Office of The RegistrarWilliams College

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Winter Study Courses 2004

 

WINTER STUDY PROGRAM

REMINDERS ABOUT WSP REGISTRATION

All students who will be on campus during the 2003-2004 academic year must register for WSP. Registration will take place in the early part of fall semester. If you are registered for a senior thesis in the fall which must be continued through Winter Study by departmental rules, you will be registered for your Winter Study Project automatically. In every other case, you must complete registration. First-year students are required to participate in a Winter Study that will take place on campus; they are not allowed to do 99's.

Even if you plan to take a 99, or the instructor of your first choice accepts you during the registration period, there are many things that can happen between registration and the beginning of Winter Study to upset your first choice, so you must list five choices. You should try to make one of your choices a project with a larger enrollment, not that it will guarantee you a project, but it will increase your chances.

If you think your time may be restricted in any way (ski meets, interviews, etc.), clear these restrictions with the instructor before signing up for his/her project.

Remember, for cross-listed projects, you should sign up for the subject you want to appear on your record.

For many beginning language courses, you are required to take the WSP Sustaining Program in addition to your regular project. You will be automatically enrolled in this Sustaining Program, so no one should list this as a choice.

The grade of honors is reserved for outstanding or exceptional work. Individual instructors may specify minimum standards for the grade, but normally, fewer than one out of ten students will qualify. A grade of pass means the student has performed satisfactorily. A grade of perfunctory pass signifies that a student's work has been significantly lacking but is just adequate to deserve a pass.

If you have any questions about a project, see the instructor before you register.

Finally, all work for WSP must be completed and submitted to the instructor no later than Thursday, January 29th. Only the Dean can grant an extension beyond this date.

WINTER STUDY 99'S

Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible to propose "99's," independent projects arranged with faculty sponsors, conducted in lieu of regular Winter Study courses. Perhaps you have encountered an interesting idea in one of your courses which you would like to study in more depth, or you may have an interest not covered in the regular curriculum. In recent years students have undertaken in-depth studies of particular literary works, interned in government offices, assisted in foreign and domestic medical clinics, conducted field work in economics in developing countries, and given performances illustrating the history of American dance. Although some 99's involve travel away from campus, there are many opportunities to pursue intellectual or artistic goals here in Williamstown.

99 forms are available online:

http://www.williams.edu/Registrar/winterstudy/99direct

The deadline for submitting the proposals to faculty sponsors is Thursday, 25 September.

Winter Study Course Offerings

AMES 031 Senior Thesis

AAS 030 Senior Project

AMST 010 "The Fatherland in Cleats:" Soccer and Identity in the Americas (Same as History 010)

AMST 011 Violence, Testimony, and the Culture Wars: Speaking, Truth, and Power (Same as Political Science 011)

AMST 012 Why New Englanders Eat What They Eat (Same as Philosophy 011 and History 019)

AMST 016 A Failure of Trust: American Indians Seek an Accounting from the U.S. Government (Same as History 016)

AMST 030 Senior Honors Project

AMST 031 Senior Thesis

ANSO 011 Berkshire Farm Internship

ANSO 012 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

ANTH 013 Deciphering Ancient Maya Civilization

ANTH 025 Archaeological Excavation at the Paleolithic Site of Attirampakkam, India (Same as Chemistry 025)

ANTH 031 Senior Thesis

SOC 012 Organizational Communications

SOC 021 Williams in New York

SOC 031 Senior Thesis

ARTH 010 "Taking the Waters" Then & Now: A History of Spa Culture (Same as History of Science 010)

ARTH 011 Breaking Ground: Women Architects in America (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 011)

ARTH 012 Master Drawings

ARTH 013 Images of War CANCELLED!

ARTH 014 Fictionalizing the Artist: =Genius and Gender in Films about Artists (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 014)

ARTH 015 Materials of the Artist: Uncovering Fakes and Forgeries (Same as Chemistry 015 and ArtS 015)

ARTH 016 Exploring Regional Museums: Nuts and Bolts and Behind the Scene Tours

ARTS 023 The Art and History of Knitting (Same as Mathematics 016 and History 023)

ARTH 025 Oriental Rugs: Art and Commerce (Same as Economics 025) CANCELLED!

ARTH 026 Contemporary Art in Los Angeles

ARTH 031 Senior Thesis

ARTH 033 Honors Independent Study

ARTS 010 CULTURES OF RHYTHM (Same as Theatre 013)

ARTS 011 Refiguring the Body

ARTS 012 Japanese Traditional Art: Kusaki-Zome and Weaving (Same as Japanese 012)

ARTS 013 Abstracting and Translating: Sculpture to Drawing

ARTS 014 Figure Drawing

ARTS 015 Materials of the Artist: Uncovering Fakes and Forgeries (Same as Chemistry 015 and ArtH 015)

ARTS 016 Collage

ARTS 017 Contemporary Mexican Women Film-Makers (Same as English 035, Spanish 012 and Women's and Gender Studies 012)

ARTS 018 Dreams, Art, and the Personal Narrative

ARTS 019 Meet the Right Side of Your Brain: Drawing as a Learnable Skill (Same as Physics 012)

ARTS 020 Pinhole Photography

ARTS 033 Honors Independent Project

ASST 031 Senior Thesis

CHIN 088 Sustaining Program for Chinese101-102

CHIN 011 Business Chinese: It is More Than Just a Chinese Business

CHIN 012 Chinese Painting and Culture

CHIN 013 Chinese Cinema: Transculturation and Modernity

CHIN 031 Senior Thesis

JAPN 088 Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102

JAPN 011 Theatre of the Body: A Transcultural Model for Physical Theatre Performance (Same as Theatre 011)

JAPN 012 Japanese Traditional Art: Kusaki-Zome and Weaving (Same as ArtS 012)

JAPN 031 Senior Thesis

ASTR 011 Image Processing in Science and Medicine

ASTR 031 Senior Research

ASPH 031 Senior Research

BIOL 010 Electron Microscopy

BIOL 011 Envisioning a Sustainable Future (Same as Environmental Studies 011)

BIOL 012 Overcoming Cultural Barriers to Healthcare in the U.S.

BIOL 013 Life as an Algorithm (Same as Computer Science 013)

BIOL 014 Orchids! (Same as Environmental Studies 014)

BIOL 016 Molecular Medicine, from Bench to Bedside (Same as Chemistry 013)

BIOL 017 The New England Forest (Same as Environmental Studies 017)

BIOL 018 The Mind of a Poet: The Psycho-Biological Bases of Creativity (Same as Neuroscience 018 and Psychology 019)

BIOL 019 Picturing Our Past (Same as Special 018, Environmental Studies 018, and INTR 019)

BIOL 020 The Green Revolution (Same as Economics 027 and Environmental Studies 027)

BIOL 022 Introduction to Biological Research

BIOL 025 History and Philosophy of Biology: The Galapagos Islands (Same as Philosophy 025)

BIOL 031 Senior Thesis

CHEM 011 Science for Kids (Same as Special 011)

CHEM 012 Learning and Teaching Chemistry in Spanish (Same as Spanish 014)

CHEM 013 Molecular Medicine, from Bench to Bedside (Same as Biology 016)

CHEM 014 Emergency Medical Technician-Basic

CHEM 015 Materials of the Artist: Uncovering Fakes and Forgeries (Same as ArtH 015 and ArtS 015)

CHEM 016 Glass and Glassblowing

CHEM 018 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry

CHEM 019 Introduction to Research in Environmental Science (Same as ENVI 020)

CHEM 020 Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry

CHEM 023 Introduction to Research in Organic Chemistry

CHEM 024 Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry

CHEM 025 Archaeological Excavation at the Paleolithic Site of Attirampakkam, India (Same as Anthropology 025)

CHEM 031 Senior Research and Thesis

CLAS 010 Sappho's Poetry in Greek: Eros the sweet-bitter (Same as Compartive Literature 013 and Women's and Gender Studies 010)

CLAS 011 Writing With Wedges II: Introduction to Sumerian

CLAS 031 Senior Thesis

COMP 010 Living by Words: Surviving and Thriving in the Art and Sport of Rhetoric (Same as English 010, Leadership Studies 012, and Special 012)

COMP 011 Surrealist Photography

COMP 012 Proust: In Search of Lost Time (Same as French 012 and English 024)

COMP 013 Sappho's Poetry in Greek: Eros the sweet-bitter (Same as Classics 010 and Women's and Gender Studies 010)

COMP 014 Jungle Fever: The Amazon in Literature and Film (Same as Spanish 011 and Environmental Studies 022)

COMP 031 Senior Thesis

LIT 031 Senior Thesis

CSCI 010 C, UNIX and Software Tools

CSCI 013 Life as an Algorithm (Same as Biology 013)

CSCI 031 Senior Honor Thesis

CMAJ 031 Senior Thesis

ECON 010 East Asia: Miracle and Crisis

ECON 011 Public Speaking

ECON 012 Women and Development (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 017)

ECON 014 Accounting

ECON 016 How to Buy a Car

ECON 017 Business Economics

ECON 018 For Richer or Poorer: A Multimedia View of Historical Economic Performance

ECON 019 Finding the Right Neighborhood

ECON 020 Globalization and Developing Countries

ECON 022 Finance and Development

ECON 025 Oriental Rugs: Art and Commerce (Same as ArtH 025)

ECON 027 The Green Revolution (Same as Biology 020 and Environmental Studies 027)

ECON 030 Honors Project

ECON 031 Honors Thesis

ENGL 010 Living by Words: Surviving and Thriving in the Art and Sport of Rhetoric (Same as Comparative Literature 010, Leadership Studies 012, and Special 012)

ENGL 011 Anxious Allegories: Horror and Sci-Fi Films

ENGL 012 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography

ENGL 013 Gender and Science Fiction (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 013)

ENGL 014 Turnpike Vernacular

ENGL 015 The Hours and Mrs. Dalloway

ENGL 016 Sebald

ENGL 017 Film Direction

ENGL 018 David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest

ENGL 019 Artificial Preservatives

ENGL 020 Henry James: The Golden Bowl

ENGL 022 Environmental Journalism: The Payoffs and Perils (Same as Environmental Studies 013)

ENGL 023 Charles Brockden Brown, "Father of the American Novel"

ENGL 024 Proust: In Search of Lost Time (Same as Comparative Literature 012 and French 012)

ENGL 025 Contemporary Film: New Voices Above and Below the Radar

ENGL 027 My Favorite Director

ENGL 028 German Cinema (Same as German 010 and Philosophy 010)

ENGL 029 Film as Radical Political Critique (Same as Political Science 010)

ENGL 030 Honors Project: Specialization Route

ENGL 031 Honors Project: Thesis

ENGL 034 Jungle Fever: The Amazon in Literature and Film (Same as Comparative Literature 014, Environmental Studies 022, and Spanish 011)

ENGL 035 Contemporary Mexican Women Film-Makers (Same as ArtS 017, Spanish 012 and Women's and Gender Studies 012)

ENGL 036 Writing from Where You Live (Same as Environmental Studies 012)

ENGL 037 Latina and Latino Migration Stories: Puerto Rico Women Write (Same as History 012 and Women's and Gender Studies 015))

ENGL 038 Fly Fishing in American Literature (Same as History 013)

ENGL 039 Objective Journalism During Times of Conflict (Same as Political Science 014)

ENGL 040 Humor Writing (Same as Mathematics 010)

ENVI 010 Geology of the National Parks (Same as Geosciences 010)

ENVI 011 Envisioning a Sustainable Future (Same as Biology 011)

ENVI 012 Writing from Where You Live (Same as English 036)

ENVI 013 Environmental Journalism: The Payoffs and Perils (Same as English 022)

ENVI 014 Orchids! (Same as Biology 014)

ENVI 015 Corporate Leadership and Social Responsibility (Same as Leadership Studies 010)

ENVI 016 The Lay of the Land-A Survey of the Business of Land Conservation

ENVI 017 The New England Forest (Same as Biology 017)

ENVI 018 Picturing Our Past (Same as Special 018, Biology 019, and INTR 019)

ENVI 019 Landscape Photography (Same as Geoscience 012)

ENVI 020 Introduction to Research in Environmental Science (Same as Chemistry 019)

ENVI 022 Jungle Fever: The Amazon in Literature and Film (Same as Comparative Literature 014, English 034, Spanish 011)

ENVI 025 Mapping a Caribbean Fringing Reef Complex (Same as Geosciences 025)

ENVI 027 The Green Revolution (Same as Biology 020 and Economics 027)

ENVI 028 Mapmaking and Ambiguity (Same as Geosceinces 014)

ENVI 031 Senior Research and Thesis

GEOS 010 Geology of the National Parks (Same as Environmental Studies 010)

GEOS 012 Landscape Photography (Same as Environmental Studies 019)

GEOS 014 Mapmaking and Ambiguity (Same as Environmental Studies 028)

GEOS 025 Mapping a Caribbean Fringing Reef Complex (Same as Environmental Sudies 025)

GEOS 031 Senior Thesis

GERM 088 Sustaining Program for German 101-102

GERM 010 German Cinema (Same as English 028 and Philosophy 010)

GERM 011 The Future of "Old Europe"

GERM 025 German in Germany

GERM 030 Honors Project

GERM 031 Senior Thesis

HIST 010 "The Fatherland in Cleats:" Soccer and Identity in the Americas (Same as American Studies 010)

HIST 011 Racism and the Colonial Legacy in Modern Europe

HIST 012 Latina and Latino Migration Stories: Puerto Rico Women Write (Same as English 037 and Women's and Gender Studies 015)

HIST 013 Fly Fishing in American Literature (Same as English 038)

HIST 015 How to Survive "Regime Change" and "Pre-Emptive Attacks" in Latin America, and be a Journalist at the Same Time

HIST 016 A Failure of Trust: American Indians Seek an Accounting from the U.S. Government (Same as American Studies 016)

HIST 017 History in Pieces

HIST 018 Genre-Bending: Literature and Politics in the Modern Middle East

HIST 019 Why New Englanders Eat What They Eat (Same as American Studies 012 and Philosophy 011)

HIST 023 The Art and History of Knitting (Same as ArtS 023 and Mathematics 016 )

HIST 031 Senior Thesis

HSCI 010 "Taking the Waters" Then and Now: A History of Spa Culture (Same as ArtH 010)

INTR 019 Picturing Our Past (Same as Special 018, Biology 019, and Environmental Studies 018)

LEAD 010 Corporate Leadership and Social Responsibility (Same as Environmental Studies 015)

LEAD 012 Living by Words: Surviving and Thriving in the Art and Sport of Rhetoric (Same as Comparative Literature 010, English 010, and Special 012)

LEAD 018 Wilderness Leadership

LEAD 019 Justice and Public Policy (Same as Political Science 019)

LGST 010 Legal Realism and the Search for Law

LGST 012 The Death Penalty and the Problem of Innocence

LGST 013 The Second Amendment: Liberty and Gun Control (Same as Special 013)

MATH 010 Humor Writing (Same as English 040) CANCELLED!

MATH 011 Lessons in Go

MATH 012 Introductory Photography: People and Places

MATH 013 Beginning Modern Dance (Same as Special 023)

MATH 015 The Science of Deception (Same as Psychology 014)

MATH 016 The Art and History of Knitting (Same as ArtS 023 and History 023)

MATH 017 Onstage! (Same as Special 017) CANCELLED!

MATH 018 Modern Dance-Muller Technique (Same as Special 020)

MATH 030 Senior Project

MATH 031 Senior Thesis

MUS 010 Chamber Music Performance

MUS 012 Ensembles in Classic American Musical Theatre (Same as Theatre 012)

MUS 013 Theolonious Monk Ensemble

MUS 014 Congolese Music and Dance

MUS 015 The Contemporary Singer/Songwriter

MUS 021 Individual Vocal and Instrumental Instruction (Can only be taken IN ADDITION to a regular WSP course)

MUS 031 Senior Thesis

NSCI 018 The Mind of a Poet: The Psycho-Biological Bases of Creativity (Same as Biology 018 and Psychology 019)

NSCI 031 Senior Thesis

PHIL 010 German Cinema (Same as English 028 and German 010)

PHIL 011 Why New Englanders Eat What They Eat (Same as American Studies 012 and History 019)

PHIL 012 Ethics Bowl: Case-based Reasoning in Ethics

PHIL 016 Civil Rights Law (Same as Political Science 016)

PHIL 025 History and Philosophy of Biology: The Galapagos Islands (Same as Biology 025)

PHIL 031 Senior Thesis

PHYS 010 Light and Holography

PHYS 012 Meet the Right Side of Your Brain: Drawing as a Learnable Skill (Same as ArtS 019)

PHYS 013 Automotive Mechanics

PHYS 015 Electronics

PHYS 016 Teaching with Technology

PHYS 022 Research Participation

PHYS 031 Senior Thesis

POEC 031 Honors Thesis

PSCI 010 Film as Radical Political Critique (Same as English 029)

PSCI 011 Violence, Testimony, and the Culture Wars: Speaking, Truth, and Power (Same as American Studies 011)

PSCI 012 Hollywood's Version of Politics

PSCI 013 European Integration, Globalization and International Business

PSCI 014 Objective Journalism During Times of Conflict (Same as English 039)

PSCI 015 The Development of Inuit Art

PSCI 016 Civil Rights Law (Same as Philosophy 016)

PSCI 017 Film and Politics in Mexico

PSCI 019 Justice and Public Policy (Same as Leadership Studies 019)

PSCI 021 Power, Authority and Decisionmaking in the Public Sector

PSYC 010 Mental Illness in Film CANCELLED!

PSYC 011 Rat Olympics

PSYC 012 Dreams, Problem-Solving and Self-Understanding

PSYC 014 The Science of Deception (Same as Mathematics 015)

PSYC 015 Principles of Psychotherapy

PSYC 016 The Examined Life

PSYC 017 Teaching Practicum

PSYC 018 Institutional Placement

PSYC 019 The Mind of a Poet: The Psycho-biological Bases of Creativity (Same as Biology 018 and Neuroscience 018)

PSYC 031 Senior Thesis

REL 010 The Zen Monastic Experience (CANCELLED)

REL 012 The Spirit and Practice of Yoga: Coming into Alignment

REL025 Explorations in Solidarity: A Meeting of Minds and Hearts in Rural and Urban Nicaragua

REL 031 Senior Thesis

RLFR 088 Sustaining Program for French 101-102

RLFR 010 Asterix the Gaul: French Culture through the Prism of the Comic

RLFR 012 Proust: In Search of Lost Time (Same as Comparative Literature 012 and English 024)

RLFR 030 Honors Essay

RLFR 031 Senior Thesis

RLIT 088 Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102

RLSP 088 Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102

RLSP 011 Jungle Fever: The Amazon in Literature and Film (Same as Comparative Literature 014, English 034 and Environmental Studies 022)

RLSP 012 Contemporary Mexican Women Film-Makers (Same as Arts 017, English 035 and Women's and Gender Studies 012)

RLSP 014 Learning and Teaching Chemistry in Spanish (Same as Chemistry 012)

RLSP 030 Honors Essay

RLSP 031 Senior Thesis

RUSS 088 Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102

RUSS 025 Williams in Georgia (Same as Special 025)

RUSS 030 Honors Project

RUSS 031 Senior Thesis

THEA 010 Giant Puppet Fauvel

THEA 011 Theatre of the Body: A Transcultural Model for Physical Theatre Performance (Same as Japanese 011)

THEA 012 Ensembles in Classic American Musical Theatre (Same as Music 012)

THEA 030 Senior Production

THEA 031 Senior Thesis

WGST 010 Sappho's Poetry in Greek: Eros the sweet-bitter (Same as Classics 010 and Comparative Literature 013)

WGST 011 Breaking Ground: Women Architects in America (Same as ArtH 011)

WGST 012 Contemporary Mexican Women Film-Makers (Same as ArtS 017, English 035 and Spanish 012)

WGST 013 Gender and Science Fiction (Same as English 013)

WGST 014 Fictionalizing the Artist: Genius and Gender in Films about Artists (Same as ArtH 014)

WGST 015 Latina and Latino Migration Stories: Puerto Rico Women Write (Same as English 037 and History 012)

WGST 016 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Special 016)

WGST 030 Honors Project

SPEC 010 Quest for College: Early Awareness in Berkshire County Schools

SPEC 011 Science for Kids (Same as Chemistry 011)

SPEC 012 Living by Words: Surviving and Thriving in the Art and Sport of Rhetoric (Same as Comparative Literature 010, English 010, and Leadership Studies 012)

SPEC 013 The Second Amendment: Liberty and Gun Control (Same as Legal Studies 013)

SPEC 016 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 016)

SPEC 017 Onstage! (Same Mathematics 017)

SPEC 018 Picturing Our Past (Same as Biology 019, Environmental Studies 018, and INTR 019)

SPEC 019 Medical Apprenticeship

SPEC 020 Modern Dance-Muller Technique (Same Mathematics 018)

SPEC 023 Beginning Modern Dance (Same as Mathematics 013)

SPEC 024 Eye Care and Culture in Caribbean Nicaragua

SPEC 025 Williams in Georgia (Same as Russian 025)

SPEC 027 Teaching and Writing at Theodore Roosevelt High School (CANCELLED)

SPEC 028 Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan

SPEC 029 Junior High School Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan

SPEC 035 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel

SPEC 036 Teaching Practicum: St. Aloysius School, Harlem

SPEC 037 To Face Suffering

SPEC 038 Giving It Away: How We Help Others

SPEC 039 Composing A Life: Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams

AFRICAN AND MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES

AMES 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by candidates for honors by the thesis route in African and Middle Eastern Studies.

AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES

AAS 030 Senior Project

To be taken by students registered for Afro-American Studies 491 who are candidates for honors.

AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 010 "The Fatherland in Cleats:" Soccer and Identity in the Americas (Same as History 010)

(See under History for full description.)

AMST 011 Violence, Testimony, and the Culture Wars: Speaking, Truth, and Power (Same as Political Science 011)

(See under Political Science for full description.)

AMST 012 Why New Englanders Eat What They Eat (Same as Philosophy 011 and History 019)

(See under Philosophy for full description.)

AMST 016 A Failure of Trust: American Indians Seek an Accounting from the U.S. Government (Same as History 016)

(See under History for full description.)

AMST 030 Senior Honors Project

To be taken by students registered for American Studies 491 or 492.

AMST 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by candidates for honors by the thesis route in American Studies.

 

ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

ANSO 011 Berkshire Farm Internship

A field placement at Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth in Canaan, New York. Berkshire Farm Center is a residential treatment facility for troubled, at-risk adolescent boys who have been remanded to the Farm by the Family Court. These youths come primarily from lower socio-economic strata, are very ethnically diverse, and hail from both urban and rural areas throughout New York State. The problems that they bring to Berkshire Farm are multiple. These include: the psychological scars of dysfunctional families, including those of physical, emotional, and sexual abuse; chemical dependency; juvenile delinquency; inability to function in school settings; and various other issues. Residential treatment is a multi-modal approach that includes anger-replacement training, social skills training, and behavioral modification.
Williams students will commute to Berkshire Farm and work under supervision in one of the following areas: school, cottage life, chemical dependency unit, research, recreation, performing arts, or in individual tutoring.
Requirements: students will keep a journal reflecting on their experiences, and a weekly seminar with the instructor will draw on service learning experience. Students will also be required to submit a final 10-page paper at the end of the course.
Prerequisites: interview with instructor. Enrollment limit: 15-please note: all queries about this course should be directed to the instructor, who can be reached at 518-781-4567 ext. 322.
Cost to student: none.

LARI BRANDSTEIN (Instructor)
NOLAN (Sponsor)

Lari Brandstein is Director of Volunteer Services at Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth.

ANSO 012 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

The incidence of reported child abuse and neglect has reached epidemic proportions and shows no signs of decreasing. Preventive and prophylactic social programs, court intervention, and legislative mandates have not successfully addressed this crisis. This course allows students to observe the Massachusetts Department of Social Services attorney in courtroom proceedings related to the care and protection of children. Students will have access to Department records for purposes of analysis and will also work with social workers who will provide a clinical perspective on the legal cases under study. The class will meet regularly to discuss court proceedings, assigned readings, and the students' interactions with local human services agencies. Access to an automobile is desirable but not required; some transportation will be provided as part of the course.
Requirements: full participation, a journal, and a 10-page paper to be submitted at the end of the course.
Enrollment limit: 15-please note: all queries about this course must be directed to the instructor, Judge Locke (phone messages may be left at 458-4833).
Meeting time: TBA.
Cost to student: $25 for books and photocopies.

JUDITH LOCKE (Instructor)
NOLAN (Sponsor)

Judith Locke is Associate Justice of the Juvenile Court, Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 013 Deciphering Ancient Maya Civilization

Ancient Maya civilization of the first millennium A.D. was one of the most advanced and complex societies of pre-Hispanic Central America. Its art, monuments, ruined cities and writing have fascinated art historians, visitors and scholars alike. After a short introduction to Maya civilization and archaeology, the course will focus on the Maya hieroglyphic writing systems. We will then apply the principles of Maya epigraphy to translate a variety of texts from stone monuments and from elaborate and beautiful polychrome vases of important sites such as Tikal, Dos Pilas, Aguateca, Yaxchilan, and Palenque. The final project will consist of creating your own stela about your life using the Maya hieroglyphic writing system.
Requirements: two or three small papers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20 (expected: 10).
Meeting time: afternoons; 2 or 3 sessions per week of two-or three hours.
Cost to student: $120 for books.

FOIAS

ANTH 025 Archaeological Excavation at the Paleolithic Site of Attirampakkam, India (Same as Chemistry 025)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

ANTH 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Anthropology 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 012 Organizational Communications

Students will examine the central role communication plays in a variety of organizations including business, government, education, and non-profits. This discussion course will be taught using the case-based approach and simulations to provide understanding of how theory translates into practice. We will use cases developed by the Harvard Business School and Harvard Negotiation Project. Cases will focus on interpersonal communication, group dynamics, negotiation and conflict resolution, communicating change, influence and persuasion, and ethics. Students will be responsible for learning how to diagnose specific organizational communication problems and developing appropriate responses for effectively managing organizational communication. You will be expected to improve on how well you demonstrate effective critical thinking, problem-solving, and communication skills.
Format: Case discussion and role-playing. Students will be expected to meet in small study groups in the afternoon or evening before class to discuss their findings with other classmates and to "warm up" for the class case discussions.
Students will be evaluated on their ability to work together in problem set reviews, preparation of two summary papers of five pages each, and active case discussion in the classroom. (Students will be expected to do 85% of the talking in class.)
Enrollment is limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings; Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 10 a.m. to noon.
Cost to student: $50 for cases and reading materials.

JO PROCTER (Instructor)
ROBERT JACKALL (Sponsor)

Jo Procter is the college's news director. She has an M.S. in communications, has taught in Simmons College Graduate Program in Communications, and was previously assistant director of Boston University's Doctoral Program in Business Administration.

SOC 021 Williams in New York

The program will offer five internships in New York City in key institutional/occupational arenas. These are still being arranged, but they will include internships at a major newspaper, a policy institute, and a museum. Students will live at the Williams Club. There will be a weekly seminar where students will analyze their field experiences against the backdrop of key readings. There will also be some joint field trips. The Gaudino Fund will provide modest scholarships for the five students selected for the program on the basis of a competition. These scholarships will cover only part of the costs of the Winter Study and students are expected to cover the rest. Financial aid students may apply to the College for additional assistance.
Requirements: 10-page paper.
Prerequisites: Sociology 207 New York New York; which will be offered Fall 2003. Enrollment limit: 5 (expected: 5).

JACKALL

SOC 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Sociology 493-494.

ART

ART HISTORY

ARTH 010 "Taking the Waters" Then & Now: A History of Spa Culture (Same as History of Science 010)

(See under History of Science for full description.)

ARTH 011 Breaking Ground: Women Architects in America (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 011)

The course would concern itself with the role of women as architects in a traditionally male dominated field. It would begin with the role of the wife in shaping the "look" of the house; to the winning entry of Sophia Hayden's Woman's Building in the Chicago Columbia Exposition in 1890; to the break through work of Julia Morgan for William Randolph Hearst and ultimately to more modern and progressive architects and urban designers of today. Guest lectures will be delivered by architects in current practice, and a field trip will be scheduled.
Requirements: one 10-page paper and reading as assigned.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 times a week for two hours.
Cost to student: $40-50 for course materials.

PATRICIA BROWN GLENN `75 (Instructor)
M. LEWIS (Sponsor)

Patricia Brown Glenn `75 holds a Masters in Renaissance and Baroque Art from the University of Chicago. Glenn has taught art and architectural courses at all levels at the University of Missouri at Kansas City for the past 15 years. She has also authored two books for middle readers: the award winning Under Every Roof and Discover America's Favorite Architects. Currently, Glenn is working on a book about female architects for adult readers.

ARTH 012 Master Drawings

This course will provide an introduction to European master drawings, from the Italian and German Renaissance to the present day, primarily through the study of actual works in the distinguished collection of the Clark Art Institute. We will begin with the materials, technique and function of drawing in the artist's working process. Then we will discuss how these informal working sketches became desirable to collectors, a subject of critical study, and eventually a key factor in the practice of connoisseurship, a fundamental discipline in traditional art history. We will also consider finished drawings produced for exhibition and sale, the effect of the invention of photography in the nineteenth century, and the changing role of drawing through the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Above all, we will consider the nature of style in drawing and in the finished paintings or objects created through it in relation to the personality of the individual artist and his development.
The course, depending on enrollment and other factors, will include field trips to Cambridge, to spend a day in the drawings study of the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard, and to New York, to view the January exhibitions of drawings at major auction houses and dealers.
Evaluation will be based on classroom performance and a 10- to 15-page research paper, or (subject to approval by the instructor) a substantial artistic project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to advanced Art majors.
Meeting time: afternoons; 6 two-hour sessions at the Clark after an introductory classroom meeting, with one or two extra meetings for discussion and research preparation, as needed. There will be two full-day field trips.
Costs to student: $60 in textbooks; approximately $30-40 expenses for the field trips.

MICHAEL MILLER (Instructor)
M. LEWIS (Sponsor)

Michael Miller has worked in the field of drawings as a curator at the Cleveland Museum of Art, an independent dealer, and a teacher at Oberlin College and New York University. He holds a Ph.D. in Classics and an M.A. in Fine Arts from Harvard University and combines his interests in language, literature and art in his research and teaching. He has published articles on Pintoricchio, Raphael, Peruzzi, and Michelangelo, and others, as well as numerous reviews and contributions to exhibition catalogues. He is also active as a fine art photographer.

ARTH 013 Images of War

CANCELLED!

ARTH 014 Fictionalizing the Artist: Genius and Gender in Films about Artists (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 014)

Films based on artists' lives have done a great deal to shape our impressions of the creative individual. This course will explore this issue, studying films about artists from the Renaissance to the modern period including Michelangelo, Vincent Van Gogh, Camille Claudel, Frida Kahlo, and Jackson Pollock. We will focus on the construction, in these films, of a notion of artistic genius, paying particular attention to the role played by gender. Our discussions will be based on the films themselves as well as comparative material-biographical and art historical readings on the various artists.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: afternoons; 2 three hour sessions per week. Some film viewing will be required outside class hours.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for books and copied materials.

SOLUM

ARTH 015 Materials of the Artist: Uncovering Fakes and Forgeries (Same as Chemistry 015 and ArtS 015)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

ARTH 016 Exploring Regional Museums: Nuts and Bolts and Behind the Scene Tours

This course will introduce the holdings and operation of selected regional museums through weekly museum excursions. All aspects of museums will be discussed, though an emphasis will be on investigating the preservation of museum objects, as well as how museums operate. The class will begin with an introduction to museum work and a tour of the Williams College Museum of Art. The class will continue with twice-weekly museum excursions, short lectures and at least one tour of an art conservation laboratory. Tours will include behind-the scenes views and meetings with key personnel, as well as time looking at the exhibitions. The class will visit MASS MoCA, the Chapin Library, the Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery, the Clark Art Institute, the Norman Rockwell Museum, the Albany Institute of History and Art, and others. The class will also travel to Boston or New York, (the museum selected will depend on the current exhibition schedule). Evaluation will be based on participation in all museum visits and lectures and one researched presentation or 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 10.
Cost to Student: $125-150, for books, handouts, costs associated with admission to Museums, and possibly one overnight field trip. The cost and schedule of the museum visits will be available during enrollment and at the first class.

LORI K. VAN HANDEL (Instructor)
LEWIS (Sponsor)

Lori van Handel is a conservation specialist who directs Heritage Conservation Services, a local conservation firm. From 1994 to 2000 she was Associate Conservator at the Williamstown Arts Conservation Center.

(See under Special for full description.)

ARTS 023 The Art and History of Knitting (Same as Mathematics 016 and History 023)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

ARTH 025 Oriental Rugs: Art and Commerce (Same as Economics 025)

(See under Economics for full description.)

ARTH 026 Contemporary Art in Los Angeles

CANCELLED!

ARTH 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for ArtH 493, 494.

ARTH 033 Honors Independent Study

To be taken by candidates for honors by the independent study route.

ART STUDIO

ARTS 010 CULTURES OF RHYTHM (Same as Theatre 013)
An intensive theory/production workshop that studies musical representation as well as the collective process of music and dance video. The result recording will be part of a larger on-going project about Rumba music in NYC. From a performance studies angle, the workshop explores how to collaborate in an interdisciplinary manner. During the first week we will study theories of representation in relationship to fictional, documentary, ethnographic and experimental video making. In second week we will do intensive specialized camera workshop in the recording of music and dance performance resulting in the recording of choreography designed for this class in Williams College. The third week requires a 2-day video shoot at a NYC professional sound studio. Internationally recognized musicians will be recording a Rumba project and the students will have the opportunity to record their sessions. During the final week we will edit a series of short pieces. The editing of final projects could be an individual or team effort. Prerequisites: some experience in one of the following, dance, music and/or art video, lighting background; knowledge doing camera work and Final Cut or Media 100 editing.
Enrollment limit: 8. Permission by the instructor required.
Meeting time: T, W, R, plus two Fridays, 2pm - 4pm.
Cost: $480.00 which includes cost of field trip to NYC.
JOTTAR

ARTS 011 Refiguring the Body

This course is a studio seminar exploring various approaches to and uses of the body. Students will investigate and interrogate issues of nude/naked, subject/object, self/other, and a variety of themes, such as gender/sex/sexuality, death, and power, as they relate to representing the body. Drawing and collage techniques will be used in relationship to twentieth century and contemporary developments, attitudes and styles.
Requirements: model sessions in the studio, critique, slide discussions. Evaluation will be based on participation in discussion sections, effort, attendance, the quality of work produced, and the final exhibition of work.
Prerequisites: any 100-level Art History or Art Studio course. Enrollment limit: 16. Open to all, with preference given to Art majors.
Meeting time: afternoons; six hours of instruction and model sessions.
Cost to student: $75 for materials.

KARIN STACK (Instructor)
TAKENAGA (Sponsor)

Karin Stack is an artist who works with prints, drawings, and photographs. She earned her B.A. from Wesleyan and her M.F.A. from Colorado State University. She taught at Amherst College for three years.

ARTS 012 Japanese Traditional Art: Kusaki-Zome and Weaving (Same as Japanese 012)

(See under Asian Studies-Japanese for full description.)

ARTS 013 Abstracting and Translating: Sculpture to Drawing

Can the constructed object or installation serve as model, structure or source for drawing? This course will explore the relationship between the sculpted object or installation and the drawing. By abstracting from nature with non-traditional materials, students will develop a three dimensional vocabulary of patterns, networks, or volumetric forms (less than 2x2x2') that can be used as foundation for two-dimensional works. The first part of the course will be an introduction to building sculptures using simple means of attachment, such as hot glue, tape and wire. Students will do research outside of class to find source material for the three dimensional works (living organisms, books, the internet). The final project "drawings" may refer to, originate from and/or incorporate sculptural elements, but are not limited to these interpretations. There will be a mandatory class trip to Mass MoCA.
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and class participation. Requirements: several small assignments, a daily journal/sketchbook, and a final project for an open studio or exhibition.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference given to Art majors.
Meeting time: afternoons; 3 times per week. Students will also be expected to work during open studio hours.
Cost to student: $75-$100.

KRISTINE TAYLOR `01 (Instructor)
TAKENAGA (Sponsor)

Kristine Taylor is a painter/sculptor who works in North Adams, MA and received the Hutchinson Memorial Fellowship in Art after graduating from Williams College in 2001.

ARTS 014 Figure Drawing

In this course students will develop representational, technical, and expressive skills through studies in drawing from live models. We will inform our practice in drawing through the study of accomplished figure drawings from the history of western art. Creating your own studies "in the manner of" such drawings, you will learn to develop methods suitable for varied approaches to the human figure. In addition to working directly from the model during class meetings, you will also be expected to develop drawings outside of class times, including anatomical studies, self portraiture, and working up figure sketches into more elaborate compositions. In addition to studio work we will allow some time for brief slide lectures and for critique.
Evaluation will be based on the level of achievement in her/his drawings, attendance, participation, and effort. Satisfactory performance in the course will require a commitment of at least 6 hours per week in addition to class meetings.
Prerequisites: ArtS 100. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings; six hours each week. .
Cost to student: approximately $75 for materials and model fees.

LEVIN

ARTS 015 Materials of the Artist: Uncovering Fakes and Forgeries (Same as Chemistry 015 and ArtH 015)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

ARTS 016 Collage

The term collage is from the French verb coller, meaning "to glue." Throughout art, film and literature of the twentieth century we regard the process of making collage an aggregate of ideas, materials and textures; a work composed of both borrowed and primary material. The assembled information produces a montage that permits meaning to slip the metaphoric conventions of a unified surface and linear logic. This studio examines several stations in which collage creates patterns that address social, political, and psychological conditions.
Prerequisites: Drawing I.
Meeting time: nine hours in class plus outside studio assignments.
Cost to student: $80 lab fee plus individual purchases of additional studio supplies.

EPPING

ARTS 017 Contemporary Mexican Women Film-Makers (Same as English 035, Spanish 012 and Women's and Gender Studies 012)

(See under Romance Languages-Spanish for full description.)

ARTS 018 Dreams, Art, and the Personal Narrative

This class is a laboratory in which one's artistic identity (style, process, technique, inspiration, and visual language) will be supplemented by the practice and tracking of dreams. How can we use the unconscious to access a deeper, poetic site of creativity? The class will be based on a mixture of art practices and dreaming techniques; creative field studies and studio assignments, group dreamwork, and critique will be grounded in lectures in the science and theory of dreams and slide presentations. How have dreams inspired artists such as Remedios Varo, Max Ernst, Matta, Maya Deren, Bill Viola, and Frederico Garcia Lorca? We will also look at the role dreams play in the art of non-western cultures such as Islam, India, indigenous America, and Aboriginal Australia. How do dreams question our sense of self, our relationship to time, and ways we construct meaning from non-linear fragments of information? What are persistent themes that arise in both our art and dreams? A final group exhibition will document our findings. The use of and exploration in any artistic media is encouraged. Students are responsible for their own materials.
Evaluation will be based on willingness to try new techniques, participation in group discussions and activities, keeping a dream journal, and successful completion of studio assignments and readings.
Prerequisite: while not required, it is recommended that students have Drawing I or Drawing II. Enrollment limit: 10.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 two hour sessions per week, and one evening for two hours.
Cost to student: $50 for materials.

JENNIFER BRAMAN `95 (Instructor)
EPPING (Sponsor)

Jennifer Braman `95 is an artist based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Her drawings, sound installations, and performance work investigate the creative language of the unconscious. She received her MFA degree as well as a certificate in Dream Studies from John F. Kennedy University. She currently works as the program advisor for the University's Department of Arts and Consciousness.

ARTS 019 Meet the Right Side of Your Brain: Drawing as a Learnable Skill (Same as Physics 012)

(See under Physics for full description.)

ARTS 020 Pinhole Photography

Anyone who has been involved in traditional photography has at one point or another been fascinated by the mysteries of pinhole photographs. This course will introduce the students to methods of making pinhole cameras and making images from these cameras. It is also a darkroom course. Students will learn how to process their film and print from both paper and film negatives. The student will be required to make two different types of cameras and be required to present a portfolio of 15 to 20 successful pinhole images. There will be specific shooting assignments that will teach them to recognize the special and very specific characteristics of a pinhole image.
Evaluation will be based on final portfolio.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to student: $150 for lab fee.

ANTHONY SALAZAR (Instructor)
LALEIAN (Sponsor)

Anthony Salazar received his MFA from Hunter College in 1998. He taught photography at Hamilton College in Clinton, New York in the fall 2000. Anthony is currently a practicing photographer and the Photography Technician in the Art Department at Williams College.

ARTS 033 Honors Independent Project

Independent study to be taken by candidates for honors in Art Studio.

ASIAN STUDIES

ASST 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Asian Studies.

CHINESE

CHIN S.P. Sustaining Program for Chinese 101-102

Students registered for Chinese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Chinese Sustaining Program.
Requirements: regular attendance and active class participation.
Prerequisites: Chinese 101.
Meeting time: mornings; Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays 9-9:50 a.m.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.

LANGUAGE FELLOW

CHIN 011 Business Chinese: It is More Than Just a Chinese Business

This course is NOT an advanced-level Chinese language course. Rather, it is designed to provide fundamental training in Chinese language to people who are interested in doing business with China in the future. In this course, we will learn the proper pronunciation of Mandarin Chinese, the official language in China and Taiwan. You will also gain basic understanding of the Chinese syntax and writing system, which can also be the basis for future language learning when necessary. In addition, a wide range of knowledge necessary for effective cross-cultural communication in the business context, such as social etiquette, business practices, and interpretation of verbal and non-verbal statements will be covered. Local merchants with extensive experience in conducting business with Chinese communities will be invited as guest speakers to share their insights with the class.
Evaluation will be based on class preparation, tests, and the completion of assignments.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 two-hour sessions per week.
Cost to student: the cost of one Xerox packet.

C. CHANG

CHIN 012 Chinese Painting and Culture

This course provides a wonderful opportunity to explore Chinese art by fostering appreciation and understanding of the aesthetics of Chinese painting. Students will gain a broad knowledge of Chinese art as well as the basic skills to facilitate further practice. More specifically, students will learn how to use gradations of black ink, one of the major techniques in Chinese painting, on rice paper. Students will also learn how to draw the "four gentlemen" series, which stands for the four seasons of the year: plum blossom, mountain orchid, bamboo, and chrysanthemum. Techniques used in Chinese landscape painting, such as drawing of mountains, trees, and water, will also be covered.
In addition to the techniques of Chinese painting, students will also be introduced to elements that are integral parts of Chinese painting, such as calligraphy, seal, and unique methods of mounting. This is a course of exploratory nature and requires no previous background in art.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and the final presentation of work.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: afternoons; 2 three-hour sessions per week.
Cost to student: $30 for materials.

YINGLEI ZHANG (Instructor)
C. CHANG (Sponsor)

Yinglei Zhang is a Chinese artist and teacher. She has a B.A. in Chinese language and literature, an advanced certificate in Chinese classical literature, and a M.A. in Art Education. She has taught Chinese at Green Mountain College in Poultney, VT. She has also been teaching Chinese Painting and Calligraphy and The Art of Chinese Tea at Frog Hollow, Middlebury College, Saint Michael's College, and many other institutions near Middlebury, VT, where she currently resides.

CHIN 013 Chinese Cinema: Transculturation and Modernity

This course is designed to explore visual forms of cultural creativity with an eye on transculturation and modernity through the genre of Chinese Cinema. Selected films are viewed outside of class. Topics may range from love and romance, saga and human tragedy, cult, warriors and martial arts, melodrama and allegory of life. In class, students are required to participate in and to lead panel discussions in the forum. Discussions involve cinematic motifs, symbolism in filmic narration, directorial control and expression, and evidence of transculturation from solo Chinese shadow plays to contemporary mass productions driven by today's transnational market capitalism.
Evaluation will be based on two 5- to 6-page papers (film critiques) and active participation in and leading of small-group film review and in-class panel discussions each meeting.
Meeting time: panel discussions, 1-3 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays; film review and small group meetings, 1-3 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays.

Cost to student: $30 for course reading packet (course website).

DOMIZIO

CHIN 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Chinese.

JAPANESE

JAPN S.P. Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102

Students registered for Japanese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Japanese Sustaining Program.
Requirements: regular attendance and active class participation.
Prerequisites: Japanese 101.
Meeting time: mornings; Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays 9-9:50a.m.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.

LANGUAGE FELLOW

JAPN 011 Theatre of the Body: A Transcultural Model for Physical Theatre Performance (Same as Theatre 011)

This course is designed for anyone that wishes to increase their performative skills by engaging in exercises adapted from contemporary and traditional Japanese arts. The course draws from butoh, noh, and aikido to propose a training model for physical theatre performance. Performance training may have profound value for people pursuing disciplines both within and outside of the performing arts.
The goals of this course are sweeping in their scope: 1) increased power, presence, and flexibility; 2) increased integration of breath and movement; 3) increased kinesthetic sense, including postural and structural awareness in movement; 4) increased `performative fluency' or the capacity to embody an idea in performance. The method will be intensive studio instruction in specific kata (or `roadmaps' for movement), limb and joint mobilizations, and tightly structured improvisations.
This will be a highly physical class, consisting of exercises that move through the space, and those that require direct physical interaction among students and between instructor and student. The students are encouraged to maintain optimum health during the term of this course and to arrive to each class on time, fed, rested, and otherwise prepared to enter into a prolonged period of physical and mental engagement. Each class will be structured to account for the students' physiological progression from hour to hour (i.e., we will not attempt to stretch cold muscles or begin with activities that are highly aerobic, but rather will follow a sequence that accounts for the participants' evolving body state). Loose, comfortable and layered (to account for climate) clothing is a must. We will work mostly in bare feet.
Evaluation will be based on their daily commitment to in-class activities, and the quality and timely completion of outside assignments. Assignments will include reading materials addressing core issues from a variety of viewpoints; written summaries of one or more of those selections; regular journal writing; and a short in-class presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. No prior performance training necessary, however students should come to class prepared to enter into an extended period of mental and physical engagement.

JAPN 012 Japanese Traditional Art: Kusaki-Zome and Weaving (Same as ArtS 012)

In this class, students will learn traditional Japanese dyeing techniques using dyes from plants. After dyeing the threads, students will make two tapestries. Each student's first project will be to make a tapestry using a cardboard loom. Their second project will be to make a wall tapestry using the "tie-dye" technique. Both tapestries will be designed by the student. This class requires no previous artistic training. The technical exercises in this class will be done through several projects under the supervision of the instructor.
Grading will be based on the completion of three projects with a journal describing each one. Students will participate in an exhibition at the end of the class where their work will be displayed.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15 per section. Two sections.
Meeting time: morning section, 10a.m.-noon, Monday, Wednesday and Thursday-afternoon section, 1:30-3:30p.m., Monday, Wednesday and Thursday.
Cost to student: $40 lab fee.

KABASAWA

Kyoko Kabasawa, a Japanese textile and dyeing artist, teaches at Asai Gakuen University in Hokkaido. In addition to a number of prizes awarded in Japan, she won an originality award in Hawaii's Hand weavers' Hui 45th Anniversary Biennial Exhibition in 1998, temari award in Hawaii's Hand weavers' Hui 46th Biennial Exhibition in 2000


Meeting time: mornings and afternoons; Monday through Thursday 10a.m.-1p.m. (10-12 hours per week).
Cost to student: approximately $40 for materials and course packet.

TOM O'CONNOR (Instructor)
KAGAYA (Sponsor)

Tom O'Connor has been an actor and movement artist for twenty years. Currently, as a visiting researcher with the National Institute of Multimedia Education in Chiba, Japan, he is studying training methods in contemporary and traditional Japanese arts.

.

JAPN 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Japanese.

ASTRONOMY

ASTR 011 Image Processing in Science and Medicine

Images have long been fundamental in the sciences such as astronomy. With the discovery of x-rays this became true in medicine as well. Digital imaging has become a staple throughout our society but the nature and processing of a scientific image differs from that of an image obtained for artistic or commercial purposes. This course will cover the principles and practice of image processing as applied to the sciences and medicine, particularly to astronomy and to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We will discuss how images are acquired, including transformations from raw data to meaningful images. We will cover images, their generalization to dimensions other than two, and many fundamental operations that may be applied to enhance features or extract particular kinds of information. Students will obtain their own images using one or more of the following: an MRI scanner, an astronomical telescope, or an electron microscope. Students will learn to use one or more image processing software packages, and will have the opportunity to create their own software.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, weekly assignments, and a final project which will be presented both in written form and as an oral presentation at a simulated scientific conference.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 105 or 106, or equivalent. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to students with experience in a programming language.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 two-hour sessions per week. Other times include a field trip to a medical MRI facility (9a.m.-5p.m.), a night of observing on the Hopkins Observatory 24" telescope (7p.m.-10p.m.), and a visit to the electron microscope on campus.
Cost to student: approximately $90 for books and shareware fees.

STEVEN SOUZA (Instructor)
KWITTER (Sponsor)

Steven Souza earned his Ph.D. in astronomy from the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1979, and is currently Observatory Supervisor and Instructor in Astronomy at Williams College. He spent 13 years at GE Global Research in Niskayuna, NY, where he did research in MRI for medical applications.

ASTR 031 Senior Research

To be taken by students registered for Astronomy 493, 494.

ASTROPHYSICS

ASPH 031 Senior Research

To be taken by students registered for Astrophysics 493, 494.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 010 Electron Microscopy

Students will undertake an independent project to investigate a topic of their choice using the transmission and scanning electron microscopes. They will do their own sample preparation, operate the two electron microscopes, and take micrographs of relevant structures. Class time will give a brief overview of the theory and operation of the microscopes and microtomes. In addition, students will learn how to develop and print their film from the TEM, and learn how to manipulate the digital images from the SEM in Adobe Photoshop. (Do you want your erythrocytes red or blue?)
The lab is scheduled to receive a new SEM this summer that will allow observation of wet samples as well as conventional dried samples , and will extend the limits of research potential for the scope.
Requirements: brief reading assignments, a guest speaker, and a 10-page paper with 8 well focused micrographs.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. No preference given.
Meeting time: afternoons; 3 two-hour sessions per week, plus scope time.
Cost to student: $40 for text and readings.

NANCY PIATCZYC (Instructor)
H. WILLIAMS (Sponsor)

Nancy Piatczyc received her B.S. in Biology from Tufts University. She attended the school of Electron Microscopy in Albany, NY. She is a trained electron microscopist who operates and maintains the electron microscope facility at Williams.

BIOL 011 Envisioning a Sustainable Future (Same as Environmental Studies 011)

If humanity is to survive the next century, a massive movement towards ecological sustainability must occur. What is a sustainable lifestyle like? Will we have to sacrifice? How do we get there from here? In this course, we will first look at key technologies and resource management issues required for (and also driving!) the movement towards sustainability, including energy, water and agricultural practices. By considering the ramifications of these issues, it will be possible to envision in some detail what a sustainable lifestyle must be like. We will then consider how the mindset and practices of the developed world must evolve to allow the sustainability movement to truly take hold. Students will read several short background papers before each class.
Requirements: reading of several short background papers before class, a 10-page paper or equivalent project on a topic of their choice, and, in the last week of Winter Study present a 15-minute summary of this independent research.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16. Preference will be given to Environmental Studies concentrators.
Meeting time: mornings; Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 10 a.m.-12 p.m., and Tuesdays should be held open for field trips beginning at 10 a.m; return times will vary and may be as late as 4 p.m.
Cost to student: $15 for purchasing a packet of photocopies papers, and may need to subsidize field trip costs.

SILVIO EBERHARDT (Instructor)
H. WILLIAMS (Sponsor)

Silvio Eberhardt holds B.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Biology from Lehigh University where he also pursued a minor in "Humanities perspectives in Technology") and a Ph.D. degree from The Johns Hopkins University. For the past 10 years he has taught computer engineering at Swarthmore College and Villanova University. During that time, he has avidly researched sustainable technologies for renewable energy systems, home construction (he participated in building a straw-bale/cob medical clinic near Ontario last summer), and food production (he has been running indoor hydroponic systems for the last 3 years). He plans to dedicate the rest of his career to sustainability.

BIOL 012 Overcoming Cultural Barriers to Healthcare in the U.S.

Does everyone in the United States have equal access to healthcare? Many cultural and socioeconomic barriers can interfere with effective care. This course is designed to expose the student to a variety of situations in which healthcare delivery is difficult. Relying on brief readings, guest speakers and experiential field trips, students will explore the problems and potential solutions specific to some cultures and conditions within American society, including poverty, migrant workers and Native Americans, GBLT, and others.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and the completion a project to be presented at a poster session at the end of the course. Access to transportation would be helpful but is not required.
No prerequisites, but previous experience in any aspect of healthcare is encouraged. Enrollment limit: 14. Preference given to upperclassmen.
Meeting time: Wednesday EVENINGS, as well as weekly field trips scheduled on Wednesdays and Fridays.
Cost to student: $30 for reading materials.

BARBARA ROSENTHAL, M.D. (Instructor)
H. WILLIAMS (Sponsor)

Dr. Rosenthal is a clinical instructor at UVM College of Medicine in Burlington. She received her undergraduate degree from Cornell and her MD degree from Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse. She is Board Certified in Family Practice and is licensed in Vermont, New York, Wisconsin, and Maine.

BIOL 013 Life as an Algorithm (Same as Computer Science 013)

(See under Computer Science for full description.)

BIOL 014 Orchids! (Same as Environmental Studies 014)

This course explores the world of orchids. First we will consider the aesthetics of orchids and how this fueled both the exploration for new species in the nineteenth century and the production of modern hybrids. Next we will study the biology of orchids particularly the structural and physiological adaptations that have permitted these plants to inhabit sites as diverse as the treetops of tropical forests and the frozen meadows of New England. The complex relationship between flower structure and the behavior of pollinators is of special interest. The fascinating world of the orchid hybridizer will be examined. How is it possible to combine four genera to make one plant? The commercialization of orchids led to the destruction of many natural populations. Is it possible to protect and possibly reestablish endangered species through the cultivation and propagation of orchids from seed? Orchid hybridization and the discovery of methods for the tissue culture of rare plants have revolutionized the commercial availability of orchids. Globalization has affected the orchid industry. We will discuss these recent trends and what it means for those hoping for a career with orchids.
Students will be given the opportunity to examine living plants and flowers of various orchid genera. We will demonstrate the techniques for growing the plants in the greenhouse and within the home. Mature specimens will be repotted and students will deflask seedlings and set up community pots.
Two field trips are planned, one to Mountain Orchid of Ludlow, VT, a leader in growing cloud forest species, and the second to Conway Orchids of Conway, MA, a grower of championship Cattleya hybrids.
Students will be required to write a 10-page paper or develop an equivalent oral presentation to the class on the orchid topic of his/her choice, and production of a poster. The poster will be displayed at an orchid show we will present on the last day of Winter Study (students will be required to be present for the show and to help set it up).
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 14.
Meeting time: mornings; Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 10 a.m.-noon; two field trips will be TBA.
Cost to student: approximately $50, which includes field trips and textbook.

C.J. GILLIG (Instructor)
H. WILLIAMS (Sponsor)

C.J. Gillig, Technical Assistant in the Department of Psychology at Williams College, received his B.A. in Biology from St. Mary's University of San Antonio, Texas and his Ph.D. in Zoology from UMass, Amherst. Although he now works in the Department of Psychology he has remained interested in biology and specializes in orchids. He has a mixed collection representing numerous genera. He is a member of the American Orchid Society and the Amherst Orchid Society.

BIOL 016 Molecular Medicine, from Bench to Bedside (Same as Chemistry 013)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

BIOL 017 The New England Forest (Same as Environmental Studies 017)

(See under Environmental Studies for full description.)

BIOL 018 The Mind of a Poet: The Psycho-Biological Bases of Creativity (Same as Neuroscience 018 and Psychology 019)

Recent advances in Neuroscience, Artificial Intelligence, Psychology and Behavioral Ecology have allowed us a glimpse onto the bases of the creative process which supplements prior anecdotal and biographical accounts from scientists and artists. This course will provide a survey of the field with special emphasis on the commonalities between creativity in art and science. We will explore the mechanisms underlying this seemingly unique human characteristic by taking a look at creativity by artists, scientists and individuals with specific psychopathologies such as manic depression, as well as by other types of "minds" from animals to machines.
Requirements: active participation, readings, attendance, and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

LUIS F. SCHETTINO (Instructor)
H. WILLIAMS (Sponsor)

Luis F. Schettino received his B.S. in biology from the Autonomous Metropolitan University in Mexico City, his M.S. in psychology from Rutgers-New Brunswick and Ph.D. in neuroscience from Rutgers-Newark. Besides his interest in cognition and creativity, he has also published two books of poetry translations into Spanish.

BIOL 019 Picturing Our Past (Same as Special 018, Environmental Studies 018, and INTR 019)

(See under Special for full description.)

BIOL 020 The Green Revolution (Same as Economics 027 and Environmental Studies 027)

(See under Economics for full description.)

BIOL 022 Introduction to Biological Research

An experimental research project will be carried out under the supervision of the Biology Department. It is expected that the student will spend 20 hours per week in the lab at a minimum, and a 10-page written report is required. This experience is intended for, but not limited to, first-year students and sophomores, and requires the permission of the instructor.
Prerequisites: Biology 101. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

THE DEPARTMENT

BIOL 025 History and Philosophy of Biology: The Galapagos Islands (Same as Philosophy 025)

(See under Philosophy for full description.)

BIOL 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Biology 493, 494.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 011 Science for Kids (Same as Special 011)

Are you interested in teaching? Do you enjoy working with kids? Do you like to experiment with new things? Here is a chance for you to do all three! The aim of this Winter Study Project is to design a series of hands-on science workshops for elementary school children and their parents. Working in teams of 2-4, students spend the first two and a half weeks of Winter Study planning the workshops. This involves deciding on a focus for each workshop (based on the interests of the students involved) followed by choosing and designing experiments and presentations that will be suitable for fourth-grade children. On the third weekend of Winter Study (January 24, 25) we bring elementary school kids with their parents to Williams to participate in the workshops. You get a chance to see what goes into planning classroom demonstrations as well as a sense of what it's like to actually give a presentation. You find that kids at this age are great fun to work with because they are interested in just about everything and their enthusiasm is infectious. You also give the kids and their parents a chance to actually do some fun hands-on science experiments that they may not have seen before, and you are able to explain simple scientific concepts to them in a manner that won't be intimidating. It is a rewarding experience for all involved.
Evaluation will be based on participation in planning and running the workshops. Each group is expected to prepare a handout with descriptions of the experiments for the kids, parents, and teachers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25. You need not be a science major; all that is needed is enthusiasm.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 three-hour sessions per week. The workshop is run on the third weekend of Winter Study (January 24, 25) and attendance from 9a.m. to 3p.m. is mandatory that weekend. There are also one or two brief meetings held in the fall term for preliminary planning.
Cost to student: none.

BINGEMANN and SCHOFIELD

CHEM 012 Learning and Teaching Chemistry in Spanish (Same as Spanish 014)

This course is designed for to students interested in taking courses in chemistry or physical sciences in a Spanish speaking country. Also, it targets students interested in teaching science in high school with predominant Hispanic population. Depending on language fluency, the class is divided into subgroups, and topics in chemistry are assigned. After the first week, each group is responsible for short presentations and short reports. During the last week, each group discusses a complete chemistry unit. This course uses the Spanish translation of "Chemistry'' by Professor Raymond Chang and readings from Scientific American. The course emphasizes on class planning, preparation and presentation as well as the use of multimedia.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, presentations and a final 10-page paper.
Prerequisites: at least intermediate Spanish fluency is required; any science background will be helpful but not required. Enrollment limit: 16.
Meeting time: afternoons; 3 two-hour sessions per week.
Cost to student: $100 for textbook and copied materials.

PEACOCK-LÓPEZ

CHEM 013 Molecular Medicine, from Bench to Bedside (Same as Biology 016)

This course offers a novel opportunity for advanced undergraduates (intent upon graduate study in molecular biology or medicine) to engage thought leaders involved in the development of target-specific monoclonal antibodies and clinicians utilizing anticytokine therapies in the treatment of immune-mediated disease. Classroom review of new developments in molecular medicine is followed by visits to corporations involved in the design/manufacture of biologics (Biogen, Amgen, Abbott and Centocor have been contacted). Opportunities for clinical observation (outpatient infusion therapy for inflammatory polyarthritis) will be available in the offices of Berkshire Rheumatology Associates.
Evaluation is based upon participation in didactic, clinical and industry sessions, in addition to the preparation of a research paper which emphasizes the regulatory and investigative efforts involved in bringing molecular therapeutics from bench to bedside.
Prerequisites: Biochemistry (cellular biology and molecular immunology are recommended, but not required). Enrollment limit: 10.
Meeting time: afternoons; 2 two-hour didactic sessions per week; half-day clinical sessions will be arranged for students interested in office-based infusion, with opportunities to engage patients in discussion of rheumatologic disease. A minimum of two full-day roadtrips, featuring discussion with scientific directors and members of the research teams of prominent biopharmaceutical companies, are required of course participants.
Cost to student: $50 for reading materials.

JONATHAN D. KRANT, M.D. (Instructor)
PEACOCK-LÓPEZ (Sponsor)

Jonathan Krant is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Massachusetts, and runs the teaching program in rheumatology at Berkshire Medical Center. He is a board-certified rheumatologist, and performed post-graduate residency and fellowship training at Yale, Dartmouth and UCSF. Dr. Krant lives on a farm in South Williamstown.

CHEM 014 Emergency Medical Technician-Basic

A course designed to prepare students for the Massachusetts EMT exam and to provide training to become certified as an Emergency Medical Technician. The course teaches the new national standard curriculum which makes reciprocity with many other states possible. This is a time-intensive course involving approximately 130 hours of class time plus optional emergency room observation and ambulance work. Students will learn, among other skills, basic life support techniques, patient assessment techniques, defibrillation, how to use an epi-pen, safe transportation and immobilization skills, as well as the treatment of various medical emergencies including shock, bleeding, soft-tissue injuries, and child birth. In order to reduce the number of class meetings required during Winter Study Period, the course will hold a few meetings beginning in the fall semester. These class meetings, which are mandatory, with the following schedule: 1 November (orientation), 2 November, 15 November, 16 November, and 30 November.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and performance on class exams, quizzes and practical exercises.
Prerequisites: it is recommended that students have American Heart Association Level C BLS Provider CPR Cards or American Red Cross BLS provider CPR cards before entering the EMT Class. A CPR class will be offered in October for those students wishing to take the EMT class who don't already have CPR cards. Enrollment limit: 24.
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons; schedule TBA in October.
Cost to student: $350/student plus approximately $75 for textbook.

KEVIN GARVEY (Instructor)
L. PARK (Sponsor)

Kevin Garvey is a Massachusetts state and nationally approved EMT-I (Intermediate) and an EMT-IC (Instructor/Coordinator). He had been involved with Emergency Medical Services for 15-20 years. Mr. Garvey currently works for Baystate Health Systems as an RN (registered nurse) and EMT-I and also works as an EMT-I for Village Ambulance in Williamstown. Mr. Garvey is also an EMT training instructor at Greenfield Community College.

CHEM 015 Materials of the Artist: Uncovering Fakes and Forgeries (Same as ArtH 015 and ArtS 015)

Many artists' materials (in the form of support, pigments, coatings, and binding media) existed in very specific times throughout history. Knowing this, we can create a timeline and begin to date art objects by examining their material and how each object was manufactured. In this class, we choose an object of questionable authenticity and immerse ourselves in it. For example, a painting of questionable authenticity will have the pigments analyzed, the media analyzed, an x-ray will be taken, showing the paint strokes and method of application. In some cases, a technique called an infrared reflectography will be utilized to view the underdrawing-the artist (or forgers) original sketches. Visual examinations combined with sophisticated analytical instrumentation will be used to identify the materials of the object and its method of manufacture. Instruments may include: x-ray fluorescence analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, x-ray diffraction, gas chromatography, and scanning electron microscope. All classes will be held at either the Williamstown Conservation Center under the direction of the analytical chemist and conservator, or in the Bronfman Science Center.
Evaluation will be based upon class participation and a 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Meeting time: mornings; 2 three-hour sessions per week.
Cost to student: $20 for reading materials.

KATE DUFFY (Instructor)
LOVETT (Sponsor)

Kate Duffy is Department Head of Analytical Services at the Williamstown Art Conservation Center.

CHEM 016 Glass and Glassblowing

This course provides an introduction to both a theoretical consideration of the glassy state of matter and the practical manipulation of glass. We do flameworking with hand torches for at least 12 hours per week. While no previous experience is required, students with patience, good hand-eye coordination, and creative imagination will find the course most rewarding. The class is open to both artistically and scientifically oriented students.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, exhibition of glass projects, a 10-page paper, and a presentation to the class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to juniors and sophomores. Interested students should contact Professor Thoman by e-mail prior to registration.
Meeting time: mornings; five days per week.
Cost to student: $50 for supplies.

THOMAN

CHEM 018 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry

An independent experimental project in biochemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in biochemistry. Biochemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the molecular details of living systems including the interaction of biologically important molecules. In the Chemistry Department, studies are underway to investigate the structure/function relationship of proteins, the interaction between proteins and RNA and DNA, DNA structure and repair, and the molecular basis of gene regulation.
Requirements: a 10-page written report.
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least Chemistry 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate.
Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

GEHRING, KAPLAN, and LOVETT

CHEM 019 Introduction to Research in Environmental Science (Same as Environmental Studies 020)

An independent experimental project in environmental science is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in environmental science. Current research projects include studies of atmospheric chemistry related to global warming and acid deposition, heavy metals in the local environment, and further development of laboratory techniques for Environmental Studies 102 (Introduction to Environmental Science).
Requirements: a 10-page written report.
Prerequisites: a one-semester science course and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate.
Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.

Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

THOMAN

CHEM 020 Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry

An independent experimental project in inorganic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in inorganic chemistry. Opportunities for research in inorganic chemistry at Williams include the study of transition metals in biological systems (enzymes, proteins), and as building blocks for new materials with interesting electronic (magnetic, conducting) and optical properties. Students working in this area will gain expertise in the synthesis of new compounds and their characterization by modern spectroscopic techniques.
Requirements: a 10-page written report.
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least Chemistry 101) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate.
Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

L. PARK and SCHOFIELD

CHEM 023 Introduction to Research in Organic Chemistry

An independent experimental project in organic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in organic chemistry. One representative project involves isolation of the bioactive constituents of Southeast Asian dart poisons from their natural sources and the elucidation of their three-dimensional structures. Another line of investigation probes new and efficient methods for the creation of molecules of medicinal interest. Some targets include the kavalactones-the active principles of the herbal extract KAVA KAVA which is promoted as an alternative anti-anxiety remedy, and octalactin A-an interesting 8-membered ring compound isolated from marine microorganisms that has shown significant toxicity toward human cancer cells.
Requirements: a 10-page written report.
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least Chemistry 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate.
Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

MARKGRAF and T. SMITH

CHEM 024 Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry

An independent experimental project in physical chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in physical chemistry. Current research projects in the Department include computer modeling of non-linear, chaotic chemical and biochemical systems, molecular modeling of water clusters, laser spectroscopy of chlorofluorocarbon substitutes, and experimental studies of the oxidation of sulfur dioxide on atmospheric aerosols.
Requirements: a 10-page written report.
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least Chemistry 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate.
Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

BINGEMANN, PEACOCK-LÓPEZ, and THOMAN

CHEM 025 Archaeological Excavation at the Paleolithic Site of Attirampakkam, India (Same as Anthropology 025)

This course will travel to Attirampakkan, a site in Southern India that has so far yielded well-preserved cultural artifacts of Lower, Middle and Upper Paleolithic deposits, including an Acheulian living floor and animal footprints in association with artifacts. Excavations at the site are sponsored by Earthwatch, which specializes in sending talented and interested amateurs to help professional scientists. It is one of relatively few opportunities for Williams students to participate in professional archaeological research. The excavating season is January and February, making it ideal for a Winter Study trip.
The vast majority of human prehistory studies have focussed either on Africa or Europe. While there have been occasional investigations in the Indian subcontinent (the first stone tool was found by a British geologist in 1863), systematic studies have only been started in the last 10 years. The goal of the project, of which Attirampakkan is a major part, is to build up a picture of the region in prehistory that will allow paleoanthropologists to test models of hominid behavioral strategies. One question is whether these are affected by climate change in ways also seen in other parts of the world.
When students return to campus after the holidays, we will spend several days in orientation activities related both to the site itself and to the practical aspects of field archaeology. They will spend approximately two weeks, plus travel, on site and return to Williamstown to write up the results of their work. While on site they will participate in all aspects of excavation including digging, cleaning artifacts, curating them and analyzing collections. Dr. Shanti Pappu, the archaeologist on this site, will lead discussions on Indian prehistory to supplement the earlier references. Students will keep a daily journal as well as a field notebook. Potential analyses include determining the appropriate attribution of material to a given Paleolithic period, correlating artifacts with possible sources of raw material, and interpreting the geology of the site in terms of climate change. However the primary result for students is the knowledge of what `real' archaeologists do.
Enrollment limit: 6.
Cost to student: approximately $3300 (includes airfare).

ANNE SKINNER (Instructor)
L. PARK (Sponsor)

Dr. Skinner's research is in applications of chemistry to archaeology and paleoanthropology. Her primary interest is dating fossil material. She has previous excavation experience, as well as a research background in paleoanthropology.

CHEM 031 Senior Research and Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Chemistry 493, 494.

CLASSICS

CLAS 010 Sappho's Poetry in Greek: Eros the Sweet-Bitter (Same as Comparative Literature 013 and Women's and Gender Studies 010)

Sappho of Lesbos (early 6th century bce) enjoys a privileged status in almost any history of sexuality or history of love poetry. Although only a small portion of her large poetic corpus has survived to us, we have retrieved enough to appreciate why Plato called Sappho "the tenth Muse" and why Solon, the great Athenian lawgiver who was himself a poet, responded to one of Sappho's poems upon hearing it for the first time: "Let me hear it again so that I may learn it and die." Readers of English translations respond to Sappho's poetry with similar enthusiasm, but no translation can fully capture the effects of her word choice, word order, syntactic shifts, sounds and rhythms. No translation can convey the passion, or the restraint, of her every poetic gesture in Greek. This course is intended for students who do not know any ancient Greek but who would like to read Sappho's poetry in Greek. We will not pretend to "learn Greek" in a month. Rather, this course will provide an introduction to Aeolic Greek, the dialect in which Sappho composed her poems. Through a specially prepared set of lessons, students will learn the Greek alphabet (really very easy) and just enough grammar, syntax, and vocabulary to read closely a selection of Sappho's poetry in Greek and to discuss problems of translation. (Sappho's syntax is unusually straightforward, even simple, so students need not worry about having to learn Greek's complex constructions.) We will also explore the dynamics of eros in her poetry and consider questions that this poetry, and its original occasions for performance, raise for the histories of not only sexuality and love poetry but even the education of young women and men.
Requirements: attendance at all classes, short quizzes on grammar and vocabulary, and preparing and presenting to one another translations and critical discussions of several poems and a number of fragments.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference given to majors (or intended majors) in Comparative Literature, English, foreign languages (including Latin but not Greek), and Women's and Gender Studies.
Meeting time: mornings, 4 times a week for one and a half to two hours per session.
Cost to student: $15 or less.

HOPPIN

CLAS 011 Writing With Wedges II: Introduction to Sumerian

The war with Iraq and the recent looting of the antiquities museum in Baghdad make the study of ancient Mesopotamian culture all the more pressing. This course will present an introduction to the Sumerian language in the context of its ancient Mesopotamian culture, and to cuneiform, the world's first writing system. Sumerian, which is not related to any other language, ancient or modern, provides a unique opportunity to study the way language works. The writing system, which was invented by Sumerian speakers around 4000 BCE and later adapted to different languages, was used for more than three millennia and is preserved on thousands of clay tablets and stone monuments in museums around the world. In this course we will learn the basics of the language and read original documents (including some in the Williams Art Museum) and become familiar with the history and the material culture of the region, which has long been known as the "Cradle of Western Civilization."
Requirements: weekly assignments from a language textbook and one 4- to 5-page research paper. This course presents an in-depth exploration of a topic touched on in Writing With Wedges: Language and Literature of Mesopotamia (2003); it is appropriate both for students who took that course and students who are new to the subject.
Prerequisites: love of language and an affinity for puzzles. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: afternoons, six hours a week (3 two-hour sessions).
Cost to student: $45 for textbook.

SALLY MOREN FREEDMAN (Instructor)
KRAUS (Sponsor)

Sally Moren Freedman received her Ph.D. in Assyriology in 1977 from the University of Pennsylvania and continued at the university as a research associate in the Babylonian section of the University Museum while lecturing in the Oriental Studies Department. She went on to teach Old Testament Studies at Princeton Theological Seminary.

CLAS 031 Senior Thesis

May be taken by students registered for Classics 493, 494.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

COMP 010 Living by Words: Surviving and Thriving in the Art and Sport of Rhetoric (Same as English 010, Leadership Studies 012, and Special 012)

Whether dealing in the realms of public life, commerce, or academe, the speaker who can clearly and cogently define or defend a policy, product, or theoretical position is usually the most successful. Depending on the venue and the aim of the speaker, the words might be artful and poetic, cajoling and competitive, formally read from the page or seemingly delivered impromptu. This course will briefly examine some of the classic styles of oratory from Ancient Greece to Madison Avenue. Students will make visits to a variety of venues that employ a special style of professional discourse (TV and radio stations, the Albany and Boston state houses) and learn a range of methods and techniques for practicing the basics of effective spoken communication. The practical intent of the course is for participants to develop confident, cogent, and dynamic presentation styles, to reinforce tight organizational focus and relaxed, natural delivery, and to develop creative approaches to speaking in front of a group. The course will guide participants through the presentation process from conception, outlining, and devising the message, to development of visual aids, message delivery, and handling question and answer sessions. Methods employed will include vigorous pursuit of improvisational theater techniques and vocal training. Participants will deliver brief presentations at each session and receive intensive personal coaching and a videotaped record of their personal progress. The final project will be a presentation at a public forum.
Evaluation will be based on active participation in the class, a written evaluation of a public presentation the student has attended, and successful completion of mini-presentations during Winter Study and the final presentation at the end of term.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 two-hour sessions per week and 2-3 field trips outside of Williamstown.
Cost to student: $25-45 for course materials.

PETER BUBRISKI (Instructor)
CASSIDAY (Sponsor)

Peter Bubriski has been coaching leaders in communication skills for twelve years. A founding partner of the Cambridge-based communications consulting firm of B&B Associates, where he has been designing and leading workshops in presentation skills since 1991, he also leads courses in Coaching, Mentoring, and Collaborative Communication at Pfizer, Inc., Morgan Stanley, and MIT. He has taught at The Boston Conservatory, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's Executive MBA Program, and he lectures regularly at Boston University's School of Management. He is also a professional actor with twenty years of credits in theater, film, and television ranging from ABC's All My Children and The King and I with Yul Brynner to independent films with Katharine Ross and Tyne Daly and documentary narration with PBS.

COMP 011 Surrealist Photography (Same as ArtH 017 and French 011)
The course will examine the interaction between the surrealistic and the photographic from the beginning of surrealism in the early 1920s to the fashion photography of the latter part of the century. With its power to capture the immediacy of the ephemeral moment and the "found object," to represent the coexistence of the ordinary and the magical, to capture the wonder of the mundane and the everyday, to offer new configurations (and disfigurations) of the human body, and to generate images expressive of desire, photography became the surrealist art par excellence. Consideration will be given to the similarities and differences between the surrealist image in poetry, painting and photography, to the representation of dream experience and the unconscious, to the portrait of the eroticized body, to the new use of photographic techniques like solarization, double image, formlessness, and distortion, and to the representation of a particularly unique scene of urban life: Paris. The role of the surreal in postwar photography-especially in advertising and fashion (Newton, Bourdin, Sokolsky), photographic narration (Winogrand), and the image of women (Turbeville)-will be examined. The photographic work of Eugène Atget, André Kertész, Brassai, Man Ray, Claude Cahun, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Lee Miller, Hans Bellmer, and Marcel Duchamp as well as theoretical texts by Breton, Bataille, Barthes, and Rosalind Krauss will be read as well.
Requirements: class participation, one class oral presentation, one 12-page final paper.
No prerequisites.Enrollment limited to 12.
Meetings: three 2-hour meetings per week, in the mornings.
Cost to student: books and reading packet: $50.
STAMELMAN

COMP 012 Proust: In Search of Lost Time (Same as French 012 and English 024)

This course will be dedicated to Marcel Proust's great novel In Search of Lost Time, whose published English title, Remembrance of Things Past, falsifies the sense of quest that the French conveys. The novel is a search for the meaning of time that has been wasted, or lost, in love and society. For Proust, erotic life and society pose profound difficulties that he proposes find their single solution in art. The extraordinary length of the work precludes reading all of it, so we will read the first two major sections of Swann's Way and Within a Budding Grove. In them, many of the great themes and problematics of the novel are introduced which find their amplification, intensification and finally even their resolution in the rest of the novel. By becoming sensitive to them, students will be readied to approach reading Proust on their own. Knowledge of French is not required; all class readings will be in English.
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance, class participation, and one 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference will be given to advanced students in Comparative Literature, English, and Romance Languages.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 meetings per week to be schedule at 11a.m. on different days.
Cost to student: approximately $45 for the books.

MARK DONEN (Instructor)
CASSIDAY (Sponsor)

Mark Donen is working on his Ph.D. at Boston University in comparative philosophy and literature. He has a Masters in philosophy from the New School for Social Research in New York City. Born in London, he has lived in Paris, and worked for Conde Nast magazines in New York and in documentary film production in France. He is married to Professor Soledad Fox in the department of Romance Languages.

COMP 013 Sappho's Poetry in Greek: Eros the Sweet-Bitter (Same as Classics 010 and Women's and Gender Studies 010)

(See under Classics for full description.)

COMP 014 Jungle Fever: The Amazon in Literature and Film (Same as Spanish 011 and Environmental Studies 022)

(See under Romance Languages-Spanish for full description.)

COMP 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Comparative Literature 493, 494.

LIT 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Literary Studies 493, 494.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CSCI 010 C, UNIX and Software Tools

This course serves as a guided tour of programming methods in the UNIX operating system. The course is designed for individuals who understand basic program development techniques as discussed in an introductory programming course (Computer Science 134 or equivalent), but who wish to become familiar with a broader variety of computer systems and programming languages. Students in this course will work on UNIX workstations, available in one of the Department's laboratories. By the end of the course, students will have developed basic proficiency in the C programming language.
The increasing success of UNIX as a modern operating system stems from its unique ability to "prototype" programs quickly. Students will use prototyping tools, such as Awk and "shell scripts" to write "filters" for transforming data from a variety of sources. It will become clear that in many cases the overhead of programming in languages such as C, C++, or Java is unnecessary. Moreover, students will learn to effectively use software tools such as debuggers, profilers, and make files.
Evaluation will be based on several programming assignments due throughout the term. While none of the projects in the course will be particularly large, the successful student will develop a tool chest, which will extend their computing "effectiveness" in their particular field. Students with computing needs particular to their field are encouraged to advise the instructor before the first meeting.
Prerequisites: Computer Science 134 or equivalent programming experience. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: texts.

MURTAGH

CSCI 013 Life as an Algorithm (Same as Biology 013)

Can computers reproduce? Can DNA compute? Can evolution give us hints on solving big problems? Is life's blueprint inefficient? This course looks at the way computers are shaped by biological thinking, and the way that experimental biology makes use of computational theories. Topics range from artificial life to identification of genes to the susceptibility of machines to viruses. Lectures investigate new and novel ways of thinking about computers and biology. Labs experiment with parameters of the evolving problems shared between the two scientific disciplines.
Evaluation will be based upon successful completion of computer laboratory assignments, written assignments and a final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings, 4 times each week for 90 minute sessions, some of which will be laboratory sessions.
Cost to student: approximately $50.

BAILEY and RAYMOND

CSCI 031 Senior Honor Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Computer Science 493-494.

CONTRACT MAJOR

CMAJ 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Contract Major 493, 494.

ECONOMICS

ECON 010 East Asia: Miracle and Crisis

This course is intended to help CDE fellows integrate the material they studied in the first semester by applying it to the circumstances of a particular group of countries. During the 2004 Winter Term session the course will focus on case studies of what are widely perceived to be successful development experiences-those of the East and Southeast Asian "miracle" economies. Among the issues to be considered are the desirability of the economic transformations that took place in these countries, the conditions that may have made such transformations possible, the roles that specific policies may have played in bringing them about, the causes of the recent economic crisis in the region and its implications for future growth in the affected countries, as well as the lessons that the East and Southeast Asian experience may hold for other developing countries.
Evaluation will be based on three 5-7 page papers plus an oral presentation.
Prerequisites: Economics 252 or its equivalent. Undergraduates are welcome to take this course, but they should first seek the permission of the instructor, since the number of undergraduate slots available will depend on the size of the CDE enrollment.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 days per week.
Cost to student: $60 for materials.

MONTIEL

ECON 011 Public Speaking

In a world in which most of us are asked at one time or another to say something to a group, public speaking is a skill which everyone should learn. This course will help you become an organized and persuasive public speaker. You will create your own public speaking style that is comfortable, confident, and conversational. We will focus on organizational techniques, handling visual aids effectively, eye contact and body language. A supportive atmosphere will give each person an opportunity to receive feedback.
Requirements: 4-5 oral presentations to the class, most of which will be videotaped and critiqued. Evaluation will be based on in-class presentations, class participation, and a 10-page written critique of the student's own videotaped presentations.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference given to juniors and seniors.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: none.

BRAINERD

ECON 012 Women and Development (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 017)

The processes of economic development in developing countries have had a different impact on women than on men. This is because of their differing social and economic roles - and perceptions thereof - and their substantial exclusion from resources and decision-making. This course will offer a
brief introduction to some economic and related human development tools that are useful in understanding these processes, and also critique their shortcomings. We will look at the position of the woman in intra-household bargaining, and examine its relation to issues such as women's access to credit, women's `voice' and the informal sector, skewed sex ratios and women vis-a-vis the current global HIV/AIDS pandemic. We will read accounts by feminist economists of the significance of the unpaid `care' economy, and other `invisible' female contributions to development. Literature by Third World writers, documentaries and feature films will also be used to expand our sense of the texture of people's lives in `income-poor' countries. Students are expected to participate in class discussions of the readings, feature films and documentaries. The final assignment for the course will be a ten-page essay on a women and development issue of the student's choice.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, brief reaction e-mails and the final essay. Format: lectures and discussion.
Enrollment limit: 14. If course is overenrolled, preference will be given to students who have taken Economics 204.
Cost to students: up to $50 for purchase of reading materials.
Meeting time:1-4 p.m., Wednesday and Thursday.

BRENDA MCSWEENEY and MANI (Instructors)
MANI (Sponsor)

Dr. Brenda McSweeney is the United Nations Resident Coordinator and United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Resident Representative-India. She leads the development cooperation with India, which is UNDP's largest single partnership in the world.

ECON 014 Accounting

This course will examine the theoretical and practical aspects of financial accounting. Although the beginning of the course will explore the mechanics of the information gathering and dissemination process, the course will be oriented mainly towards users, rather than preparers, of accounting information. The project will include discussion of the principles involved in accounting for current assets, plant assets, leases, intangible assets, current and long-term debt, stockholders' equity, the income statement and the statement of cash flows. Students will be expected to interpret and analyze actual financial statements. The nature of, and career opportunities in, the field of accounting will also be discussed.
This course will present a substantial body of material and will require a considerable commitment of time by the student.
Requirements: regular attendance and participation in discussion, and homework cases and problems. Evaluation will be based on several quizzes.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: none.

LEO McMENIMEN (Instructor)
ZIMMERMAN (Sponsor)

Leo McMenimen is returning to Williams this January from the School of Business, Montclair State University.

ECON 016 How to Buy a Car

The premise of this course is that car buyers get more for their money if they are aware of the economic principles involved at the time of purchase. At our first meeting, students will participate in an auto purchase bargaining game; students will be paired off, one playing the role of the "dealer" and the other the role of the "purchaser." In subsequent meetings we will discuss various issues including: the decision to buy a new or used car, foreign or domestic car; supply side determinants of car prices such as optimal pricing strategies of manufacturers and dealers, unit costs, options' pricing, rebates, special interest rates, product quality, product safety, advertising, and the roles of government, insurance companies and banks; demand side determinants of car prices such as preferences, demographics, exchange rate fluctuations, seasonal buying cycles, and business cycles; leasing. At the sixth meeting, students will participate in a second auto purchase simulation. Although the practical side of car purchasing is the focus, microeconomics is viewed through the lens of the car buying process.
Requirements: required readings, participation in both simulations, two 2-page synopses of the simulations, and a 5-page paper at the end of the program discussing the reasons why the material we covered helped (or hurt) them in negotiating their second car purchase.
Prerequisites: Economics 110. Enrollment limit: 20 Preference given to students who have had Economics 251.
Meeting time: mornings, 2 two-hour sessions per week, while expecting to meet as a group for four hours a week to work on their strategic plan. There will be extensive use of Internet car-buying web sites.
Cost to the student: $100 for the purchase of books.

HUSBANDS FEALING

ECON 017 Business Economics

In this course, the class will carry out a real-time forecast of the U.S. economy and explore its implications for the bond and stock markets. The course will build upon principles of both macro and micro-economics. It will provide an introduction to the work done by business economists and the techniques they use. An economic database, chart-generating software and a statistical analysis program will be available to each student on the Jessup computers and, if necessary, on a disk for IBM-compatible computers.
The first week will focus on becoming familiar with the database, looking for relationships between key economic variables, and studying movements in interest rates over the period 1960-2002. Early in the first week, the class will be divided into teams of 2 students with each team choosing a particular aspect of the economy to forecast.
During the second and third weeks, the class will work with various leading indicators of economic activity and will prepare forecasts of the key components of gross domestic product and other key variables. We will also have several invited guests from the Wall Street investment world speaking on various aspects of the stock market at regular and optional class sessions. The fourth week will feature a formal presentation of the economic forecast with invited guests from the Williams College faculty.
To put the forecasting exercise in context, there will be class discussions of business cycles, credit cycles, long waves in inflation and interest rates and the impact of the Internet on the economy and the stock market.
Because essential concepts and tools are covered during the first week, all students are expected to attend the first class.
Requirements: homework, participation in short presentations of their analyses, a formal presentation during the last week, and a 3-page paper summerizing the result of the forecast project.
No prerequisites, but Economics 110 or another semester course in Economics is strongly recommended. Enrollment limit: 22.
Meeting time: mornings; 3-4 session per week. There will be two afternoons of workshops lasting approximately 30 minutes with hands-on instruction for each team.
Cost to student: approximately $25 for text and other materials.

THOMAS SYNNOTT `58 (Instructor)
ZIMMERMAN (Sponsor)

Thomas Synnott `58 is Chief Economist, Emeritus, U.S. Trust Company of New York

ECON 018 For Richer or Poorer: A Multimedia View of Historical Economic Performance

The world today is awash in inequality. In rich countries, the majority of people take expensive vacations and purchase larger and larger televisions and automobiles. On the other hand, in poor countries people struggle for access to safe drinking water, basic health care, and enough calories. Why is it that some countries are rich and others so poor? Economists and other scholars have attempted to answer this question from a number of different perspectives. In this class, we will examine this question from a somewhat unique perspective. We will read and critique Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs, and Steel and David Landes' The Wealth and Poverty of Nations, which offer different perspectives on the historical development of economies. We will supplement the readings by playing and analyzing Civilization II and/or Age of Empires II. The objective of these games is to build the most successful society among a group of players. We will specifically attempt to learn about the algorithms the games use to determine successful societies. The we will compare and contrast those strategies with the ideas of Diamond and Landes.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper and class participation. Game play will also be required outside of class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 14. Preference given by random number generator.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: $75 for books and software.

DE BRAUW

ECON 019 Finding the Right Neighborhood

What do looking for an apartment, advising a client on the best location for a new retail store, or trying to understand the impacts of rent control and fair housing laws have in common? They all involve trying to describe and understand the nature of neighborhoods. How is finding the `right' neighborhood possible without the detailed knowledge that comes from having lived in the area? This course will introduce you to information sources that are available for describing, mapping, and understanding characteristics of neighborhoods and for defining and identifying local markets. At the end of the course you will be able to produce maps and descriptions that will enable you or others to find the `right' neighborhood.
Each student will be required to prepare a written report, at least 10 pages in length, describing the city they have chosen to examine and presenting the information they have collected. Each student will be required to make an oral presentation of their analysis. The presentation and written material will serve as the basis for evaluation. Evaluation will be based on the above presentation and written materials.
Prerequisites: familiarity with the use of Microsoft Excel and prior use of a computer. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference given to students who have taken Economics 110.
Meeting time: mornings, 3 days per week, with computer lab facilities available at other times.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for reading packets and computer media.

S. SHEPPARD

ECON 020 Globalization and Developing Countries

The turbulence surrounding the World Trade Organization meetings in Seattle in 1999 illustrated both the far-reaching effects of greater integration among nations as well as the depth of misinformation about an array of issues termed "globalization". This course will explore a number of issues in the globalization debate, with a particular focus on developing countries. In order to accurately understand the opportunities and challenges facing developing nations, we will also explore the domestic social and economic conditions in these countries. We will make use of lectures, videos, readings, discussions, and student presentations.
Evaluation will be based on in-class presentations and/or a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to students who have taken some introductory economics.
Meeting time: afternoons; 2 three-hour sessions per week.
Cost to student: approximately $60 for books and readings.

KHAN

ECON 022 Finance and Development

This course will provide a banker's approach to international financial dealings related to developing countries. The first half of the course will introduce core concepts and require the demonstration of particular skills. Subjects for these classes will include: the roles of financial intermediaries in developed and developing countries, sources of financial information, payment and settlement systems, making lending decisions, managing a financial institution's balance sheet, the role of capital markets, and the workings of specific markets (foreign exchange, credit, and equity). In the second half of the course, the emphasis will shift to current topics in international finance including: sovereign debt restructuring, issuing new sovereign debt, sovereign ratings, project finance, trade finance, and financial risk management. It is hoped that the course will have guest speakers from different fields of expertise. The course will be open to CDE students and to undergraduates with permission of the instructor.
Evaluation to be on the basis of class participation, problem sets and papers.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: 3 three-hour session per week, with possible re-arrangement to accommodate guest speakers.
Cost to student: approximately $20 for reading packets-additional textbooks optional.

TOM POWERS `81 (Instructor)
ZIMMERMAN (Sponsor)

Thomas Powers `81 is the Director of the Center for Development Economics at Williams.

ECON 025 Oriental Rugs: Art and Commerce (Same as ArtH 025)

People, primarily women, have been weaving rugs for thousands of years, and rugs have played a central role in the culture and commerce of many societies. This course will explore the world of oriental rugs, with an emphasis on the aesthetics and economics of these extraordinary weavings. The course will be divided between classes in Williamstown for the first part of Winter Study and a trip to Turkey, one of the great rug weaving centers of the world, for the second part. We will discuss the origins and ethnography of oriental rug weaving and designs, the methods by which rugs are made, and the tactile and visual characteristics that separate "a rag from a rug," and a great rug from a good rug. We'll discuss as well the economics of the "rug trade," a world in which "caveat emptor" rules with a vengeance. We'll examine what factors determine the cost of making new rugs; what determines the value of "collectable rugs;" the role of "bargaining" in the market for rugs; and the role of auction "bidding pools" and the methods that rug dealers use to divide the gains when they collude at auctions.
After a series of classes in Williamstown and the examination of rugs and textiles from several Massachusetts collections, the class will proceed to Turkey for about two weeks in Istanbul, Konya (Central Anatolia), and the vicinity of Bergama (Western Anatolia). Dr. Nicholas Wright, a rug collector and authority on rugs, will lead the trip. In Istanbul, we will see classical rugs in two museums and see the market up close in the Grand Bazaar in Sultanahmet. Traveling to Konya, we will visit museums and see production of kilims (flatwoven rugs) and felt rugs. We will visit at least one repair workshop in Istanbul/ and possibly also Sultanhami (near Aksaray, in Central Anatolia east of Konya) and then discuss conservation issues. There may also be an opportunity for dye analysis in the lab of Dr. Harald Bohmer of Marmara University in Istanbul, who is world-renowned for reviving the art of weaving with natural dyes in Turkey in the early 1980s. (If political or other conditions preclude a trip to Turkey, this course will run as a regular length Winter Study in Williamstown.)
Evaluation will be based on classroom discussion, one 3-page paper discussing an individual rug (or group of rugs) from an aesthetic perspective, and one 7-page paper on any topic that addresses either the aesthetics or economics of rugs. The papers will be due prior to the trip to Turkey.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Placement is through interview prior to registration for the course.
Meeting time: several mornings and some afternoons for extensive meetings each week for first part of Winter Study; travel to Turkey for the second part of Winter Study.
Cost to student: approximately $100 per student for books and local travel, and about $1950 for travel to, and within, Turkey.

NICHOLAS WRIGHT `57 (Instructor)
BRADBURD (Sponsor)

Nicholas H. Wright'57 has been a dealer and collector of oriental rugs since 1968.

ECON 027 The Green Revolution (Same as Biology 020 and Environmental Studies 027)

Beginning in the 1950s, agriculture in developing countries underwent a dramatic transformation, as modern scientific techniques of plant breeding were applied to tropical and semi-tropical crops and agroecosystems. This Green Revolution led to massive increases in the production of staple foods within some developing countries. Growth of food production in turn allowed for increases in average consumption, even in the face of historically unprecedented increases in human population. But the expansion of food production was not without costs - environmental, social, and economic. And in the end, the Green Revolution did not "solve" problems of hunger or rural poverty.This course will look in depth at the Green Revolution. We will consider the underlying science, the institutions involved, and the economic, social, and environmental impacts. We will also talk about implications for the impending "Gene Revolution" and its management. Most class meetings will consist of lectures and discussion. We will also view a number of videos and perhaps explore cooking and eating some of the foods we are considering!
Evaluation will be based on a 15-paper addressing some feature of the Green Revolution, along with class attendance, participation, and overall effort. A brief presentation of the paper near the end of Winter Study will be required.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to those students with some prior interest or experience in agriculture.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: approximately $100 (books and reading packets).

GOLLIN

ECON 030 Honors Project

The "Specialization Route" to the degree with Honors in Economics requires that each candidate take an Honors Winter Study Project in January of their senior year. Students who wish to begin their honors work in January should submit a detailed proposal. Decisions on admission to the Honors WSP will be made in the fall. Information on the procedures will be mailed to senior majors in economics early in the fall semester.
Seniors who wish to apply for admission to the Honors WSP and thereby to the Honors Program should register for this WSP as their first choice.
Some seniors will have begun honors work in the fall and wish to complete it in the WSP. They will be admitted to the WSP if they have made satisfactory progress. They should register for this WSP as their first choice.

ECON 031 Honors Thesis

To be taken by students participating in year-long thesis research (ECON 493-W031-494).

ENGLISH

ENGL 010 Living by Words: Surviving and Thriving in the Art and Sport of Rhetoric (Same as Comparative Literature 010, Leadership Studies 012, and Special 012)

(See under Comparative Literature for full description.)

ENGL 011 Anxious Allegories: Horror and Sci-Fi Films

This film course will also be a casual tutorial on popular American moods, both cultural and political, and it will seek to place the films we study in the context of such trends as Fifties conformism, dread of Communism, the post-Watergate mistrust of government, suspicion of science and technology, and the entertaining of Biblical prophecies. The class will examine the possibility that what unites these loose allegories in not only their expression of once-popular fears, but also their campiness-their impulse to subvert our solemnities, whether intentionally or inadvertently. The films will include Nightmare on Elm Street, Halloween, Jaws, Village of the Damned, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, The Andromeda Strain, The Seventh Sign, The Exorcist, Forth of July, Alien, ET, Starship Trooper, and Minority Report.
Requirements: short oral presentations and one 10-page paper.
Enrollment limit: 15.

DEAN CRAWFORD (Instructor)
J. SHEPARD (Sponsor)

Dean Crawford has written The Lay of the Land, a novel, as well as articles and stories. He teaches writing and literature at Vassar College but harbors an affection for ingenious science fiction and horror movies.

ENGL 012 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography

This course explores the evolution of modern documentary photography. We will start with Robert Frank's The Americans, and how Frank's singular vision deeply shaped the next generation of photographers working the American streets and landscape. Diane Arbus, Bruce Davidson, Lee Freidlander, William Klein, Danny Lyon, Gary Winogrand are some of the photographers whose work we will get to know well . Discussions will include the new wave of independent and Magnum photojournalists (Phillip Jones Griffiths, Josef Koudleka, Susan Meiselas, Gilles Peress, James Nachtwey, Alex Webb, Ron Haviv and Tyler Hicks) and the wars from Vietnam to Bosnia to Iraq they cover as well as the personal visions they explore. Insight into the diverse currents of documentary photography will be explored through the work of Robert Adams, Bill Burke, Larry Clark, Lois Conner, Linda Connor, Larry Fink, Nan Goldin, Emmet Gowin, Sally Mann, Mary Ellen Mark, Nicholas Nixon, and Abelardo Morell. Slide presentations will occupy half of the first meetings and give way to discussion of issues in documentary photography. Students will be encouraged to work on individual projects of their own choice. Each student will be required to make a brief presentation to the class on a documentary topic of their choice. A final paper expanding on this documentary topic will be due at the end of the course. A field trip to New York will let us see first hand works from the collections at the Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American Art and the International Center of Photography and meet with curators of photography at these institutions.
Evaluation will be based on their classroom presentation, general participation and their written work.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference given to upper class students.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 two-hour sessions per week.
Cost to student: $30 (field trip and personal expenses)

KEVIN BUBRISKI (Instructor)
PYE (Sponsor)

Kevin Bubriski has received photography fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the Fulbright Foundation, the Asian Cultural Council, and the National Endowment for the Arts. His photographic prints are in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, and the International Center of Photography in New York, and the Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris.

ENGL 013 Gender and Science Fiction (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 013)

This course will focus on the development and current range of science fiction, fantasy and utopian fiction-predominantly by women-that is explicitly and centrally engaged with gender issues. We will begin with Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Herland (1915), a utopian novel about an all-female world. Likely further readings include work by Ursula LeGuin, Marge Piercy, Margaret Atwood, Joanna Russ, Sheri Tepper, Octavia Butler, Melissa Scott, Rachel Pollock, Paul Park, and others. Issues to be considered include the function and value of non-realist fiction as a locus for theorizing or speculating about male and female culture and identity, sexuality, the uses and dangers of technology, and the role of violence in human culture. Students will have opportunities to pursue particular authors or types of fiction that interest them, and the course will also offer some opportunity to meet with some contemporary writers in the field.
Requirements: reading journal or a 10-page essay, relatively heavy reading load.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to seniors and English majors.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 two-hour sessions per week.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for books.

CASE

ENGL 014 Turnpike Vernacular

No state in the nation is more important to modern American poetry than is New Jersey. Poems of Walt Whitman, William Carlos Williams, LeRoi Jones, Allen Ginsberg, and Bruce Springsteen will take us to Camden (where Whitman spent the last years of his life, "receiving many buffets and some precious caresses"), Paterson (maniacal focus of Williams's book-length poem), Newark (birthplace of Ginsberg and Jones) and Asbury Park. Films by Kevin Smith will provide comic relief, of sorts. These works variously create a state of mind rooted in a physical sense of place-but this "place" never stays still, always amounts somehow to less than the sum of its dreams. Using the resources of everyday language these poets express longing, displacement, a love of mean streets and angry rivers: Williams said, "in the very lay of the syllables Paterson as Paterson would be discovered." Following Williams we'll ask what it means for a piece of art to be "particular to its own idiom." The course will include a mandatory trip (January 13, 14, 15) to places we've read about: including Whitman's grave in Harleigh Cemetery and the site of his "shanty" at 328 Mickle Street; the Passaic River and the Falls at Paterson; and the "City Secrets" tour of Newark.
Requirements: attendance, participation in three day field trip, 10 page paper.
Prerequisites: previous experience with poetry; permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons; full days during field trip January 13-15.
Cost to student: $300 (three-day field trip).

CLEGHORN

ENGL 015 The Hours and Mrs. Dalloway

The Hours, a 1998 novel by Michael Cunningham and a 2003 film directed by Stephen Daldry (starring Meryl Streep, Nicole Kidman, and Julianne Moore), weaves together scenes of Virginia Woolf writing her ground-breaking modern novel, Mrs. Dalloway, a fifties housewife who is reading the novel, seeing herself in Mrs. Dalloway, and a woman who relives the novel in a highly contemporary way while planning a party for a friend dying of aids in 2001. After discussing the film of The Hours, we will spend a week exploring Virginia Woolf's life, reading selections from her letters, diaries, memoirs, and biographies, discussing her artistic innovation, the radical social experiments of the Bloomsbury group, Woolf's mental illness, and suicide. In the second week we will examine Mrs. Dalloway along with the 1999 film adaptation (directed by Marleen Gorris, starring Vanessa Redgrave), discussing social and artistic experimentation and convention, and the ways in which Woolf's high modernist form is adapted to the cinema. In the final week, we will return to The Hours, analyzing Cunningham's novel (along with the film) as an innovative work of art which is at once an insightful tribute to and a thoughtful interpretation of Woolf's life and work.
Requirements: attendance at all classes and scheduled screenings of films, completion of readings, taking an active and informed role in class discussions, and writing a series of short essays.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings; 3-4 two-hour sessions per week.
Cost to student: $60 for books.

I. BELL

ENGL 016 Sebald

This course will mainly involve reading the four major works (perhaps you could call them documentary novels) of the contemporary German writer, W.G. Sebald. In a curious style (it combines photographs, biographies of actual people, fictional biographies, odd topics, dreams), Sebald considers the deepest issues of twentieth-century history. A lot of critics think he may be the most important writer of the last decade. We'll read his books, including The Emigrants, Rings of Saturn, and Austerlitz, in translation.
Requirements: regular attendance and 10 pages of writing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 times a week.
Cost to student: $50 for books.

LIMON

ENGL 017 Film Direction

Much labor by many people goes into the making of a feature film, yet it is the director who, by a possibly regrettable shorthand, is normally regarded as the principal "author" of a film. In this course we will try both to understand the nature of a director's work, in relation to that of his or her colleagues (the screenwriter, actors, cinematographer, editor, and so on), and to learn how to distinguish in finished films the particular marks of the director's influence. We will examine closely two films by each of a number of distinguished directors, in order to pinpoint some of the essential devices and stylistic qualities that characterize each director's work. We will pay especially close attention to the way in which a director imagines and constructs an individual scene, analyzing in depth for this purpose a film directed by Andrew Litvack, Merci Docteur Rey. There will be screenings (normally one in advance of each class) of films by such directors as Ernst Lubitsch (Trouble in Paradise, To Be or Not To Be), Jean Renoir (Grand Illusion, The Golden Coach), Luis Buñuel (Belle du Jour, The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie), Robert Altman (Nashville, The Long Goodbye), and Pedro Almodóvar (Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, All About My Mother).
Requirements: faithful attendance and active participation in class discussion, and exercises amounting to about 10 pages of writing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited: 15.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 sessions per week.

ANDREW LITVACK `87 and TIFFT

Andrew Litvack is a 1987 graduate of Williams College. He has been involved in the film industries in France and the United States for a number of years, and is currently a filmmaker living in Paris.

ENGL 018 David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest

In 1996 David Foster Wallace published a brilliant, hilarious, intricate novel, Infinite Jest, which won critical acclaim and zealous readers. While the novel is vastly entertaining and provocative, it is also vastly long and complicated. Winter Study Period is an ideal time to read and discuss this remarkable work. This course will explore, enjoy, and analyze Infinite Jest.
Requirements: regular attendance, participation, and completion of several brief writing assignments and seminar reports.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings; 4 sessions per week.
Cost to student: nominal.

R. BELL

ENGL 019 Artificial Preservatives

A course designed to explore the "mummification" of contemporary culture: fantasies of virtuality, suspended animation, and forensic revivification that aim to deny the necessity of loss and ruin. We'll look at a variety of texts, from Toy Story II to Paul Auster's City of Glass, but much of our time will be spent considering the implicit logic of American museums. The course will combine class discussions with field trips to museums and collections in Pittsfield, the Hudson Valley, and New York City. Readings will include fiction, museum histories, and works of cultural theory. Museums to be visited may include the Berkshire Museum; Dia:Beacon; The Museum of Natural History; and the Isabella Gardner.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation, and the creation of an exhibit demonstrating understanding of the issues treated during the course. This exhibit will be displayed in a group show on the final day of Winter Study.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference given to seniors. All interested students must consult the instructor before registration.
Meeting time: afternoons; Monday & Wednesday class sessions, plus a Friday field trip January 9; an overnight field trip January 13 and 14; and a three-day trip to New York January 20-22. Students who cannot make the field trips may not take the course.
Cost to student: approximately $390 for course materials, transportation, overnight lodging, and admissions.

ROSENHEIM

ENGL 020 Henry James: The Golden Bowl

In this course we will closely analyze Henry James' The Golden Bowl, which all consider to be his last, and many his greatest, novel. This long, demanding and capacious book dramatizes many of James' most powerful preoccupations. Centered on a wealthy American collector living in England at the turn of the twentieth century, the novel examines the personal and cultural costs of an American obsession with amassing relics of a collapsing European empire, as well as the effects of wealth and refined sensibility on tangled love relations. The novel's ethical and perceptual subtlety is conveyed in an ingeniously complex style that requires close concentration.
Requirements: faithful attendance, active participation and 10 pages of writing.
Prerequisites: a 100- or 200-level English course other than English 150. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons; 3 times each week.
Cost to student: $8.

SOKOLSKY

ENGL 022 Environmental Journalism: The Payoffs and Perils (Same as Environmental Studies 013)

(See under Environmental Studies for full description.)

ENGL 023 Charles Brockden Brown, "Father of the American Novel"

A half-crazed man kills a panther with his bare hands; covered in blood and disoriented, he is shot at by settlers who mistake him for an Indian. A man able to mimic voices uses his uncanny skill to torment a brother and sister whose father has been struck dead by lightning while at prayer. Such bizarre plots and disturbed characters characterize the writing of Charles Brockden Brown, whose novels Wieland (1798), Edgar Huntly (1799), and Arthur Mervyn (1799-1800) this course examines. We will investigate Brown's technique of psychological narration, which relates the characters' experiences of terror, fury, and anticipation in breathless, suspenseful prose. We will also consider how the focus on untrustworthy individual minds, driven by emotions rather than reason, critiques the ideals of America at the end of the eighteenth-century. The era's republican philosophy held that citizens discoursed rationally about questions of rights and justice; in contrast, Brown's novels showed individuals manically voicing the power of attraction, hatred, and greed. Yet Brown also represented the attempts of reason to triumph amid entirely surreal circumstances; he is finally torn between fealty to the ideal of rational discourse (he sent his novels to Thomas Jefferson) and his deep skepticism about its relationship to psychological reality. Although he embraces the tormented reality of his characters, he presents that reality as so untrustworthy and volatile that it seems to cry out for some kind of external discipline. Brown's interest in the constant struggle between the rational and the irrational, and between the conscious and the subconscious, became a hallmark of American authors such as Poe and Melville, making the novelist a crucial figure in American literary history.
Evaluation will be based on one 8- to 10-page paper.
Prerequisites: 100-level English class other than 150.
Meeting time: afternoons; 3 times a week.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for books.

DAVIS

ENGL 024 Proust: In Search of Lost Time (Same as Comparative Literature 012 and French 012)

(See under Comparative Literature for full description.)

ENGL 025 Contemporary Film: New Voices Above and Below the Radar

A course in contemporary film with a significant travel component. The course will spend its first and final week-and-a-half's worth of class sessions in Williamstown, and its middle portion-an eight day period extending from 1/15 to 1/22 -in New York City. The first week and a half will be spent in classroom time considering recent trends and developments in contemporary filmmaking; the final week and a half will be spent in consideration of all that was absorbed in the course's middle portion. As to that middle portion: the class will divide its time in New York between the film festivals at the Brooklyn Academy of Music and Lincoln Center. The former-the BAM Cinématek at the BAM Rose Cinemas-features first-run independent films, documentaries, and sneak previews of the sort that will almost certainly never arrive in Williamstown, often including question and answer sessions with the filmmakers, actors and screen writers. The latter-run by the Film Society of Lincoln Center-is renowned for its first-run series involving independent film from neglected traditions: Mexican, Bulgarian, Tibetan. Students will stay at the Williams Club and attend class at the Club on four of the eight days, as well as attend multiple film showings: frequently twice a day. The rest of the time will be the students'.
Evaluation will be based on in-class exercises and one 10-page paper.
Prerequisites: English 204 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons; 3 times a week for two hours (Williamstown)-mornings (New York).
Cost to student: $800 -Travel to and from NY: $80; Accommodations at the Williams Club (including breakfast): $300 [1/2 of $75 x 8 ]; Per diem: $320 [$40 x 8]; Tickets for showings: $100.

J. SHEPARD

ENGL 027 My Favorite Director

This course gives students an opportunity to do research on their favorite film directors and in an oral presentation share what they have learned. The first half of the course will be devoted to developing a filmography and an annotated bibliography of 10 items (e.g., reviews, articles, books or chapters) on the director each student chooses. We will be working with a librarian to facilitate this part of the course. One reading about each director or one of his/her films will be recommended for reading by the whole class (this should be approximately 10-15 pages long). During this time, we will also screen one film by each director for the whole class to view. There will be oral presentations during the second half of the course, and students should also turn in their filmographies, bibliographies, and an outline of their oral presentation at the end of Winter Study. Students may choose to augment their oral presentations with video clips from the directors' films.
Requirements: annotated bibliography, filmography, oral presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8.
Meeting time: afternoons; 3 times a week.
Cost to student: none.

BUNDTZEN

ENGL 028 German Cinema (Same as German 010 and Philosophy 010)

(See under Philosophy for full description.)

ENGL 029 Film as Radical Political Critique (Same as Political Science 010)

(See under Political Science for full description.)

ENGL 030 Honors Project: Specialization Route

Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the specialization route.

ENGL 031 Honors Project: Thesis

Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the thesis route.

ENGL 034 Jungle Fever: The Amazon in Literature and Film (Same as Comparative Literature 014, Environmental Studies 022, and Spanish 011)

(See under Romance Languages-Spanish for full description.)

ENGL 035 Contemporary Mexican Women Film-Makers (Same as ArtS 017, Spanish 012 and Women's and Gender Studies 012)

(See under Romance Languages-Spanish for full description.)

ENGL 036 Writing from Where You Live (Same as Environmental Studies 012)

(See under Environmental Studies for full description.)

ENGL 037 Latina and Latino Migration Stories: Puerto Rico Women Write (Same as History 012 and Women's and Gender Studies 015)

(See under History for full description.)

ENGL 038 Fly Fishing in American Literature (Same as History 013)

(See under History for full description.)

ENGL 039 Objective Journalism During Times of Conflict (Same as Political Science 014)

(See under Political Science for full description.)

ENGL 040 Humor Writing (Same as Mathematics 010)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

ENVI 010 Geology of the National Parks (Same as Geosciences 010)

(See under Geosciences for full description.)

ENVI 011 Envisioning a Sustainable Future (Same as Biology 011)

(See under Biology for full description.)

ENVI 012 Writing from Where You Live (Same as English 036)

In an age of homogenized development and diminished cultural and biological diversity, a strong hunger has arisen for writing that celebrates the unique life and character of specific parts of the country. Terry Tempest Williams' Refuge (Utah), Richard Nelson's The Island Within (Alaska), and Annie Dillard's An American Childhood (Pittsburgh, PA) are just some of the many books to emerge in recent years that cultivate attentiveness to place. In this workshop, we'll read and discuss selections of place-based literature from around the world, but the primary focus will be on personal writing about places each student knows well-his or her hometown, Williamstown, etc. We'll begin with exercises designed to free one's creative writing energies and hone skills of observation and description, and build toward each student's completion of a 10- to 15-page piece of fiction, memoir, or other nonfiction set in a familiar community. The course will encourage students to consider local landscapes and species, but no special natural history knowledge is required and writing from urban and suburban settings is welcome.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference given to seniors and Environmental Studies concentrators.
Meeting time: afternoons; 2 days per week.
Cost to student: approximately $50 to cover readings.

SARA ST. ANTOINE `88 (Instructor)
H. ART (Sponsor)

Sara St. Antoine'88 is a senior writer for World Wildlife Fund and the editor of Stories from Where We Live, a series of literary anthologies devoted to North American ecoregions. She is the author of numerous works of fiction for young people.

ENVI 013 Environmental Journalism: The Payoffs and Perils (Same as English 022)

Environmental journalism is fundamentally journalism, with all that implies about reporting, research, accuracy, understanding the subjects and the audience, clarity, and style. In this course we will read and critically analyze noteworthy recent examples of this special genre. The point is to understand the techniques and elements of a successful feature article on an environmental subject. Aspects of journalism we will cover include: audiences, goals, research, sources (including the internet), bias and objectivity, interviews, plus the nuts and bolts of structuring your story, finding a fresh approach, writing a good lead, handling quotations effectively, making deft transitions, and concluding with a punch.
Issues we may cover (on local and national levels) include air and water pollution, hazardous materials transportation and disposal, extractive industries including fisheries, endangered and threatened species, land-use, global trends, disasters and other events, heros and villains, etc.
Participants will write a series of short pieces, including news reports, reviews, photo essays, and editorial commentaries. We will also develop one major feature article on a subject of your choice, from selection of subject, framing the story, research, outline proposal and "pitch" letter to the finished feature, which will be shaped to meet the needs and demands of a specific magazine or newspaper or other medium. This will be considered a "live fire" exercise.
The course will be conducted as a workshop, with comment and analyses by the instructor, by guest writers and editors, and by student participants.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and completion of all writing assignments.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference given to Environmental Studies concentrators and those expressing an interest in environmental journalism.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for books and other print materials.

MICHAEL W. ROBBINS (Instructor)
H. ART (Sponsor)

Michael Robbins is an experienced writer of books (Woodswalk, The Hiking Companion, Birds: A Family Field Guide, High Country Trail: Along the Continental Divide, and Brooklyn: A State of Mind) and editor of magazines (Audubon, Conde Nast Traveler, Museum News, Oceans Magazine, and Connections). Currently, he is a partner in the publications consulting firm of Palitz & Robbins. He resides in Brooklyn and Stephentown, NY.

ENVI 014 Orchids! (Same as Biology 014)

(See under Biology for full description.)

ENVI 015 Corporate Leadership and Social Responsibility (Same as Leadership Studies 010)

(See under Leadership Studies for full description.)

ENVI 016 The Lay of the Land-A Survey of the Business of Land Conservation

Today, there are more than 1,300 local land trusts operating throughout the country. There are numerous other regional or nationwide organizations with missions pertaining to the conservation of land or other natural resources. Miscellaneous agencies, at all levels of government, regulate, fund, own and/or manage public lands. Ballot questions increasingly include land-related measures. Issues pertaining to land in urban, suburban, rural and wilderness areas are highlighted in the news on a daily basis. Land and resource-related policy debates are, as much as any other issue, a defining moment in the differentiation between candidates, and parties. What is this all about? Why should I care? This course will be an energetic hike across the field of land conservation today. Topics will include: Who are the players? What are they doing and where are they doing it? How does land conservation happen (what are the tools, the business-side of the deals)? And, importantly, why does land conservation happen? As a core component of the course, student groups will identify, research, and present oral arguments on a potential local conservation project. Class content will include extended group discussions based on readings, handouts and presentations. It is anticipated that one or more outside speakers will be arranged to discuss specific topics (community organizing, public finance, stewardship, development trends, etc.).
Evaluation will be based on class participation, and an oral presentation. Some reading material will be assigned prior to the first class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings; Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 10 a.m.-noon. Weekly outings to local conservation project.
Cost to student: none.

JERRY TONE `77 (Instructor)
H. ART (Sponsor)

Jerry Tone graduated from Williams in 1977 with a degree in American Civilization, and a concentration in Environmental Studies. He holds an MBA degree from University of California-Berkeley. He has worked for non-profit organizations in the areas of environmental internships and the development of affordable housing, has been a commercial banker, and is currently a real estate investor and developer. For over 10 years he has served on the National Board of the Trust for Public Land, and in that capacity has served as Board Chair, and Chair of the Investment Policy Committee. He currently serves as the Chairman of the Executive Committee.

ENVI 017 The New England Forest (Same as Biology 017)

This field-oriented course explores (first hand and through readings and discussions) the ecology, natural history, utilization and conservation of New England's most abundant natural resource: the forest. A comparative approach to forest communities will be taken: we will visit different forests across the New England landscape delving into some of the reasons why they may vary. Specific topics will include community dynamics, tree and shrub identification, adaptation, wildlife, threats to the forest, forest management and conservation issues. There will be three to four meetings per week, at least two of which will be in the field (some field trips will require students to be engaged in the class beyond normal WSP class hours). The course will culminate in a two to three day trip to investigate a more distant forest region. Accordingly, students should be prepared to spend many hours in the outdoors coping with the elements.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper, technical report or comparable creative work on a topic relevant to the course.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10-this course is appropriate for any student who possesses a healthy interest in natural history and the outdoors.
Meeting time: TBA with some all-day field trips.
Cost to student: approximately $170 (covers field trips, equipment, readings, etc.).

DREW JONES (Instructor)
H. ART (Sponsor)

Drew Jones, Manager of the Hopkins Memorial Forest, has a Master of Forestry degree from Duke University. He has worked as a wildlife biologist and naturalist from the Southern Appalachians to the North Woods.

ENVI 018 Picturing Our Past (Same as Special 018, Biology 019, and INTR 019)

(See under Special for full description.)

ENVI 019 Landscape Photography (Same as Geoscience 012)

(See under Geosciences for full description.)

ENVI 020 Introduction to Research in Environmental Science (Same as Chemistry 019)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

ENVI 022 Jungle Fever: The Amazon in Literature and Film (Same as Comparative Literature 014, English 034, Spanish 011)

(See under Romance Languages-Spanish for full description.)

ENVI 025 Mapping a Caribbean Fringing Reef Complex (Same as Geosciences 025)

(See under Geosciences for full description.)

ENVI 027 The Green Revolution (Same as Biology 020 and Economics 027)

(See under Economics for full description.)

ENVI 028 Mapmaking and Ambiguity (Same as Geosciences 014)

(See under Geosciences for full description.)

ENVI 031 Senior Research and Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Environmental Studies 493-494.

GEOSCIENCES

GEOS 010 Geology of the National Parks (Same as Environmental Studies 010)

A vicarious trip through selected national parks of the U.S. and Canada with emphasis on the geological basis for their unique scenery. Areas to be studied will be chosen in order to illustrate a wide variety of geologic processes and products. Readings will include a paperback text as well as short publications of the U.S. Geological Survey and of various natural history associations. The second part of the month will involve independent study of topics chosen by the students in preparation for half-hour oral presentations during the last week. The oral reports will be comprehensive, well illustrated explanations of the geology of a particular national park or monument of the student's choice, using maps, slides, and reference materials available within the department and on the internet. A detailed outline and an accompanying bibliography will be submitted at the time of the oral presentation.
Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation and on the quality of the final report.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Open only to students with no previous college-level study of geology. Preference given to first-year students.
Meeting time: mornings; during the first two weeks for lectures and discussions supplemented with lab work devoted to the interpretation of topographic and geologic maps and to the study of rock samples.
Cost to student: approximately $60 for text.

WOBUS

GEOS 012 Landscape Photography (Same as Environmental Studies 019)

This class will broaden students' appreciation for the appearance and history of the landscape and teach the skills of making a successful photograph. Williamstown, situated in a valley between the Green and Taconic Mountains and bisected by the Green and Hoosic Rivers, is a place of great natural beauty. The local landscape is a subject that inspires both professional and amateur photographers alike. While Williamstown will be the subject of most of our work, we will use it to learn principles of universal application. Students will discover the importance of light in making a photograph. They will also learn camera skills and the mechanics of photography to make slides, which will be reviewed at biweekly class meetings. In addition to photographing and critiquing slides, the class will visit collections at the Clark Art Institute and WCMA to see original work and examine and discuss books on reserve at Sawyer Library. An overview of the history of landscape photography will be provided with an emphasis on American workers such as Carlton Watkins, William Henry Jackson, Edward Weston, Ansel Adams, and Alvin Langdon Cobern. We will also demonstrate examples of different cameras such as medium format, view cameras, and panorama cameras. Students will produce a body of successful photographs/slides that will be projected at the Winter Study presentation day.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, the student's photography, and their presentation.
Prerequisites: students will need a 35mm camera. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to first-year students and sophomores.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 days a week for the first two weeks and 2 days a week after that; short field trips will supplement the morning meetings.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for film and materials.

NICHOLAS WHITMAN (Instructor)
DETHIER (Sponsor)

Nicholas Whitman is a professional photographer and the former Curator of Photography at the New Bedford Whaling Museum. A 1977 graduate of the Rochester Institute of Technology, he has honed his craft to make landscape photographs of power and depth. See more at www.nwphoto.com.

GEOS 014 Mapmaking and Ambiguity (Same as Environmental Studies 028)

Including maps for the visual presentation of data is often an effective means of getting your point across, but are the data accurately represented?Students will learn the basics of mapping software, how to find and import data sets, the elements of generating professional looking maps and printing techniques. We will also study how maps are used to encourage people to draw incorrect conclusions about data. Specific topics will include: color use and perception; data classification; aggregation of data; making the point.
Evaluation will be based on class attendance, a 5-page paper including student generated maps, and a class presentation supported by visual displays including maps.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference given to students that have not taken ENVI/GEOS 214.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 two-hours sessions per week with additional lab time.
Cost to student: $35.

SHARRON MACKLIN (Instructor)
DETHIER (Sponsor)

Sharron Macklin is an Instructional Technology Specialist in the Office for Information Technology at Williams College.

GEOS 025 Mapping a Caribbean Fringing Reef Complex (Same as Environmental Sudies 025)

Participants will spend two weeks camping and conducting field work on St. John in the US Virgin Islands. In 1998 a group of Williams students mapped the Mary Creek Reef Complex and documented that large-scale sedimentologic and ecologic transformation had occurred since a previous mapping in 1968, but we were not able to explain why these changes had occurred. We will return in 2004 to remap the reef. Looking at any modifications that have occurred in this six-year period will allow us to better understand this reef complex and to put constraints on models for its recent evolution.
Evaluation will be based on participation in field mapping and on field notebooks.
Prerequisites: Geoscience 253T in fall of 2003. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: approximately $1000, but will depend on airfare and food expenses. There will be no required textbook, and accommodation costs will be subsidized by the Geosciences Department.

COX

GEOS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Geology 493-494.

GERMAN

GERM S.P. Sustaining Program for German 101-102

Something new and different for students enrolled in German 101-102. Practice in the use of German for everyday purposes; creation and performance of short dramatic sketches through group collaboration; games; songs; storytelling; reading. No homework.
Requirements: active participation and regular attendance earn a "Pass" grade.
Prerequisites: German 101 or equivalent. Limited to German 101-102 students.
Meeting time: mornings, 3 times a week 9-9:50 a.m.
Cost to student: approximately $5 for photocopied materials.

LANGUAGE FELLOW

B. KIEFFER

GERM 010 German Cinema (Same as English 028 and Philosophy 010)

(See under Philosophy for full description)

GERM 011 The Future of "Old Europe"

From the banal to the world-historical, from rancor over bananas to splits on Iraq, the signs are mounting that the leading powers of continental Europe are not only chafing at their traditional place in the American hegemony but itching to go their own way. Where will it lead? Focusing on Germany and France, we'll consider four major topics: overt anti-Americanism, the possibility and feasibility of a "United States of Europe," social democracy as a European alternative, and the increasingly divergent stances of Europe and the U.S. in relation to the rest of the world. After undertaking a fast study of Europe's shapes, systems, and vital statistics, we'll explore and discuss current issues and viewpoints as reflected in the major American and European media. All texts in English, but students with competence in German and/or French will have the opportunity to work with materials in those languages.
Requirements: active participation in discussions, two presentations to be reworked into two short papers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 sessions per week.
Cost to student: $50 to $75 for books.

B. KIEFFER

GERM 025 German in Germany

Begin or continue study of the German language at the Goethe Institute in Germany. The Goethe Institute program attracts students from all over the world. A typical course meets for four weeks, 18 hours/week, generally providing the equivalent of one semester course at Williams. To earn a pass, the student must receive the Goethe Institute's Teilnahme-Bestätigung which denotes regular attendance at classes, completion of homework, and successful completion of a final test. Students wishing to apply must fill out an application, obtainable in the office of the Center for Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Cultures in Weston,or online at www.goethe.de, and return it to the Goethe Institute as soon as possible (admission is on a first-come, first-served basis).
No prerequisites, but any student interested in beginning German with this course and then entering German 102 at Williams should contact Professor Kieffer by December 1, at the latest. Enrollment limit: 15. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: $1300 to $1800 for tuition and room and board, plus round trip travel costs. The Goethe Institute arranges for room and board at various levels upon students' request, but students must make their own travel arrangements. This course is not defined as a "trip" for financial aid purposes. The maximum reimbursement to financial aid students is $300.

B. KIEFFER

GERM 030 Honors Project

To be taken by honors candidates following other than the normal thesis route.

GERM 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for German 493-494.

HISTORY

HIST 010 "The Fatherland in Cleats:" Soccer and Identity in the Americas (Same as American Studies 010)

This course will examine the cultural meaning of futebol in inter-American contexts. Across the Americas people have used this often low-scoring sport to define themselves, their nations, and even their civilizations. Looking on both the darker tendencies (especially violence) and the aesthetically pleasing products (such as Brazilian "football-art" or "the beautiful game" of soccer, we will discuss the boundaries involved in such definitions-between Latin American countries, the United States, and other regions of the world; between men and women; between macho and non-macho men; between radical and ethnic groups. Among the questions we will address are: What does soccer represent for players and spectators in Boston and Buenos Aires? How and why do nations develop distinct styles of play? Will the rise of women's teams challenge soccer machoism? Students will also explore the themes of the course in a project on a specific team, game, athlete, or league.
Requirements: regular attendance and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 sessions per week.
Cost to student: $50 for books and photocopies.

KITTLESON

HIST 011 Racism and the Colonial Legacy in Modern Europe

Europe is in a tumultuous period of growth and change, not least because of the strong and increasing presence of non-European immigrants within its borders. Where do these immigrants come from? When and why did they arrive in Europe? How have they been greeted in France, England, and Germany? In this course, we will explore how Europeans today are grappling with these immigrants. Film, newspapers, music, literature, and historical works will give us insight into such diverse topics as Afro-Caribbean culture in England, the European debate on multiculturalism, radical Islamic fundamentalism, Rai music, and the affaire des foulards (headscarves) in France and Germany.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page research paper/presentation on a topic chosen by the student.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings; 2-3 sessions per week.
Cost to student: $30 for books and photocopies.

SINGHAM

HIST 012 Latina and Latino Migration Stories: Puerto Rico Women Write (Same as English 037 and Women's and Gender Studies 015)

Migration is often understood in the aggregate, as the mass movement of people. Yet migration is also an intensely personal experience. This course will explore how Latinas and Latinos have told their migration stories. After a brief historical overview of a particular group's migration history, we will read fictional and autobiographical accounts to address what life was like in the home country, the experience of the journey, and the challenges of adjusting to life in the United States.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page essay.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: afternoons; 2 sessions per week.
Cost to student: $30 for books and photocopies.

WHALEN

HIST 013 Fly Fishing in American Literature (Same as English 028)

It is a long and noble tradition to catch fish (especially trout) on a fly. There has also developed a rich body of American literature that uses fly fishing as a central theme. This course will examine how American culture has been reflected in some of the classics of the genre such as A River Runs Through It and The Big Two-Hearted River as well as more recent writings by men and women who enjoy casting bits of feathers and fur in search of trout.
Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation and two 5-page papers or one 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings; 2 sessions per week.
Cost to student: $30 for books and photocopies.

WONG

HIST 015 How to Survive "Regime Change" and "Pre-Emptive Attacks" in Latin America, and be a Journalist at the Same Time

Drawing on the instructor's own first-hand experience as a correspondent in South America, the course will focus on the current war in Iraq and how it compares with what has happened in Latin America in the past, as well as on issues that arise from being a journalist abroad.
The course will start with a discussion of the US doctrines of "pre-emptive attack" and "regime change" and ask: Are these policies as novel as US officials suggest? After all, in the old days of the Spanish American War (1898), Theodore Roosevelt was credited with being the first to proclaim-in the context of Latin America-that the U.S. (to paraphrase him) has a right to do what they like in, or with, Latin American countries, so long as it could plead special U.S. interests or a vague duty to police the Western Hemisphere on behalf of a civilized world. So are the differences between what happened in Iraq in 2003 and what occurred in Latin American countries over the last century-e.g.,: in Mexico (1908), the Dominican Republic (1916 & 1965), Chile (1973), Grenada (1983), Panama (1989), and El Salvador and Nicaragua (for most of the 1980's)-differences of degree or technology or differences of principle? And have the principles themselves stayed vague and elusive?
Suggesting some parallels, key figures associated with George W. Bush's current Middle East policies also played a major role in President Ronald Reagan's Latin American agenda. To name a few: John Negroponte, now ambassador to the United Nations, was in the 1980s ambassador to Honduras during the time the Contras were being trained and receiving aid in defiance of US laws banning it. Richard Perle, a prominent ideologue in the Bush administration on the war in Iraq and until recently chairman of the Defense Policy Board, in the 1980s in the Pentagon promoted President Reagan's proxy wars in Nicaragua and El Salvador. Otto Reich, now advisor on Latin America in Condoleeza Rice's office, was then head of a covert Contra-propaganda program that operated out of the State Department. Elliott Abrams, now senior director for Near East and North African Affairs at the National Security Council, was during the Reagan administration assistant secretary of the state for Western Hemisphere Affairs; John Poindexter, now Director of the Information Awareness Office at the Pentagon's research agency, was in the 1980s national security advisor...and so on.
Delving into this subject of US relations with Latin America in the past, and how they compare with US foreign policy goals today, the course will highlight some fundamental issues facing a journalist in foreign assignments and/or in war-like and/or repressive situations. For example, how important is it for a journalist to ask difficult questions-the ones officials don't like-and to know about history? How can a journalist get beyond propaganda? Can you distinguish between good and bad journalism? What sources can you trust and/or even find in a repressive situation? How can a journalist cope with censorship? Are ethics important for a journalist?
Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation in classes, as well as a 10-page required essay on a Latin American country of the student's choice that endorses or refutes how a regime change or a change of government was brought about by US military and/or US business pressure. Final classes may be spent giving examples of how such written work may be edited for publication.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings; Tuesdays and Wednesdays.
Cost to student: $40-$50 for books and newspapers. The course will include other media-films-and a comparison of they way newspapers in different countries (or in the same country) cover the same topic.

JANE MONAHAN (Instructor)
KUNZEL (Sponsor)

A journalist with over twenty-five year's experience as a correspondent in Europe, Latin America, and the U.S., reporting on economic and business issues for The Financial Times, the Economist, Business, and The Banker, Jane Monahan currently is based in Washington, D.C., where she writes for The Financial Times and The Banker.

HIST 016 A Failure of Trust: American Indians Seek an Accounting from the U.S. Government (Same as American Studies 016)

This Winter Study course examines the complex legal and political issues regarding the Federal Government's management as a trustee of extensive land holdings on behalf of tribes and individual Indians. After examining the legislation that created the Government's trusteeship long ago for the Indian beneficiaries, we will study why this trusteeship has been so contentious, why individual Indians have sued the Government, and why several high officials in both the Clinton and Bush II administrations have been held in contempt by the U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C. The course will also study related problems, such as weak schools for the Indian population, devastating unemployment, and issues of self-governance.
After reviewing the basic historical documents and issues, students will be asked to determine solutions that benefit all of the parties: Indian country, the Court, the Congress and the Administration.
Requirements: two 5-page papers, a short oral presentation, and active class participation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings; 2-3 sessions per week.
Cost to student: $50.

TOM SLONAKER `57 (Instructor)
KUNZEL (Sponsor)

A 1957 graduate of Williams College, Tom Slonaker later received an MBA from Harvard Business School. After retiring from the private sector, in 2000 he was appointed Special Trustee for American Indians, a position he held until 2002.

HIST 017 History in Pieces

Burgoyne Surrounded, Mexican Cross, Log Cabin, Texas Star, Mariner's Compass, Storm at Sea, Drunkard's Path, Underground Railway are just a few of the many quilt patterns designed by our American ancestors, representing events, political or social, in this country in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.
In this course, students will study American history through quilts. At the same time, they will learn traditional and contemporary methods of quilt making. Each student will select a traditional American quilt pattern and reproduce that pattern into a 45" x 60" quilt. In addition, each student will design either an original pattern representing an event in late-twentieth- early-twenty-first-century history or keep a January journal of life as a twenty-first-century quilter. The completed quilts will be the basis of a quilt show to be scheduled during the second semester.
Evaluation will be based on regular participation in class and completion of the quilt and original design or journal. Students should understand that these are time-consuming projects and they must be prepared to put in considerable time beyond actual class hours.
No prerequisites, but sewing experience is useful. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings; Monday, Tuesday, Thursday.
Cost to student: $120 for quilting supplies and reading materials. Students need to supply their own portable sewing machines.

SYBIL SHERMAN (Instructor)
KUNZEL (Sponsor)

Sybil Sherman has 29 years of experience as a quilter. She taught Fabric Palette, Quilt Canvas for the Williams College Art Department in January 2000 and 2001 and History in Pieces in January 2002 and 2003 for the History Department.

HIST 018 Genre-Bending: Literature and Politics in the Modern Middle East

Political and historical issues have often been embedded within questions of literature in the modern Middle East. At times, the very use of certain genres-including the novel and autobiography-has been critiqued as a preference for the imported over the authentic. Yet writers in the Middle East have used even "indigenous" forms to advance larger political critiques. As both a site of contestation and a means of communication, literature has played a prominent role in twentieth century Middle Eastern political life.
In this course we will examine a selection of twentieth century prose and poetic literary works with an eye to elucidating their relationship to larger historical events. These works will be supplemented by historical and theoretical readings intended to provoke critical assessment of the role of literature in particular Middle Eastern contexts.
Works to be considered include: Cities of Salt, Return to Childhood, The Story of Zahra, Arabesques, An Apartment Called Freedom, poems by Nizar Qabbani, and selected short storied by Ghassan Kanafani.
Evaluation will be based on regular response papers and a final paper. Students should anticipate additional activities, including possible film screenings.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings; Mondays and Thursdays.
Cost to student: $25 for a reading packet and two books.

ANDREA STANTON `98 (Instructor)
KUNZEL (Sponsor)

Andrea Stanton `98 is a doctoral student in Middle Eastern History at Columbia University and a teaching fellow at Columbia College.

HIST 019 Why New Englanders Eat What They Eat (Same as Philosophy 011 and American Studies 012)

(See under Philosophy for full description.)

HIST 023 The Art and History of Knitting (Same as ArtS 023 and Mathematics 016)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

HIST 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for History 493-494.

MUTONGI

HISTORY OF SCIENCE

HSCI 010 "Taking the Waters" Then and Now: A History of Spa Culture (Same as ArtH 010)

Have you ever wondered why you desire a brand of sparkling water the likes of Perrier or Poland Springs? Or why you enjoy soaking in a hot tub or whirlpool after a workout on sweat-inducing machinery? Or why you feel energized after a long, vigorous walk? Or why families and individuals alike seek healthful destinations for their vacations? The answers may be found in this course, an interdisciplinary study that traces the historical development of the spa-from its origins in antiquity, through its efflorescence around 1900, to our present time-as an architectural ensemble within its unique therapeutic context.
For millennia, the healthful elements of nature-good waters, pure airs, and serene settings-have been recognized by practitioners of medicine and by architects for cultivating "mens sana in corpore sano" (a sound mind in a sound body). These aspects of nature have served as the foundation of sites both sacred and secular. The spa emanates from a special relationship humans have cultivated with these elements, particularly with water. We will explore how this relationship, shaped over time by cultural values, has evolved from medical and spiritual pilgrimage to health tourism and fitness worship, and how water, serving as a curative means and design element, has in turn shaped the built environment to accommodate better health of mind and body.
Specifically, we will see how the therapeutic value of mineral waters and high altitudes has been analyzed, prescribed, and commercialized by medical experts for the good of their patients. We will examine the evolving relationship between doctor and patient, in particular regarding women's health and the current surge in alternative therapies. We will glimpse some of the bath complexes, spa towns and sanatoria where patients have endured a rigorous schedule of water treatments, exercise, and diet. Our "travels" include stops at, among other places, the Asklepion sanctuary at Kos, Lourdes, Bath, Pyrmont, Karlsbad, Marienbad, Davos, Saranac Lake, Battlecreek, as well as an actual site visit to Saratoga Springs, NY, where we will indulge in a bath and massage at the historic Lincoln Baths. A spa, however conceived, represents a place where a short-term stay, whether a month, a weekend, or an hour or two, is meant to induce long-term effects.
Using the collections at Williams and Yale University, we will examine these places through the material culture (period medical treatises and journals, guidebooks, maps, promotional brochures, prints, photographs, picture postcards, architectural plans) that have steered health-seekers toward these salubrious destinations as well as shaped their curative experiences. To augment the visual materials, the readings will tap literary selections, including the following: Hippocrates, Vitruvius, Illich, Vigarello, Schnitzler, Mann, Appelfeld, and Sontag.
Evaluation will be based on active class participation, 2 brief essays-one, a literary response, the other, a site analysis-and a final creative project (for example, design a curative treatment or a health facility, compare cross-cultural roles of bathing) presented in class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to students with a reading knowledge of French or German as well as those planning a career in medicine or architecture.
Meeting time: mornings; 2 two-hour sessions per week. Full day and half day field trips may include evening sessions.
Cost to student: $66 ($20 for reading materials, $16 for 20-minute bath and $30 for 30-minute massage at Lincoln Mineral Baths in Saratoga Springs).

WANDA BUBRISKI (Instructor)
D. BEAVER (Sponsor)

Wanda Bubriski, `82 MA, has lectured and published on the Bohemian Spas. She was curator of "Salubrious Destinations," an exhibition on the history of health resorts at Yale's School of Medicine. She has taught at Williams (WSP "Vienna 1900: in World & Image") as well as Yale, Central European University (Prague campus), and in Washington D.C. Public Schools.

INTERDEPARTMENTAL PROGRAM FOR EXPERIMENTAL AND CROSS-DISCIPLINARY STUDIES

INTR 019 Picturing Our Past (Same as Special 018, Biology 019, and Environmental Studies 018)

(See under Special for full description.)

LEADERSHIP STUDIES

LEAD 010 Corporate Leadership and Social Responsibility (Same as Environmental Studies 015)

This course considers the responsibilities of leadership in corporate life through the perspectives of visiting alumni who hold leadership positions in American corporations. It examines the social obligations created by success in business, with special emphasis on the social and environmental duties of contemporary business. We will also explore the organizational, professional, social, and personal dilemmas faced by leading figures in modern corporations and institutions. Readings will include material from organizational sociology and economics, as well as relevant biography and autobiography.
Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation in class discussions, and a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 22.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: approximately $30 for reading materials.

K. LEE and JOHN CHANDLER, President emeritus

LEAD 012 Living by Words: Surviving and Thriving in the Art and Sport of Rhetoric (Same as Comparative Literature 010, English 010, and Special 012)

(See under Comparative Literature for full description.)

LEAD 018 Wilderness Leadership

This Winter Study project is for students who would like to participate in an off-campus experiential education opportunity. Students will be required to research an appropriate accredited program i.e. National Outdoor Leadership School, Outward Bound etc., that will provide a suitable learning environment and be at least 22 days in length. The Director of the Williams Outing Club will assist students in their search if necessary. Upon choosing a program and being accepted, students will meet with the Director in a pre-program meeting in December to create a framework for observing group dynamics and studying a variety of leadership styles. There will also be a follow up class to debrief the experience in the last week of February. All programs must meet with the approval of the Outing Club Director.
Requirements: course approval by WOC Director, daily journal writing with focus on leadership and group dynamics, a 10-page paper and 2 class meetings pre and post trip. Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper and class discussions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Not open to first-year students. Interested sophomores, juniors and seniors must consult with WOC Director before registration.
Cost to student: varies depending on the program selected-range is generally from $1,500-3,000.

SCOTT LEWIS, WOC Director

LEAD 019 Justice and Public Policy (Same as Political Science 019)

The course will examine four or five significant public policy matters which have been resolved by the court system. These might include abortion, affirmative action, death penalty, election laws, free speech/obscenity. The focus of the course will be on the process involved in resolving the issues in the courts, the competing interests involved, the public impact of the decisions and, in most cases, the difficulty of resolution. Students will spend two-three days in Boston where they will have the opportunity to witness activities at the Middlesex County District Attorneys Office and meet with representatives of the federal and state judiciary.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper and regular participation in class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16. If the course is overenrolled, students will be asked to write a short essay to determine selection.
Meeting time: mornings; Monday and Thursday -all day while in Boston. Students will meet in December prior to the break to discuss logistics and expectations for the course.
Cost to student: none, but students will be responsible for obtaining lodging for two nights in Boston, Massachusetts.

MICHAEL B. KEATING `62 and MARTHA COAKLEY `75
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

The course will be taught by Michael B. Keating `62, a trial lawyer with the Boston law firm of Foley, Hoag & Elliot, LLP, and Martha Coakley `75, District Attorney for Middlesex County.

LEGAL STUDIES

LGST 010 Legal Realism and the Search for Law

From the 1920s-1940s, a movement called Legal Realism assailed the notion of an objective and impartial legal system. According to the Realists, the outcomes of legal disputes depend on the values, backgrounds, and idiosyncrasies of decision-makers(usually judges and juries). In the most extreme formulation, what a judge eats for breakfast has a greater effect on the outcome of a case than the rules or laws that ostensibly govern the case. Modern-day descendents of the Legal Realism proclaim that "law is politics." Is this radical skepticism on the mark? Insightful but exaggerated? Fundamentally flawed? This course will probe the Realist perspective in the context of major legal controversies, including Roe vs. Wade, Bush vs. Gore, the O.J. Simpson trial, the impeachment of Bill Clinton, and the fight over the Supreme Court nominations of Robert Bork and Clarence Thomas.
Requirements: mandatory attendance, participation in discussions, short writing assignments, and a final paper (8-10 pages).
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: $50-$100.

ALAN HIRSCH (Instructor)
KASSIN (Sponsor)

Alan Hirsch received a J.D. from Yale Law school and has written extensively on the law.

LGST 012 The Death Penalty and the Problem of Innocence

During the past decade, more than one hundred people convicted of murder and sentenced to death have been subsequently proven innocent and freed. The most recent study has shown that more than half of all trials that result in a death sentence are tainted by serious legal and procedural errors. These statistics become even more shocking when we realize that only a tiny fraction of people on death row are ever afforded the counsel and resources needed to prove their innocence. This course will explore the legal and systemic tensions which have made the death penalty so difficult to administer in a just manner. Among the subjects we will address are: the failure of the assigned counsel system, the impact of habeas corpus reform, problems with eyewitness identification and human memory, and the persistent problem of prosecutorial misconduct.
Evaluation will be based on a final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25.
Cost to student: $50.

IRA MICKENBERG '72 (Instructor)
KASSIN (Sponsor)

Ira Mickeberg '72 is an appellate defense lawyer who has represented indigent defendents in the United States Supreme Court and elsewhere. He has taught at several law schools.

LGST 013 The Second Amendment: Liberty and Gun Control (Same as Special 013)

(See under Special for full description.))

MATHEMATICS and STATISTICS

MATH 010 Humor Writing (Same as English 040)

CANCELLED!

MATH 011 Lessons in Go

Go is probably the oldest board game in the world, originating in China more than 4,000 years ago, and played today by millions of people. Unlike (Western) Chess, which focuses on hierarchical society and strictly defined and limited powers, and unlike (Middle Eastern) Backgammon, which is preoccupied with fate, chance and a wave of luck, Go has an Eastern spirit, where every piece is of equal value and can be played anywhere on the board. The aim is not to destroy but to build territory, where single stones become groups, and groups become organic structures. Two players alternate in placing black and white stones on a 19 - 19 ruled board with the aim of surrounding territory. The stones are left as they stand throughout the game, so that the game itself takes shape as a visible record of the thinking that went into it. The result is an amazing aesthetic and intuitive movement with deep complexity. Although easy to learn, no computer program exists which can beat a strong amateur player (even with a $5 million reward incentive). We look at how Go helped shape Asian culture, namely in Japan, and how this game is a reflection of Asian values. Strategic topics include: Joseki (openings), Tesuji (tactical magic), life and death, territory and influence, endgame, and handicap strategy. We will analyze famous games, discuss problems, as well as moderate a tournament among students and computer programs.
Evaluation will be based primarily on attendance, participation, problem sets and a final exam.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. No slackers need apply.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for books and supplies.

DEVADOSS

MATH 012 Introductory Photography: People and Places

This will be an introductory course in photography, with an emphasis on color photography. The main themes will be portraiture and the landscape. No previous knowledge is assumed, but students are expected to have access to a 35 mm camera, preferably with manual override or aperture priority. The use of a digital camera may be possible, after consultation with the instructor. The topics covered will include composition, exposure, camera use and properties of film, direction and properties of light, and digital imaging (scanning and printing). Students will develop their eye through the study of the work of well-known photographers and the critical analysis of their own work. We will discuss the work of contemporary photographers such as Mary Ellen Mark, Joel Meyerowitz, Constantine Manos, and Eugene Richards. Students will be expected to spend a considerable amount of time practicing their own photography outside of class (using 35mm color slide film). There will be one required local half-day field trip. Students will also be introduced to the program Photoshop used to manipulate images digitally, and will work on their own pictures with this program. The film used will be color slide film, but students will learn to scan their slides and produce prints using a digital printer.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, two quizzes and a final project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Meetings time: mornings.
Cost to the student: $180 for the purchase and processing of film and a text.

C. SILVA

MATH 013 Beginning Modern Dance (Same as Special 023)

This course is an introduction to modern dance for those who have never taken a modern dance or ballet class, but who want to give it a try. (Those with more experience might consider Math 018 -Modern Dance: Muller Technique). The technique for the course is based on a combination of styles from the companies that Dick De Veaux worked with while he toured as a professional dancer. The course includes both flexibility and strength training as well as dance instruction. We will work on the basics of movement through space and the different efforts and shapes that are used to propel us.
Requirements: class participation, short essays on assigned videos and readings, and participation in an end of term lecture demonstration that we will present to the public.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25.
Meeting time: afternoons; Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 1-3p.m. (six to eight hours per week).
Cost to student: none.

R. DEVEAUX

MATH 015 The Science of Deception (Same as Psychology 014)

This course is designed by Charles Baschnagel `05 and provides an introduction to the basic strategies behind bluffing in real world situations and techniques of detecting a bluff. Professor Stewart Johnson of the Mathematics/Statistics department will lecture on the game theoretic aspects of bluffing using simplified poker models of Borel and Von Neumann. Professor Steve Fein of the Psychology department will lecture on interpersonal perception and the detection of lies. Students will practice techniques and strategies in lab periods run by Mr. Baschnagel in which various card games will be played.
Requirements: select and research some aspect of bluffing and write a 10 page research paper. Research proposals must be submitted and approved by Professor Fein or Professor Johnson. Evaluation will based on participation and the final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Meeting time: 2 one-hour lectures per week with homework and a three-hour lab.
Cost to student: none.

S. JOHNSON and FEIN

MATH 016 The Art and History of Knitting (Same as ArtS 023 and History 023)

Creating fabric out of interlocking loops can be traced back to the Neolithic period, and knitted artifacts 1600 to over 2000 years old have been found in Egypt, Peru, and Sweden. Knitting requires little machinery and can be done almost anywhere - walking, riding, even in poor light- yet requires a significant amount of learned skill. Knitting techniques have been handed down through generations, shared in small groups, and transferred between cultures as trade routes emerged. The social history of knitting is a rich reflection of the history of culture.
This course examines the history and technique of this important skill. We will examine the history of knitting from a global and social perspective through a sequence of readings and lectures. Reading list includes: History of Knitting, by Richard Rutt; No Idle hands: The History of American Knitting, by Anne L. MacDonald; and The Age of Homespun, by Laurel Thatcher Ulriche.
We will engage a series of project samples designed to introduce and improve skills of beginning knitters, starting with simple blankets and culminating in a final project of the students choosing. Students will also be required to select and research some aspect of knitting and write a 10-page research paper. Topics will need pre-approval of the instructor.
Evaluation will be based on participation, final project, and final 10-page research paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to beginning knitters.
Meeting time: three 2-hour evening periods every week.
Costs to the student include materials and about $55 for textbooks.

M. JOHNSON (Instructor)
O. BEAVER (Sponsor)

Mary Johnson, M.Ed., an experienced knitter who has worked professionally for the NYC design firm Knit Wits, and is currently a project knitter for Storey Communications.

MATH 017 Onstage! (Same as Special 017)

CANCELLED!

MATH 018 Modern Dance-Muller Technique (Same as Special 020)

This dance class will be based on the modern dance technique developed by Jennifer Muller, with whom the instructor danced professionally for 5 years in New York City and in Europe. Jennifer Muller was a soloist in the dance company of José Limòn before she started her own company in 1974. She has added her own style of movement to the Limòn technique, creating an expansive, free-flowing dance that is wonderful to do and to watch.
Students will have the opportunity to choreograph a short piece either as a soloist or in small groups. We will finish the course with a short lecture-demonstration illustrating what we have learned.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 24. Open to men and women alike, with preference given to those with previous dance experience.
Meeting time: mornings; Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 10-noon (six hours per week).
Cost to student: approximately $20.

SYLVIA LOGAN (Instructor)
O. R. BEAVER (Sponsor)

Sylvia Logan received her B.A. in Slavic Literature from Stanford University. She danced professionally with the Jennifer Muller Dance Company, a modern company based in New York, for five years.

MATH 030 Senior Project

To be taken by candidates for honors in Mathematics other than by thesis route.

MATH 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Mathematics 493-494.

MUSIC

MUS 010 Chamber Music Performance

A project offering focused rehearsal and performance of chamber music for string and piano players (a few wind players might be accommodated). The repertoire might include, but is not limited to, string trios, quartets, quintets; piano trios, quartets, quintets; string quartets or quintets with one wind instrument; and piano plus one string instrument sonatas. Ensembles will explore various works from the repertoire at the beginning of the course and select a program for performance. Small ensembles may combine to perform works for larger ensembles. Small ensembles will rehearse daily, and large ensembles three times a week. Students are expected to maintain a regular schedule of individual practice. Performances of all ensembles will be scheduled during the final week of Winter Study.
Evaluation will be based on faithful attendance at rehearsals, classes, coaching sessions, and appropriate performances.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor; you must see Mr. Feldman during fall registration period. Previous participation in music department ensembles suggested; audition (in the fall) may be necessary for placing student with others of similar ability. Enrollment limit: 19.
Meeting time: afternoons; Monday through Thursday 1-3p.m.
Cost to student: none, although students may prefer to purchase their own copies of the music.

RONALD FELDMAN
Artist in Residence in Orchestral and Instrumental Performance

MUS 012 Ensembles in Classic American Musical Theatre (Same as Theatre 012)

This Winter Study will give participants an opportunity to study and perform numbers for more than one singer in great American musicals. You have sung a solo, you have sung in chorus-now practice the exacting art of singing an ensemble on stage. Music from the recently revived Mitch Leigh/Joe Darion show Man of La Mancha will be the central focus. The course will culminate with a public performance of ensembles from the show including the finale. Other ensembles from Bernstein's West Side Story, or from European light opera models such as Franz Lehar's The Merry Widow may also be included. Singers, actors, and pianists are all welcome to participate.
Requirements: performing, writing a 10-page discursive paper, or some combination of the two approved by the teacher.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons; Mondays and Wednesdays.
Cost to student: none.

KEITH KIBLER (Instructor)
KECHLEY (Sponsor)

Keith Kibler has performed under some of the finest directors currently working including David Alden, Peter Sellars, Galina Vishnevskaya. He sang a major role in Kurt Weill's "Die Kleine Mahagonny" under Alvin Epstein with the American Repertory Theatre. He has been a featured soloist with the Boston Pops in American theater music. Keith Kibler is an adjunct teacher of singing at Williams College. He can be reached at kibler@sover.net

MUS 013 Theolonious Monk Ensemble

This is an ensemble course primarily devoted to studying and playing the music of Thelonious Monk. Musicians needed include: voices, horns, piano, bass, guitar, drums. In addition to performing the music, the course will give students an in-depth look at the life of Thelonious Monk as a composer and pianist. Each composition will be explored in-depth as to its structure and improvisational concepts. Straight No Chaser, a video by filmmaker Charlotte Zwerin, will be shown and discussed. Students will be required to read: Straight No Chaser: The Life and Genius of Thelonious Monk by Leslie Gourse.
Requirements: participation in a concluding concert of Monk's music during the last week of Winter Study is required. Evaluation will be based on their performance at this concert. Students will be expected to practice the material outside of class, and will also be evaluated on mastery of the material, class participation and attendance.
Prerequisites: students should have the ability to competently play the music, plus permission of instructor. Students may contact the instructor by email Tess251@aol.com or phone (845-331-9835). Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: afternoons; Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 2-4 p.m. Outside listening assignments and preparation of individual parts will also be required. There will be a possible field trip to the International Association of Jazz Educators (IAJE) convention being held in New York City in January 2004.
Cost to student: $100 maximum.

TERI ROIGER, Adjunct Teacher of Jazz Voice (Instructor)
JAFFE (Sponsor)

Teri Roiger is an Adjunct Teacher of Jazz Voice at Williams College, and a professional singer, pianist and lyricist. For more info go to her WebSite at www.teriroiger.com American jazz vocalist, pianist and lyricist Teri Roiger has succeeded in keeping the music of Theolnious Monk alive since his death in 1982. Teri Roiger and John Menegon's latest CD, MISTERIOSO, featuring jazz legends Jack DeJohnette and Kenny Burrell, is titled after Monk's much-loved composition, now given lyrics by Roiger, with the rarely-given permission of Monk's family, and retitled Listen to Your Soul.

MUS 014 Congolese Music and Dance

This course will provide students with the opportunity to learn to perform selected music and dance forms from the Republic of the Congo (Brazzaville) and will culminate in a concert. Students will work closely with guest artists, Titos and Biza Sompa, both renowned masters of Congolese music and dance, as well as with Williams faculty. Students will have the opportunity to drum, dance, sing, and play marimba. In addition to acquiring performance skills, students will study the history and cultural context of the music and dance forms that they learn to perform. This course is open to students at a beginning as well as an advanced level in either music or dance. Each student's performance level will be assessed at the beginning and at the end of the course.
Evaluation will be based in part on improvement in performance skills and in part on a 5-page paper. Students who do not wish to be evaluated on their performance skills may write two five-page papers instead. Students may not miss the final performance or more than one class and pass this course.
Enrollment limit: 25.
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons; Beginning Drumming and Dance Tuesday & Thursday 10a.m.-2p.m., Advanced Drumming and Dance Monday & Wednesday 4-6:30p.m., and Friday 4-6p.m., Advanced Marimba Tuesday & THursday 4-6:30p.m. Additional rehearsals scheduled as needed especially during the final weekend before concert.

TITOS and BIZ SOMPA, AGYAPON, E. BROWN, and S. BURTON

MUS 015 The Contemporary Singer/Songwriter

This course will focus on learning how to write and perform songs in a contemporary style. Topics addressed will include song structure, how to create a lyric that communicates, vocal and instrument presentation, performing techniques, publicity for events, and today's music industry. This class will culminate in a public performance of material written during the course.
In order to pass this course, each student will be expected to complete a minimum of two songs, both music and lyrics. One of these songs will be presented during the final performance, preferably by the student. If not, the student must arrange for someone else in the class to assist him or her. Also, a 2-page paper will be passed in on the last day of class.
No prerequisites, although students with musical backgrounds and the ability to play an instrument may be given preference and should email the instructor (Bernice.Lewis@williams.edu). Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings,Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursdays for two-hour sessions.
Cost to student: $75 for books and xeroxing costs.

BERNICE LEWIS (Instructor)
KECHLEY (Sponsor)

Bernice Lewis is an accomplished singer and songwriter who has performed her work throughout the country. She lives in Williamstown and has released five recordings of original material.

MUS 021 Individual Vocal and Instrumental Instruction

Can only be taken IN ADDITION to a regular WSP course. CONTACT THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT ABOUT SIGNING UP FOR THIS COURSE!!!
Individual lessons in voice, keyboard and most orchestral instruments offered during Winter Study. Four lessons, given at approximate one week intervals (TBA). Student is expected to practice at least two hours per day. All individual instruction involves an extra fee which is partially subsidized by the department. For further information and guidelines, or to secure a contract for lessons, see the Department Chair, David Kechley.
Prerequisites: permission of Department Chair and Instructor .
Cost to student: $100.

STAFF

MUS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Music 493, 494.

NEUROSCIENCE

NSCI 018 The Mind of a Poet: The Psycho-Biological Bases of Creativity (Same as Biology 018 and Psychology 019)

(See under Biology for full description.)

NSCI 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Neuroscience 493-494.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 010 German Cinema (Same as English 028 and German 010)

This course will take a broad look at German cinema. We will begin with an intensive study of the `golden age' of German film -Weimar cinema, a period which includes such classic films as Fritz Lang's Metropolis and M, F.W. Murnau's Nosferatu and Faust, Robert Wiene's Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari, Josef von Sternberg's Das Blaue Engel, and many, many more. In addition to viewing many of these films, we will look at some of the classic literature on the period, including the now notorious readings offered by Siegfried Kracauer and Lotte Eisner. The class will pay particular attention to the various genres that span the length of German cinema including Berg- and Heimatfilme, Strassenfilme, Problemfilme, and Trümmerfilme. This study of genres will propel to class forward chronologically to explore other periods including National Socialist films (e.g., Riefenstahl) and New German Cinema (e.g., Fassbinder, Herzog, Schloendorff). All films will be in German with English subtitles. All reading and discussion will be in English.

WILBERDING

PHIL 011 Why New Englanders Eat What They Eat (Same as American Studies 012 and History 019)

Have you ever wondered why the food of New England is sugary and bland: is it the people, the land, the economy? Do New Englanders like their diets or are they forced into them? This course will investigate these kinds of questions by looking at the political, economic, cultural, and climatic factors that have shaped the diet and culture of New Englanders.
We will begin our course by learning about the ecology and culture of food developed by Native Americans: how did they hunt, gather and farm, and how did their methods of procuring food form their relationship to nature and to each other? Then we will consider the diet of the first European settlers and their interaction with Native Americans. Issues such as differing uses of the land, what was considered by the term "property," and what was being sold by the Native Americans to the settlers will be considered. Next we will examine how food was used to try to socialize the next wave of immigrants to New England and how women used food to gain entrance to higher education, which also opened the door to science in food. Finally we will look at international issues such as genetically modified foods, the economic and cultural impact of agribusiness, over-fishing the seas and pollution as it relates to our food. We will enjoy a historically accurate demonstration of life in the 1700's at Historic Deerfield and a guest speaker. The reading list will include: Change in the Land, William Cronon; Unredeemed Captive, John Demos; Cod, Mark Kurlansky; Perfection Salad, Laura Shapiro; Runaway World, Anthony Giddens.
Requirements: a 10-page essay on a topic of your choosing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: $50-$100 for books.

ROBIN LENZ MACDONALD (Instructor)
A. WHITE (Sponsor)

Robin MacDonald received her B.A. and M.A. in Political Science from UC Berkeley. She has written several articles about "food and its history" and has extensive experience in her field.

PHIL 012 Ethics Bowl: Case-based Reasoning in Ethics
This course will be based on Ethics Bowl, which is a nationwide intercollegiate competition held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics (APPE). Each participating college or university fields a team comprising three to five undergraduate students; and the competition proceeds as a series of matches in which two teams present analyses of ethically complex case scenarios that have been distributed in advance of the event. Winning teams advance until a national champion is named at the end of the final round.
The winter study course will begin with a brief introduction to reasoning in practical (as opposed to theoretical) ethics and case analysis. Shortly thereafter, students will begin working through this year's Ethics Bowl cases -- a set of fifteen scenarios that present ethical problems in one of a number of personal or professional domains (e.g., medical, legal, journalistic, and environmental ethics; issues of academic integrity, personal relationships, etc.) Students will collaborate in analyzing the cases in-depth, preparing to respond to any questions about the cases that judges may pose during the competition and to arguments presented by opposing teams. Depending on the size of the class, each student will take primary responsibility for at least one case and potentially as many as three, but all students will be expected to contribute to the development of a consensus position on every case. The discussion sessions will be intensive, but very much student-driven, with the instructor acting as a coach rather than as a teacher.
The course will culminate in an Ethics Bowl competition modeled on the national version. This event may include teams from area schools, e.g., Dartmouth, Smith, Union, and would represent a first step toward gaining entry of a Williams team to the national competition.
Cases from previous Ethics Bowl competitions along with rules and format are available from Professor Pedroni (Julia.A.Pedroni@williams.edu).
Requirements: final paper (7-10 pp) based on Ethics Bowl case of the student's choice.
Enrollment limit: 15 (expected 5-10), priority to juniors and seniors (any major).
No prerequisites. Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost: app. $25-$50 for books; costs of attending national competition may be additional.
PEDRONI

PHIL 016 Civil Rights Law (Same as Political Science 016)

This course will examine contemporary civil rights law including application of constitutional and statutory law to modern civil liberties issues.
The course will address discrimination, employment, privacy, sexual harassment, ethnic profiling and police misconduct issues. The course will emphasize analysis of cases, statutes and related legal materials.
The class will begin with an introduction to legal research principles including traditional and electronic legal research. Students will analyze appellate court decisions and related materials, primarily U.S. Supreme Court decisions and select federal statutes including the Americans With Disabilities Act and the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Most of the class time will be devoted to discussion of the cases and statutes. This course will be helpful to students contemplating law school.
Requirements: a ten page research paper addressing a civil rights topic to be decided by student and instructor. A summary of the research project will be orally presented by each student at the end of the course. Evaluation will be based on the analysis of a student paper, class participation and the final presentation.
No prerequisites, although an interest in civil rights issues is recommended. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to juniors and seniors.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $65 for materials.

J.MICHAEL MCGUINNESS (Instructor)
A. WHITE and A. WILLINGHAM (Sponsors)

J. Michael McGuinness is a practicing civil rights lawyer and has lectured and published heavily in the civil rights field. Mr. McGuinness has litigated a broad variety of civil rights cases before trial and appellate courts including the U.S. Supreme Court.

PHIL 025 History and Philosophy of Biology: The Galapagos Islands (Same as Biology 025)

"If there is the slightest foundation for evolution, the zoology of the Galapagos will be well worth examining..." Charles Darwin
On September 16, 1835, the HMS Beagle , with young Charles Darwin as the boat's naturalist, reached the Galapagos Archipelago, a cluster of islands on the equator, 600 miles west of South America. During his five weeks in the Galapagos, Darwin found distinct types of giant tortoises in different islands, land and marine iguanas, thirteen different types of finches whose beaks were modified to different sub-environments on the islands, and discovered many plant and animal species found nowhere else on earth. His ground-breaking theory of evolution by natural selection took shape on the islands, and the major evidence provided for it in The Origin of Species, published some 20 years later, comes from Darwin's Galapagos notes and diaries. After a long period of neglect, in 1959 the Galapagos islands became Ecuador's first National Park; in 1978, UNESCO declared the Islands a World Heritage Site, of unique and universal significance for our world and our science.
Aims of the course: The Galapagos Islands provide an unique opportunity to understand science as a dynamic process, focused on nature but influenced by human needs, desires and institutions. The Islands occupy an important place in the history of science: after the evidence of adaptation they provided, young Darwin was "... almost convinced (quite contrary to the opinion I started with) that species are not (it is like confessing a murder) immutable." We will examine the concept, nature and strength of evidence in evolutionary biology, with the implied comparison with the nature of evidence in other scientific fields. Simultaneously, we will discuss the relationship between scientific theories and a larger intellectual (religious, political) context of the time, following the same line of thought to the present day, in the tensions between `pure' scientific research at the Darwin Station, the conservation efforts, and "ecotourism," sometimes understood as a form of popularization of science, and sometimes as a new form of exploitation of the environment. In order to pursue these general questions in depth, we will undertake a detailed study of the Galapagos islands, focusing on the following specific topics: Charles Darwin and the voyage of the Beagle; formation and geology of the Galapagos islands; Galapagos sea birds; Darwin's finches and other land birds; reptiles of the Galapagos; sea mammals of the Galapagos; plants of the Galapagos; and human history in the Galapagos.
Tentative itinerary: The trip will probably take 11 days: one full day of travel on each end, a full day in Quito, Ecuador's capital in the Andes, and a 7-night cruise in the islands. Following our tour of old Quito, we will travel about 45 minutes north of the city to spend an afternoon at the equator. The next day, we will fly to the Galapagos island of Santa Cruz, where we will board a boat. Our first important stop will be at the Charles Darwin Research Station, which develops and supports various international research projects, and advises the Ecuadorian government on minimizing the impact of tourism on the islands. It contains a national-park information center and a museum. The station is also an tortoise breeding and rearing center, where tortoise of different subspecies are prepared to be reintroduced back to their natural habitat. After leaving Santa Cruz, we will cruise for 7 days among the islands, visiting Baltra, Genovesa, Espanola, San Cristobal, Bartolome, Santiago, Isabela and Fernandina, finally returning to Santa Cruz. Each day will include a morning and afternoon excursion, during which we will walk along trails and experience first-hand the islands' amazing wild life. Our daily discussions will take place after dinner. There will also be ample opportunity for swimming and snorkeling with Galapagos sea-lions, beautiful fish, sea turtles, and penguins.
Requirements: this course falls into three parts: preparation for the trip, the trip itself, and work after our return. In general, each student will be responsible for a segment of the course, and required to participate in joint activities. Specifically: before departure, there will be 10 contact hours, during which we will set the main aims and methodology of the course, start our discussion of Darwin's seminal work, The Origin of Species, and see an introductory video of the Galapagos islands. Students should count on doing 20-30 additional hours of research and reading. During the trip, each student will: (a) give an on-site presentation, prepared in Williamstown; (b) serve as the source for a particular area of information (for example, geology of the islands, giant tortoises, land and marine iguanas, etc.); (c) participate in daily discussions of the assigned readings and the day's itinerary; and (d) collect documentation for the final class project (drawings, photography, film, naturalist diary...). Upon return to Williamstown, each student will submit a 5-7 pages long paper, and contribute to the production of the class project, to be displayed on the last day of Winter Study in Goodrich Hall.
Cost to student: approximately $3000-$4000. The costs include all airfare, hotels, meals, boat cruise, Ecuadorian fees and taxes, cancellation insurance, and books.

MLADENOVIC

PHIL 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Philosophy 493-494.

PHYSICS

PHYS 010 Light and Holography

This course will examine the art and science of holography. It will introduce modern optics at a level appropriate for a non-science major, giving the necessary theoretical background in lectures and discussion. Demonstrations will be presented and students will make several kinds of holograms in the lab. Thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation, we have 7 well-equipped holography darkrooms available for student use.
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance, completion of 4 laboratory exercises, and a holography laboratory project or a 10-page paper. Attendance at all classes and labs is required for a passing grade.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference given to students with no previous college course in physics more advanced than Physics 100.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 times per week for lecture and discussion-afternoons; 2 times per week for lab. Toward the end of the course, classes will be mainly laboratory.
Cost to student: approximately$50 for holographic film, chemicals, and photocopies.

BOLTON and FORKEY

PHYS 012 Meet the Right Side of Your Brain: Drawing as a Learnable Skill (Same as ArtS 019)

Representational drawing is not merely a gift of birth or a magical ability granted by angels, but a learnable skill. If you ever wanted to draw, but doubted you had the ability or believed you could not learn, then this course is for you. This intensive course utilizes discoveries in brain research to teach representational drawing. By using simple techniques and extensive exercises you will discover and develop the perceptual shift from your symbol based left hemisphere to your visually based right hemisphere. This cognitive shift enables you to accurately see and realistically represent the physical world. You will learn to draw a convincing portrait, self-portrait, and still life. This course is designed to develop your powers of observation and enhance your innate creative problem solving abilities, which are applicable in any field.
Requirements: keeping a sketchbook recording of progress, attendance and participation in all sessions, and a final project.
No prerequisites-students need no previous artistic experience, just the willingness and desire to learn a new skill. Enrollment limit: 30 (two sections of 15). Preference given to juniors and seniors.
Meeting time: afternoons; 3 times per week (about 10 hours lecture and group exercises) with substantial additional independent student work.
Cost to student: approximately $15 for text and drawing materials.

STELLA EHRICH (Instructor)
MAJUMDER (Sponsor)

Stella Ehrich holds an MFA in painting from Bennington College. She teaches drawing at Bennington and other local colleges. She has had solo exhibits from Rutland, VT to Dallas, Texas to Mobile, Alabama.

PHYS 013 Automotive Mechanics

The purpose of this course will be to provide an understanding of the basic function of the major components of the modern automobile. Through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on experience, individuals will learn basic maintenance of an automobile. In addition, students will be expected to study in depth one of the major automotive systems which include carburetor or fuel-injection systems, the lubrication and cooling stem, the electrical system, the steering, brake and suspension system, and the power train for both manual and automatic transmissions.
Requirements: attend class regularly, read assigned material from the text, actively participate in work at the garage, and pass written midterm and final examinations.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference given to seniors. The class will be broken into three sections for lab work.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 two-hour sessions per week for classroom instruction. In addition, students will meet at the Flamingo Motors in Williamstown one evening each week for practical demonstrations and hands-on activity.
Cost to student: approximately $45 for text.

MICHAEL FRANCO (Instructor)
MAJUMDER (Sponsor)

Michael Franco is the owner of Flamingo Motors in Williamstown

PHYS 015 Electronics

Electronic instruments are an indispensable part of modern laboratory work throughout the sciences. This course will cover the basics of analog electronic circuits, including transistors and operational amplifiers, and will briefly introduce digital circuits. Students will build and test a variety of circuits chosen to illustrate the kinds of electronic devices and design problems a scientist is apt to encounter. This course will be a mixture of lab, lecture, and discussion, providing ample opportunity for hands-on experience. In the last week, students will design and build a final project, or will write a 10-page paper.
Evaluation will be based on participation, completion of both laboratory work and occasional homework, and the quality of the final project or paper.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 104 or equivalent calculus-no prior experience with electronics is required. Enrollment limit: 16.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: $108 for two textbooks.

STRAIT

PHYS 016 Teaching with Technology

Explore the use of technology in the classroom using a variety of multimedia including Photoshop, Dreamweaver, iMovie, Flash, presentation software, multimedia hardware, and data projection to communicate and teach ideas and concepts effectively. Other topics include copyright issues in education, project planning, and developing alternative presentation plans in case of hardware failure. This course will include practical hands on workshops, assignments, and readings, leading to the development of a professional electronic portfolio. Supervised lab sessions and group critiques will provide feedback on student work. The final products will be publicly presented at the end of the course.
Evaluation will be based on the completion of assignments and a class presentation of the electronic portfolio with attention to content, effort, and development of the work. Attendance and participation will also be taken into account.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to students who have an interest in teaching.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 two-hour blocks per week with extra supervised-lab times scheduled in accordance with our needs. Most of the development of the electronic portfolio will be completed outside of class.
Cost to student: none.

TREVOR MURPHY and MIKA HIRAI (Instructors)
MAJUMDER (Sponsor)

Trevor Murphy and Mika Hirai are Instructional Technology Specialists for the Office for Information Technology at Williams College. Trevor Murphy has a MS in Scientific and Technical Communication from Oregon State University. Mika Hirai has an MA in Japanese Pedagogy and also in Instructional Design and Technology from the University of Iowa. Together they have 12 years of teaching experience.

PHYS 022 Research Participation

Several members of the department will have student projects available dealing with their own research or that of current senior thesis students. Approximately 35 hours per week of study and actual research participation will be expected from each student.
Students will be required to keep a notebook and write a five-page paper summarizing their work. Those interested should consult with members of the department as early as possible in the registration period or before to determine details of projects then expected to be available.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 1 or 2 per project.
Meeting time: to be arranged with instructor.
Cost to student: none.

T. MAJUMDER and members of the department

PHYS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Physics 493, 494.

POLITICAL ECONOMY

POEC 031 Honors Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Political Economy 493.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

PSCI 010 Film as Radical Political Critique (Same as English 029)

Films has long been used as a medium for conveying political views and ideologies, and for exploring social injustice and political scandal. In this course, we'll screen a wide range of early and more recent films and documentaries whose primary object is to convey a particular political viewpoint or to offer a pointed critique of prevailing social, political, or economic arrangements. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which film has been used to shift prevailing opinions and beliefs about particular political systems. Some of the films we may view include Eisenstein's The Battleship Potempkin (1925) and October, or 10 Days that Shook the World (1928), Chaplin's Modern Times (1936), Mulligan's To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), Frankenheimer's The Manchurian Candidate (1962), Pontecorro's Battle of Algiers (1965), Sembene Ousmane's Black Girl (1965), Palcy's Surgarcane Alley (1983), Gilliam's Brazil (1985), Kusurica's Time of the Gypsies (1989), Yimou's Raise the Red Lantern (1992), Schepisi's Six Degrees of Separation (1992), and Nair's Salaam Bombay (1989).
Requirements: reading assignments, class participation, one oral presentation on a film, and a 10- to 12-page final paper.
Enrollment limit: 25. Preference given to Political Science majors.
Meeting time: afternoons; Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday 1-3p.m. Some additional evening screenings.
Cost to student: none.

M. DEVEAUX

PSCI 011 Violence, Testimony, and the Culture Wars: Speaking, Truth, and Power (Same as American Studies 011)

This course is about how the experience of genocide and other forms of state-sponsored mass murder is given narrative form by those who survive it, and about the expectations or demands that shape readers', and in particular American readers', responses to such testimony. We will consider some accounts by survivors of the Shoah or Holocaust. We will engage related, but more philosophical work on the problems of testifying about suffering and violence. Our central case study, however, will be of Nobel Peace Prize-winning activist and author Rigoberta Menchú, whose narrative of life and struggle in Guatemala, I, Rigoberta Menchú, has been celebrated by some as a classic account of indigenous resistance to oppression and challenged by others as systematically distorted and fundamentally dishonest. In exploring this case, we will learn something about both the civil war in Guatemala of which Menchú writes and the Latin American testimonio tradition on which she draws, and we will make sense of how and why this particular book and author came to play such a prominent role in the "culture wars" that marked U.S. intellectual and political life in the nineties. Though we concentrate especially on one particular battle in those conflicts, the goal is to come to understand broader problems of speaking, truth, and power in the Americas.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page paper.
Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to those with prior work in Political Science, American Studies, or Latin American Studies.
Meeting time: mornings; Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 10 a.m.-noon.
Cost to student: approximately $75 for books.

REINHARDT

PSCI 012 Hollywood's Version of Politics

This course will include the showing of several movies based on important aspects of political life in America. Each movie will also be followed by a class discussion of the political theme depicted and its relevancy to political events today. The movies shown will be: Inherit the Wind (based on the Scopes trial) and its relevancy to the politics of today's Christian right, Advise and Consent (a story of congressional machinations over presidential appointments) and today's congressional handling of such appointments, The Candidate (a satirical depiction of the hypocrisy and complicity in the American political world), and today's political world, The Last Hurrah (loosely based on Boston's past, great political machines) and what constitutes political machines today. And if time permits either or both All the President's Men (the story of politics and the press) or Wag the Dog (the story of a fabricated war as a cover for a presidential sex scandal).
Evaluation will be based on classroom participation, completion of assignments, attendance, and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to Political Science majors.
Meeting time: afternoons; 2 three-hour sessions per week.
Cost to student: none.

ROBERT JAKUBOWICZ (Instructor)
JACOBSOHN (Sponsor)

Robert Jakubowicz served in the Massachusetts legislature. His political experience also includes 10 years as a local and county elected official and participation in national political campaigns. His political commentaries appear bi-monthly in the Berkshire Eagle. His columns have also appeared in the Boston Globe, Boston Herald, the New England Bedford Standard Times, and the Cape Cod Times.

PSCI 013 European Integration, Globalization and International Business

The intent of this course is to increase appreciation of the course of European integration. The continuing effort of western European countries to develop an ever-closer economic and political union represents the most advanced case of globalization and international cooperation. The European Union (EU), founded in 1956 to foster economic development as well as avoid a third World War, has in the last few decades formed a common market, expanded to 15 members (and is set to increase to 25), and introduced a common currency. Its convention has already submitted a set of recommendations that will lead to further political as well as economic integration. These efforts have been spurred by instant communication, rapid transportation, and increased competition. What opportunities and challenges does the emergence of the EU present to Europe-and the United States?
This seminar-style course depends upon the active participation of each student.
Requirements: a 10-page paper (a case study or an international trade topic on a subject to be decided upon with the instructor), class preparation by studying assigned readings and participate actively in class discussions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to Political Science majors.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: none.

SAMUEL HUMES '52 (Instructor)
JACOBSOHN (Sponsor)

Mr. Humes '52 is a former Professor and Director of Boston University in Brussels, Belgium and a Partner, Management Development International (MDI), Belgium. Formerly associated with Centre for European Studies (1988-1999), he has published numerous books and articles.

PSCI 014 Objective Journalism During Times of Conflict (Same as English 029)

Can a newspaper editor or reporter from a nation fighting terror separate their patriotism and be members of a medium whose goal it is to reveal the truth, report objectively and let the reader judge for him or herself? This class will follow personal experiences of two Israeli journalists, Aviva Lori and Shlomo Papirblat, through major recent events in the Middle East such as the current Intifada, the war in Lebanon, military reserve duty and many other current topics. Students will examine actual journalistic dilemmas of the instructors and discuss their perspective vis-à-vis the reality of the situation. Topics for discussion include whether a governing body can require journalists, during times of national peril, to favor national interest and potentially compromise their journalistic integrity. Can a true democracy restrict and regulate press coverage during times of emergency? What is the influence of the international media on the political developments in a contiguous region? And how much should political leaders consider the influence of the media on the success or failure of their planned political strategy? A central question will be whether journalism is just another profession or is a journalist an intermediary between the public and the decision-makers and thus partake in the evolution of national events? In addition, the course will address the foreign press coverage of events and will question whether a foreign correspondent, who is not familiar with the local language and culture and the complexities of the local realities, can report in a manner that conveys the whole picture.
Evaluation will be based on a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Meeting time: afternoons; Monday, Wednesday, Friday 2-4 p.m.
Cost to student: none.

AVIVA LORI and SHLOMO PAPIRBLAT (Instructors)
JACOBSOHN (Sponsor)

Aviva Lori is a senior journalist at Haaretz daily newspaper. Shlomo Papirblat is the International News Editor-In-chief at the daily Yediot Acharonot newspaper.

PSCI 015 The Development of Inuit Art

Inuit art (which includes the following genre of art: sculpture, graphic arts, as well as jewelry, wall hangings, pottery and other modes) is a very modern development. It can be dated very precisely to the early 1950s. Since that beginning it has gained world-wide attention. There are galleries of Inuit art not only through out Canada and the United States but also Europe and Asia. Inuit art is included in the collections of major museums throughout the world. The production of Inuit art developed in response to the sudden change in Inuit life from nomadic subsistence in the norther arctic regions of Canada to fixed settlements on Baffin Island and areas around Hudson Bay and the consequent need to create a cash based economy. The course will cover the development of Inuit art focusing on the major centers (Cape Dorset, Baker Lake, Arviat, etc.), the major artists (Kenojuak, Oonark, George Arlook, Latcholassie, Parr, Pauta, etc.) and the major forms of sculpture and print making. The changing character of Inuit life and governance (the Canadian government recently completed a major reconsitution granting much of the people of the arctic north autonomy as a self-governing region called Nunavut. In addition to the technical development of the art, its history and the biography of the major artists, we will be exploring the cultural context of Inuit art to the Inuit as well as to the international market.
Requirements: assigned readings and a 10- to 15-page paper assignment with students choosing from the following topics: a study of a particular work of art, the work of a particular artist, some aspect of Inuit life or politics, or economic analyses (e.g., using Inuit art auction results over the years). There will be visiting lectures by major Inuit art dealers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25.
Meeting time: three classes per week.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for course readings.

MARCUS

PSCI 016 Civil Rights Law (Same as Philosophy 016)

(See under Philosophy for full description.)

PSCI 017 Film and Politics in Mexico

With the international success of movies such as The Crime of Padre Amaro and Amores Perros, Mexican films are getting notice again. The story of this industry is actually longer and more politically complicated than it may seem today. This course offers a history of Mexican post-Revolutionary politics through film, with special attention to the "golden age" of the late 1940's and early 1950's, the figure of Cantínflas, the economics and politics of the different genres of film in Mexico, and the recent resurgence of high-quality feature-length movies that combine
international influences with aspects of the locally established genres.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites, but a knowledge of Spanish is an advantage. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to Political Science majors and students of Latin American Studies.
Meeting time: afternoons, plus film viewing time.
Cost to student: none.

MAHON

PSCI 019 Justice and Public Policy (Same as Leadership Studies 019)

(See under Leadership Studies for full description.)

PSCI 021 Power, Authority and Decisionmaking in the Public Sector

This course is an internship experience in which students both work in and analyze governmental and related nongovernmental organizations. The goal of this course is to develop the ability to analyze power, authority and decisionmaking in public organizations; in short, to better understand leadership. Students may have internships in government and nonprofit organizations. They may have internships in for-profit organizations if the internship involves significant involvement with public issues. Examples include: town government offices; state or federal administrative offices such as environmental agencies or housing authorities; interest groups that lobby government such as the Chamber of Commerce or the ACLU; and nonprofit organizations such as think tanks or service providers. The instructor will work with each student to arrange an internship, and such arrangements must be made in advance of the Winter Term. Students are expected to spend the better part of the day, five days a week, with the organization. Each student's internship mentor shall send a confirmation letter to the instructor verifying the internship and describing the nature of the work to be performed by the intern. All students will read a few short articles and engage in on-line discussion with other students about the issues raised in these articles in relation to their internship. All students are expected to maintain weekly contact with the instructor. A group meeting of all students will occur after winter study to discuss experiences.
Requirements: internship work, participation in on-line discussion, and a 10-page paper analyzing issues of power, authority, and decisionmaking in the organization. Evaluation will be based on the mentor's assessment, participation in discussions, and the paper.
Enrollment limit: 15. At the time of registration, interested students should send a brief resume and letter of interest to Professor Johnson.
Cost to student: $5 for readings, transportation costs to and from internship site.

C. JOHNSON

PSCI 030 Senior Essay

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 491 or 492.

PSCI 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 493-494.

PSCI 032 Individual Project

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 495 or 496.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 010 Mental Illness in Film

CANCELLED!

PSYC 011 Rat Olympics

Behaviorism is a school of psychological thought founded on the idea that the expression of a particular behavior is the consequence of stimulus-response experiences. For example, the behaviorist might argue that people engage in particular behaviors because doing so has been associated with reinforcement in the past. Over the course of Winter Study, we will read classic writings from the founders of Behaviorism (e.g., John Watson, B.F. Skinner) and we will consider ways in which these principles apply to our everyday lives. Students will use behaviorist principles to modify human behavior. We will also use these principles to train rats to perform amazing feats. The course will culminate in a "Rat Olympics" in which the success of the conditioning efforts will be assessed in head-to-head competition of conditioned animals.
Evaluation will be based on a written report of their experiences conditioning a change in human behavior as well as a written report of the conditioning methods used in training their rat Olympians. The Olympics will be held on the final day of Winter Study.
No prerequisites.
Meeting time: mornings; Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10 a.m.-noon. Extensive time will be spent outside of class working on the assigned projects (conditioning changes in human behavior and conditioning rats).
Cost to student: none.

N. SANDSTROM

PSYC 012 Dreams, Problem-Solving and Self-Understanding

In this course, students will learn how paying attention to nighttime dreams can help solve daytime problems and lead to increased self-understanding, in support of living a more satisfying and creative life. These benefits of working with dreams will be illustrated through assigned readings, then brought to life in class, where students will discuss the readings, as well as share and work with their own dreams. A variety of skills for understanding dreams will be taught and practiced, covering the perspectives of many schools of thought in the history of dream interpretation.
Evaluation will be based on a final research paper and classroom discussion of assigned readings. Participation in discussion of dreams will also be taken into account.
Requirements: assigned readings and Internet search, and keeping a dream journal for the duration of the winter session.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference is first come-first serve.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 two and a half hour classes per week.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for books.

NANCY GRACE (Instructor)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Nancy Grace, M.A., has been teaching about dreams for over 10 years. She has done research and published articles with sleep and dream researcher Ernest Hartmann, M.D., and has trained extensively in the group dreamwork process with Jeremy Taylor, D.Min., and also with Montague Ullman, M.D. She is on the board of directors of the International Association for the Study of Dreams, and on the faculty of the New England Dreamwork Institute.

PSYC 014 The Science of Deception (Same as Mathematics 015)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

PSYC 015 Principles of Psychotherapy

Outlining the principles underlying the "talking cure", this course represents the kind of overview of psychotherapy the instructor wishes he had received as an undergraduate. Topics covered will include the particular arrangements for therapy, how they differ from other social situations, the initiation of therapy, and principles of transference, counter-transference, personal history investigation and interpretation. Of particular interest will be to describe how, during psychotherapy, persons change. By using both imagined therapy dialogues and published student autobiographies, efforts will be made at each stage to illustrate ways in which the general principles work out in practice. For the course paper, students will be asked to describe an issue of concern in the student's own experience and to imagine how a therapist might collaborate in working on that issue. At the end of the course the instructor will discuss each paper individually with each student.
Requirements: readings, class discussion, and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preferences given to juniors and seniors.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: approximately $25.

RICHARD Q. FORD (Instructor)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

Richard Q. Ford received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Chicago in 1970. He was, for twelve years, on the medical staff on the Austen Riggs Center in Stockbridge, Massachusetts; for the past eighteen years he has been in the private practice of psychotherapy in Williamstown. He is co-author with Sidney J. Blatt of Therapeutic Change: An Object Relations Perspective.

PSYC 016 The Examined Life

"The unexamined life is not worth living." This ancient maxim gains contemporary meaning in the context of the burgeoning field of behavioral health with its emphasis on the integral role of self-awareness to physical and psychological well-being. This course takes off from this premise and invites students on a journey of self-discovery and increased self-awareness. Through a variety of readings and presentations, the course will introduce central concepts of behavioral health such as mindfulness, learned optimism, and confronting vs. inhibition (our theoretical mentors being J. Kabat-Zinn, M. Seligman, and J.W. Pennebaker). The primary focus of the course, however, will be practical application rather than theoretical mastery and to facilitate an experiential engagement with these concepts in students' lives. A variety of in-class demonstrations and experiential exercises (e.g., expressive art work, guided visualization, meditation practice) will be used to foster students' personal integration of course content. A required field trip to the Kripalu Center will provide another kind of entry into the observation of mindfulness. The experiential process of self-discovery will include the subjective "lens" of working with dreams and personal journal activities augmented by the objective "lens" of self-administered instruments (e.g., Myers-Briggs, the Coping Style Inventory, and others) providing formalized information on one's personality and coping style, career interests, and aptitudes. At the end of this course, a student will know more about her/himself, the value of examined living in decreasing stress and increasing psychological health, and an array of ways to continue the journey of self-discovery.
Evaluation will be based on 1) class attendance and participation, 2) keeping a journal, both for firsthand experience of the value of writing as "confronting" and as a personal record of experiential exercises, dream work, etc. and 3) a final paper (10 pages) or project.
Prerequisites: students considering this WSP should note that the nature of some of the experiential exercises and group processing in class calls for modest levels of self-disclosure. Class participants can and may choose to "pass" in some instances, but most students find the exercises to be interesting and non-problematic. Some aspects of the course might be helpful to those students making transitions and/or decisions such as declaration of major, career choices, etc. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: approximately $60 for books and psych test batteries.

JOHN MINER, MARGARET WOOD, and LUCILLE LARNEY
and staff of Psychological Counseling Services (Instructors)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

John Miner, M.D., is currently Co-Director of the Psychological Counseling Service at Williams College. He received his M.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1975 and then trained in Family Practice in Duluth, Minnesota. He then worked as an Emergency Room physician in Rapid City, South Dakota, from 1977 -1982. He then did his Psychiatry Residency at Yale and came to the Berkshires in 1985 when he did a fellowship at the Austen Riggs Center, where he remained on the full time staff until 1994. He has been working at Williams for the past 5 years. He and the staff at the Psychological Counseling Service are very interested in promoting wellness and stress reduction within the campus community.

Margi Wood, LICSW, is Co-Director of the Psychological Counseling Service at Williams College. She has been a staff psychotherapist since 1993 and worked as a staff psychotherapist at Bennington College from 1988 to 1996. She has an MSW from SUNY-Albany and an M.A. in philosophy from Emory University. She and the staff of the Psychological Counseling Service are interested in fostering the values of psychological well-being and self-awareness within the College community.

Lucille Larney, Ph.D., is a consulting psychologist in the Psychological Counseling Services at Williams College. A Registered Art Therapist, she has a Masters in Art Therapy and Creativity Development from Pratt Institute. She received her Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from SUNY-Albany. Her research interests include career development, wellness, and creativity.

PSYC 017 Teaching Practicum

Students interested in teaching may submit applications for a Winter Study assignment as a teacher's aide at Mt. Greylock Regional High School or at the Williamstown Elementary School. Those accepted will work under the supervision of a regular member of the teaching staff and submit a report on their work at the end of the Winter Study Period. This project involves a four-week commitment to full-time affiliation with the school. Interested students should consult before winter study registration with Professor Zaki, Bronfman 326. She will assist in arranging placements and monitor students' progress during the four-week period.
Criteria for pass include full time affiliation with the school and a final 10-page report. The final report should summarize the student's experiences and reflections as drawn from a daily journal.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to number of places available at the two participating schools.
Cost to student: none

ZAKI

PSYC 018 Institutional Placement

Students interested in a full time January placement in a mental health, social service or applied psychology (e.g., advertising, law) setting may consult with members of the Psychology Department to make appropriate arrangements. Students should first make their own contacts with an institution or agency. They should also arrange to obtain a letter from a sponsor at the institution who will outline and supervise the student's duties during January. The student must agree to keep a journal and to submit a final paper summarizing and reflecting upon the experiences outlined in the journal.
Requirements: satisfactory evaluation from the institutional sponsor and a 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: none.

ZAKI

PSYC 019 The Mind of a Poet: The Psycho-biological Bases of Creativity (Same as Biology 018 and Neuroscience 018)

(See under Biology for full description.)

PSYC 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Psychology 493-494.

RELIGION

REL 010 The Zen Monastic Experience

THIS COURSE HAS BEEN CANCELLED!

REL 012 The Spirit and Practice of Yoga: Coming into Alignment

This class provides an orientation to yoga and builds a foundation for an effective and rewarding personal yoga practice. Each class begins with centering and discussion of selected readings on Patanjali's Yoga Sutras,providing a historical, cultural, and philosophical background for yoga. The second part of each class is an extended yoga practicum where students will learn and refine yoga poses including standing poses, vinyasa (flow), inversions, abdominals, hip-openers, backbends, twists, forward bends, and restoratives. In this way the class develops lung capacity and builds strength, flexibility, and awareness. Students receive individualized attention on how to work with principles of alignment in their particular bodies, express poses with balanced energy, and embody heart qualities. Yoga training is complementary to sports, athletics, and dance, aids in classroom and study, gives tools for handling stress, and cultivates a sense of well-being and balance.
Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation in all classes and sessions, 4 three-page essays on Yoga Sutras; documentation of daily personal practice, and participation in public yoga demonstration.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 24.
Meeting time: afternoons; Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 1:30-3:30p.m.
Cost to student: $35 for Yoga Sutras, yoga mat, strap, block, and blanket.

NATASHA JUDSON (Instructor)
DREYFUS and SHEEHY (Sponsors)

Natasha Judson, M.Ed. R.Y.T., has been practicing yoga for over twenty years and meditation for fifteen. She trained in Iyengar and Anusara yoga and is an affiliated Anusara yoga teacher. She practices meditation in Thai and Tibetan traditions and completed an internship in Mindfulness Bases Stress Reduction at UMASS Medical School. She began teaching yoga in 1999 and currently offers classes through her business Sunflower Yoga in Williamstown, and at Frog Lotus Yoga, Southwest Vermont Supervisory Union school district, and Southwestern Vermont Health Care Women's and Children's Services.

REL 025 Explorations in Solidarity: A Meeting of Minds and Hearts in Rural and Urban Nicaragua

This course will explore the lived realities of the hemisphere's second most impoverished nation, and the relevance of faith and religious community to the struggle for social justice. Students will reflect on these realities and struggles in the company of subsistence farmers, urban factory workers, and those working for progressive social change. The effects of an increasingly globalized economy, a series of natural disasters (most notably hurricane Mitch), and the changeable attentions of the developed world will be explored through conversations with ordinary people, using some of the methods of popular education and oral history. Significant attention will also be given to the efficacy of liberation theology and the base Christian community movement, as well as other influences, Christian, Marxist and neo-Liberal - on the material and spiritual well-being of Nicaraguan people. The experience of the course will include approximately one week of living (with minimal amenities) in a subsistence farming community; students will also attend a number of Christian religious services. (The course is open to students of any religious background or no affiliation.) Travels and encounters in Nicaragua will be facilitated by Elena Hendrick and Luis Aguirre of the Asociacion Kairos para la Formacion, an organization that links Christian communities north and south through solidarity toward the goal of transformed relationships. Throughout, students will be invited to enter as deeply as possible the story of Nicaraguans, and to reflect on their own stories as North Americans and the sometimes-volatile interaction between these stories. The goal is to begin to reflect on the relevance of religious community to the possibilities for restorative justice, and to discover what it would mean to shape a relationship with the people of Nicaragua according to a paradigm of solidarity - contrasted with the more familiar paradigms of national self-interest, on the macro level, and charity on the micro level.
Requirements: daily reflection sessions-for which a journal will be kept, attendance at three orientation sessions, approximately 250 pages of reading on Nicaraguan history and current political and economic situation prior to departure, participation in a group oral presentation to the college community upon return to Williamstown, and a final 10-page paper.
Prerequisites: conversational knowledge of Spanish, though not required, will be helpful. Willingness to live in physically demanding situations is essential. Enrollment limit: 14 (expected: 8).
Cost to student: $1,800 (including all food, lodging, round-trip airfare from Miami, and in-country transportation). Students are individually responsible for the cost of travel to and from Miami at the beginning and at the conclusion of the program.

RICHARD SPALDING (Instructor)
G. DREYFUS (Sponsor)

Rev. Richard Spalding is the Chaplain of the College.

REL 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Religion 493 or 494.

ROMANCE LANGUAGES

FRENCH

RLFR S.P. Sustaining Program for French 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study period. There are three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

SPAAK and ARGIMON (Teaching Associates)

RLFR 010 Asterix the Gaul: French Culture through the Prism of the Comic

The longevity and popularity of the Asterix comic strip series over successive generations of French (and foreign) readers can be explained, in part, by its subtle and incisive rendering of Europeanism through caricature. This course will examine some of the most enduring texts in the Asterix saga as interpretations, first, of French culture and the way the French view themselves with respect to the rest of Europe and, second, of the way they view Europe in dialogue with French cultural norms. Such issues as "la patrie" (homeland), linguistic characteristics, the idea of France, French provincial distinctiveness, France's view of homogeneous national character seen through its own cultural diversity, and the relationship of France to other specific regional cultures will be studied as a way not only of defining the nation's historic legacy, but of coming to terms with the way it sees its place within the vision of the European Union. Among the texts to be studied will be Asterix the Gaul, Asterix and the Banquet, Asterix and the Normans, Asterix in Corsica , Asterix in Britain, Asterix and the Goths, Asterix in Belgium, Asterix in Switzerland. Analysis of the primary texts will be complemented by secondary cultural readings by prominent interpreters in French culture. Readings will be in English, but those students who wish to read the texts in the original French should make arrangements in advance with the instructor. Conducted in English.
Requirements: class participation and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 two-hour sessions per week.
Cost to student: books and reading packet only.

NORTON

RLFR 012 Proust: In Search of Lost Time (Same as Comparative Literature 012 and English 024)

(See under Comparative Literature for full description.)

RLFR 030 Honors Essay

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLFR 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for French 493-494.

ITALIAN

RLIT S.P. Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

NICASTRO

SPANISH

RLSP S.P. Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

RIOBÓO, BRAVO, and SERRALLER (Teaching Associates)

RLSP 011 Jungle Fever: The Amazon in Literature and Film (Same as Comparative Literature 014, English 034 and Environmental Studies 022)

Lost Eden? Green Hell? Imperiled eco-system? Cultural discourse on the Amazon jungle ranges from one extreme to the other, but it is almost always impassioned and imaginative. This course will examine modern mythologies of the Amazon in literature and film from Latin America, Europe and the US. We will explore representations of the Amazon in three major categories-tales of colonial adventure, the Spanish American "romance of the jungle" and contemporary environmental discourse-considering their differences and often surprising similarities. Guided by readings from eco-critics including Lawrence Buell and Candace Slater, we will probe the difficult relationship between representation and reality: why is it, for instance, that some of the most widely-held beliefs about Amazonia sharply diverge from the reality of the region? And perhaps more importantly, how do the words and images we use to describe the Amazon influence policy decisions that directly affect the people who live there?
Readings may include the work of Joseph Conrad, Horacio Quiroga, Alejo Carpentier, Mario Vargas Llosa, and Clarice Lispector. Films will include: The Naked Jungle, Aguirre, the Wrath of God; At Play in the Fields of the Lord, and The Golden Serpent. Conducted in English.
Requirements: active class participation and attendance, and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites.
Cost to student: $60 for books and photocopies.

J. FRENCH

RLSP 012 Contemporary Mexican Women Film-Makers (Same as Arts 017, English 035 and Women's and Gender Studies 012)

Students in this course will have the opportunity to view and discuss a variety of films directed in Mexico during the last two decades, by prominent contemporary Mexican women film-makers such as María Novaro, Maryse Sistach, Alejandra Moya, Sabina Berman, Busi Cortes, Dana Rotberg, Guita Schyfer, Ma. Del Carmen Lara and others. This class will focus on how these women directors re-conceptualize women's roles in Mexican society, propose multidimensional feminine characters, and articulate a new female/national identity. The widely varying accepted gender roles between cultures will be explored, and differences uncovered as to why this difference in expectations exists across the border between Mexico and the United States.
This class will be taught in Spanish. The theoretical and background reading will be provided both in English and Spanish, however most of the films to be screened are in Spanish. Students must prove proficiency in language either with Placement Test results or evidence of classes taken at required levels.

PAULINA SALAS-SCHOOFIELD (Instructor)
ROUHI and PODMORE (Sponsors)

Paulina Salas-Schoofield is resident of Oaxaca, Mexico. During the past 8 years she has taught courses on Mexican Culture and Spanish Language at the Language Center of the Benito Juarez University, the Canadian International College and the Instituto Cultural Oaxaca. Paulina Salas-Schoofield studied art history at the Instituto de Cultura Superior in Mexico City, and film studies at Edinburgh University.

RLSP 014 Learning and Teaching Chemistry in Spanish (Same as Chemistry 012)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

RLSP 030 Honors Essay

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLSP 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Spanish 493-494.

RUSSIAN

RUSS S.P. Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102

Required of all students enrolled in Russian 101-102. Three meetings per week, 50 minutes per session. Practice in speaking and comprehension based on material already covered as well as some new vocabulary and constructions. Designed to maintain and enhance what was acquired during fall semester, using new approaches in a relaxed atmosphere. No homework.
Regular attendance and active participation required to earn a "Pass." Open to all.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

LANGUAGE FELLOW

RUSS 025 Williams in Georgia (Same as Special 025)

Williams has a unique program in the Republic of Georgia, which offers students the opportunity to engage in three-week-long internships in any field. Our students have worked in the Georgian Parliament, helped in humanitarian relief organizations like Save the Children, interned in journalism at The Georgian Times, taught unemployed women computer skills at The Rustavi Project, documented wildlife, studied with a Georgian sculptor, done rounds at the Institute of Cardiology, and learned about transitional economies at the Georgian National Bank. In addition to working in their chosen fields, students experience Georgian culture through museum visits, concerts, lectures, meetings with Georgian students, and excursions. Visit the sacred eleventh-century Cathedral of Sveti-tskhoveli and the twentieth-century Stalin Museum, take the ancient Georgian Military Highway to ski in the Caucasus Range, see the birthplace of the wine grape in Kakheti and the region where Jason sought the Golden Fleece. Participants are housed in pairs with English-speaking families in Tbilisi, Georgia's capital city. At the end of the course students will write a 10-page paper assessing their internship experience.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Knowledge of Russia or Georgia is not required.
Cost to student: approximately $2000.

CASSIDAY

RUSS 030 Honors Project

May be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RUSS 031 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Russian 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY-See under ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

THEATRE

THEA 010 Giant Puppet Fauvel

In this course we will create a giant puppet play based on a medieval source, the Roman de Fauvel. Derived from a 1310 manuscript by Gerard de Bus, the Roman de Fauvel was one of history's first "multimedia" productions, combining colorful artwork, poetry and abstract musical works into one carefully produced book. Fauvel is a strongly satirical work, and one of the artistic monuments of the late Middle Ages. The goal of this course is to transpose some of the varied and fascinating elements of the Fauvel illuminated manuscript into an original multimedia work involving music, spoken words, and large scale puppets, which we will present at the end of Winter Study Period.
Students may be involved in any or all aspects of the production: making puppets, masks, costumes, and props, painting backdrops, transposing and performing music, acting, lighting, and advertising.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and attendance.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Adventurous musicians, actors, and artists are especially encouraged to enroll.
Meeting time: afternoons; Mondays and Wednesdays-but more frequently as the performance approaches.
Cost to student: $25 for lab fee.

DOUGLAS PAISLEY (Instructor)
BAKER-WHITE (Sponsor)

Doug Paisley impedes his work as a muralist and miniature painter (and studio art assistant at Williams) with a constant stream of immensely diverting musical and theater activities. He was Artistic Director of Williamstown's annual midwinter revels, Wassail, from 1992-2001, and is a co-founding member of the Early Muses, an ensemble devoted to the exploration and performance of Medieval and Renaissance music.

THEA 011 Theatre of the Body: A Transcultural Model for Physical Theatre Performance (Same as Japanese 011)

(See under Asian Studies-Japanese for full description.)

THEA 012 Ensembles in Classic American Musical Theatre (Same as Music 012)

(See under Music for full description.)

THEA 030 Senior Production

May be taken by students registered for Theatre 491, 492 but is not required.

THEA 031 Senior Thesis

May be taken by students registered for Theatre 493, 494 but is not required.

WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES

WGST 010 Sappho's Poetry in Greek: Eros the Sweet-Bitter (Same as Classics 010 and Comparative Literature 013)

(See under Classics for full description.)

WGST 011 Breaking Ground: Women Architects in America (Same as ArtH 011)

(See under Art for full description.)

WGST 012 Contemporary Mexican Women Film-Makers (Same as ArtS 017, English 035 and Spanish 012)

(See under Romance Languages-Spanish for full description.)

WGST 013 Gender and Science Fiction (Same as English 013)

(See under English for full description.)

WGST 014 Fictionalizing the Artist: Genius and Gender in Films about Artists (Same as ArtH 014)

(See under Art for full description.)

WGST 015 Latina and Latino Migration Stories: Puerto Rico Women Write (Same as English 037 and History 012)

(See under History for full description.)

WGST 016 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Special 016)

(See under Special for full description.)

WGST 017 Women and Development (Same as Economics 012)

(See under Economics for full description.)

WGST 030 Honors Project

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

SPECIALS

SPEC 010 Quest for College: Early Awareness in Berkshire County Schools

Today's extremely competitive higher education market places significant pressure on students nationwide to start planning for college at an increasingly early age while simultaneously demanding ever-higher standards of excellence for admission to top schools. "Early Awareness" initiatives aim to educate middle school students as to what lies ahead on the college horizon, empowering them to make sound academic and extracurricular choices that will keep open a maximum of options. The first week of this course will be spent in the classroom, exploring and discussing problems and issues germane to the national trends towards greater (and earlier) college-related pressures. Students will respond to a series of readings dealing with such issues as tracking, paid test preparation and untimed testing, early decision, parental and peer pressures, special interests, misrepresentation of information, independent counseling, and others. Class time will also be devoted to familiarizing students with both the nuances of the college admission process and the administration of the early awareness game, Quest for College. Students will spend the next two weeks visiting 10-12 Berkshire County middle schools, administering the game and inviting students to the culminating College Day. All 8 students will then work together to plan and run College Day activities for students and their parents. This day will include a) campus tours, b) general higher education info sessions, and c) financial aid/scholarship info for the parents. If student and community interest is sufficient, the course may culminate in a public presentation and open forum early second semester.
Evaluation will be based on completion of field work (school visits), organization and execution of project to bring local middle school students to the Williams Campus for a day of early-awareness related activities and a final paper (approximately 10 pages) reflecting on a course-related issue of the student's choosing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Preference given to a) students with prior education/admission experience, b) students with access to transportation c) juniors and seniors. Interested students must consult with instructors prior to registration. Students will be selected according to the following criteria: a) experience in teaching or admission, b) access to transportation, and c) seniority. Provision will be stated that interested students must consult the instructors before registration, that instructors may determine depth of experience and focus of interest.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: transportation to field work sites and purchase of text.

GINA COLEMAN `90 and MATTHEW SWANSON `97 (Instructors)
WSP COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Gina Coleman `90, is Associate Director of Admission, Director of Multicultural Recruitment, and in her fifth year as women's rugby coach. Coleman, who holds an MA in education from MCLA, designed the game, Quest for College. Matthew Swanson `97 is in his third year as Assistant Director of Admission. Swanson has spent the past seven summers teaching/leading in various educational environments. Both Gina and Matthew have been involved with Early Awareness initiatives in Berkshire County schools.

SPEC 011 Science for Kids (Same as Chemistry 011)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

SPEC 012 Living by Words: Surviving and Thriving in the Art and Sport of Rhetoric (Same as Comparative Literature010, English 010, and Leadership Studies 012)

(See under Comparative Literature for full description.)

SPEC 013 The Second Amendment: Liberty and Gun Control (Same as Legal Studies 013)

To some, the Second Amendment is an embarrassing anachronism that stands in the way of common sense gun regulation. To others, it is our most fundamental right, the backbone of American constitutional liberties. Yet despite the importance of these issues it is difficult to find any civil liberties issue on which people are more poorly informed. The first part of this course will be an examination of the history, meaning, intent, and judicial interpretation of the Second Amendment. Does the Second Amendment mean that gun ownership by individual citizens cannot be restricted? Or does it mean that only agents of the state, such as National Guards, have a right to bear arms? To address these questions we will read and discuss original documents pertaining to the framing of the Constitution, US Supreme Court rulings, and historical analyses of these texts. In the second part of the course we will focus on current gun control issues. Does gun ownership increase violence, decrease crime, or both? What sorts of gun regulations are effective, and which, if any, overstep the bounds of the Second Amendment? Rather than approach these questions from uninformed intuition, as is typically done, we will focus on trying to understand the implications of the historical texts and the empirical data bearing on these issues.
Requirements: class attendance and participation, and a 10-page position paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference given according to seniority.
Meeting time: afternoons; 3 two-hour sessions per week.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for books.

K. KIRBY

SPEC 016 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Women's and Gender 016)

This course introduces students to basic knowledge about American Sign Language and deaf people. Emphasis in this preliminary introduction to ASL is on developing rudimentary receptive, expressive and interactive skills through an intensive immersion in ASL. Students will also be introduced to deaf history, culture and politics. This course is designed to help nonsigners develop rudimentary skills, to introduce them to the complexity of ASL, and to cultivate interest in further study of the language.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation, quizzes, and student produced videotapes of their own expressive skills. Students will also be expected to spend an hour outside of class each week viewing native ASL signers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15 (expected: 10).
Meeting time: afternoons; 3 two-hour meetings per week.
Cost to student: $40.

LAURIE BENJAMIN (Instructor)
SAWICKI (Sponsor)

Laurie Benjamin is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts in multicultural and international education. Ms. Benjamin has taught deaf students at the secondary level. She is a nationally certified ASL interpreter with extensive experience in a wide range of interpreter settings including mental health, legal, and performance interpreting. In addition to working as a free-lance interpreter for the deaf, she is currently teaching ASL to students at Williamstown Elementary School.

SPEC 017 Onstage! (Same Mathematics 017)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

SPEC 018 Picturing Our Past (Same as Biology 019, Environmental Studies 018, and INTR 019)

Images help us to imagine the past and preserve our collective history. A significant amount of the cultural history of Williamstown and Williams College lies hidden, and often deteriorating in shoe boxes and closets of members of our community. As a culmination of the 250th year anniversary of the Town of Williamstown, residents will be given an opportunity to bring in pre-1975 images to be scanned for incorporation into a digital database. The owner of the image will provide data along with an audio caption for inclusion in the database. Once complete, the image database will reside in the Williamstown House of Local History and the Williams College Archives.Students participating in the course will learn how to use Photoshop software to digitally restore the images. At the end of the course we will print many of the images and install a community-wide exhibition. We will also produce a catalog for the exhibit. The exhibition will cover historical topics such as schools, churches, farms, mills, commerce, families, and neighborhoods, and will take place at a variety of venues on campus and around Williamstown.
Evaluation will be based on participation in the collection, restoration, interpretation of the images, and production of the catalog. Exhibition of coursework is mandatory.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to those expressing interest.
Meeting time: mornings-intensively the first week and then scheduled at the convenience of participants.
Cost to student: $30 for text.

H. ART

SPEC 019 Medical Apprenticeship

A student is assigned to a local physician, dentist, or veterinarian to observe closely his or her practice in the office and/or at the North Adams Regional Hospital, Berkshire Medical Center (Pittsfield, MA), or Southwestern Vermont Medical Center (Bennington, VT). It is expected that a student will spend the better part of the day, five days a week, with the physician or a period mutually agreed upon by the student and the physician as being educationally significant. The program has proven to be extremely successful in giving interested students a clear picture of the practice of medicine in a non-urban area. An effort is made to expose the student to a range of medical specialties.
A 10-page report written on some aspect of the month's experience is required.
Prerequisites: interested students must attend a mandatory information meeting in early October, prior to applying for this course. Enrollment limit: 44. Preference is given to juniors, and then sophomores, whose course work has been suggestive of a firm commitment to preparation for medical school.
Cost to student: none, except for local transportation and vaccinations.

  1. TEACHING ASSOCIATES (Instructors): TIM J. BAISCH, M.D.; DANIEL I. BECKER, M.D.; JAMES BOVIENZO, D.O.; PEGGY CARON, D.V.M.; JOSHUA KLEEDERMAN, D.M.D.; VICTORIA R. CAVALLI, M.D.; BRIAN CUNNINGHAM, M.D.; RUTLEDGE CURRIE, M.D.; MARIANNE DEMARCO, M.D.; PAUL DONOVAN M.D.; STUART DUBUFF, M.D.; DAVID ELPERN, M.D.; ROBERT FANELLI, M.D.; STUART FREYER, M.D.; ERIC SCOTT FROST, M.D.; WADE GEBARA, M.D.; MICHAEL L. GERRITY, M.D.; CYNTHIA GEYER, M.D.; HENRY M. GOLD, M.D.; DAVID M. GORSON, M.D.; AMY GRIFFIN, M.D.; BONNIE H. HERR, M.D.; DOUGLAS V. HERR, M.D.; ROBERT HERTZIG, M.D.; ROBERT C. JANDL, M.D.; LAURA JONES, D.V.M.; COLLEEN KELLEY, M.D.; JONATHAN KRANT, M.D.; ANDRE LANGLOIS, M.D.; IRA LAPIDUS, D.M.D.; JOAN E. LISTER, M.D.; PAUL MAHER, M.D.; JEFFREY MATHENY, M.D.; RONALD S. MENSH, M.D.; STEVE NELSON, M.D.; CHARLES O'NEILL, M.D.; JUDY H. ORTON, M.D.; NORMAN PARADIS, M.D.; MICHAEL C. PAYNE, M.D.; FERNANDO PONCE, M.D.; RICHARD PROVENZANO, M.D.; HENRY RICHMOND, M.D.; DANIEL S. ROBBINS, M.D.; OSCAR RODRIQUES, M.D.; CHARLES SILBERMAN, M.D.; JULIE SILBERSTEIN, M.D.; ANTHONY M. SMEGLIN, M.D.; ERWIN A. STUEBNER, JR., M.D.; DANIEL M. SULLIVAN, M.D.; KATHERINE URANECK, M.D.; KATHRYN WISEMAN, M.D.; RICHARD WISEMAN, M.D.; CHARLES I. WOHL, M.D.; JEFFREY A. YUCHT, M.D.; MARK ZIMPFER, M.D.

CHARLEY STEVENSON
Health Professions Advisor

SPEC 020 Modern Dance-Muller Technique (Same Mathematics 018)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

SPEC 023 Beginning Modern Dance (Same as Mathematics 013)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

SPEC 024 Eye Care and Culture in Caribbean Nicaragua

Following up on the very successful Winter Study trip to the South Atlantic coast of Nicaragua in January 2003, where approximately 2000 people were fitted with distance and reading glasses, the trip this January will visit the North Atlantic coast to again deliver eye care to the indigenous population of the region.
The community of Puerto Cabezas is in the principal population area of the indigenous Misquito people. The communities around Puerto Cabezas have a population of over 50,000.
After a background study of health care policy and "hands-on" training in eye care by Dr. Bruce Moore, Professor of the New England College of Optometry (NECO), the group will travel to Puerto Cabezas and surrounding communities.
Students will assist in the conducting of eye care clinics under the guidance of NECO optometrists and the international organization Volunteer Optometric Services to Humanity (VOSH).
The schedule will include an introduction to health care policy by Dr. Melvin Krant. An introduction to the culture and realities of the Northern Caribbean Coast will be led by Dr. Robert Peck and Lynn Hood, co-leaders of the 2001 Spring Break construction brigade as well as the 2003 Winter Study eye care trip to the South Atlantic Coast.
After two weeks of study of the region, the group will travel to Puerto Cabezas. While being immersed in the culture of the area, we will assist in the dispensing of glasses using evaluation techniques learned in preparation for the trip.
Requirements: attendance at all class meetings prior to the trip, the keeping of a journal to be submitted after our return, and an essay reflecting on the daily realities of life in a third world region.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16. This course is not open to first-year students.
Meeting time: mornings; Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 10 a.m.-noon.
Cost to student: $1,500.

ROBERT PECK, LYNN HOOD, and MELVIN KRANT (Instructors)
WSP COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Dr. Robert Peck is a 23-year volunteer and traveler to the Atlantic Coast and retired Director of Athletics at Williams (1971-2001).

Lynn Hood, a painting major at Bennington College, was the former Director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving at her alma mater before her work at the Williamstown Council on Aging.

Dr. Melvin Krant is a former professor at Brandeis and lecturer in medicine at Harvard Medical School and professor of medicine at UMass and Tufts Medical Schools.

SPEC 025 Williams in Georgia (Same as Russian 025)

(See under Russian for full description.)

SPEC 027 Teaching and Writing at Theodore Roosevelt High School

(CANCELLED)

SPEC 028 Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan

Participating sophomores, juniors and seniors will be expected to pursue a full day's program of observing, teaching, tutoring, and mentoring at Christopher Columbus HS in the Bronx or at A. Philip Randolph HS in Manhattan. Each of the schools will provide a resident supervisor for the Williams teaching interns who will meet regularly to assist with questions and to monitor individual schedules.
Evaluation will be based on full-time affiliation with the school for the entire winter study, keeping a daily journal, participating in the weekly after school seminars held for all of the NYC teaching practicums, and submitting a 5- to l0-page report at the end of Winter Study reflecting upon and summarizing the month's learning experience. Orientation meetings and a visit to the high school prior to the start of winter study will be arranged.
Cost to student: approximately $400 for food and transportation. Housing in NYC will be arranged where necessary.

P. SMITH
Coordinator of High School/College Partnerships

SPEC 029 Junior High School Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan

Participating sophomores, juniors, and seniors will be expected to pursue a full day's program of observing, teaching, tutoring and mentoring at PS 45 in the Bronx (a feeder school to Roosevelt HS) or at Roberto Clemente Junior High School in Manhattan (a feeder school to A. Philip Randolph HS). Each of the schools will provide a resident supervisor for the Williams teaching interns who will meet regularly to assist with questions and to arrange individual schedules.
Evaluation will be based on full-time association with the school for winter study, keeping a daily journal, participating in the weekly meetings for all of the Williams Teaching Interns, and submitting a 5- to l0-page report at the end of Winter Study reflecting upon and summarizing the month's learning experience. An orientation program and a visit to the school will be arranged prior to January.
No prerequisites.
Cost to student: approximately $400 for food and transportation while in NYC. Housing will be arranged for those needing it.

P. SMITH
Coordinator of High School/College Partnerships

SPEC 035 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel

Each class will begin with a lecture-demonstration, followed by practice on the potter's wheel. Each student will have the use of a potter's wheel for each class. We will work on mugs, bowls, pitchers, plates, jars, lids, vases, and bottles, and will finish these shapes as required by trimming and adding handles, lugs, lids, spouts, and knobs. We will also work on several different handbuilding projects. After the tenth class session, all class work will be biscuit-fired. The eleventh class will be devoted to glazing the biscuited pieces. Glazing techniques will include pouring, dipping, layering, brushing, and stamping, and using wax resist and other masking techniques to develop pattern and design. The completed work will then be glaze-fired. The last meeting will be devoted to a "final exam" gallery show of your best work. Woven into lecture-demonstrations will be presentations on various topics relating to the science and history of pottery making.
Requirements: attendance at all class sessions and enthusiasm for learning the craft of pottery making. No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 9.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $160 lab fee, plus makeup class fees ($32.50 per class) if applicable.

RAY BUB (Instructor)
Winter Study Committee (Sponsor)

Ray Bub is a ceramic artist and teacher at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery in Pownal, Vermont, 10 minutes north of the Williams College campus.

SPEC 036 Teaching Practicum: St. Aloysius School, Harlem

An opportunity for up to five sophomore, junior or senior students to observe, tutor, teach and mentor at St Aloysius School in Harlem under the direction of Principal Laurel Senger. An orientation session and a visit to the school in December will be arranged prior to Winter Study.
Evaluation will be based on full-time participation at St Aloysius for the month, keeping a daily journal, participating in the weekly meetings of all NYC practicum students, and submitting a 5- to l0-page report at the end of WSP reflecting upon and summarizing the month's learning experience. Enrollment limit: 5. Sophomores, juniors and seniors only please.
Cost to student: approximately $400. for food and transportation. Housing in NYC will be arranged where necessary.

P. SMITH
Coordinator of High School/College Partnerships

SPEC 037 To Face Suffering

I have been increasingly gnawing on an uncomfortable feeling. It began a decade ago with my work to train medical students to recognize the therapeutic elements of the patient-physician relationship, continued in the painful months following the 9/11 attacks and has persisted through all the build-up and conduct of the war in Iraq. The feeling? We don't know how to suffer. We know how to avoid suffering. And, many people have learned to survive suffering. But I would suggest that if you don't know how to suffer, your ability to help those who are suffering is limited. For those whose job is to face suffering day after day - the physician, the activist, the war journalist, the minister, the social worker, the daughter of a dying parent - the most common responses include forms of detachment, distortion, or immediate efforts to problem-solve, few of them effective. How can we change this?My experience as a Zen priest is that the capacity to face suffering is a physical ability. It can be built through hard physical training that focuses on the breath and posture, and that takes long years of effort. In a month we can only begin that work but we can also begin looking at other traditions of training as well.
The format for this course is two-fold: one part built on physical training and the other part is based on reading, story-telling and reflection. Daily practice of at least 3 hours of physical training is required and it can be satisfied in a number of ways. Those interested are invited to join morning practice in Zen meditation and training in the Jikishin-kage ryu of swordsmanship. But students may be already involved in other strenuous physical training such as dance or swimming and those can be proposed as alternative means to satisfy this element of the course. The discussion element of the course will be conducted 3 afternoons each week, meeting 2 hours each time. Readings will be drawn from a variety of sources, including literature, medical case studies, personal accounts, and non-fiction accounts of people facing suffering.
Evaluation will be based on active participation in the seminars and will culminate in a 10-12 page paper analyzing one of our readings for the lessons it offers on how to train people to face suffering.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference given based a one-page statement that describes your reasons to take this course and proposes the physical training you would like to pursue for the month.
Cost to student: $80 for required texts-for those training in Zen and sword, equipment will cost approximately $280.

GORDON GREENE (Instructor)
Charley Stevenson (Sponsor)

Gordon Greene, Ph.D. is a Zen priest and medical educator, training students and residents at the medical school at the University of Hawaii. He has trained in Zen and martial arts for 25 years and has taught or co-taught four previous Williams WSPs. (Unlike last year's WSP held in Hawaii, this course won't be conducted 24 hours per day, 7 days per week.)

SPEC 038 Giving It Away: How We Help Others

Old-fashioned charity used to provide support for "the less fortunate among us." Today, sharing our good fortune with others is a far more complicated matter. There are mixed motives, from guilt to taxes to prestige. There are new organizations, with some 800,000 501(c) 3 organizations seeking funds for health and human services, education, and the arts. There are new standards of accountability, measuring outcomes and change rather than the mere volume of money or clients. So-called venture philanthropy focuses resources on specific results, with active direction from those who are footing the bill. Foundations have moved from long-term support to short-term projects, and traditional charities look more and more to government support, with consequences for all concerned, even as they continue mass appeals for public support. From the moment a Williams graduate begins to get a paycheck, an overwhelming number of interests will be asking for part of it, and for time and service as well. This course will consider the economics, history, philosophy and sociology of how we give it away, with guest speakers from today's changing and challenged non-profit world.
Evaluation on class participation and ten-page paper. Enrollment limited to 20. Preference given to seniors and descending.
Meeting time: four mornings per week.
Cost to students: approximately $50 for texts.

PAUL NEELY '68 (Instructor)
WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Paul Neely '68, the former editor and publisher of The Chattanooga Times, has broad experience with non-profit organizations. He is currently board chair of the United Way in Chattanooga and a Williams Trustee.

SPEC 039 "Composing A Life:" Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams

To be at Williams you have learned to be a successful student, but how do you learn to be successful in life? How will you define success in both your career and in your personal life? How will you resolve the inevitable tradeoffs and achieve balance between the two? In short, what will constitute the "good life" for you? We borrow the concept of "composing a life," from a book by Mary Catherine Bateson, as a very apt metaphor for the ongoing process of defining success and balance in life. This course is designed: (1)To offer college students, on the threshold of entering adulthood, an opportunity to examine and define their beliefs, values, and assumptions about their future personal and professional lives, and to consider how they might achieve a successful balance; (2) To encourage students to gain a better understanding of how culture, ideology, and opportunity affect their life choices; 3) To provide an opportunity for students to consider different models of success and balance through an emphasis on case studies and "living cases" (in the form of guests from various professions who have made different life choices); and (4) To aid students in contemplating their career options through individual advising and introducing various career and life planning resources. Through the use of selected readings, cases, guest speakers and field interviews, we will explore both the public context of the workplace as well as the private context of individuals and their personal relationships in determining life choices.
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance, class participation, field interview, and a 10-page final paper
No prerequisites. Questions about the course: please contact Michele Moeller Chandler at 458-8106. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: approximately $30 for case materials.

MICHELE MOELLER CHANDLER `73 and CHIP CHANDLER `72 (Instructors)
TOOMAJIAN (Sponsor)

Michele Moeller Chandler ('73) and Chip Chandler ('72) have taught this Winter Study course for the past seven years. They have been both personally and professionally engaged in the course topic. Michele's career has been in college administration, and she has an M.A. from Columbia, and a Ph.D. from Northwestern. Her Ph.D. dissertation focused upon the career/family decisionmaking of professional women who altered their careers because of family obligations. Chip is a senior partner with McKinsey & Company, an international management consulting firm, and he has an MBA from Harvard.

WILLIAMS PROGRAM IN TEACHING

Students interested in exploring one or more of the following courses related to teaching and/or working with children and adolescents should contact Susan Engel, Director of Education Programs, who will be able to help you choose one that best suits your educational goals.

ANSO 011 Berkshire Farm Internship

(See under Anthropology/Sociology for full description.)

ANSO 012 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

CHEM 011 Science for Kids (Same as Special 011)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

CHEM 012 Learning and Teaching Chemistry in Spanish (Same as Spanish 014)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

PHYS 016 Teaching with Technology

(See under Physics for full description.)

PSYC 017 Teaching Practicum

(See under Psychology for full description.)

SPEC 016 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Women's and Gender 016)

(See under Special for full description.)

SPEC 027 Teaching and Writing at Theodore Roosevelt High School

(See under Special for full description.)

SPEC 028 Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan

(See under Special for full description.)

SPEC 029 Junior High School Teaching Practicum, the Bronx and Manhattan

(See under Special for full description.)

SPEC 036 Teaching Practicum: St. Aloysius School, Harlem

(See under Special for full description.)

WILLIAMS-MYSTIC PROGRAM IN AMERICAN MARITIME STUDIES

An interdisciplinary one-semester program co-sponsored by Williams College and Mystic Seaport which includes credit for one winter study. Classes in maritime history, literature of the sea, marine ecology, oceanography, and marine policy are supplemented by field seminars: offshore sailing, Pacific Coast and Nantucket Island. For details, see "Williams-Mystic Maritime Studies Program" or our website: www.williamsmystic.org.


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