the other members of the artistic team. The stage manager is the prime communicator and liaison who synthesizes the disparate elements of production into a cohesive whole and is responsible for the implementation of diverse artistic choices throughout the production process. This course will explore the role of the stage manager and will offer a comprehensive investigation of the work from pre-production to closing a show. Through a system of readings, exercises, written assignments and `hands-on' activities, the student will learn the importance and process of stage management.
Requirements: For a final project, students will compile a sample prompt book, which requires work outside of class hours.
Prerequisite: Previous involvement in live performance prior to course entry. Enrollment limit: 15. Priority given to Theatre Majors.
Meeting time: mornings; Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays.
Cost to student: $20 for text.

LAURA ANDRUSKI (Instructor)
EPPEL (Sponsor)

Laura W. Andruski is the Production Associate for the Williams College Department of Theatre. Equity-trained in stage management, she has worked with Princeton Opera, the McCarter Theater, Arizona Civic Theatre, Old Tucson Film Studios, Southern Arizona Light Opera Company, and The Milwaukee Repertory Theater. E-mail the instructor with any questions: Laura.W.Andruski@williams.edu.

THEA 014 From Avant Garde to Popular Culture: The Theatre Songs of Kurt Weill (Same as Music 014)

Kurt Weill's works are proof that serious art and popular musical theater are not mutually exclusive. From his early years as one of the most progressive European composers to his later years as a wildly popular New York theater composer, there runs a consistent thread of economy and sharpness. One can hear the theatrical potential in Weill's early instrumental music just as clearly as one can hear density and concentration in his songs for the New York stage. This Winter Study course will concentrate on selected early works and songs from "the Three Penny Opera," probably Weill's finest theater score. Class meetings will consist of both lectures and dramatic coaching. A cabaret of songs from "Three Penny" will be performed during the last week of the class.
Method of evaluation: A student may fulfill the requirements of the course by performing, writing a 10-page discursive paper, or some combination of the two approved by the teacher.
No prerequisites. Singers, actors, pianists, and listeners are all welcome. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons, Monday and Wednesday.
Cost to student: none.

KEITH KIBLER (Instructor)
EPPEL (Sponsor)

Keith Kibler has performed under some of the finest directors currently working including David Alden, Peter Sellars, Galina Vishnevskaya, and Weill's "Die Kleine Mahagonny" under Alvin Epstein with the American Repertory Theatre. He has been a featured soloist with the Boston Pops in American theater music. Keith Kibler is an adjunct teacher of singing at Williams College. He can be reached at kibler@sover.net

THEA 030 Senior Production

May be taken by students registered for Theatre 491, 492 but is not required.

THEA 031 Senior Thesis

May be taken by students registered for Theatre 493, 494 but is not required.

WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES

WGST 010 Gender in Talmud and Midrash (Same as Classics 010)

(See under Classics for full description.)

WGST 011 Queer Literatures: The Lesbian Tradition (Same as English 011)

(See under English for full description.)

WGST 013 Gender and the Media: Images of Women and Their Effects on Identity and Achievement (Same as Psychology 013)

(See under Psychology for full description.)

WGST 014 The Evolution of the Women's Counseling Movement (Same as History 014 and Psychology 019)

(See under History for full description.)

WGST 030 Honors Project

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

SPECIALS

SPEC 010 Quest for College: Early Awareness in Berkshire County Schools

Today's extremely competitive higher education market places significant pressure on students nationwide to start planning for college at an increasingly early age while simultaneously demanding ever-higher standards of excellence for admission to top schools. "Early Awareness" initiatives aim to educate middle school students as to what lies ahead on the college horizon, empowering them to make sound academic and extracurricular choices that will keep open a maximum of options. The first week of this course will be spent in the classroom, exploring and discussing problems and issues germane to the national trends towards greater (and earlier) college-related pressures. Students will respond to a series of readings dealing with such issues as tracking, paid test preparation and untimed testing, early decision, parental and peer pressures, special interests, misrepresentation of information, independent counseling, and others. Class time will also be devoted to familiarizing students with both the nuances of the college admission process and the administration of the early awareness game, Quest for College. Students will spend the next two weeks visiting 10-12 Berkshire County middle schools, administering the game and inviting students to the culminating College Day. All 8 students will then work together to plan and run College Day activities for students and their parents. This day will include a) campus tours, b) general higher education info sessions, and c) financial aid/scholarship info for the parents. If student and community interest is sufficient, the course may culminate in a public presentation and open forum early second semester.
Evaluation will be based on completion of field work (school visits), organization and execution of project to bring local middle school students to the Williams Campus for a day of early-awareness related activities and a final paper (approximately 10 pages) reflecting on a course-related issue of the student's choosing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Preference given to a) students with prior education/admission experience, b) students with access to transportation c) juniors and seniors. Interested students must consult with instructors prior to registration. Students will be selected according to the following criteria: a) experience in teaching or admission, b) access to transportation, and c) seniority. Provision will be stated that interested students must consult the instructors before registration, that instructors may determine depth of experience and focus of interest.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: transportation to field work sites and purchase of text.

GINA COLEMAN '90 and MATTHEW SWANSON '97 (Instructors)
WSP COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Gina Coleman '90, is Associate Director of Admission, Director of Multicultural Recruitment, and in her fifth year as women's rugby coach. Coleman, who holds an MA in education from MCLA, designed the game, Quest for College. Matthew Swanson '97 is in his third year as Assistant Director of Admission. Swanson has spent the past seven summers teaching/leading in various educational environments. Both Gina and Matthew have been involved with Early Awareness initiatives in Berkshire County schools.

SPEC 011 Science for Kids (Same as Chemistry 011)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

SPEC 012 What is Williams?

What is the essence of this complex and evolving entity Williams College and how can it be communicated? To advance its mission the College must understand the heart of its enterprise and effectively articulate that understanding to a variety of audiences from prospective students and parents to alumni, potential donors, government leaders, media, and even current students, faculty, and staff. We'll refine our understanding of Williams by analyzing how the College represents itself, assessing how effective those communications are, and comparing how other colleges and organizations represent themselves. Along the way we'll discuss what makes communication effective. In addition to a number of short in-class presentations, students (individually or in pairs) will undertake, with the instructors consent, a communications project (using any of a variety of media) to advance some aspect of Williams. This might be a script for admissions tour guides, a media campaign to promote need-blind financial aid, a plan to enhance the recruitment of students of color, a publication to raise funds for some curricular innovation or the new student center.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, class participation, presentations, and project.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $30 for reading materials.

JIM KOLESAR '72 and ROB WHITE (Instructors)
WSP COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Jim Kolesar is the college's Director of Public Affairs and Rob White its Director of Communications for Alumni Relations and Development.

SPEC 013 Going to Extremes (Same as English 013)

This course will examine how and why works of both fiction and non-fiction travel to the ends of the earth to investigate extremes of human behavior. Topics to be addressed include going native, the lure of intemperate places, Romanticism the monster that will not die, and the attractions of disaster. We'll assume a familiarity with Frankenstein, focusing instead on Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer, An Imaginary Life by David Malouf, shorter narratives by Edward Abbey, Bruce Chatwin, David Quammen, and Annie Proulx; and at least two films. Written work, which will amount to ten pages in various forms, will invite students to draw on their own experiences, as well as traverse the usual borders between genres.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Priority given to upper-level students.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week for two hours.

DEAN CRAWFORD (Instructor)
WSP COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Dean Crawford has published one novel, The Lay of the Land, as well as short stories, articles, and essays, and is now writing a book about white sharks. He's been an adjunct professor in the English Department at Vassar College since 1988.

SPEC 014 Winter Emergency Care, CPR, Ski Patrol Rescue Techniques

The course is in three parts. When successfully completed it can lead to a certification as a National Ski Patrol member and certification in Professional Rescue CPR. It will also be designed to teach wilderness and outdoor emergency techniques.
The Winter Emergency Care Course designed by the National Ski Patrol is the main ingredient. It will be supplemented by the Red Cross CPR for the Professional Rescuer. An additional 18-hour outdoor course in Ski Patrol rescue techniques will be taught. Passing all three courses will certify the student as a National Ski Patrol member if he/she is a competent skier.
The course will deal with and teach how to treat wounds of all types, shock, respiratory emergencies, poisoning, drug and alcohol emergencies, burns, frostbite and other exposures to cold, also bone, joint, and back injuries, and sudden illnesses such as heart attacks, strokes, convulsions, etc. It will also teach the use of all splints, backboards, bandages, and other rescue equipment. It will teach extrication and unusual emergency situations and the use of oxygen. The outdoor course will include rescue toboggan handling, organization of rescues, and outdoor practical first aid. Classroom work will include lectures, seminars, and practical work.
Requirements : There will be a mid-term and a final exam which will be both written and practical. Each week there will be 17 hours of classroom work plus 8 hours of practical outdoor work at Jiminy Peak ski area. Attendance at all classes is mandatory.
Prerequisites: None.
Enrollment limit: 18. (Students will be chosen on the basis of skiing interest and ability and prior first aid experience.)
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons.
Cost to student: $100 which will include all materials, books and registration fees.

JAMES BRIGGS (Instructor)
SHEEHY (Sponsor)

Jim Briggs was the Outing Club director at Williams for many years. He has led trips to the Alps on a number of occasions. He is both a certified OEC instructors and a certified CPR instructor.

SPEC 015 Uncle Eph in his Youth: Old Williams in Thought and Form (Same as American Studies 015, ArtH 015 and English 024)

The Williams of the past is very much like the Williams of today: and also very different. In this course we will explore our community's past by looking at its architectural history, its building (many of which are still here), and at what was happening in those buildings (which we will have to dig out of the archives). How have the buildings and the work that the students do-in and out of the classroom-changed as they have grown up together? We will read about these areas; we will tour our own campus, and we will take some field trips too; Amherst, and perhaps Union. We will try to re-create-literally-some of the experiences of previous Williams students, and we will do this in the buildings where those experiences took place. In doing so we will see how radically, even fundamentally, the learning experience of the past differs from that of today. Students will do independent work in the archives-Williamsiana-and take an active part in the staging of the re-animated classes. Work from the class will be used to create and exhibition in Williamsiana, with students each working on some part of the display.
Requirements: perfect attendance and several short, sometimes collaborative, assignments, both written and otherwise.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 18.
Meeting time: various; six hours a week, with additional field trips.

P. MURPHY and DAVID JOHNSON

SPEC 016 Living by Words: Surviving and Thriving in the Art and Sport of Rhetoric (Same as Comparative Literature 010, English 010 and INTR 014 )

(See under Comparative Literature for full description.)

SPEC 017 Onstage! (Same as Mathematics 017)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

SPEC 018 Sports Writing (Same as English 027)

In this introduction to Sports Writing, students will learn the fundamentals of sports writing and how it differs from news writing. Students will explore different reporting, interviewing and editing techniques; learn how to develop leads and approach feature articles. Students will examine the differences in sports writing styles of newspaper and magazine publications (i.e., Sports Illustrated, New York Post, Boston Globe). Skills will be developed through in-class and on-campus writing assignments and discussion.
Requirements will include submission of articles for deadline and written text on the craft of interviewing and reporting.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons, twice a week.
Cost to student: approximately $20.

KRIS DUFOUR (Instructor)
SHEEHY (Sponsor)

Kris DuFour is a graduate of SUNY Old Westbury and has an M.A. from the Syracuse School of Communication. He has been the Sports Editor of the North Adams Transcript for the last 6 years after previous positions in New York, Georgia and Texas.

SPEC 019 Medical Apprenticeship

A student is assigned to a local physician, dentist, or veterinarian to observe closely his or her practice in the office and/or at the North Adams Regional Hospital, Berkshire Medical Center (Pittsfield, MA), or Southwestern Vermont Medical Center (Bennington, VT). It is expected that a student will spend the better part of the day, five days a week, with the physician or a period mutually agreed upon by the student and the physician as being educationally significant. The program has proven to be extremely successful in giving interested students a clear picture of the practice of medicine in a non-urban area. An effort is made to expose the student to a range of medical specialties.
A 10-page report written on some aspect of the month's experience is required.
Prerequisite: interested students must attend a mandatory information meeting in early October, prior to applying for this course. Preference is given to juniors, and then sophomores, whose course work has been suggestive of a firm commitment to preparation for medical school. Enrollment limited to 44.
Cost to student: none, except for local transportation and vaccinations.

TEACHING ASSOCIATES (Instructors)

DAVID ARMET IRA LAPIDUS, D.M.D.
TIM J. BAISCH, M.D. JOAN E. LISTER, M.D.
JAMES BOVIENZO, D.O. PAUL MAHER, M.D.
PEGGY CARON, D.V.M. JEFFREY MATHENY, M.D.
VICTORIA R. CAVALLI, M.D. RONALD S. MENSH, M.D.
BRIAN CUNNINGHAM, M.D. RANDALL MILLER, M.D.
PAUL DONOVAN D.O. JOANNE MORRISON, D.V.M.
STUART DUBUFF, M.D. PAMELA NATHENSON
RONALD DURNING, M.D. STEVE NELSON, M.D.
DAVID ELPERN, M.D. CHARLES O'NEILL, M.D.
ROBERT FANELLI, M.D. JUDY H. ORTON, M.D.
STUART FREYER, M.D. NORMAN PARADIS, M.D.
ERIC SCOTT FROST, M.D. MICHAEL C. PAYNE, M.D.
WADE GEBARA, M.D. FERNANDO PONCE, M.D.
MICHAEL L. GERRITY, M.D. RICHARD PROVENZANO, M.D.
MANINDRA GHOSH, M.D. DANIEL S. ROBBINS, M.D.
BENJAMIN GLICK, M.D. WILLIAM ROCKET, M.D.
DAVID M. GORSON, M.D. OSCAR RODRIGUES, M.D.
EUGENE GRABOWSKI, M.D. JULIE SILBERSTEIN, M.D.
AMY GRIFFIN, M.D. ANTHONY M. SMEGLIN, M.D.
BONNIE H. HERR, M.D. JESSE SPECTOR, M.D.
ROBERT HERTZIG, M.D. KATHERINE URANECK, M.D.
LAURA JONES, M.D. KATHRYN WISEMAN, M.D.
JASON KITTLER, M.D. RICHARD WISEMAN, M.D.
JOSHUA KLEEDERMAN, D.M.D. CHARLES I. WOHL, M.D.
JONATHAN KRANT, M.D. JEFFREY A. YUCHT, M.D.
GORDON KUHAR, M.D. MARK ZIMPFER, M.D.

CHARLEY STEVENSON
Health Professions Advisor

SPEC 020 Modern Dance-Muller Technique (Same as Mathematics 018)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

SPEC 022 Deaf and Proud: An Introduction to Deaf Language and Culture

CANCELLED!

SPEC 023 Beginning Modern Dance (Same as Mathematics 013)

CANCELLED!

SPEC 024 Eye Care and Culture in Caribbean Nicaragua

The Winter Study will take place in Bluefields, Nicaragua and surrounding villages on the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua. After background study of Health Care Policy and "hands on" training in eye care by Dr. Bruce Moore, Professor of the Massachusetts College of Optometry, the group will travel to Bluefields, Nicaragua and surrounding communities to assist in the conducting of eye care clinics under the auspices of the international organization "Volunteer Optometric Services to Humanity" (VOSH). "The Primary Mission of VOSH is to facilitate the provision of vision care worldwide to people who can neither afford nor obtain eye care." Schedule: January 6-17, Study of Health Care Policy and Culture in a third world country. January 18-26, Assist in the dispensing of glasses after using evaluation techniques learned in January before the trip, record more complicated cases for a future clinic possibly during spring break of 2003 During the Williamstown preparation (Jan. 6-17), the students will be led in a study of health care policy by Dr. Melvin Krant, retired oncologist and former professor at Brandeis University on third world health policy and history; culture and realities of the Caribbean Coast people will be led by Dr. Robert Peck and Lynn Hood, former Director of the Council on Aging in Williamstown and co-leader of the spring break 2001 trip to the Coast to build a library building for the new university in Bluefields.
Requirements: attend classes in Williamstown, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 10 a.m.-noon. Keep a journal on the daily experiences of living and working in a third world country. Research, in some detail, the daily realities of an eye care recipient (education, vocation, family, economics, future, etc.). Write up this information in a bio-graphical essay, reflecting on life in the third-world region.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. This is a Winter Study travel course and is not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: $1,500.00.
ROBERT PECK (Instructor)
WSP COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Dr. Robert Peck is a twenty-year volunteer and traveler to the Caribbean Coast and retired Director of Athletics at Williams (1971-2001).

SPEC 025 Williams in Georgia (Same as Russian 025)

(See under Russian for full description.)

SPEC 026 Introduction to Zen Training for Pre-Medical Students (Same as Asian Studies 026 and Religion 026)

An intensive exposure to the training methods of Chozen-ji line of Rinzai Zen, training that includes zazen (seated mediation), budo (martial arts) and manual labor, all of them based on attention to breath, posture and the most efficient use of the body. Three weeks is a trivial amount of time, but experience shows it to be the minimum necessary to generate a fundamental shift in perspective. The emphasis is on understanding Zen as mind-body training and training as a way of life. Come prepared to work hard and sleep little for 21 days.
It can take a long time for physicians to recognize that who they are can be as therapeutic as what they know. Zen is a means to accelerate that process by physically training that "who you are," asking you to look at the nature of healing, the nature of compassion, the relations between giving life and taking life. Unlike all other forms of training in the healing arts, Zen works directly through the body and not the intellect. How do you stand when facing a grieving parent? How do you breath when rushed to a scene of mass destruction? How do you live a life in which all relationships can be therapeutic?
The program will be based at the Greene's home in Nuuanu Valley, outside of Honolulu. Students will live in rough outdoor accommodations there, will eat there and will do the majority of their Zen training there. Once students have become accustomed to the rigors of meditation, they will do portions of their Zen training at Daihonzan Chozen-ji, a few miles away. Budo training (primarily with a sword) will take place at the Daihonzan and other dojo nearby.
Final evaluation: Given the rigorous mind-body emphasis of the training, final evaluation will be done in the form of an oral review of the strengths and weaknesses of each student's performance. Areas to be discussed with each student include ability to focus, ability to attend to the needs of the group, and ability to bring out kiai. This is the same format for evaluation used with medical students during their most intense period of training, their 3rd year clerkships.
Contacts:-Gordon Greene-phone: 808-595-7024 (home).
Enrollment limit: 8. Preference given to pre-medical students. Not open to first-year students. Any interested students must contact the instructor via email prior to registering for the course (greeneg@hawaii.edu).
Cost to student: approximately $900-$1,000 (to cover food, shelter, books, and training equipment and clothing) plus airfare.

GORDON GREENE (Instructor)
CHARLEY STEVENSON, Health Professions Advisor (Sponsor)

The group of teachers for the workshop will be led by Gordon Greene, PhD. He is associate director for medical education at the University of Hawaii Medical School and a priest ordained in the Chozen-ji line of Rinzai Zen. He has over 20 years experience in training students in Zen and martial arts, including 2 Winter Studies at Williams co-taught with John Eusden. Under his Buddhist name of Hakuun Soei, Dr. Greene was awarded inka by his teacher in 1997 indicating his rank as a Zen master. Other teachers in the program include Alan Suyama, MD, Kendo teacher and Director of the Academy of Zen and the Ways; Tom Morelli, MD psychiatrist for many years in the Veterans Administration; Alex Greene, training in Zen and sword for 2 years; and Patricia Greene, 20 year veteran of Zen and budo training and master chef and baker.

SPEC 027 Teaching and Writing at Theodore Roosevelt High School

Students choosing this Winter Study project will live in New York and travel daily to Roosevelt, a large comprehensive high school in the Bronx. A typical day includes: conducting small group work in selected classes (mostly English and Social Studies, but others are possible), working one-on-one with selected students, working in school departments (e.g., college guidance office, tutoring center), and seminar-style meetings in which we discuss and write on issues that emerge from the work with students and teachers. Requirements: Active and reliable participation in tutoring and discussion during January; participation in several brief orientation meetings before January (possibly including a half-day trip to TRHS), a journal during the program, a written report in a format of the student's choice at the end.
Prerequisites: Strong interest in working with young people. Enrollment limit: 15 sophomores, juniors and seniors.
Cost to student: $350 for transportation and food. We will attempt to provide housing for tutors. Consult with instructor.

P. SMITH
Coordinator of High School/College Partnerships

SPEC 028 Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan

Participating sophomores, juniors and seniors will be expected to pursue a full day's program of observing, teaching, tutoring, and mentoring at Christopher Columbus HS in the Bronx or at A. Philip Randolph HS in Manhattan. Each of the schools will provide a resident supervisor for the Williams teaching interns who will meet regularly to assist with questions and to monitor individual schedules.
Criteria for a pass include full-time affiliation with the school for the entire winter study, keeping a daily journal, participating in the weekly after school seminars held for all of the NYC teaching practicums, and submitting a 5- to l0-page report at the end of Winter Study reflecting upon and summarizing the month's learning experience. Orientation meetings and a visit to the high school prior to the start of winter study will be arranged.
Cost to student: approximately $400 for food and transportation. Housing in NYC will be arranged where necessary.

P. SMITH
Coordinator of High School/College Partnerships

SPEC 029 Junior High School Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan

Participating sophomores, juniors, and seniors will be expected to pursue a full day's program of observing, teaching, tutoring and mentoring at PS 45 in the Bronx (a feeder school to Roosevelt HS) or at Roberto Clemente Junior High School in Manhattan (a feeder school to A. Philip Randolph HS). Each of the schools will provide a resident supervisor for the Williams teaching interns who will meet regularly to assist with questions and to arrange individual schedules.
Criteria for a pass include full-time association with the school for winter study, keeping a daily journal, participating in the weekly meetings for all of the Williams Teaching Interns, and submitting a 5- to l0-page report at the end of Winter Study reflecting upon and summarizing the month's learning experience. An orientation program and a visit to the school will be arranged prior to January.
No prerequisites.
Cost to student: approximately $400 for food and transportation while in NYC. Housing will be arranged for those needing it.

P. SMITH
Coordinator of High School/College Partnerships

SPEC 035 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel (Same as ArtS 035)

Each class will begin with a lecture-demonstration, followed by practice on the potter's wheel. Each student will have the use of a potter's wheel for each class. We will work on mugs, bowls, pitchers, plates, jars, lids, vases, and bottles, and will finish these shapes as required by trimming and adding handles, lugs, lids, spouts, and knobs. We will also work on several different handbuilding projects. After the tenth class session, all class work will be biscuit-fired. The eleventh class will be devoted to glazing the biscuited pieces. Glazing techniques will include pouring, dipping, layering, brushing, and stamping, and using wax resist and other masking techniques to develop pattern and design. The completed work will then be glaze-fired. The last meeting will be devoted to a "final exam" gallery show of your best work. Woven into lecture-demonstrations will be presentations on various topics relating to the science and history of pottery making.
The two most important requirements for this course are attendance at all class sessions and enthusiasm for learning the craft of pottery making.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 9.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $150 plus makeup class fees ($30 per class), if applicable.

RAY BUB (Instructor)
WSP COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Ray Bub is a ceramic artist and potter at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery in Pownal, Vermont.

SPEC 036 Teaching Practicum: St. Aloysius School, Harlem

An opportunity for up to five sophomore, junior or senior students to observe, tutor, teach and mentor at St Aloysius School in Harlem under the direction of Principal Laurel Senger. An orientation session and a visit to the school in December will be arranged prior to Winter Study.
Criteria to pass include full-time participation at St Aloysius for the month, keeping a daily journal, participating in the weekly meetings of all NYC practicum students, and submitting a 5- to l0-page report at the end of WSP reflecting upon and summarizing the month's learning experience.
Enrollment limited to 5 sophomores, juniors or seniors interested in teaching
Cost to student: approximately $400. for food and transportation. Housing in NYC will be arranged where necessary.

P. SMITH
Coordinator of High School/College Partnerships

SPEC 039 Composing A Life: Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams

To be at Williams you have learned to be a successful student, but how do you learn to be successful in life? How will you define success in both your career and in your personal life? How will you resolve the inevitable tradeoffs and achieve balance between the two? In short, what will constitute the "good life" for you? We borrow the concept of "composing a life," from a book by Mary Catherine Bateson, as a very apt metaphor for the ongoing process of defining success and balance in life. This course is designed: (1)To offer college students, on the threshold of entering adulthood, an opportunity to examine and define their beliefs, values, and assumptions about their future personal and professional lives, and to consider how they might achieve a successful balance; (2) To encourage students to gain a better understanding of how culture, ideology, and opportunity affect their life choices; 3) To provide an opportunity for students to consider different models of success and balance through an emphasis on case studies and "living cases" (in the form of guests from various professions who have made different life choices); and 4) To aid students in contemplating their career options through individual advising and introducing various career and life planning resources. Through the use of selected readings, cases, guest speakers and field interviews, we will explore both the public context of the workplace as well as the private context of individuals and their personal relationships in determining life choices.
Requirements: evaluation will be based on regular attendance, class participation, field interview, and a 10-page final paper
No prerequisites. Questions about the course: please contact Michele Moeller Chandler at 458-8106 or chandler@bcn.net. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: approximately $30 for case materials and photocopied course packets

MICHELE MOELLER CHANDLER '73 and CHIP CHANDLER '72 (Instructors)
TOOMAJIAN (Sponsor)

Michele Moeller Chandler ('73) and Chip Chandler ('72) have taught this Winter Study course for the past six years. They have been both personally and professionally engaged in the course topic. Michele's career has been in college administration, and she has an M.A. from Columbia, and a Ph.D. from Northwestern. Her Ph.D. dissertation focused upon the career/family decisionmaking of professional women who altered their careers because of family obligations. Chip is a senior partner with McKinsey & Company, an international management consulting firm, and he has an MBA from Harvard. He will share the teaching load on a part-time basis.

WILLIAMS PROGRAM IN TEACHING

Students interested in exploring one or more of the following courses related to teaching and/or working with children and adolescents should contact Susan Engel, Director of Education Programs, who will be able to help you choose one that best suits your educational goals.

ANSO 011 Berkshire Farm Internship

(See under Anthropology/Sociology for full description.)

ANSO 012 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

(See under Anthropology/Sociology for full description.)

BIOL 023 Science Through Technology in an Elementary School Classroom

(See under Biology for full description.)

CHEM 011 Science for Kids (Same as Special 011)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

ENGL 015 Writing, Illustrating, and Publishing Children's Books (Same as ArtS 020)

(See under English for full description.)

PHYS 016 Teaching with Technology

(See under Physics for full description.)

PSYC 012 Children's Play

(See under Psychology for full description.)

PSYC 017 Teaching Practicum

(See under Psychology for full description.)

PSYC 018 Institutional Placement

(See under Psychology for full description.)

SPEC 010 Quest for College: Early Awareness in Berkshire County Schools

(See under Special for full description.)

SPEC 027 Teaching and Writing at Theodore Roosevelt High School

(See under Special for full description.)

SPEC 028 Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan

(See under Special for full description.)

SPEC 029 Junior High School Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan

(See under Special for full description.)

SPEC 036 Teaching Practicum: St. Aloysius School, Harlem

(See under Special for full description.)

WILLIAMS-MYSTIC PROGRAM IN AMERICAN MARITIME STUDIES

An interdisciplinary one-semester program co-sponsored by Williams College and Mystic Seaport which includes credit for one winter study. Classes in maritime history, literature of the sea, marine ecology, oceanography, and marine policy are supplemented by field seminars: offshore sailing, Pacific Coast and Nantucket Island. For details, see "Williams-Mystic Maritime Studies Program" or our website: www.williamsmystic.org


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