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Winter Study 2006

Last updated: 12/15/05 2:17 PM

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REMINDERS ABOUT WSP REGISTRATION

All students who will be on campus during the 2005-2006 academic year must register for WSP. Registration will take place in the early part of fall semester. If you are registered for a senior thesis in the fall which must be continued through Winter Study by departmental rules, you will be registered for your Winter Study Project automatically. In every other case, you must complete registration. First-year students are required to participate in a Winter Study that will take place on campus; they are not allowed to do 99's.

Even if you plan to take a 99, or the instructor of your first choice accepts you during the registration period, there are many things that can happen between registration and the beginning of Winter Study to upset your first choice, so you must list five choices. You should try to make one of your choices a project with a larger enrollment, not that it will guarantee you a project, but it will increase your chances.

If you think your time may be restricted in any way (ski meets, interviews, etc.), clear these restrictions with the instructor before signing up for his/her project.

Remember, for cross-listed projects, you should sign up for the subject you want to appear on your record.

For many beginning language courses, you are required to take the WSP Sustaining Program in addition to your regular project. You will be automatically enrolled in this Sustaining Program, so no one should list this as a choice.

The grade of honors is reserved for outstanding or exceptional work. Individual instructors may specify minimum standards for the grade, but normally, fewer than one out of ten students will qualify. A grade of pass means the student has performed satisfactorily. A grade of perfunctory pass signifies that a student's work has been significantly lacking but is just adequate to deserve a pass.

If you have any questions about a project, see the instructor before you register.

Finally, all work for WSP must be completed and submitted to the instructor no later than Thursday, January 26th. Only the Dean can grant an extension beyond this date.

WINTER STUDY 99'S

Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible to propose "99's," independent projects arranged with faculty sponsors, conducted in lieu of regular Winter Study courses. Perhaps you have encountered an interesting idea in one of your courses which you would like to study in more depth, or you may have an interest not covered in the regular curriculum. In recent years students have undertaken in-depth studies of particular literary works, interned in government offices, assisted in foreign and domestic medical clinics, conducted field work in economics in developing countries, and given performances illustrating the history of American dance. Although some 99's involve travel away from campus, there are many opportunities to pursue intellectual or artistic goals here in Williamstown.

99 forms are available online:

http://www.williams.edu/Registrar/winterstudy/99direct

The deadline for submitting the proposals to faculty sponsors is Thursday, 29 September.

Winter Study Course Offerings

AAS 30 Senior Project

AMST 11 Arabs on Atlantic Avenue: Arab-American Communities, Literature and Art (Same as English 24 and French 11)

AMST 12 Asian Pacific American Creative Writing: From Yarn Wigs to Persimmons

AMST 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as Music 17)

AMST 30 Senior Honors Project

ANSO 11 Berkshire Farm Center Internship

ANSO 12 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

ANSO 13 History and Cinema in Eastern Europe

ANTH 31 Senior Thesis

SOC 31 Senior Thesis

ARTH 10 Inventing Joan of Arc: The History of a Heroine in Pictures and Film

ARTH 15 Materials of the Artist: Uncovering Fakes and Forgeries (Same as ArtS 15 and Chemistry 15)

ARTH 24 Sarah Bernhardt in New York

ARTH 25 The Birth of the Modern: Art and Music in Vienna

ARTH 31 Senior Thesis

ARTH 33 Honors Independent Study

ARTS 10 Oil Painting Workshop

ARTS 11 Drawing Life

ARTS 12 Picture Book Illustration

ARTS 13 Video Art Production

ARTS 14 Noir and Neo Noir

ARTS 15 Materials of the Artist: Uncovering Fakes and Forgeries (Same as ArtH 15 and Chemistry 15)

ARTS 16 Glass and Glassblowing

ARTS 17 Painting: Mythological Landscape and Imagery of Ancient Greece

ARTS 18 A House in a Box

ARTS 19 Pinhole Photography

ARTS 33 Honors Independent Project

ASST 31 Senior Thesis

ASTR 10 Adventures Under The Dome: Communicating Astronomy (Same as English 10)

ASTR 31 Senior Research

ASPH 31 Senior Research

BIOL 10 Electron Microscopy

BIOL 11 Images of Greylock: Interpreting Landscape Change (Same as Environmental Studies 11 and INTR 11) (CANCELLED!)

BIOL 12 Picture Book Illustration (Same as ArtS 12)

BIOL 13 Food: An Integrative Approach

BIOL 14 Biological Clocks

BIOL 15 Students Teaching AIDS to Students (STATS) (Same as Special 20)

BIOL 22 Introduction to Biological Research

BIOL 31 Senior Thesis

CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as Special 11)

CHEM 12 Epidemiology, Public Health and Leadership in the Health Professions (Same as Leadership Studies 12)

CHEM 14 Emergency Medical Technician-Basic

CHEM 15 Materials of the Artist: Uncovering Fakes and Forgeries (Same as ArtH 15 and ArtS 15)

CHEM 16 Glass and Glassblowing

CHEM 17 Introduction to Research in Archaeological Science (CANCELLED!)

CHEM 18 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry

CHEM 19 Introduction to Research in Environmental Science (Same as Environmental Studies 19)

CHEM 20 Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry

CHEM 23 Introduction to Research in Organic Chemistry (CANCELLED!)

CHEM 24 Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry

CHEM 31 Senior Research and Thesis

CHIN 88 Sustaining Program for Chinese 101-102

CHIN 10 Reading and Translating Tang Poetry

CHIN 11 Chinese Painting

CHIN 31 Senior Thesis

CLAS 11 The Religions of the Roman Empire and Christianity (Same as Religion 11)

CLAS 12 The Ovidian Renaissance (CANCELLED!)

CLAS 31 Senior Thesis

COGS 31 Senior Thesis

COMP 11 The Colonialist Visions

COMP 12 Contemporary Queer Cinema in France (Same as French 12 and Women's and Gender Studies 11)

COMP 31 Senior Thesis

LIT 31 Senior Thesis

CSCI 15 Designing for People (Same as Psychology 15)

CSCI 31 Senior Honor Thesis

CMAJ 31 Senior Thesis

ECON 10 Excel for Economics

ECON 11 "Inside" Information Policy (CANCELLED!)

ECON 12 Blogonomics

ECON 13 Art and Economics

ECON 14 Accounting

ECON 15 Stock Market

ECON 16 LEGO Mindstorms Robotics

ECON 17 Business Economics

ECON 18 The American Dream?

ECON 19 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 19)

ECON 20 Introduction to the Economics, Geography and Appreciation of Wine

ECON 23 Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Model

ECON 25 Social Activism in Senegal (Same as Political Science 25)

ECON 27 Henry George, Eliminating Poverty

ECON 30 Honors Project

ECON 31 Honors Thesis

ENGL 10 Adventures Under The Dome: Communicatin (Same as Astronomy 10)

ENGL 11 Anxious Allegories: Horror and Science Fiction Films

ENGL 12 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography (Same as Special 27)

ENGL 13 White Coat, Black Coat: Literature and Medicine (CANCELLED!)

ENGL 14 Poetry and Painting

ENGL 15 Victorian Monsters (CANCELLED!)

ENGL 16 The Rabbit Novels of John Updike

ENGL 17 Shame

ENGL 18 Comics, Comic Books and Graphic Novels

ENGL 19 Structuring Your Novel

ENGL 20 Hypnosis and Social Knowledge

ENGL 23 Adorno's Negative Dialectics

ENGL 24 Arabs on Atlantic Avenue: Arab-American Communities, Literature and Art (Same as American Studies 11 and French 11)

ENGL 27 Piracy or Freedom? File Sharing, Open Source and Seed Patents: the Battle over Intellectual Property

ENGL 28 Journalism Today (CANCELLED!)

ENGL 29 Philosophy in Literature (Same as Philosophy 29)

ENGL 30 Honors Project: Specialization Route

ENGL 31 Honors Project: Thesis

ENVI 10 The Winter Naturalist's Journal

ENVI 11 Images of Greylock: Interpreting Landscape Change (Same as Biology 11 and INTR 11) (CANCELLED!)

ENVI 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Geosciences 12)

ENVI 13 The Law and the Literature of the Environment: The Environment on Trial (Same as Legal Studies 13)

ENVI 16 Got Maps? An Experiential Exploration of Maps and Mapmaking in Contemporary Life (Same as Geosciences 16)

ENVI 17 Alaska: Land of Pipelines or Pipe Dreams?

ENVI 18 State Environmental Politics (Same as Political Science 16)

ENVI 19 Introduction to Research in Environmental Science (Same as Chemistry 19)

ENVI 31 Senior Research and Thesis

GEOS 11 Science of Jurassic Park

GEOS 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Environmental Studies 12)

GEOS 16 Got Maps? An Experiential Exploration of Maps and Mapmaking in Contemporary Life (Same as Environmental Studies 16)

GEOS 25 Caves and Karst Geology of Northern Spain

GEOS 31 Senior Thesis

GERM 88 Sustaining Program for German 101-102

GERM 43 Introduction to Scientific Cynicism #43 (Same as Special 43) (CANCELLED!)

GERM 25 German in Germany

GERM 30 Honors Project

GERM 31 Senior Thesis

HIST 10 "Queer" in the 'Fifties: British Histories and Identities (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 10)

HIST 11 The Great Kahoona: The Surfer in the Modern Popular Imagination (CANCELLED!)

HIST 12 The Unremembered Genocide: the Armenian Genocide

HIST 13 The Historian as Detective

HIST 14 American Wars: Directed Independent Reading and Research

HIST 15 Martin Luther King Jr.'s Moral Vision for Today

HIST 16 Genealogy

HIST 17 American Strategy in World War II: War Plans and Execution

HIST 18 J.R.R. Tolkien, Middle Earth, and Modern Medievalism

HIST 31 Senior Thesis

INTR 11 Images of Greylock: Interpreting Landscape Change (Same as Envi 11 and Biol11) (CANCELLED!)

INST 26 Arabic in Cairo

INST 30 Senior Honors Project\JAPN 88 Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102

JAPN 10 Stories from the Edges: Japanese and Beyond

JAPN 12 Performative Learning

JAPN 31 Senior Thesis

JWST 13 In the Beginning: Fundamentals of Hebrew (Same as Special 13) (CANCELLED!)

LATS 10 Gender and the Latino Urban Scene

LEAD 11 Justice and Public Policy (Same as Political Science 19)

LEAD 12 Epidemiology, Public Health and Leadership in the Health Professions (Same as Chemistry 12)

LEAD 13 Presidential Leadership

LEAD 18 Wilderness Leadership

LEAD 25 Hawaii, Before, During, and After Pearl Harbor (CANCELLED!)

LGST 13 The Law and the Literature of the Environment: The Environment on Trial (Same as Environmental Studies 13)

LING 12 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Women's and Gender 12 and Special 12)

MATH 12 Forgot Math?

MATH 13 Roulette

MATH 14 Can You Keep a Secret? An Introduction to Cryptography

MATH 15 Math and Music (Same as Music 15)

MATH 16 Knitting: The Social History and Craft Form (Same as Special 16)

MATH 17 Humor Writing (Same as Special 29)

MATH 18 Introductory Photography: People and Places (Same as Special 18)

MATH 30 Senior Project

MATH 31 Senior Thesis

MUS 10 Symphonic Winds

MUS 11 Beethoven

MUS 12 Ensembles in Classic American Musical Theatre (Same as Theatre 12)

MUS 13 Voice Workshop

MUS 14 The Music of Billy Strayhorn

MUS 15 Math and Music (Same as Mathematics 15)

MUS 16 Percussion for Non-Percussionists

MUS 17 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as American Studies 15)

MUS 18 Chamber Music Performance

MUS 21 Individual Vocal and Instrumental Instruction (Can only be taken IN ADDITION to a regular WSP course)

MUS 25 Ghanaian Music, Dance, and Textiles: Interdisciplinary Studies

MUS 31 Senior Thesis

NSCI 31 Senior Thesis

PHIL 10 Formal Logic

PHIL 11 Aikido and Ethics

PHIL 29 Philosophy in Literature (Same as English 29)

PHIL 31 Senior Thesis

PHYS 10 Light and Holography

PHYS 11 Computational Methods for Science and Engineering

PHYS 12 Meet the Right Side of Your Brain: Drawing as a Learnable Skill

PHYS 13 Automotive Mechanics (CANCELLED!)

PHYS 14 Electronics

PHYS 15 Livres des Artists – The Artist Book

PHYS 22 Research Participation

PHYS 31 Senior Thesis

POEC 31 Honors Thesis

PSCI 10 Adventures in Disabilities (Same as Psychology 10)

PSCI 11 The Gospel According to U2

PSCI 12 Constitution Making

PSCI 13 Politics and the Novel in South Asia (CANCELLED!)

PSCI 15 Globalization: Good or Evil?

PSCI 18 State Environmental Politics (Same as Environmental Studies 16)

PSCI 19 Justice and Public Policy (Same as Leadership Studies 11)

PSCI 21 Fieldwork in Public and Private Non-Profits

PSCI 25 Social Activism in Senegal (Same as Economics 25)

PSYC 10 Adventures in Disabilities (Same as Political Science 10)

PSYC 11 The Exonerated

PSYC 12 How To Think Like a Social Psychologist

PSYC 13 Fictional Worlds

PSYC 15 Designing for People (Same as Computer Science 15)

PSYC 16 Community Screening for Alzheimer's Disease

PSYC 17 Teaching Practicum

PSYC 18 Institutional Placement

PSYC 31 Senior Thesis

REL 11 The Religions of the Roman Empire and Christianity (Same as Classics 11)

REL 12 Yoga: A Mind-Body Connection

REL 25 Religion, Culture and Performance in Bali

REL 26 Explorations in Solidarity: A Meeting of Minds and Hearts in Nicaragua

REL 31 Senior Thesis

RLFR 88 Sustaining Program for French 101-102

RLFR 10 Asterix the Gaul: French Culture through the Prism of the Comic (CANCELLED!)

RLFR 11 Arabs on Atlantic Avenue: Arab-American Communities, Literature and Art (Same as English 24)

RLFR 12 Contemporary Queer Cinema in France (Same as Comparative Literature 12 and Women's and Gender Studies 11)

RLFR 30 Honors Essay

RLFR 31 Senior Thesis

RLIT 88 Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102

RLSP 88 Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102

RLSP 12 Cooking with Don Quixote: The History and Culture of Spanish Food (CANCELLED!)

RLSP 30 Honors Essay

RLSP 31 Senior Thesis

RUSS 88 Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102

RUSS 14 Food Writing Workshop (Same as Special 14)

RUSS 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Special 25)

RUSS 30 Honors Project

RUSS 31 Senior Thesis

THEA 10 Self-Production at Williams

THEA 12 Ensembles in Classic American Musical Theatre (Same as Music 12)

THEA 31 Senior Project

THEA 32 Senior Honors Thesis

WGST 10 "Queer" in the 'Fifties: British Histories and Identities (Same as History 10)

WGST 11 Contemporary Queer Cinema in France (Same as Comparative Literature 12 and French 12)

WGST 12 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Linguistics 12 and Special 12)

WGST 19 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) (Same as Economics 19)

WGST 30 Honors Project

SPEC 10 Quest for College: Early Awareness in Berkshire County Schools

SPEC 11 Science for Kids (Same as Chemistry 11)

SPEC 12 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Linguistics 12 and Women's and Gender 12)

SPEC 13 In the Beginning: Fundamentals of Hebrew (Same as Jewish Studies 13) (CANCELLED!)

SPEC 14 Food Writing Workshop (Same as Russian 14)

SPEC 15 American Colleges and Universities Past and Present

SPEC 16 Knitting: The Social History and Craft Form (Same as Mathematics 16)

SPEC 17 Printmaking on Ceramics

SPEC 18 Introductory Photography: People and Places (Same as Mathematics 18)

SPEC 19 Medical Apprenticeship

SPEC 20 Students Teaching AIDS to Students (STATS)

SPEC 23 Introduction to Sports Writing

SPEC 24 Eyecare and Culture in the Rural Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua

SPEC 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Russian 25)

SPEC 27 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography (Same as English 12)

SPEC 28 Teaching Practicums in New York City Schools

SPEC 29 Humor Writing (Same as Mathematics 17)

SPEC 35 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel

SPEC 39 "Composing a Life:" Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams

SPEC 43 Introduction to Scientific Cynicism #43 (Same as German 43) (CANCELLED!)

AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES

AAS 30 Senior Project

To be taken by students registered for Afro-American Studies 491 who are candidates for honors.

AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 11 Arabs on Atlantic Avenue: Arab-American Communities, Literature and Art (Same as English 24 and French 11)

(See under Romance Languages-French for full description.)

AMST 12 Asian Pacific American Creative Writing: From Yarn Wigs to Persimmons

Begin your year with a creative jump-start. We will look at the broad tapestry to which the label "Asian Pacific American poetry" is applied and read from a wide range of writings, from the raucous, colloquial works of Lois-Ann Yamanaka to the spare, devotional poems of Li-Young Lee. Using the readings as springboards, we will challenge ourselves with writing assignments, in class and out. We will look both to the page and (via audio, video, and, schedules permitting, live presentations by visiting poets) stage. We will write furiously and, with any luck, fearlessly. No prior cultural or creative experience necessary.
Students will be required to submit both critical and creative responses (totalling 8 pages) to the readings, present a poem from memory, and participate in class discussions.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for materials.
Meeting time: Tuesday and Thursday, 1-3:50 p.m.

BARBARA TRAN (Instructor)
WONG (Sponsor)

Barbara Tran, author of In the Mynah Bird's Own Words and coeditor of Watermark: Vietnamese American Poetry and Prose, is a Pushcart Prize-winning poet. She received her M.F.A. from Columbia University.

AMST 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as Music 17)

This course will focus on learning how to write and perform songs in a contemporary style. Topics addressed will include song structure, how to create a lyric that communicates, vocal and instrument presentation, performing techniques, publicity for events, and today's music industry. This class will culminate in a public performance of material written during the course.
To successfully pass this course, students are required to create, edit, perform and possibly record two original songs. These songs must be conceived during the course period (in other words, previously written material is not usable.) Students will be guided to create both music and lyrics. They may also be required to participate in a co-write session. One of these songs will be presented during the final performance, preferably by the student. Attendance at classes, feedback sessions, and all officially scheduled events is mandatory and crucial. Also, a short writing assignment will be passed in on the last day of class.
No prerequisites. Students with a musical background and the ability to play and instrument may be given preference, but anyone interested is encouraged to register. (Bernice.Lewis@williams.edu). Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $75 for books and xeroxing costs.
Meeting time: mornings,Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday for two-hour sessions.

BERNICE LEWIS (Instructor)
WONG (Sponsor)

Bernice Lewis is an accomplished singer and songwriter who has performed her work throughout the country. She lives in Williamstown and has released five recordings of original material.

AMST 30 Senior Honors Project

To be taken by students registered for American Studies 491 or 492.

ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

ANSO 11 Berkshire Farm Center Internship

A field placement at Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth in Canaan, New York. Berkshire Farm Center is a residential treatment facility for troubled, at-risk adolescent boys who have been remanded to the Farm by the Family Court. These youths come primarily from lower socio-economic strata, are very ethnically diverse, and hail from both urban and rural areas throughout New York State. The problems that they bring to Berkshire Farm are multiple. These include: the psychological scars of dysfunctional families, including those of physical, emotional, and sexual abuse; chemical dependency; juvenile delinquency; inability to function in school settings; and various other issues. Residential treatment is a multi-modal approach that includes anger-replacement training, social skills training, and behavioral modification.
Williams students will commute to Berkshire Farm and work under supervision in one of the following areas: school, cottage life, chemical dependency unit, research, recreation, performing arts, or in individual tutoring.
Requirements: students will keep a journal reflecting on their experiences, and a weekly seminar with the instructor will draw on service learning experience. Students will also be required to submit a final 10-page paper at the end of the course.
Prerequisites: YOU MUST HAVE A TELEPHONE INTERVIEW WITH THE INSTRUCTOR who can be reached at 518-781-4567 ext. 322. Enrollment limit: 15. Please note: all queries about this course should be directed to the instructor.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting times to be arranged.

LARI BRANDSTEIN (Instructor)
NOLAN (Sponsor)

Lari Brandstein is Director of Volunteer Services at Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth.

ANSO 12 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

The incidence of reported child abuse and neglect has reached epidemic proportions and shows no signs of decreasing. Preventive and prophylactic social programs, court intervention, and legislative mandates have not successfully addressed this crisis. This course allows students to observe the Massachusetts Department of Social Services attorney in courtroom proceedings related to the care and protection of children. Students will have access to Department records for purposes of analysis and will also work with social workers who will provide a clinical perspective on the legal cases under study. The class will meet regularly to discuss court proceedings, assigned readings, and the students' interactions with local human services agencies. Access to an automobile is desirable but not required; some transportation will be provided as part of the course.
Requirements: full participation, a journal, and a 10-page paper to be submitted at the end of the course.
Enrollment limit: 15. Please note: all queries about this course must be directed to the instructor, Judge Locke (phone messages may be left at 458-4833).
Cost to student: $25 for books and photocopies.
Meeting time: TBA.

JUDITH LOCKE (Instructor)
M. F. BROWN (Sponsor)

Judith Locke is Associate Justice of the Juvenile Court, Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

ANSO 13 History and Cinema in Eastern Europe

How can history and identity be represented in film? By watching and analyzing films of different genres, time periods, and cinematographic traditions, the students learn not only to relate the film to its cultural context, but also to assess visual and narrative devices that the film employs. This course focuses specifically on Eastern European films, where the questions of ideological representation dominated the agenda, while rules of the market hardly mattered. The students are invited to explore different modes of historical representations, as well as the compositional, narrative and visual devices, including the questions of genre conventions and different generational and national (regional) identities of the film makers, including early Soviet avant-garde, Czech new wave, Balkan cinema.
Along with films, the readings related to the topic will be assigned to accompany the discussion. As there is no single textbook which would fit the objectives of the course, the reading package with selected articles and extracts from monographs will be offered to students. The tapes will be placed on reserve in the college library for additional viewing. The readings come from the field of history, cultural studies, film studies, etc. and provide both methodological and factual information about the problems posed. Along with short extracts on the historical films the students will view the following full films: October (Soviet Union, Sergie Eisenstein, 1927), Ashes and Diamonds (Poland, Andrzej Wajda, 1958), Fireman's Ball (Czechoslovakia, Milos Forman, 1967), My 20th Century (Hungary, Ildiko Enyedi, 1989), The Color of Pomegranites (Soviet Union/Armenia, Paradjanov, 1970), and Underground (Yugoslavia, Emir Kusturica, 1995).
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a final 10-page essay, elaborating the relationship between film and history, referring to the material and themes discussed in the class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: nominal fee for reading packet.
Meeting time: mornings, Tuesday and Thursday, 10 a.m.-12:50 p.m.

OKSANA SARKISOVA (Instructor)
SHEVCHENKO (Sponsor)

Oksana Sarkisova holds a Ph.D. in History from Central European University. She is currently working as a Visual Archivist at the Open Society Archives at Central European University in Budapest, and a Program Director for Version/Verzió, The Human Rights Documentary Film Festival.

ANTH 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Anthropology 493-494.

SOC 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Sociology 493-494.

ART

ARTH 10 Inventing Joan of Arc: The History of a Heroine in Pictures and Film

Joan of Arc (known during her own lifetime most commonly as Jeanne "la Pucelle", or Joan "the Maid") was one of the most dynamic and yet enigmatic personalities of the European Middle Ages. Born into a peasant family in the French border province of Lorraine in 1412, she gained control of an army, won brilliant military victories, crowned a king, and was burnt at the stake as a heretic, all before her twentieth birthday. Triply marginalized by gender, age, and socio-economic status, she nonetheless managed to shake the Church and State establishments to their very core. But who was Joan of Arc? Nationalist martyr? Pioneer feminist? Champion of the people? Instrument of God's grace? Victim of post-traumatic stress disorder? Over the centuries since her death, artists-and not just politicians and scholars-have attempted to answer this question, creating myriad visions of la Pucelle under the influence of an ever-changing lens of contemporary tastes and concerns. Through readings and discussion, this course will survey the history of representations of Joan of Arc in painting, prints, sculpture, and film, from the time of her death to the present.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student : $40.
Meeting time: afternoons.

LOW

ARTH 15 Materials of the Artist: Uncovering Fakes and Forgeries (Same as ArtS 15 and Chemistry 15)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

ARTH 24 Sarah Bernhardt in New York

This course focuses on a major exhibition, "Sarah Bernhardt: The Art of High Drama," that will be on view at The Jewish Museum (92nd/5th) in New York City from December 2, 2005 to April 2, 2006. This multi-media exhibition of 250 objects (paintings, sculpture, drawings, vintage photographs and posters, costumes, jewelry, film, sound recordings), curated by Carol Ockman and Kenneth E. Silver, Chair and Professor of Art History at New York University, focuses on Bernhardt as the first celebrity actress. In fact, it demonstrates that she established the template for all stars to come. The exhibition brings attention to Bernhardt's involvement with new forms of popular entertainment (boulevard theaters, vaudeville, etc.) and new technologies (photography, film, and sound recording), thus modifying the standard interpretation of Bernhardt as principally a great, classical tragedienne.
"Sarah Bernhardt in New York" constitutes an unprecedented opportunity to learn about an exhibition from soup to nuts: to study the objects, installation, and catalogue, as well as to experience related programming. In addition, students will visit important temporary exhibitions and permanent collections around the city with an eye to assessing how they create narratives through the choice of objects and their installation.
In consultation with the instructor, each student will choose a particular exhibition or collection about which to research and write a 10-page paper.
The course will be offered in New York City where students will reside at the Williams Club from January 3 to January 26.
Enrollment limit: 4.
Cost per student: $1300 (includes lodging and full breakfast; $20 per diem; metro card for in-city transportation; evening at theatre; museum admission when accompanied by instructor, and required text). This course is not defined as a "trip" for financial aid purposes. The maximum reimbursement to financial aid students is $500. Not open to first-year students.

OCKMAN

ARTH 25 The Birth of the Modern: Art and Music in Vienna

Back at the turn into the last century, Vienna was one of the primary centers for ground-breaking innovations in art, architecture and music ( and also the time and place where Freud defined psychoanalysis.) Using the rich repositories of that culture in the museums and concert halls of present-day Vienna, we will explore the artists who introduced "modernism" and analyze the particular qualities that set them apart from the norm. Our course will begin with a visit to Vienna's major museum of fine art, the Kunsthistorisches Museum, to view a special exhibition of the great 19th-century Spanish artist, Goya. The exhibition, called "Goya: The Prophet of the Modern," will be our starting point in discussing the concept of "Modernism" as it was defined in the early 20th century. What was "modern" about Goya and do these qualities apply to the ways avant-garde Austrian artists reenvisioned painting and restructured music? In particular we want to study the works of Schoenberg, Berg and Webern in music; Kokoshka, Schiele, and Klimt in painting; Hofmann and Moser in design; and Otto Wagner and Adolf Loos in architecture.
The class will visit the sites of modern murals, paintings and decorative arts (The Museum für Angewandte Kunst; The Belvedere Palace; The Secession building; The Leopold Museum). For the music, we will study scores and recordings at the Schoenberg Center in Vienna, the repository of all the composer's manuscripts and recordings, as well as those of his pupils, Berg and Webern (and, additionally, the Center is the place where we can study Schoenberg's Expressionist paintings, so important that Kandinsky included them in a seminal exhibition of German Expressionist art in 1910.)
In various excursions to villas and churches and walks around town, we'll explore the contributions to architecture made by Otto Wagner and the audacious Adolf Loos. Comparing the confectionary architecture of the Habsburg Palace to the Loos "House without Eyebrows" across from it, might alone give you the essence of the revolutionary quality of the Viennese avant-garde.
Each student will be expected to develop enough expertise about a given artist that they can lead the class when we visit galleries and architectural sites.
Proposed budget: about $2250.
Enrollment limit: 10.

E. GRUDIN and YOSSI GUTMANN

Professor Yossi Gutmann is the artistic director of the Vienna Chamber Music Society and the founder of the Stradivari Sextet. He plays the Gibson Stradivarius viola and teaches viola at the Haydn Conservatory in Eisenstadt, Austria and is Professor of Chamber Music at the Academy of Art and Music in Graz, Austria.

ARTH 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for ArtH 493, 494.

ARTH 33 Honors Independent Study

To be taken by candidates for honors by the independent study route.

ARTS 10 Oil Painting Workshop

This class will be a hands-on exploration of the possibilities of oil paint on stretched canvas. Working primarily on medium size formats, students will develop necessary skills such as color, value, surface and texture. The course work will be divided into three thematic units, black and white studies of nature, color studies of nature and figure painting. The workshop will be intense and require a lot of work.
Evaluation based on final critique of course work.
Meeting time: two afternoons a week with the remainder of the time spent on painting
Enrollment limit:  12

JUAREZ

ARTS 11 Drawing Life

Drawing live things is different than drawing dead things since live things tend to move. Together, we will use charcoal, pencil and ink to draw live models, clothed and nude, plants and animals and shoppers in action at the Berkshire Mall. "Drawing Life" will meet for nine hours a week in the Spencer Studio art building and occasionally wander out into the campus and community with sketchbooks. Beginning and advanced students are welcome, since the small class size allows for personalized instruction.
Evaluation is based on successful in-class projects and weekly homework.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Since most drawing classes give priority to first years, this class will reverse the order and accept seniors first, then juniors, sophomores and first years.
Meeting times : Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons.
Lab fee: $100.

GLIER

ARTS 12 Picture Book Illustration (Same as Biology 12)

(See under Biology for full description.)

ARTS 13 Video Art Production

This is a studio seminar exploring various approaches to Video Art. Students will investigate and interrogate some of the theoretical, aesthetic, and practical issues of Video Art. This is primarily a studio workshop that will focus on vocabulary building in the studio and with software, with screenings and some supplemental reading, but most of our effort will be put toward each student making two final pieces to show at the end of Winter Study.
Evaluation will be based on participation and assignments.
Prerequisites are either one art course, some experience with video production, or excitement about working with video art. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost will be $50 lab fee, plus other minor costs depending on specifics of project.
Meeting time: three mornings a week for 2 hours with field trips and extra lab time scheduled as necessary.

DAVID LACHMAN, (Instructor)
L. JOHNSON (Sponsor)

David Lachman is an artist exploring questions of consciousness, and the role of the artist and viewer in creating meaning. He has a B.A. from Oberlin College and an M.F.A. from Northwestern University.

ARTS 14 Noir and Neo Noir

This course will combine film studies and video production to investigate film noir and its legacies. The course will begin with the study of crime movies of the 1940's and 50's like The Maltese Falcon, Detour, Double Indemnity, Kiss Me Deadly, Sunset Boulevard, The Third Man, Out of the Past, The Hitch-hiker, No Way Out, Gilda, The Postman Always Rings Twice, The Big Sleep, Gun Crazy, Night of the Hunter, Touch of Evil, and other films, and will explore their impact in more recent contributions to the genre, ranging from Chinatown and Serpico to LA Confidential, Mulholland Drive, Bound, Devil in a Blue Dress, Pulp Fiction, The Usual Suspects, Femme Fatale, and The Deep End. Readings in film history and criticism will help us to consider the films using a range of methods: How do the films emerge in a historical period from a genre of pulp fiction? How do the films use language and visual style to produce their fictional world? What are the narrative functions of the obsessions, repressions, alienations, and femmes fatales that lurk in the criminal underbelly of the nation, and how might these stories be seen to stage certain crises of masculinity? How do the films produce and reproduce ideas about urban (and sometimes non-urban) spaces? How do the films reproduce and/or shift American thinking about racial and ethnic cultures, particularly in films like Touch of Evil, Miller's Crossing, Caught, Devil in a Blue Dress, and Pulp Fiction? How do stars function in the films, ranging from Barbara Stanwick or Robert Mitchum to Tilda Swinton or Denzel Washington?
In response to these inquiries, students will produce two one-minute videos, two 1-page papers, two short scripts, and one final 5-minute video. Each assignment will be a response to issues, themes, visual forms, and narrative strategies raised by the films and critical readings.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Lab fee: $125.
Meeting time: 1-4 p.m., Tuesday and Wednesday, plus 3-8 hours/week of scheduled screenings and 2 1/2 hour scheduled individual editing lab sections.

L. JOHNSON

ARTS 15 Materials of the Artist: Uncovering Fakes and Forgeries (Same as ArtH 15 and Chemistry 15)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

ARTS 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as Chemistry 16)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

ARTS 17 Painting: Mythological Landscape and Imagery of Ancient Greece

This course will use the imagery of landscape, mythology and the natural world associated with ancient Greece as a source for painting. Students will research an area of interest or topic related to ancient Greece and compile and gather images and ideas that will be incorporated into a painting or series of paintings.
Students will be evaluated on the basis of regular attendance and completion of their work. Students will be expected to spend considerable time outside of class researching their subject and gathering imagery. Students will also find it necessary to spend additional studio time, outside of scheduled class time, in order to explore, experiment and create strong work. Technical aspects of painting will be addressed as needed.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $150 for materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

JOHN RECCO (Instructor)
GLIER (Sponsor)

John Recco lives and works in Hoosick, NY. and has exhibited in New York, Boston and throughout the Northeast and is currently represented by the Katharina Rich Perlow Gallery in New York. He has taught at Bennington College, Marlboro College and Williams College and has been a visiting artist at a number of institutions. In 2004 he received a Fulbright to conduct research and paint at various temple sites throughout Greece.

ARTS 18 A House in a Box

This is a home design course. Each student will design a house to be built within a 6-meter cube (20 feet). There will be several exercises in which the students will present solutions restricted to the 6 meter limits as well as solutions which could use limited outward expansions for balconies, bay windows or actual second floor room enlargements.
The students will design the entire living space, including all furniture (volume, size, functionality). The main design purpose is to get away from the limitations of a floor plan, a two-dimensional-projection approach to design. The conception of the living spaces will focus on multi-level occupancy, highly ergonomic built-in furniture and differences of ceiling heights. Special emphasis will be given to tri-dimensional layer-occupancy design, as it is done in airplane restrooms (and customarily in product design, as can be seen inside the CPU cabinet of a personal computer).
Due to the familiarity of the themes involved (living in enclosed spaces, personal spatial needs, human behavior) and to specific exercises, the students will develop their own data sheets with information on human dimensions, furniture sizes, hand reaching curves, shelving heights.
Final presentation will be a 1:20 scale model of the house, assembled in such a way as to permit internal viewing. Drawings, sketches and partial (cut) models can also be included.
This is not a course limited to students in pre-architecture programs or even restricted to art majors. The exploration exercises will give each student enough information to produce a good design solution. Although previous studio training and personal drawing talent will help students with their final presentation, the lack of either (or even both) will not be an impairment to good course performance. This is a CONCEPT DESIGN course. Presentation model and drawings are just the means of presenting the concepts and solutions. There will be no emphasis on the artistic expression or graphic qualities of those items.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student : $80.
Meeting time: mornings, three hours (depending on class size) on a daily basis. It is expected that each students will work an average of 100 hours, including class time.

RAUL NOBRE MARTINS (Instructor)
GLIER (Sponsor)

Raul Martins is an architect based in Salvador, Brazil whose work includes high-density low-rise, low-income housing complexes. He is presently working in new housing developments. Other professional interests include urban policy, architecture history and preservation. He presently serves as Secretary General for the Instituto dos Arquitetos do Brasil, Departamento da Bahia-the Brazilian equivalent of the AIA).

ARTS 19 Pinhole Photography

Pinhole Photography offers to the beginner and the seasoned photographer alike an entry way into a unique way of viewing the world. Ordinary colors and shapes are transformed. The cameras themselves can be anything from a shoe box to a paint bucket. The sky is the limit as to where pinhole photography can take you.
Students will be evaluated on their efforts with building their own pinhole camera. They will be given instruction as to how to drill a pin hole to the correct size as dictated by their container. They will also learn the darkroom process for they will be making their own prints, which will be displayed at the end of winter study
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Lab fee: $50 to cover materials.
Meeting time: mornings, twice a week for 3 hours with optional labs in the afternoon.

SALAZAR (Instructor)
GLIER (Sponsor)

Anthony Salazar is an artist who uses photography as his medium. He earned his B.A. and his M.F.A. from Hunter College in New York City. He taught at Hamilton College before coming to Williams, where he is the Photo technician for the department.

ARTS 33 Honors Independent Project

Independent study to be taken by candidates for honors in Art Studio.

ASIAN STUDIES

ASST 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Asian Studies.

CHIN S.P. Sustaining Program for Chinese 101-102 and Chinese 111-112

Students registered for Chinese 101-102 and Chinese 111-112 are required to attend and pass the Chinese Sustaining Program. Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9:00-9:50.
Prerequisite: Chinese 101 or Chinese 111.
Requirements: regular attendance and active class participation.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.

LANGUAGE FELLOWS

CHIN 10 Reading and Translating Tang Poetry

The Tang dynasty (618-906) has traditionally been considered the golden age of Chinese poetry. Poems from the Tang continue to be enjoyed by millions of people and memorized by school children in mainland China and Taiwan down to the present day. In this class we will learn the basics of reading Tang poetry in the original literary Chinese in which it was written. We will look at a small number of poems very closely and examine such topics as rhyme, imagery, allusion, and structure. We will also look closely at commentaries and annotations of the poems in both modern Chinese and English. This class requires knowledge of Chinese at least at the level of Chinese 201, but does NOT assume any knowledge of literary or "Classical" Chinese. The language of instruction will be English.
Evaluation will be based on preparation for class, class participation, a presentation, and a final exam based on the material covered in class. Students will be expected to prepare assignments outside of class (including memorizing some short poems). During class we will refine our translations and discuss the poems and their historical context. We will also drink tea.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: small Xeroxing fee.
Meeting time: afternoons, 2-3:50 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

NUGENT

CHIN 11 Chinese Painting

This hands-on course will foster an appreciation and understanding of the aesthetics of Chinese painting and calligraphy. Participants will gain a broad knowledge of Chinese art, as well as the basic skills for further practice. Students will learn how to use gradations of black ink and some limited color, using the brush on rice paper. Participants will learn how to draw the "four gentlemen" series, which stands for the four seasons of the year: plum blossom, mountain orchid, bamboo, and chrysanthemum; and learn how to draw mountains, trees, and water in Chinese landscape painting. This course will also cover the use of the seal and Chinese mounting.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a final presentation.
No prerequisites; no prior background in art required. Enrollment limit: 12 (in case of overenrollment, upper-class students will receive preference).
Cost to student: approximately $30 for materials.
Meeting time: mornings, 10 a.m.-12:55 p.m., Tuesday and Thursday.

YING-LEI ZHANG (Instructor)
KUBLER (Sponsor)

Ying-lei Zhang is an artist who lives in Middlebury, Vermont, where she has taught at various colleges and schools. She has previously taught Chinese painting at Williams during Winter Studies, and has also given tea ceremony demonstrations on campus for the Chinese and Japanese programs.

CHIN 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Chinese.

JAPN S.P. Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102

Students registered for Japanese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Japanese Sustaining Program. Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9:00-9:50.
Prerequisite: Japanese 101.
Requirements: regular attendance and active class participation.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.

LANGUAGE FELLOWS

JAPN 10 Stories from the Edges: Japanese and Beyond

Okichi unwillingly became the mistress of the first American consul (1856-1862), Townsend Harris, at the age of seventeen. Her traumatic story is well known to Japanese and the various ways it has been told exemplify a cultural fascination with those living in the margins. In this course, we will examine Okichi's and other border stories that are told in multiple media narratives, from personal diaries to television dramas. The latter part of the course will be devoted to creating and developing a project on a subject of each participant's choosing. Projects may take the shape of an ethnographic paper, an audio recording, a mini-documentary film, or even a live performance, according to the particular skills and interests of each participant.
Evaluation is based on class participation, regular journaling, and the project. We will meet in the morning as a group an average of three times per week, with allowances made for one-on-one meetings, a few films showings outside the regular class hours, and for those exigencies that develop around the final projects.
No prerequisites. Materials and discussions will be in English, though the projects may be bilingual where appropriate. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: approximately $50.
Meeting time: mornings, 10-noon, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

KAGAYA

JAPN 12 Performative Learning

Performance has outgrown its theatrical meaning and has come to serve as a paradigm for the means by which we participate in our culture and in our world. That sea change necessitates a rethinking of what we mean by `learning' and `training'. "Performative Learning" describes the interplay between the intellect and the viscera necessary to engage in any number of endeavors such as martial arts, dance, music, theatre, etc. The goals of this course are far-reaching, but the methods of studio activity will be much more focused: the instructor will draw primarily from experiences training with artists of the Japanese butoh dance movement, and from teaching movement in an acting conservatory setting to create an intensive course of training in physical theatre performance. Exercises provide pointed challenges to both body and imagination, and pose the question: "How do we go about learning, when the body is at the center of the equation?" They will include carefully structured improvisations and partnered limb and joint mobilizations, designed to increase proprioceptive awareness and sensitivity to kinesiology, space, and interplay with others.
Evaluation is based on daily participation, regular journaling, written summaries, and active participation in discussions on reading assignments. A performance of selections from the coursework will take place at or near the end of the term.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: approximately $45.
Meeting time: mornings, 10-noon, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

THOMAS O'CONNOR (Instructor)
KAGAYA (Sponsor)

Thomas O'Connor is a performer, performance teacher, and movement artist based in the Berkshires.

JAPN 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Japanese.

ASTRONOMY

ASTR 10 Adventures Under The Dome: Communicating Astronomy (Same as English 10)

This course will combine an exploration of astronomy with a study of effective ways to communicate astronomy to the public. It will cover the presentation of astronomy and related topics, ranging from print media to multi-media live and taped presentations. We will open by examining how astronomy is presented in various forms of media, with particular emphasis on language and audience assumptions. These will prepare us for several sessions that will focus on planetarium show production and the show producer's multi-disciplinary media background. Some sessions will be held in the new Williams College planetarium, with its new Zeiss and digital projectors. There will also be a short (1-day with possible overnight) field trip to a working production dome in Nashua, NH, to see shows in fulldome format and talk to artists and designers involved in creating the newest generation of fulldome video programs for planetarium facilities.
Evaluation will be based on class discussion participation and preparation of a short planetarium presentation or suitable equivalent in other media. If overenrolled, students will be selected on the basis of a paragraph describing their interest.
This course is open to students with an interest in and/or aptitude in writing for media and production. No formal background in astronomy is required, although some knowledge will be extremely helpful. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: $100 for field trip.
Meeting time: three afternoons per week

CAROLYN COLLINS PETERSEN (Instructor)
J. PASACHOFF (Sponsor)

Carolyn Collins Petersen is an established science writer specializing in astronomy-related books, articles, and documentary scripts for planetarium and science center use.

ASTR 31 Senior Research

To be taken by students registered for Astronomy 493, 494.

ASTROPHYSICS

ASPH 31 Senior Research

To be taken by students registered for Astrophysics 493, 494.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 10 Electron Microscopy

Students will undertake an independent project to investigate a topic of their choice using the transmission and scanning electron microscopes. They will do their own sample preparation, operate the two electron microscopes, and take micrographs of relevant structures. Class time will give a brief overview of the theory and operation of the microscopes and microtomes. In addition, students will learn how to develop and print their film from the TEM, and learn how to manipulate the digital images from the SEM in Adobe Photoshop. (Do you want your erythrocytes red or blue?) There will be brief reading assignments, a guest speaker and a 10-page paper with 8 well-focused micrographs required.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. No preference given.
Cost to student: $40 for text and readings.
Meeting time: afternoons. Class will meet for two hours, three times a week, plus scope time.

NANCY PIATCZYC (Instructor)
ALTSCHULER (Sponsor)

Nancy Piatczyc received her B.S. in Biology from Tufts University. She attended the school of Electron Microscopy in Albany, NY. She is a trained electron microscopist who operates and maintains the electron microscope facility at Williams.

BIOL 11 Images of Greylock: Interpreting Landscape Change (Same as Environmental Studies 11 and INTR 11) (CANCELLED!)

(See under Environmental Studies 11 for full description.)

BIOL 12 Picture Book Illustration (Same as ArtS 12)

The art for picture books ranges from black and white line art to explosions of color literally lifting off the page. In this course the instructor will demonstrate and show examples of illustrated picture books, including non-fiction and fables. Students will experiment with several illustration techniques including three-dimensional sculpted watercolor art. Each student will create a 3-D painting of one of Aesop's Fables for display at the end of Winter Study.
Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation and effort. This course is open to all levels of artistic ability.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: $50.
Meeting times: mornings, twice a week for three hours. Field trips are planned to The Eric Carle Museum and to The Normal Rockwell Museum.

ROBIN BRICKMAN (Instructor)
ALTSCHULER (Sponsor)

Robin Brickman received her Bachelor's degree in graphic arts and botany from Bennington College. She is an award-winning illustrator known for the unique three-dimensional watercolor art she developed. Her picture book client list includes: Charlesbridge, Simon & Schuster, HarperCollins, The Millbrook Press, Rodale Press, and Boyd's Mills Press.

BIOL 13 Food: An Integrative Approach

We will take a comprehensive and multidisciplinary look at the topic of food. Food is the only thing we need to survive, although it is something that most of us take for granted. The food industry is the largest industry in the world, affecting every aspect of our lives. We'll examine how contemporary society is impacted by our food systems. We'll explore both global and local issues, using a variety of disciplines: economics, politics, public health, and environmental studies, to name a few. Students will be encouraged to bring their own interests and approaches to this topic. The research project can be literature-based or experiential, practical application or theoretical in nature. Topics to be addressed include: population growth, the U.S. agricultural system, biotechnology, food safety, organic farming, eating locally/seasonally, the "externalization" vs. "internalization" of costs, food aid and trade policy. Readings: articles from various publications will be assigned.
The class will be highly participatory; students will discuss current issues presented in the assigned readings and documentary films.
Evaluation will be based on contribution and participation, 2-page response papers to the readings for 5 of the 12 classes as well as a 5-page research paper accompanied by a short presentation on your topic to the class on the last day.
Cost to student: $40 for reading packet.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting: mornings, 2 hours per class 3 days a week.

JOHANNA KOLODNY '01 (Instructor)
ALTSCHULER (Sponsor)

Johanna Kolodny graduated from Williams in '01 with a B.A. in Anthropology and has a M.A. degree in Food Studies from NYU.

BIOL 14 Biological Clocks

Intrinsic timepieces within all organisms control a wide variety of biological processes, from the cellular to the behavioral. Through readings and discussions, we will learn how biological clocks function in all organisms. We will also attempt to determine how biological clocks are involved in humans in establishing sleep and activity cycles; in determining jet lag and seasonal affective disorder; and in influencing athletic performance, cognitive performance, and susceptibility to cancer and other diseases. As part of the course, students will set their biological clocks to a defined rhythm based upon a rigid schedule of sleep and light exposure; they will then shift their clocks to a new rhythm and attempt to determine its effect on athletic performance, cognition or some other measurable parameter. In addition, students will write a 5-page paper based upon their self-experimentation (if it is successful) or on some other aspect of biological rhythms and deliver a short presentation to the class.
Evaluation will be based on class attendance and participation, design and execution of experimental protocol, a 5-page paper, and a short presentation to the class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. First year students will be given preference.
Cost to student: $30 for a textbook.
Meeting times: mornings, 2-3 sessions per week.

DEWITT

BIOL 15 Students Teaching AIDS to Students (STATS) (Same as Special 20)

Students Teaching AIDS to Students is a Winter Study project that aims to bring trained Williams students into local schools as facilitators and educators about topics relating to HIV and AIDS. During the first two weeks of Winter Study, students learn how to teach and work together to develop lesson plans about HIV and its implications. In addition to learning the science of HIV, students will have the opportunity to hear from guest speakers about the prevalence of HIV in the Berkshires and the support services available to community members living with HIV/AIDS. During the final two weeks, Williams students will travel to area middle schools to present their lesson plans and then return in the fourth week to wrap-up their lessons and address middle school student questions solicited after the first classroom session.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation, development and implementation of lesson plans, and a final paper.
No prerequisite. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for course materials.
Class will meet in the morning during the first two weeks. Students will be in local classrooms during weeks three and four, with a final group wrap-up meeting after the teaching sessions are complete.

ERIN MORRISETTE '00 and CAITLIN CARR '01 (Instructors)
ALTSCHULER (Sponsor)

Erin Morrissette '00 and Caitlin Carr '01 are former Biology majors at Williams. Both are currently fourth-year medical students at the University of Pennsylvania.

BIOL 22 Introduction to Biological Research

An experimental research project will be carried out under the supervision of Biology Department faculty. It is expected that the student will spend 20 hours per week in the lab at a minimum, and a 10-page written report is required. This experience is intended for, but not limited to, first-year students and sophomores. Interested students must submit an application form available on the Biology Department webpage: http://www.williams.edu/Biology/Research/Winter/022Application/022application.shtml.
Prerequisites: Biology 101. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

STAFF

BIOL 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Biology 493, 494.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as Special 11)

Are you interested in teaching? Do you enjoy working with kids? Do you like to experiment with new things? Here is a chance for you to do all three! The aim of this Winter Study Project is to design a series of hands-on science workshops for elementary school children and their parents. Working in teams of 2-4, students spend the first two and a half weeks of Winter Study planning the workshops. This involves deciding on a focus for each workshop (based on the interests of the students involved) followed by choosing and designing experiments and presentations that will be suitable for fourth-grade children. On the third weekend of Winter Study (January 21, 22) we bring elementary school kids with their parents to Williams to participate in the workshops.
You get a chance to see what goes into planning classroom demonstrations as well as a sense of what it's like to actually give a presentation. You find that kids at this age are great fun to work with because they are interested in just about everything and their enthusiasm is infectious. You also give the kids and their parents a chance to actually do some fun hands-on science experiments that they may not have seen before, and you are able to explain simple scientific concepts to them in a manner that won't be intimidating. It is a rewarding experience for all involved.
Evaluation is based on participation in planning and running the workshops. Each group is expected to prepare a handout with descriptions of the experiments for the kids, parents, and teachers.
No prerequisites: You need not be a science major; all that is needed is enthusiasm. Enrollment limit: 25.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings. Classes meet three times a week for approximately three hours each session. The workshop is run on the third weekend of Winter Study (January 21, 22) and attendance from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. is mandatory that weekend. There are also one or two brief meetings held in the fall term for preliminary planning.

S. GOH and J. MACINTIRE (Instructors)
L. PARK (Sponsor)

Jenna MacIntire is a Laboratory Instructor for both the Biology and Chemistry Departments at Williams.

CHEM 12 Epidemiology, Public Health and Leadership in the Health Professions (Same as Leadership Studies 12)

Epidemiology, the study of disease and disability in human populations, has been called the basic science of public health and preventive medicine. Epidemiology has made substantial contributions to the advancement of health and improved illness care through a sharper understanding of the natural history of disease, the multiple "causes" of disease, and the control of epidemics of both infectious and (later) non-infectious disease. Epidemiological approaches are used constantly to test new medicines and guide treatment and prevention strategies.
Making use of epidemic exercises, selected original papers from the medical and public health literature, and a basic text, this course starts by reviewing the history, logic and approaches of epidemiology. We then turn to discussions of scientific and social leadership in the health professions. With the help of guest lecturers/discussion leaders, we explore aspects of leadership in at least three of the following areas: clinical medicine and patient care, international health, basic science discovery and/or applied research, ethics, and health care evaluation.
Evaluation is based on active student participation and a paper on selected aspects of leadership in health or epidemiologic analysis based on analysis of original literature concerning a topic of personal interest.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: $150 for books and reading materials.
Meeting time: afternoons; three days per week, for approximately 6 hours per week. There may be some evening meetings, depending on the schedules of visiting instructors.

NICHOLAS H. WRIGHT '57 (Instructor)
L. PARK (Sponsor)

Dr. Nicholas H. Wright '57, a medical epidemiologist with a longstanding interest in family planning/population and international health issues, recently retired from the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Jersey, and now lives in Williamstown.

CHEM 14 Emergency Medical Technician-Basic

A course designed to prepare students for the Massachusetts EMT exam and to provide training to become certified as an Emergency Medical Technician. The course teaches the new national standard curriculum which makes reciprocity with many other states possible. This is a time-intensive course involving approximately 130 hours of class time plus optional emergency room observation and ambulance work. Students learn, among other skills, basic life support techniques, patient assessment techniques, defibrillation, how to use an epi-pen, safe transportation and immobilization skills, as well as the treatment of various medical emergencies including shock, bleeding, soft-tissue injuries, and child birth. In order to reduce the number of class meetings required during Winter Study Period, the course holds a few meetings beginning in the fall semester. These class meetings, which are mandatory, with the following schedule: 12 November, 13 November, 10 December, and 11 December. Any questions regarding this course should be directed to the instructor, Kevin Garvey, via email (pece@netscape.com).
Evaluation is based on class participation and performance on class exams, quizzes and practical exercises.
Prerequisite: It is recommended that students have American Heart Association Level C BLS Provider CPR Cards or American Red Cross BLS provider CPR cards before entering the EMT Class. A CPR class will be offered in October for those students wishing to take the EMT class who don't already have CPR cards. Enrollment limit: 24.
Cost to student: $350/student plus approximately $75 for textbook.
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons; schedule TBA in October.

KEVIN GARVEY (Instructor)
L. PARK (Sponsor)

Kevin Garvey is a Massachusetts state and nationally approved EMT-I (Intermediate) and an EMT-IC (Instructor/Coordinator). He had been involved with Emergency Medical Services for 15-20 years. Mr. Garvey currently works for Baystate Health Systems as an RN (registered nurse) and EMT-I and also works as an EMT-I for Village Ambulance in Williamstown. Mr. Garvey is also an EMT training instructor at Greenfield Community College.

CHEM 15 Materials of the Artist: Uncovering Fakes and Forgeries (Same as ArtH 15 and ArtS 15)

Many artists' materials (in the form of support, pigments, coatings, and binding media) existed in very specific times throughout history. Knowing this, we can create a timeline and begin to date art objects by examining their material and how each object was manufactured. In this class, we choose an object of questionable authenticity and immerse ourselves in it. For example, a painting of questionable authenticity will have the pigments analyzed, the media analyzed, an x-ray will be taken, showing the paint strokes and method of application. In some cases, a technique called an infrared reflectography will be utilized to view the underdrawing-the artist (or forgers) original sketches. Visual examinations combined with sophisticated analytical instrumentation will be used to identify the materials of the object and its method of manufacture. Instruments may include: x-ray fluorescence analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, x-ray diffraction, gas chromatography, and scanning electron microscope. All classes will be held at either the Williamstown Conservation Center under the direction of the analytical chemist and conservator, or in the Bronfman Science Center.
Evaluation is based upon class participation and a 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 9.
Cost to student: $20 for reading materials.
Meeting time: mornings; twice a week for three hours and two hours/person/week beyond class time.

KATE DUFFY (Instructor)
LOVETT (Sponsor)

Kate Duffy is Department Head of Analytical Services at the Williamstown Art Conservation Center.

CHEM 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as ArtS 16)

This course provides an introduction to both a theoretical consideration of the glassy state of matter and the practical manipulation of glass. We do flameworking with hand torches for at least 12 hours per week. While no previous experience is required, students with patience, good hand-eye coordination, and creative imagination will find the course most rewarding. The class is open to both artistically and scientifically oriented students.
Evaluation is based on class participation, exhibition of glass projects, a 10-page paper, and a presentation to the class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference is given to juniors, sophomores, and those who express the most and earliest interest and enthusiasm by early e-mail to Professor Thoman.
Cost to student: $75 for supplies.
Meeting time: 9:00 a.m. to noon, five days per week.

THOMAN

CHEM 17 Introduction to Research in Archaeological Science (CANCELLED!)

An independent experimental project in archaeological science is carried out in collaboration with Dr. Skinner whose research involves two types of studies: dating fossil material and establishing the sources of ancient artifacts.
A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in a faculty research lab, interested students must consult Dr. Skinner and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

ANNE SKINNER (Instructor)
L. PARK (Sponsor)

Anne Skinner is a Senior Lecturer in Chemistry at Williams.

CHEM 18 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry

An independent experimental project in biochemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in biochemistry. Biochemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the molecular details of living systems including the interaction of biologically important molecules. In the Chemistry Department, studies are underway to investigate the structure/function relationship of proteins, the interaction between proteins and RNA and DNA, DNA structure and repair, and the molecular basis of gene regulation.
A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

GEHRING, KAPLAN, LOVETT

CHEM 19 Introduction to Research in Environmental Science (Same as Environmental Studies 19)

An independent experimental project in environmental science is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in environmental science. Current research projects include studies of atmospheric chemistry related to global warming and acid deposition, heavy metals in the local environment, and further development of laboratory techniques for ENVI 102 (Introduction to Environmental Science).
A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: a one-semester science course and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

THOMAN

CHEM 20 Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry

An independent experimental project in inorganic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in inorganic chemistry. Opportunities for research in inorganic chemistry at Williams include the study of transition metals in biological systems (enzymes, proteins), and as building blocks for new materials with interesting electronic (magnetic, conducting) and optical properties. Students working in this area will gain expertise in the synthesis of new compounds and their characterization by modern spectroscopic techniques.
A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

HASANAYN, L. PARK

CHEM 23 Introduction to Research in Organic Chemistry (CANCELLED!)

An independent experimental project in organic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in organic chemistry. One representative project involves isolation of the bioactive constituents of Southeast Asian dart poisons from their natural sources and the elucidation of their three-dimensional structures. Another line of investigation probes new and efficient methods for the creation of molecules of medicinal interest. Some targets include the kavalactones-the active principles of the herbal extract KAVA KAVA which is promoted as an alternative anti-anxiety remedy, and octalactin A-an interesting 8-membered ring compound isolated from marine microorganisms that has shown significant toxicity toward human cancer cells.
A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

GOH, MARKGRAF, RICHARDSON, T. SMITH

J. Hodge Markgraf, Professor of Chemistry emeritus, taught organic chemistry at Williams for four decades. He has previously taught a WSP course on the science of chocolate and combinatorial chemistry.

CHEM 24 Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry

An independent experimental project in physical chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in physical chemistry. Current research projects in the Department include computer modeling of non-linear, chaotic chemical and biochemical systems, molecular modeling of water clusters, laser spectroscopy of chlorofluorocarbon substitutes, and experimental studies of the oxidation of sulfur dioxide on atmospheric aerosols.
A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

PEACOCK-LOPEZ, THOMAN

CHEM 31 Senior Research and Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Chemistry 493, 494.

CLASSICS

CLAS 11 The Religions of the Roman Empire and Christianity (Same as Religion 11)

This course will survey some of the many religions that existed within the boundaries of the Roman empire in the two centuries before and after the birth of Jesus. Taking into account the particular interests of students who register for this course, it will consider not only the "traditional" state and domestic cults of Rome but also the imperial cult, various mystery religions, and early Christianity. We will begin by briefly examining how the Romans themselves defined their religion and its purpose(s) and consider how this definition contrasted with that of participants in the mystery cults and that of early Christians. We will also examine how the Roman authorities used various cults/religions as political tools to secure the empire. Finally, through our answers to these questions, we will explore the Roman authorities' reaction to Christianity.
Each student will be expected to write two papers (10-20 pages total). In a shorter paper students will try to put themselves in the position of a "traditional" Roman and write about either what they would believe about their own gods or their resistance to one of the new mystery cults. The longer paper will be on a topic of each student's choice (after consultation with the instructor), and each student will also present an oral report on the topic of this paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to majors in Classics and Religion.
Cost to student: less than $15.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week.

ROBIN LORSCH WILDFANG '86 (Instructor)
HOPPIN (Sponsor)

Professor Wildfang is a 1986 graduate of Williams College and taught as Visiting Assistant Professor at Williams in 1991.

CLAS 12 The Ovidian Renaissance (CANCELLED!)

Ovid's Metamorphoses, a rich and varied poem unified by the theme of physical transformation, was unmatched as a source of inspiration for Renaissance artists working across a variety of media. We will explore the ways Ovid's poem figures in artistic works from the Renaissance, including drama, poetry, painting, sculpture, and music. We will begin by reading the Metamorphoses with a view toward appreciating the stories, themes, and narrative techniques that have long made his work so appealing. We will then explore the ways figures such as Shakespeare, Spenser, Marlowe, Titian, Bernini, and Monteverdi incorporate and re-imagine Ovid's poem in their own work. We will consider Ovid's influence on later artists, the contribution of later works to our understanding of Ovid, and the relationships between various kinds of art.
Requirements: several presentations and a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to students: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

NESHOLM

CLAS 31 Senior Thesis

May be taken by students registered for Classics 493, 494.

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

COGS 31 Senior Thesis

May be taken by students registered for Cognitive Science 493, 494.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

COMP 11 The Colonialist Visions

From the peak of imperialism to its decline, what were the myths, observations, and prejudices that informed the European view of the colonial enterprise? How is the relationship between colonialists and the colonized expressed in literature and film? This course will examine what happens to the novel when it explicitly confronts issues of race, class and ideology, oppression and resistance, the individual and the mass, the meeting of two radically different cultures and systems of belief. Do men and women narrate the colonialist experience differently? The texts will include some fiction by postcolonial writers. Fiction by Conrad, Flaubert, Kipling, Foster, Dineson. Films include adaptations of Foster's Kipling's, and Dineson's works, and the documentary about Sara Baartman, "the Hottentot Venus."
Class will meet for discussion for two hours, twice a week in the morning, plus two hours of film screenings. A passing grade requires active class participation, a brief oral presentation, and a 10-page paper.
Cost to student: $30.00.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.

DRUXES

COMP 12 Contemporary Queer Cinema in France (Same as French 12 and Women's and Gender Studies 11)

(See under Romance Languages-RLFR 12 for full description.)

COMP 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Comparative Literature 493, 494.

LIT 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Literary Studies 493, 494.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CSCI 15 Designing for People (Same as Psychology 15)

(See under Psychology for full description.)

CSCI 31 Senior Honor Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Computer Science 493-494.

CONTRACT MAJOR

CMAJ 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Contract Major 493, 494.

ECONOMICS

ECON 10 Excel for Economics

This course is an introduction to the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet software, with applications to economics, finance, business, and public policy analysis. A variety of Excel commands and tools will be introduced, and then applied to examples such as analyzing an investment project, modeling the determination of stock prices, finding data and evaluating evidence on a question of public policy, and effectively communicating information with a graph or table. These are all invaluable skills for many of the kinds of jobs Williams students commonly pursue after graduation. Readings will include The Visual Display of Quantitative Information by Edward Tufte, as well as a guidebook for using Excel for financial modeling, and some accessible articles on the substantive aspects of economics, finance, or public policy involved in each application.
Evaluation will be based on a number of hands-on problem sets.
No prerequisites. Preference will be given to students with no prior experience with Finance and with Excel, and to freshmen and sophomores. Students who have taken Economics 317 (Finance and Capital Markets) will not be admitted. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: approximately $60 for books.
Meeting time: afternoons, twice a week for 3 hours each (half of which is "lecture-time," and the other half is "lab-time").

BAKIJA

ECON 11 "Inside" Information Policy (CANCELLED!)

In the post-Enron, Worldcom, Adelphia etc. capital market the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 has substantially altered the legal framework of the Federal securities laws. Those laws, in the name of preserving "transparency" and with it investor confidence, impose substantial restrictions on how and who may use information about a public corporation. In addition, Regulation FD ("Fair Disclosure") adopted by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in August 2000, when Arthur Levitt, Jr. '52 was its Chair, attempts to insure that any release of information is made available to all, not just some investors. Breaking these rules can result in giving up any profit made, substantial fines or even imprisonment. Yet some information is different from other information. How do we know what is "inside" information and an asset of the business and what is not? Does the theoretical basis for these legally mandated policies on disclosing information, the so-called "efficient" market hypotheses, make sense? And is there a problem of information overload? What ought a corporate manager do? And does speaking of "ought" raise issues of ethics and personal standards that transcend legal norms?
Evaluation will be based on class participation and an essay examination requiring analysis of a given fact pattern. Independent reading and in class reports will be considered for additional credit.
No prerequisites. Some familiarity with business developments from TV, newspapers or magazines may prove helpful.Enrollment limit: 25.
Costs to students: $25-$50 for reading materials (excerpts from court decisions, Sec law and regulations, newspaper and journal articles, etc.).
Meeting times: afternoons, three times a week for two hours each.

PETER D. HUTCHEON '65, Esq. (Instructor)
ZIMMERMAN (Sponsor)

Peter Hutcheon '65 practices law primarily in the areas of corporate governance, commercial transactions, securities, banking and finance. Peter was a director and former chair of the New Jersey State Bar, Corporate and Business Law Section for 22 years and, also, the former chairman (1989-2001) of the New Jersey Corporate and Business Law Study Commission where he provided reports and suggestions on business law developments to the New Jersey Legislature and the Governor. Peter chaired the New Jersey Securities Advisory Committee appointed by the Attorney General since 1995-2001 and has served as the American Bar Association's Liaison to the New Jersey Bureau of Securities for almost 25 years. He has also served as Chair of the ABA's Section of Science and Technology and as Editor of its quarterly journal, Jurimetrics. Additionally, he has authored numerous articles on various business-related law topics including limited liability companies, securities, and directors and officers liability.

ECON 12 Blogonomics

The ability to disseminate intellectual and creative works has traditionally been a scarce resource. In addition to facilitating the creation of intellectual and creative works, information technology, and the Internet in particular, has enabled many creators to widely disseminate their works without relying on traditional intermediaries such as newspapers, magazines, software firms, publishing houses, radio and television stations, and music labels. In this course, we shall look at these technological innovations and consider their impacts on what gets created, how it gets disseminated, and who, if anybody, pays for it.
Students will be required to produce intellectual or creative content and distribute it to the world via the Internet. Dissemination may be by blog, iPodcast, or other agreed-upon means. Exhibition of this project on the last day of Winter Study is required. Attendance and participation will also be taken into account.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $50 for books and readings.
Meeting time: afternoons, 1-3:50 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday.

GAZZALE

ECON 13 Art and Economics

Art and economics are two disciplines that might seem incongruent. Economics is sometimes portrayed as being all about the money while art may just be for art's sake. Even if the art itself transcends many of the worldly issues of economics, it cannot escape the standard forces of economics. For example, artists must sell their work (unless, of course, they want to be starving artists). How is art sold? Some art is sold at auction, some through dealers, and some artists work through commissions. Why are different types of art sold through these different mechanisms? What determines the price of art? Collectors buy art for its enjoyment (or consumption) value as well as its investment potential. How can one use economics to measure the success of buying art as an investment? In addition to collectors, institutions such as museums also buy art. What are the economics of an art museum? What is the role for private donations, public subsidies, and entrance fees in sustaining museums? What is an appropriate role for government in the economics of art? Should the government subsidize art? If so, should the subsidies focus on the creation of art or the preservation and exhibition of art? How should the government decide what art to subsidize? These are some of the questions that this class will explore.
Students will prepare a 10-page project based on one of the major themes of the course.
No prerequisites. While the course will use some economic concepts that are covered in Economics 110, the goal of the course is to be a self-contained coverage of how economic analysis can be used to think about art and art markets. Students who are not economics majors are encouraged to take the class.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $25 for text.
Meetings: 3 mornings per week.

GENTRY

ECON 14 Accounting

The project will examine the theoretical and practical aspects of financial accounting. Although the beginning of the course will explore the mechanics of the information gathering and dissemination process, the course will be oriented mainly towards users, rather than preparers, of accounting information. The project will include discussion of the principles involved in accounting for current assets, plant assets, leases, intangible assets, current liabilities, stockholders' equity, the income statement and the statement of cash flows. Students will be expected to interpret and analyze actual financial statements. The nature of, and career opportunities in, the field of accounting will also be discussed. The project is a "mini course." It will present a substantial body of material and will require a considerable commitment of time by the student, including regular attendance and participation in discussion and homework cases and problems.
The course grade will be determined on the basis of several quizzes and a written group report presenting an analysis of a company's annual report.
Enrollment limit:30.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

LEO MCMENIMEN (Instructor)
ZIMMERMAN (Sponsor)

Leo McMenimen has taught in the Winter Study Program at Williams College since 1980. He recently retired as a professor from the School of Business, Montclair State University.

ECON 15 Stock Market

Elementary description and analysis of the stock market. Emphasis will be on the roles of the market in our economy, including evaluation of business firms and the success of particular capital investments, allocating savings to different types of investment, and providing liquid and marketable financial investments for individual savers.
The course will focus on the description of mechanics of trading on various exchanges and other markets, stock market indexes or "averages" (Dow-Jones, S&P, 500, etc.), how to read the financial news, historical rates of return on stocks and portfolios, role of mutual funds, beta coefficients, and "random walk" theory. The course will also involve a brief introduction to financial reports of firms and analysis of financial ratios.
Each student will participate in discussions, do some homework assignments and, as part of a team, give two presentations and write a 10-page report analyzing the wisdom or folly of having chosen a particular investment portfolio. The project grade will be determined on the basis of performance on several quizzes and the written investment portfolio report.
Not intended for students who already know much about the stock market; students who have had Economics 317 not admitted.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit:30.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

LEO MCMENIMEN (Instructor)
ZIMMERMAN (Sponsor)

Leo McMenimen has taught in the Winter Study Program at Williams College since 1980. He recently retired as a professor from the School of Business, Montclair State University.

ECON 16 LEGO Mindstorms Robotics

Robotics has been an exciting topic for decades. Current technology allows students to design, build, and program their own robots using the Lego Mindstorms system. It is straightforward to build the robots, as they are very similar to Legos toys. Programming the robots may be done using the graphical software that comes with the Mindstors kits, or one may use more sophisticated, JAVA based software. During the first part of the course, students will familiarize themselves with the tools and software by creating robots that fulfill a relatively simple set of tasks, such as measuring distance, following a maze, and drawing letters. The first project will be done using both the graphical software and the JAVA based system to ensure programming mastery. After a basic competency in the tools is reached, the students will propose a more complex project. After instructor approval, the students will design, build, and program their final project. It may be possible to provide mentoring for local children interested in robotics by allowing them to come and interact with the class.
Students will be evaluated on completing the initial projects, as well as on their design and implementation of their final project. There will also be an exhibition of the project at the end of Winter Study.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 14.
Cost to student: approximately $10.
Meeting times: afternoons.

ROLLEIGH

ECON 17 Business Economics

In this course, the class will carry out a real-time forecast of the U.S. economy and explore its implications for the bond and stock markets. The course will build upon principles of both macro and micro-economics. It will provide an introduction to the work done by business economists and the techniques they use. An economic database, chart-generating software and a statistical analysis program will be available to each student on the Jessup computers.
The first week will focus on becoming familiar with the database, looking for relationships between key economic variables, and studying movements in interest rates over the period 1960-2004. Early in the first week, the class will be divided into teams of 2 or 3 students with each team choosing a particular aspect of the economy to forecast.
During the second and third weeks, the class will prepare forecasts of the key components of gross domestic product and will study other key issues such as: Globalization, Energy Policy and the Outlook for Oil Prices. We will also have several invited guests from the Wall Street investment world speaking on various aspects of the stock market. The fourth week will feature a formal presentation of the economic forecast with invited guests from the Williams College faculty among others.
The class will meet 3 to 4 times per week in the morning. During the first week there will be two afternoons of workshops lasting approximately 30 minutes with hands on instruction for each team. Each student should expect to spend a reasonable amount of time on homework, to participate in short presentations of their analyses as the work progresses as well as in the formal presentation during the last week. There will also be a 3-page paper summarizing the result of the forecast project or the special topic chosen by each team.
To put the forecasting exercise in context, there will be class discussions of business cycles, credit cycles, long waves in inflation and interest rates and the impact of the Internet on the economy and the stock market.
Prerequisites: Economics 120 or another semester course in Economics is strongly recommended. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: about $25 for text and other materials.
Meeting time: mornings, 3-4 sessions per week. There will be two afternoons of workshops lasting approximately 30 minutes with hands-on instruction for each team. Because essential concepts and tools are covered during the first week, all students are expected to attend the first class.

THOMAS SYNNOTT `58 (Instructor)
ZIMMERMAN (Sponsor)

Thomas Synnott `58 is Chief Economist, Emeritus, U.S. Trust Company of New York

ECON 18 The American Dream?

The "American Dream"-the idea of achieving prosperity through hard work-contains home ownership as a central feature. In advertising and the popular press home ownership is sometimes considered the defining characteristic of the American Dream. In this course we will explore-through film, literature, and economics-the role that home ownership plays in defining the economic aspirations and identities of individuals in the United States and elsewhere. We will view and discuss three films (Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, House of Sand and Fog, and The Castle) that present the pathetic, comic and tragic aspects of pursuing this dream. We will read and discuss A House for Mr. Biswas by V. S. Naipaul, and consider the symbolic and economic significance of home ownership. In addition to developing an appreciation for its importance, you will hear brief discussions of how an economist might model the pursuit of home ownership and its significance for the economy, and learn why so few Swiss own their own homes, and why a larger share of Irish, Spanish and Greeks achieve the "American" dream than do the Americans themselves.
Evaluation will be based on participation in class discussions, two-page critical essays for each film, plus a paper of at least 5 pages in length exploring themes from the book and class discussion.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 19, with preference (in the event of over-enrollment) given to first-years and sophomores.
Cost to student: $10 (for the book).
Meeting time: afternoons, four times per week.

S. SHEPPARD

ECON 19 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 19)

This course examines tax policy towards low-income families in the United States, and has the following three objectives: 1) For students to understand the shift of redistributive policy in the United States from income support through the transfer system (Aid to Families with Dependent Children/Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) towards support of working individuals through the tax system (primarily the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC)); 2) For students to understand the challenges that low income individuals have "making ends meet" and to understand the role that the EITC has played in increasing the standard of living of the working poor; and 3) To enable students to understand the tax code well enough to prepare simple income tax returns, including those for filers claiming the EITC. Students will be trained by the IRS to prepare income tax returns for low-income individuals and families. At the end of the term, students will use their newly acquired expertise to help individuals and families in Berkshire County prepare and file their returns.
Students must complete IRS VITA training; staff one session of tax preparation assistance during the final week of winter term; and write a ten-page analytical and reflective essay.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 14.
Cost to student: $100 for texts and coursepack.
Meeting times will depend on availability of IRS trainers, but will be announced before registration for WSP begins.

WATSON

ECON 20 Introduction to the Economics, Geography and Appreciation of Wine

This course provides an introduction to the economics, geography and appreciation of wine. We will be studying the economics and geography of wine production, and will also learn to identify, understand and appreciate the major wine types of the world. The course will involve lectures, outside readings, and in-class wine tastings. We will focus primarily on the Old World wine styles and regions in France, Germany, Italy, Austria, Hungry, Spain and Portugal, but will occasionally make comparisons to analogous New World style wines.
Evaluations will be based on short quizzes, including blind tastings, and either an oral presentation or 10 page paper at the conclusion of the course.
Enrollment limit: 10. Since the course will include wine tastings, it will also be restricted to those who are of legal age for wine consumption by the date of the first class meeting. In the event that demand exceeds the maximum limit for the course, students will be selected on the basis of their academic record.
Although this course will be no doubt fun and interesting, it is also a serious course in which students are expected to learn the materials and skills presented in the lectures and wine tastings.
Cost to student: $150.
Meeting time: Monday evening with additional meetings to be determined.

PEDRONI

ECON 23 Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Model

A common tool for applied policy work is the Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model. These models are used extensively by various NGO's when deciding aid and policy recommendations. Advanced undergraduates or masters students can attain a basic understanding of these models in a relatively short time frame. The great advantage of these models is that they capture the general equilibrium feedback effects of policy proposals on various sectors of the economy. This is of great importance to applied work, as this allows the identification of the winners and losers from potential policies. The class will begin with a general overview of CGE models, followed by a detailed construction of a simple model for the US. During the latter part of the course, students will create a CGE model for a country of their choice (preferably their home country). This exercise will provide them with a basic model to use to examine the possible effects of various changes in national policy. Interested students could continue this project as a potential thesis topic.
Students will be evaluated using problem sets and their country-specific model.
Enrollment/prerequisites: this course is intended for CDE students and is open to undergraduates only with permission of instructor.
Cost to student: approximately $25 for reading packets
Meeting times: mornings, 10-noon.

ROLLEIGH

ECON 25 Social Activism in Senegal (Same as Political Science 25)

(See under Political Science for full description.)

ECON 27 Henry George, Eliminating Poverty

Henry George, an American economist (1839-1897) published Progress and Poverty in 1879. In this he observes that with increasing wealth there is increasing poverty and he offers a solution to this problem. We will study Progress and Poverty to understand his theory and his remedy and to understand the possibility of its application today.
George's remedy is to tax land to the exclusion of all other taxes. Today the Georgist movement uses this idea to encourage cities to modify the property tax, which, in most places, taxes land and buildings at the same rate, to reduce the tax on buildings and to increase the tax on land to produce the same yield. We will study the effect of shifting the property tax from buildings to land in the twenty Pennsylvania cities that have adopted this idea.
One of the great problems of the world today is that in many countries, a small minority of the people, own most of the land. We will study the possible use of George's ideas to ameliorate this problem.
Evaluation will be based on attendance and the completion of a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings, two hours three times a week.

ALBERT HARTHEIMER (Instructor)
ZIMMERMAN (Sponsor)

Albert Hartheimer has been an advocate for the philosophy of Henry George since 1967. He has worked to convince cities to adopt the two-rate tax by making studies of the effect of shifting taxes from buildings to land with constant yield. He served on the board of the Schalkenbach Foundation of America and The Center for the Study of Economics. He is an architect.

ECON 30 Honors Project

The "Specialization Route" to the degree with Honors in Economics requires that each candidate take an Honors Winter Study Project in January of their senior year. Students who wish to begin their honors work in January should submit a detailed proposal. Decisions on admission to the Honors WSP will be made in the fall. Information on the procedures will be mailed to senior majors in economics early in the fall semester.
Seniors who wish to apply for admission to the Honors WSP and thereby to the Honors Program should register for this WSP as their first choice.
Some seniors will have begun honors work in the fall and wish to complete it in the WSP. They will be admitted to the WSP if they have made satisfactory progress. They should register for this WSP as their first choice.

ECON 31 Honors Thesis

To be taken by students participating in year-long thesis research (ECON 493-W31-494).

ENGLISH

ENGL 10 Adventures Under The Dome: Communicating (Same as Astronomy 10)

(See under Astronomy for full description.)

ENGL 11 Anxious Allegories: Horror and Science Fiction Films

This film course will also be a casual tutorial on popular American moods, both cultural and political, and it will seek to place the films we study in the context of such trends as Fifties conformism and dread of Communism or the post-Watergate mistrust of government. The class will examine the possibility that what unites these loose allegories is not only their expression of once-popular fears, but also their campiness-their impulse to subvert our solemnities, whether intentionally or inadvertently. The films will include Halloween, Village of the Damned, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Dawn of the Dead, Eyes Without a Face, Forbidden Planet, The Exorcist, Them, Starship Trooper, The Shining, Rosemary's Baby, and The Ring.
Requirements: short oral presentations and one ten page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week.

DEAN CRAWFORD (Instructor)
SWANN (Sponsor)

Dean Crawford has written The Lay of the Land, a novel, as well as articles and stories. He teaches writing and literature at Vassar College but harbors an affection for ingenious science fiction and horror movies.

ENGL 12 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography (Same as Special 27)

This course explores the evolution of modern documentary photography. We will start with Robert Frank's The Americans, and how Frank's singular vision deeply shaped the next generation of photographers working the American streets and landscape. Diane Arbus, Bruce Davidson, Lee Freidlander, William Klein, Danny Lyon, Gary Winogrand are some of the photographers whose work we will get to know well . Discussions will include the new wave of independent and Magnum photojournalists (Phillip Jones Griffiths, Josef Koudleka, Susan Meiselas, Gilles Peress, James Nachtwey, Alex Webb, Ron Haviv and Tyler Hicks) and the wars from Vietnam to Bosnia to Iraq they cover as well as the personal visions they explore. Insight into the diverse currents of documentary photography will be covered through the work of Bill Burke, Larry Clark, Larry Fink, Nan Goldin, Emmet Gowin, Sally Mann, Mary Ellen Mark, Nicholas Nixon, Richard Misrach, Joel Sternfeld, Birney Imes, Regan Louie, Edward Burtynsky, Laura Letinsky and Simon Norfolk.
Each student will be required to make a brief presentation to the class on a documentary topic of their choice. A final paper expanding on this documentary topic will be due at the end of the course. Students will be evaluated on their classroom presentation, general participation and their written work.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: three mornings a week for two hours. Slide presentations will occupy half of the first meetings and give way to discussion of issues in documentary photography. Students will be encouraged to work on individual projects of their own choice. A field trip to New York will let us see first hand works from the collections at the Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American Art and the International Center of Photography.

KEVIN BUBRISKI (Instructor)
SWANN (Sponsor)

Kevin Bubriski (instructor) has received photography fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. His photographs are in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. His books include Portrait of Nepal (Chronicle Books 1993) and Pilgrimage: Looking at Ground Zero (powerHouse 2002).

ENGL 14 Poetry and Painting

In his essay on the relations between poetry and painting, Wallace Stevens asserts a deep affinity: "Where the poet does his job by virtue of an effort of the mind he is in rapport with the painter, who does his job with respect to the problems of form and color." Stevens continues an ancient tradition: long before Horace uttered his famous formulation, "ut pictura poesis," the Greek poet Simonides said that "poetry is a speaking picture, painting a silent poem." In 1712 Shaftesbury warned his readers to be suspicious of such equations: comparisons and parallels between painting and poetry are, he wrote, "almost ever absurd and at best constrained, lame and defective." After acquainting ourselves with the history of this debate, we will study particular poems and paintings, as well as the collaborations between painters and poets. We will confine ourselves to Western writers and painters including: Blake, Lessing, Ruskin, Turner, Stein, Auden, Stevens, Williams, Demuth, Creeley and Katz.
Requirements: one 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: none.
Meetings: mornings.

CLEGHORN

ENGL 16 The Rabbit Novels of John Updike

John Updike's four books about Harry Angstrom (nicknamed Rabbit) are now considered to be among the most engrossing, important fictions of the second half of the 20th century, and they also offer among the most astute and provocative analyses of American society in that period. We will read Rabbit, Run, Rabbit Redux, Rabbit is Rich and Rabbit at Rest both as works of art and as analyses of American culture over forty-some-odd years.
Requirements: several brief class reports designed to stimulate discussion, and a ten-page essay on some aspect of the novels, due at the end of the course.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preferences given to juniors and seniors, but sophomores and first year students are welcome to apply.
Cost to student: books.
Meeting time: 10-noon, three times a week.

LAWRENCE GRAVER (Instructor)
SWANN (Sponsor)

ENGL 17 Shame

This course will focus on the idea of shame in contemporary fiction. Readings will include Rushdie's Shame, Coetzee's Disgrace, and one or two other novels. We shall also read excerpts from the philosophy and anthropology of shame, and the recent politics of shame(shame and torture). The course packet will include readings on related topics such as guilt, disgust, dirtiness.
Requirements: one final paper of ten pages.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $25 for books and packet.
Meeting time: Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, 10-noon.

LIMON

ENGL 18 Comics, Comic Books and Graphic Novels

This course will explore the many forms of narrative that use pictures as their primary medium. We will examine graphic narratives from their beginnings in the 19th century to the present day. Artists might include Frank Miller, Art Spiegelman, Stan Lee, George Herriman and others.
Requirements: perfect attendance, class participation, a 10-page paper
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: approximately $100 for books.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week.

MURPHY

ENGL 19 Structuring Your Novel

This course is particularly designed for students who are currently wallowing in the morass of their own novels, or who imagine themselves diving in and want to test the mud. Class time will be divided between lecture/discussions and workshops; for the first half of the course, we'll talk about different kinds of novels and different strategies for building them. I'll ask you to complete a number of short sketches or plot summaries, which we will discuss in class. But you'll also be working on a longer, more detailed summary, a scene-by-scene breakdown of an extended piece of prose fiction, which can either be some pre- existing project you bring in from outside the class, or else something generated out of the first two weeks. During the second half of the course, we will workshop these. The goal is to finish with one functioning, detailed outline and several small workable sketches. Please note that our time constraints will not permit us to look at or discuss in class any portions of an actual novel, but only these plot skeletons. I may, however, have time outside of class to look at some finished prose.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings, two three-hour sessions each week.

PAUL PARK (Instructor)
SWANN (Sponsor)

Paul Park is the author of seven novels and a collection of short stories.

ENGL 20 Hypnosis and Social Knowledge

What is hypnosis? What does it suggest about the vulnerability of the self to social and artistic influence? This course will explore such questions by looking at hypnosis as a narrative subject and as a model for the relationship of artwork to viewer. Simultaneously we will consider the ways hypnosis is actually used in psychotherapy and live theater, comparing its powers and limits in social practice to those imagined for it in art.
Materials for the course will include critical and historical readings; novels and films (for example, George Du Maurier's Trilby, John Frankenheimer's The Manchurian Candidate, Werner Herzog's Heart of Glass, the Farrelly Brothers' Shallow Hal) and self-hypnosis CDs. If possible, we'll take an all-day field trip to watch a performing hypnotist in action.
Evaluation will be based on rigorous class attendance, participation in class and on the field trip, and completion of a 12-page paper comparative paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $100, for books and field trip.
Meeting time: 9:00-noon, Monday and Wednesday mornings, and one day- long field trip to be arranged.

ROSENHEIM

ENGL 23 Adorno's Negative Dialectics

Theodor Adorno was one of the twentieth century's most challenging thinkers -a German Jewish refugee who loathed the United States but ended up in Los Angeles, who had no hope for Germany but returned there after the war. His intellectual contributions are too extensive to list-he produced groundbreaking work in philosophy, musicology, literary criticism, sociology, and political theory. His magnum opus is called Negative Dialectics, and its questions will be our questions: What is the responsibility of philosophy in the face of suffering? What kind of thinking is possible in a world reduced to rubble? Is it possible to produce a form of thought that does not dominate others, that cannot be put in the service of their domination? We will read all of Negative Dialectics with occasional, explanatory forays into Adorno's philosophical opponents.
Students will write a single 15-page paper.
No prerequisites, though prior exposure to critical theory or continental philosophy can't hurt. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $35.00 for books and materials.
Meeting time: afternoons, two hours three times a week.

THORNE

ENGL 24 Arabs on Atlantic Avenue: Arab-American Communities, Literature and Art (Same as American Studies 11 and French 11)

(See under Romance Languages-French for full description.)

ENGL 27 Piracy or Freedom? File Sharing, Open Source and Seed Patents: the Battle over Intellectual Property

"The Information Wants to Be Free!" Or does it? This course examines the role of copyright, patents, and other forms of intellectual property ("IP") protection in the digital age. Students will be introduced to a variety of viewpoints on information sharing and will explore the implications of current U.S. and international laws and conventions regarding the protection of various forms of IP, particularly music, films, computer software, and genetically-modified foods.
The history and evolution of IP protections will be discussed, as will the current systems used to compensate information creators (musicians, filmmakers, computer programmers, bioengineers, etc.). Battles over the control of IP- from Napster and MP3s to subsistence farmers in India and patented seed corn-will be explored. Finally, recent innovations in information sharing and protection-including CopyLeft, the General Public License, Creative Commons, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, Business Method Patents, and others-will be introduced and debated.
Although many legal issues will be discussed, the nature of the inquiry pursued in this course is philosophical, not legal.
Evaluation will be based on a final paper, minimum 10 pages in length, presenting and justifying the student's position on the complex issues examined in the course. Attendance and class participation will also be taken into account.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons, twice a week for three-hour sessions, which will consist of lectures, structured discussions, and in-class debates. Students will be required to read a wide variety of material outside of class.

BRIAN CABRAL (Instructor)
ROSENHEIM (Sponsor)

Brian Cabral is a local entrepreneur. He has founded and/or served as CEO of five computer software companies since graduating from Harvard University in 1983. One of his most recent start-ups is a Linux/Open Source services organization, funded with $2 million in venture capital.

ENGL 28 Journalism Today (CANCELLED!)

This is a course for either the potential journalist or those merely intrigued by the media circus. It will cover the rudiments of journalism-its formats, customs and economics-but it will also look at how those practices developed and where they appear headed. We'll cover the basics of writing and editing for the press, but we'll also look at how technology and culture are changing those old rules. Some of it will be nuts and bolts, but all of it will be set in the wider context of the special influence of the media. By the end, you should be able both to "do journalism" and critique others who do. Appropriate to the topic, writing will be in short, frequent exercises rather than one long paper.
Enrollment limit: 30. Preference by seniority and to Record staff.
Cost limited to basic texts, $60.
Meeting time: Wednesday and Thursday, 10-1.

PAUL NEELY (Instructor)
SWANN (Sponsor)

Paul Neely '68, a Williams trustee, is the former editor and publisher of The Chattanooga Times. He has an MS in Journalism and an MBA, both from Columbia University, and held editing positions at various newspapers for 30 years.

ENGL 29 Philosophy in Literature (Same as Philosophy 29)


What is it for a novel, a story or a play to be a philosophical novel, story or play? It is not enough for it merely to be about a character who happens to be a philosopher; nor is it just that philosophical theories are reviewed in the narrative, as in Gaarder's Sophie's World. Milan Kundera tried to answer this question by saying that a good philosophical novel does not serve philosophy but, on the contrary, tries to "get hold of a domain that (...) philosophy had kept for itself. There are metaphysical problems, problems of human existence, that philosophy has never known how to grasp in all their concreteness and that only the novel can seize." If Kundera is right, literature at its best does the philosophical work that philosophy cannot do for itself. What kind of work is that, and how is it accomplished? Why can't argumentative prose -philosophers' preferred form of expression - clearly say, and moreover prove, what literature illustrates, shows and displays? One possible answer which we will examine is that, while many philosophers recognize that there are intimate connections between what we believe, feel and do, philosophical argumentation by its very nature appeals to belief alone; literature, by contrast, can simultaneously engage our reason, emotions, imagination and will, thus resulting not only in deeper understanding, but also in transformation of the self.
The class will require close readings of a (necessarily small) sample of philosophical novels, stories and plays, and a selection of theoretical works on the nature of the relationship between philosophy and literature (Murdoch, Danto, Goodman, Rorty, Nussbaum, and others). We will start with Voltaire's Candide, a straightforward illustration and dramatization of conflicting philosophical systems, and proceed to discuss the works in which literature and philosophy interact in more complex and more interesting ways: Eliot's Middlemarch, Kafka's Metamorphosis, Musil's The Man Without Qualities, Woolf's To the Lighthouse, Sartre's No Exit, several stories by Thomas Mann and J.L. Borges, Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Pirandello's Six Characters in Search of an Author and, time permitting, Pirsig's Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance or Ecco's The Name of the Rose.
Format: seminar. Requirements: Class participation, frequent short assignments and a longer final paper.
Class size limit: 15 (expected : 15). Preference given to students with strong background and interest in both philosophy and literature.
Estimated cost to the student: $60 for books.
Meeting time: mornings.

CASE and MLADENOVIC

ENGL 30 Honors Project: Specialization Route

Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the specialization route.

ENGL 31 Honors Project: Thesis

Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the thesis route.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

ENVI 10 The Winter Naturalist's Journal

This course will explore the tools for studying the natural world through various uses of writing, literature, and drawing. Students will spend time outdoors learning the ecosystem of the Williamstown area and time indoors doing observational drawing, reflective writing, and reading and discussions of nature literature. The writing component of the journal will be the equivalent of a ten- page paper. The month's work will be contained in a nature journal, to be displayed and discussed as part of a final project.
Designed for students with interests in environmental studies, natural history writing, and drawing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: $50 for books and art supplies.
Meeting time: mornings.

CLARE WALKER LESLIE and CHRISTIAN MCEWEN (Instructors)
MERRILL (Sponsor)

Clare Walker Leslie has written eight books, six on drawing nature including, Keeping a Nature Journal. Christian McEwen is the editor of Jo's Girls: Tomboy Tales of High Adventure, True Grit & Real Life, and co-editor of The Alphabet of the Trees: A Guide to Nature Writing. She divides her time between teaching in the USA and Scotland.

ENVI 11 Images of Greylock: Interpreting Landscape Change (Same as Biology 11 and INTR 11) (CANCELLED!)

The highest peak in southern New England (at 3491 feet above mean sea level) has long attracted the attention of residents, outdoor enthusiasts (Timothy Dwight in 1800), literati (including Hawthorne and Melville), and, led Henry David Thoreau to remark "It would be no small advantage if every college were thus located at the base of a mountain..." Mt. Greylock has also been the subject of over a century of photography, a medium that has produced an archive of the natural disturbances (hurricanes, landslides, blizzards, etc.) and human interventions (agriculture, logging, charcoal production, road building, tower construction, etc.) that have occurred on its slopes. The purpose of this course is to collect and interpret historical images of Mt. Greylock, to digitally restore them, to interpret changes in evident in series of photographs made at the same location through time, and to document the contemporary views of these sites. The product of this endeavor will be a group digital research paper on the historical changes of the Mt. Greylock landscape, with each student contributing a chapter on a different view.
Evaluation will be based on participation in the collection, restoration, and interpretation of images and production of the digital research paper.
Prerequisites: none, but access to a high quality digital camera will be helpful. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to those who have an interest in photographic history and interpretation. Interested students should contact the instructor and complete a short questionnaire.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for texts.
Meeting times: mornings, with three, all-day fieldtrips.

ART

ENVI 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Geosciences 12)

(See under Geosciences for full description.)

ENVI 13 The Law and the Literature of the Environment: The Environment on Trial (Same as Legal Studies 13)

(See under Legal Studies for full description.)

ENVI 16 Got Maps? An Experiential Exploration of Maps and Mapmaking in Contemporary Life (Same as Geosciences 16)

(See under Geosciences for full description.)

ENVI 17 Alaska: Land of Pipelines or Pipe Dreams?

The North has frequently been both characterized and mischaracterized by the many waves of miners, homesteaders, poets, easterners and westerners that have settled there. It is a storehouse of resources, a pristine wilderness, the last great place, or "the land that God forgot." How do we sort through this complexity and arrive at a common sense of the North? Is this possible or even desirable?
In this seminar course we will approach this issue by posing four questions related to the North: 1) What are the conflicted assumptions about land use and wilderness that Natives or non-natives hold in Alaska? 2) What are the key elements that describe and control the success or failure of northern development projects? 3) Is there a pattern, language, or mode of analysis which can be used to best analyze and represent these issues? And, finally, 4) Is there any way that our twenty-first century world views of wilderness can lead effectively to sustainable development in Alaska?
These and other questions will be approached through the examination of certain Northern case studies-the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill and Alyeska, gold extraction in the Pogo and Pebble mines, mining zinc and lead at Red Dog, the Bering Sea Fisheries and Project Chariot.
Format: seminar/project. Evaluation will be based upon a demonstrated feverish class interest and participation as well as a 10-page individual report on a topic of the student's own choosing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: 10-noon, three times a week.

HENRY P. COLE '59(Instructor)
MERRILL (Sponsor)

Henry P. Cole '59 has lived in Alaska for 35 years and was the Science Advisor to Governor Steve Cowper at the time of the oil spill in 1989.

ENVI 18 State Environmental Politics (Same as Political Science 18)

Many environmental issues-air and water quality, land use and conservation, toxic chemicals and hazardous waste, environmental justice issues, public parks, beaches, and forests, and wildlife and their habitat-are decided, or strongly influenced, at the state level. This course examines how state environmental laws and policies are made, how they relate to those of national and local governments, and the effect those laws and policies have on the resources and values that people care about. Topics to be covered will include: federalism and environmental policy; the role of the media and organized interest groups in state environmental policy making; environmental justice in state law and policy; and the electoral significance -or lack thereof-of environmental issues. The course will include field trips to two state capitols, Boston and Montpelier, for meetings with state officials, media, and advocacy groups.
Format: seminar/discussion. Requirements: one short paper, take home final exam, participation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference given to those students with permission of instructor.
Cost to student: $100.
Meeting time: afternoons.

JAMES R. GOMES (Instructor)
GARDNER (Sponsor)

James R. Gomes is the Chief Executive Officer of the Environmental League of Massachusetts, an environmental advocacy and policy group.

ENVI 19 Introduction to Research in Environmental Science (Same as Chemistry 19)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

ENVI 31 Senior Research and Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Environmental Studies 493-494.

GEOSCIENCES

GEOS 11 Science of Jurassic Park

The movie "Jurassic Park" was the one of the biggest hits in American film history and it sparked renewed interest in dinosaurs. What are the paleontological facts and theories behind the story and the dinosaur reconstructions used in this movie? The course will analyze the movie and the book it was based on by Michael Crichton. We will also read Raptor Red a novel by a "real paleontologist" to learn more about the world of the dinosaurs. Through discussion we will consider the feasibility of DNA recombination for recreating dinosaurs. Also we will consider the various facts and interpretations of dinosaur reproduction, their digestive system, metabolism, locomotion, defense and attack systems, and their intelligence.
Required reading: Michael Crichton: Jurassic Park, Robert T. Bakker: Raptor Red, selected passages from DeSalle & Lindley: The Science of Jurassic Park and The Lost World, and a selection of other scientific dinosaur articles.
Students are expected to write a 10-page paper on a dinosaur topic and present the result orally for group discussion. Course evaluation will be based on the assigned paper and oral presentation, as well as participation in group-discussions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for books, a reading package and museum admission.
Meeting time: three times a week from 10 a.m.-noon. The course will start with a mandatory all-day field trip (Jan. 5th) to the American Museum of Natural History in New York for the exhibition: "Dinosaurs, ancient fossils, new discoveries."

B. GUDVEIG BAARLI (Instructor)
M. JOHNSON (Sponsor)

B.Gudveig Baarli holds a Ph.D. in paleontology from the University of Oslo, Norway. She is a Research Scientist in the Department of Geoscience at Williams and has previously taught Winter Study courses on dinosaurs.

GEOS 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Environmental Studies 12)

This class will broaden students' appreciation for the appearance and history of the landscape and teach the skills of making a successful photograph.
Williamstown, situated in a valley between the Green and Taconic Mountains and bisected by the Green and Hoosic Rivers, is a place of great natural beauty. The local landscape is a subject that inspires both professional and amateur photographers alike. While Williamstown will be the subject of most of our work, we will use it to learn principles of universal application. Students will discover the importance of light in making a photograph. They will also learn camera skills and the mechanics of photography to make slides, which will be reviewed at biweekly class meetings.
In addition to photographing and critiquing slides, the class will visit collections at the Clark Art Institute and WCMA to see original work and examine and discuss books on reserve at Sawyer Library. An overview of the history of landscape photography will be provided with an emphasis on American workers such as Carlton Watkins, William Henry Jackson, Edward Weston, Ansel Adams, and Alvin Langdon Cobern. We will also demonstrate examples of different cameras such as medium format, view cameras, and panorama cameras.
Students will produce a body of successful photographs/slides which will be presented in a class web page.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, the student's photography and their presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 15 with priority given to first and second-year students.
Students will need a 35mm camera.
Cost to student: approximately $60 for film and materials.
Meeting time: three mornings a week for the first two weeks and twice a week after that; short field trips will supplement the morning meetings.

NICHOLAS WHITMAN (Instructor)
DETHIER (Sponsor)

Nicholas Whitman is a professional photographer and the former Curator of Photography at the New Bedford Whaling Museum. A 1977 graduate of the Rochester Institute of Technology, he has honed his craft to make landscape and photographs of power and depth.

GEOS 16 Got Maps? An Experiential Exploration of Maps and Mapmaking in Contemporary Life (Same as Environmental Studies 16)

This Winter Study will be a short course in finding, evaluating and making maps. Students will research map and data sources, and develop criteria to evaluate their findings. Through a series of mapmaking exercises students will work to develop the necessary skills to produce their own maps with data of their choice. Maps could potentially range from hometown neighborhoods to results of student research.
Evaluation will be based on class attendance, participation and a presentation supported by a visual display of student generated maps. Maps will be submitted for inclusion in the Winter Study Exhibition.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to student: approximately $35.
Meeting time: mornings. The course will meet two times a week for 2 hours with additional lab time.

SHARRON MACKLIN and TREVOR MURPHY (Instructors)
DETHIER (Sponsor)

GEOS 25 Caves and Karst Geology of Northern Spain

From artistic sanctuary for early cultures to drinking water reservoirs for modern cities, cave systems serve as a vital, albeit mysterious, cradle for civilizations. The stalagmites and stalagtites that adorn many caves provide important archives of past climate. Rounded cobbles cemented high on cave walls tell of the underground river systems that once carved channels through the rock, abandoned as the rivers cut down into deeper levels of the earth. In this field course we explore the geology and hydrology of the cave and karst system in the Asturias-Cantabrian region of northern Spain. This area has dramatic relief with 9,000 foot mountains within 100 miles of the scenic rocky coast, a rich cultural history of prehistoric cave paintings. We will work in several cave systems, mapping evidence for ancient river levels, identifying promising stalagmite fields for paleoclimate reconstruction and making preliminary chemical analysis on stalagmites We will also evaluate cave hydrology and risk of groundwater contamination to cave aquifer systems. Our field work in caves will complement examination of geological and topographic maps, analysis of historical climatic data, and our ongoing monitoring of cave dripwater chemistry in the area. In Northern Spain, we will be based in dorms at the University of Oviedo but will take one extended field trip. Students will complete team projects including a final poster presentation at the end of the course.
Reasonable physical condition is strongly recommended for moderate hiking inside and outside of the cave systems. Preference is given to students who have taken a 200 level Geosciences course or who have other comparable science and field experience.
Enrollment limit: 8.
Students will learn basic geological field techniques and have the opportunity to contribute to original research on karst hydrology in the area. Final projects will allow them to apply this knowledge of karst hydrogeology to specific problems, including protection of cave painting resources, protection of groundwater resources, reconstruction of past climates, and river incision records.
Cost to student: approximately $1500.

STOLL

GEOS 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Geology 493-494.

GERMAN

GERM S.P. Sustaining Program for German 101-102

Something new and different for students enrolled in German 101-102. Practice in the use of German for everyday purposes; creation and performance of short dramatic sketches through group collaboration; games; songs; storytelling; reading. No homework.
Requirements: active participation and regular attendance earn a "Pass" grade.
Prerequisites: German 101 or equivalent. Limited to German 101-102 students.
Cost to student: approximately $5 for photocopied materials.
Meeting time: mornings, 3 times a week 9-9:50 a.m.

GRUBER, DELACROIX

GERM 43 Introduction to Scientific Cynicism #43 (Same as Special 43) (CANCELLED!)

Scientific cynicism-scicyn-studies the ways human beings encounter and manage Truth. It rests on the assumption that Truth is not only knowable but also readily accessible to most, if not all, humans throughout their lives. Hence, it views humans not as striving toward Truth, as usually represented in or by biology, art, history, philosophy, literature, psychology, physics, and religion (among other disciplines), but instead as struggling to evade It. Scicyn was first proposed by F. I. Breucker, a German-American thinker who died in 2000. She laid out its principles, core terms, and main lines of inquiry. Her unpublished writings are being compiled and edited by Bruce Kieffer. Introduction #43 presents scicyn in a form that is sufficiently compatible with academic styles of reading and discussion as to be suitable for a WSP course. We will approach scicyn by focusing on its stance towards those thinkers and writers who are often judged the most cynical in Western intellectual and literary history: Diogenes of Sinope, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Baudelaire, Nietzche, and Beckett. We will read selected texts by and on these figures and consider Breucker's critiques of them as unscientific and therefore false cynics. All readings in English.
Requirements: active participation, three 3- to 4-page presentations/papers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference to seniors.
Cost to student: less than $30.
Meeting time: three 2-hour morning meetings weekly.

B. KIEFFER

GERM 25 German in Germany

Begin or continue study of German at the Goethe Institute in Germany. The Goethe Institute program attracts students from all over the world. A typical course meets for four weeks, 18 hours/week, generally providing the equivalent of one semester course at Williams. To earn a pass, the student must receive the Goethe Institute's Teilnahme-Bestätigung which denotes regular attendance at classes, completion of homework, and successful completion of a final test. Students wishing to apply must fill out an application, obtainable in the office of the Center for Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Cultures in Weston,or online at www.goethe.de, and return it to the Goethe Institute as soon as possible (admission is on a first-come, first-served basis).
No prerequisites, but any student interested in beginning German with this course and then entering German 102 at Williams should contact Professor Druxes by December 1, at the latest. Enrollment limit: 15. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: $1600 to $2100 for tuition and room and board, plus round trip travel costs. The Goethe Institute arranges for room and board at various levels upon students' request, but students must make their own travel arrangements. This course is not defined as a "trip" for financial aid purposes. The maximum reimbursement to financial aid students is $500.

DRUXES

GERM 30 Honors Project

To be taken by honors candidates following other than the normal thesis route.

GERM 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for German 493-494.

HISTORY

HIST 10 "Queer" in the 'Fifties: British Histories and Identities (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 10)

As currently used, the term "queer" refers to any number of identities and practices that fall outside the realm of normative heterosexuality. By contrast, the term had a more limited meaning in Great Britain in the 1950s: it was simply the term of choice used by many homosexual men to designate themselves-men who viewed the term "gay" to be an offensive, American vulgarism. But what did it actually mean to be "queer" in Britain in the 1950s? How was homosexuality understood and "queerness" experienced by men in this decade? This course will attempt to address these questions through an examination of the historical evidence of a way of life that today, half a century later, seems increasingly alien, archaic and remote. In many respects, the period from the late 1940s to early 1960s is a crucial one in "queer" British history: it was then that an increasingly visible male homosexual subculture elicited a number of "moral panics" in the media, that novelists and film-makers began to deal "honestly" with what was termed the "problem of homosexuality," that a government commission (the Wolfenden Committee) recommended the partial decriminalization of male homosexuality, and that a cautiously reformist homosexual rights movement was established. This course will examine a wide range of documentary evidence pertaining to these phenomena. We will consider works of fiction (such as Mary Renault's The Charioteer and Rodney Garland's The Heart in Exile), two feature films (Victim and The Leather Boys), autobiographies (Peter Wildeblood's Against the Law), official documents (The Wolfenden Report), tabloid newspaper articles, and a number of medical and psychological treatises on the "condition" of homosexuality. In so doing we will attempt to map the complex articulation of "deviant" male sexual identities in Britain in the 1950s and explore the subjective experience of a mode of selfhood very different from our own.
Evaluation based on class attendance and participation, one in-class presentation, and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit:15 (preference, if oversubscribed, to students in History and Women's and Gender Studies).
Cost to student: approximately $40 for books and course packet.
Meeting time: Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday afternoons and two additional film screenings.

WATERS

HIST 12 The Unremembered Genocide: the Armenian Genocide

Between the years 1915 and 1923, the Ottoman Turkish government engaged in the systematic mass murder of its Armenian population, killing some one and a half million Armenians. Yet, outside of Armenian communities, few people know about this genocide. Through film, literature, and primary sources, we will study the history of the Armenian genocide and the Armenians' moral and political struggle to gain worldwide recognition of the genocide. In addition, we will spend one class session each week researching primary source documents related to the assigned texts, which include Franz Werfel's best-selling novel from the 1930s The Forty Days of Musa Dagh, director Atom Egoyan's 2002 film Ararat, and selected memoirs and historical accounts.
Evaluation will be based on completion of three short research assignments (3-4 pages each), attendance, and class participation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Priority to first-years and sophomores.
Cost to student: $40 for books and photocopies.
Meeting times: mornings. We will meet three times a week for two-hour sessions. Each week, one session will focus on developing research skills and conducting research. The other two sessions each week will be dedicated to discussion of readings and films.

GARBARINI and LORI DUBOIS

Lori DuBois is a Reference and Instruction Librarian at Sawyer Library. She received her M.S. in Library Science in 1997 from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

HIST 13 The Historian as Detective

This course will bring students into close physical and intellectual contact with the papers of notable nineteenth-century Americans: Presidents, literary figures, and leading social reformers. Students will have a rare opportunity to work with original manuscripts of people like Governor Thomas Hutchinson, Thomas Jefferson, John Qunicy Adams, Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, William Cullen Bryant, John Brown, and Dorothea Dix, to cite a few representative examples. All documents are part of the Chapin Library's manuscript holdings, and all work for this course will be done in Williamstown.
Research into any historical topic requires some knowledge of what historical editors do and frequently calls for editing on the part of the researcher. It is detective work that begins with the simple existence of a document but then turns it over, analyzes it, relates it, evaluates it, and finally draws conclusions. In this course students will learn to transcribe a document accurately and to make sense of it as well.
In the first week daily classes will introduce past and present editorial practices and rationales and allow work on more easily read Presidential letters. In sessions during each of the second and third weeks, additional points of historical editing will be discussed, while work is done on somewhat more challenging letters in the William Cullen Bryant papers and the "reformer files" of the Julia Ward and Samuel Gridley Howe papers. Class sessions will be held at the end of the fourth week in which students will present and discuss an important historical or literary document or letter series each has earlier selected for editing.
Students will be expected to attend all class meetings and present a medium- length paper on the document or letter series each student selects as his or her special editing project. The instructors also expect everyone who registers for this course to commit themselves to the hard work and high research standards required in serious historical editing.
Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to student: less than $50 for books and Xerox materials.
Meeting time: mornings, 2-3 times per week. Original documents students will be working with will be available for consultation from 1-5 p.m., Monday- Friday in Chapin Library.

DEW and ROBERT VOLZ

HIST 14 American Wars: Directed Independent Reading and Research

An independent reading and research course on American wars from colonial times to the present. All participants will share a few common readings, but there will be no formal classes. Instead, each participant will meet individually with the instructor to develop a unique reading list on a topic of their choice. Once their topic is decided, they will spend the rest of the Winter Study researching and writing a substantial paper (at least 25 pages) on their topic.
Prerequisites: none, except interest in American military history. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: $40 for books.
Meeting time: no formal classes.

WOOD

HIST 15 Martin Luther King Jr.'s Moral Vision for Today

We hear much these days about the role of "moral vision" in American politics and social change. Conservatives seem to have cornered the market on moral values and vision, while progressives and "secular fundamentalists" flounder in fostering their own moral discourse. This has not always been the case. During the 1960s the progressive moral vision was a force to be reckoned with, especially as articulated by Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement. King's prophetic vision is even more relevant for our time as for his own. This course will explore King's prophetic moral vision as a "work in progress"-looking at its grounding in African-American spirituality, its shaping by his mentors and fellow leaders, and how it deepened to grapple with issues of global peace, economic justice, human rights, and his "revolution of values." Two films will be shown: Citizen King and The Promised Land.
Each student will write a 10-page essay on how King's vision speaks to current issues of racism, sexism, homophobia, war, terrorism, poverty, planetary peril, depersonalization, and faith-based politics. Full class participation mandatory.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for reading materials.
Meeting time: 2-3 afternoons per week.

S. BURNS

HIST 16 Genealogy

In this course, students will become familiar with the basic methodology of genealogical research and use this information to create a family history. Students will conduct research using primary and secondary sources, including vital records (birth, marriage and death certificates), federal and state census records, immigration records, military service and pension records, naturalization records, probate and court records, newspapers, city directories, and published genealogies. Students will index vital records in Williamstown Berkshire County and Pownal Bennington County Vermont to learn what information is included in the records and become familiar with computerized databases. The course will be held at the National Archives and Records Adminstration Center at Conte Drive Pittsfield to gather Federal Records and then include field trips to local libraries, local town clerks offices . Students will complete a family history using both secondary and primary sources. They will become familiar with the process of historical research including formulating theories, finding evidence through various media (including oral interviews, records, ephemera, and published sources), and drawing conclusions based on that research.
Requirements: students will complete a family history equivalent to a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites; students should have some basic family knowledge such as names and locations including counties of ancestors on April 1st in 1930. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week.

ALAN HORBAL (Instructor)
W. WAGNER (Sponsor)

Alan Horbal has worked as a volunteer at the National Archive and Record Center in Pittsfield, Massachusetts since 2001.

HIST 17 American Strategy in World War II: War Plans and Execution

During the Second World War, the United States fought a global conflict. By late 1943, for example, American forces were in combat in Italy, New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, and the Central Pacific. The war against the U Boat threat and the air war against Germany continued with increasing intensity, and the allied staffs were engaged in planning the 1944 invasion of France. To achieve the nation's basic political objective-the unconditional surrender of Germany and Japan-the United States devised a series of strategic and operational war plans for both the European and Pacific areas of operation. A number of factors including inter-allied and inter-service disputes, logistics, and enemy actions frequently led to results that were quite different from the planners' expectations. The course will examine the major U.S. war plans using selected readings and a number of actual plans. The course will then explore the realities of battle and the differences between plans and execution.
Requirements: class participation, attendance, and a 10-page essay.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost to student: $40 for books and Xeroxes.
Meeting time: afternoons, twice a week for three hours.

STEVEN ROSS '59 (Instructor)
W. WAGNER (Sponsor)

Steven Ross, '59, holds the Admiral William V. Pratt Chair of Military History at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island.

HIST 018 J.R.R. Tolkien, Middle Earth, and Modern Medievalism

This winter study explores how an Oxford professor of medieval linguistics wrote the most influential work of fantasy literature, The Lord of the Rings. We will investigate how Tolkien's scholarship on Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse literature, fascination with languages, and deep Catholic piety shaped the creation of his fantasy-world, Middle Earth. By examining the writings of Tolkien within their larger intellectual, social, and cultural contexts, we will uncover how an author of fantasy literature helped form the image of the Middle Ages in the modern popular imagination.
Format: seminar. Evaluation will be based on attendance, class participation, a presentation and quiz, and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Priority will be given to first-years, sophomores, and History majors.
Meeting time: Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons and additional film screenings on Tuesday evenings.
Cost to student: $40 for books and photocopies.

GOLDBERG

HIST 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for History 493-494.

KITTLESON

INTERDEPARTMENTAL PROGRAM FOR EXPERIMENTAL AND CROSS-DISCIPLINARY STUDIES

INTR 11 Images of Greylock: Interpreting Landscape Change (Same as Environmental Studies 11 and Biololgy 11)

(See under Environmental Studies for full description.)

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

INST 26 Arabic in Cairo

Students will travel to Cairo and enroll in a January term intensive Arabic course at the American University of Cairo. The course meets four hours a day with additional practice sessions. Students will live in the dormitories of the university and make occasional day trips around Cairo to practice Arabic and see the Pharonic and Islamic sights.
Successful completion of the WSP course will depend on successful completion of the course. Students enrolled in the course will also need to attend three preparatory meeting during the fall.
Enrollment limit: 8.
Cost to student: approximately $3600.

BERNHARDSSON

INST 30 Senior Honors Project

To be taken by candidates for honors in International Studies.

LATINO STUDIES

LATS 10 Gender and the Latino Urban Scene

Conventionally the urban scene has been imagined and portrayed in strictly masculine terms. In this course, we will review classic and more contemporary texts about Latino city life in an effort to think more critically about how males and females, specifically Latinos and Latinas, experience, navigate, and possess urban milieus. Working with ethnography, literature, critical essays, and film, we will consider how gender as well as race and class is depicted, performed, and inscribed in notions of urbanity. Course materials include, but are not limited to, ethnographic studies by Elena Padilla, fiction by Piri Thomas and Angie Cruz, and the films Girlfight and Manito.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, class presentations, and one 10-page paper.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for books and photocopies.
Meeting time: afternoons, 3 sessions per week.

RUA

LEADERSHIP STUDIES

LEAD 11 Justice and Public Policy (Same as Political Science 19)

The course will examine four or five significant public policy matters which have been resolved by the court system. These might include abortion, affirmative action, death penalty, election laws, free speech/obscenity. The focus of the course will be on the process involved in resolving the issues in the courts, the competing interests involved, the public impact of the decisions and, in most cases, the difficulty of resolution. Students will spend two-three days in Boston where they will have the opportunity to witness activities at the Middlesex County District Attorneys Office and meet with representatives of the federal and state judiciary.
Requirements: 10-page paper and regular participation in class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16. If the course is overenrolled, students will be asked to write a short essay to determine selection.
Cost to student: none, but students will be responsible for obtaining lodging for two nights in Boston, Massachusetts.
Meeting time: mornings, Monday and Thursday-all day while in Boston. Students will meet in December prior to the break to discuss logistics and expectations for the course.

MICHAEL B. KEATING '62 and MARTHA COAKLEY '75 (Instructors)
G. GOETHALS (Sponsor)

The course will be taught by Michael B. Keating '62, a trial lawyer with the Boston law firm of Foley, Hoag & Elliot, LLP, and Martha Coakley '75, District Attorney for Middlesex County.

LEAD 12 Epidemiology, Public Health and Leadership in the Health Professions (Same as Chemistry 12)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

LEAD 13 Presidential Leadership

In this course we will focus on the widely different leadership strategies of six presidents: George Washington, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, Lyndon Baines Johnson, George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush. What were their goals? How did they communicate their values and visions? How did they galvanize popular support for their policies? How did they deal with setbacks and outright failure? To what extent did they model themselves on their predecessors? How do they stand up in the test of time? Through readings, documentary films, and class discussions, we will explore these pivotal presidencies.
Requirements: One research paper, attendance at all meetings and film showings and active participation in class discussions.
Enrollment limit: 12. Preference will be given to students with a background in Leadership Studies, Political Science or American history.

DUNN and JAMES MACGREGOR BURNS

Professor Susan Dunn and Professor James MacGregor Burns, Woodrow Wilson Professor of Government Emeritus, have co-authored two books, George Washington and The Three Roosevelts: Patrician Leaders Who Transformed America. Burns won the Pulitzer Prize for his biography, FDR: Soldier of Freedom.

LEAD 18 Wilderness Leadership

This Winter Study project is for students who would like to participate in an off- campus experiential education opportunity. Students will be required to research an appropriate accredited program i.e. National Outdoor Leadership School, Outward Bound etc., that will provide a suitable learning environment and be at least 22 days in length. The Director of the Williams Outing Club will assist students in their search if necessary. Upon choosing a program and being accepted, students will meet with the Director in a pre-program meeting in December to create a framework for observing group dynamics and studying a variety of leadership styles. A required ten-page paper based on their journals will be required immediately after their return to campus for the start of third quarter. There will also be a follow up class to debrief the experience in the first week of February. All programs must meet with the approval of the Outing Club Director.
Requirements: course approval by WOC Director, daily journal writing with focus on leadership and group dynamics, ten page paper and 2 class meetings pre and post trip.
Student assessment will be based on ten page paper and class discussions.
No prerequisites. Not open to first-year students. Interested sophomores, juniors and seniors must consult with WOC Director before registration. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student will vary depending on the program selected-range is generally from $1,500-3,000.

SCOTT LEWIS, Director of the Outing Club

LEGAL STUDIES

LGST 13 The Law and the Literature of the Environment: The Environment on Trial (Same as Environmental Studies 13)

This course will trace the development of an American consciousness towards the environment through an examination of our law and our literature. It will consider the historical and political roots of that development as well. The term "law" includes state and federal judicial decisions and legislation, particularly during the presidency of Theodore Roosevelt and during the decades which followed the year 1960 when much of the legal basis for the American environmental protection movement was established. The term "literature" includes not just the written word but also painting, sculpture, and music. This course will examine the historical and legal choices we as Americans have made which have put our environment on trial. What has occurred in our development as a people that explains this quintessentially American phenomenon? Our journey begins with the Puritans of New England and the planters of Virginia and their predecessors in the New World. Among the other subjects to be considered are the influence of the frontier and the important role played by the ready availability of seemingly endless land, Thomas Jefferson and the Lewis and Clark Expedition, Emerson and Thoreau, the paintings of Thomas Cole, Albert Bierstadt, Frederick Remington and others, the beginning of the environmental protection movement in the later half of the 19th century, Frederick Jackson Turner and the end of the frontier in 1890, the establishment through federal legislation of the forest reserve and the national park systems, Theodore Roosevelt and the debate between conservation v. preservation, as presented by Gifford Pinchot and John Muir, the music of Aaron Copeland, Woody Guthrie and others, Rachel Carson and Silent Spring, environmental "trigger" disasters, the crucial year, 1960, and the decades that followed, full of new laws and judicial opinions interpreting those laws, NEPA, EPA and the evolving role of the courts, Mr. Justice Douglas' dissent in Sierra Club v. Morton, and the approach of the current national administration.
Evaluation will be based on attendance and classroom participation. Students will prepare three short papers, 3 to 4 pages each, which will present one or more sides of an issue and form the basis for classroom discussion. They will be asked to defend or reject the conclusions reached or approaches taken by our courts and legislatures and by our literature, as broadly defined, on environmental issues.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. This course is appropriate for students eager to explore the material presented and prepared to argue assigned positions on important legal, literary and historical issues.
Cost to students: approximately $60 for books and materials.
Meeting time: mornings. 3 two-hour sessions a week.

PHILIP R. MCKNIGHT '65 (Instructor)
L. KAPLAN (Sponsor)

Philip R. McKnight '65 is a trial and appellate attorney. At Williams he completed the honors program for both American History and Literature and European History. He earned his law degree from The University of Chicago Law School and then practiced in the state and federal courts of New York and Connecticut, as well as in Europe.

LINGUISTICS

LING 12 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Women's and Gender 12 and Special 12)

This course introduces students to basic knowledge about American Sign Language and deaf people. Emphasis in this preliminary introduction to ASL is on developing rudimentary receptive, expressive and interactive skills through an intensive immersion in ASL. Students will also be introduced to deaf history, culture and politics. This course is designed to help nonsigners develop rudimentary skills, to introduce them to the complexity of ASL, and to cultivate interest in further study of the language.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation, quizzes, and student produced videotapes of their own expressive skills. Students will also be expected to spend an hour outside of class each week viewing native ASL signers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15 (expected: 10).
Cost to student: $40.
Meeting times: 3 two-hour meetings per week in the afternoon.

LAURIE BENJAMIN (instructor)
SANDERS (sponsor)

Description of Adjunct: Laurie Benjamin (Instructor) is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts in multicultural and international education. Ms. Benjamin has taught deaf students at the secondary level. She is a nationally certified ASL interpreter with extensive experience in a wide range of interpreter settings including mental health, legal, and performance interpreting. In addition to working as a free-lance interpreter for the deaf, she is currently teaching ASL to students at Williamstown Elementary School.

MATHEMATICS and STATISTICS

MATH 12 Forgot Math?

This course is for those students who want additional preparation before entering Calculus 103, 104, or 105/106, or Statistics 201, but do not want to take a full-semester course. Each student entering the course will be interviewed and we will agree on a contract of topics of study, exercises to complete, and a schedule. The student will be self-guided with as much support needed from the instructors open class hours. This course will be rounded out by reading Calculus Gems by George Simmons, with exercises, discussions, and a 10-page book report.
Evaluation will be based on fulfillment of individual contracts, and completion of exercises, and book report, and participation in group discussions.
No prerequisites. Each student must be interviewed before being accepted into the course. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: approximately $35 for text.
Meeting time: All students will meet as a group for one hour every week, followed by individual and open hours as students work on their contract.

S. JOHNSON

MATH 13 Roulette

Although only considered the "third" table game throughout casinos in the United States (behind Blackjack and Craps), Roulette is a traditional and fascinating game, having its roots in 17th century France. Part of the fascination for that game, besides its aristocratic feel is that it allows for both small and huge wins and offers bets at relatively favorable odds. This course takes a closer, analytical look at this elegant game. We will study basic probability concepts to derive odds for various bets and learn how to use the computer to simulate various playing strategies, statistically analyzing their merits or shortcomings.
Requirements: at least one of the three weekly meetings will be held in the computer lab.
Evaluation will be based on small weekly assignments and not on the amount of cyber dollars won.
No prerequisites are required other than a genuine interest in analytical thinking and computer programming. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

KLINGENBERG

MATH 14 Can You Keep a Secret? An Introduction to Cryptography

Is your ATM account number safe? What about your purchases on the web? In this age of the Information Superhighway, how can you be sure your data, your electronic transactions, ultimately your money is safe? In this course we will explore the 4000 year old science of secret writing known as cryptology. We will learn how the ancients kept their secrets safe all the way to why that on-line purchase you just made is secure (mostly).
Evaluation will be based on homeworks and exams.
Prerequisite: although a wide range of mathematics will be used, proficiency in and comfort with algebra is sufficient (prerequisites Mathematics 101). Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: $50 for text.
Meeting time: mornings.

LEW LUDWIG (Instructor)
BURGER (Sponsor)

Professor Ludwig is in his fourth year at Denison University. He is a national Project NExT Fellow and active in undergraduate research and presentations. He has won several teaching awards and grants including the University College Graduate Associate Outstanding Teaching Award at Ohio University.

MATH 15 Math and Music (Same as Music 15)

(See under Music for full description.)

MATH 16 Knitting: The Social History and Craft Form (Same as Special 16)

Creating fabric out of interlocking loops can be traced back to the Neolithic period, and knitted like artifacts 1600 to over 2000 years old have been found in Egypt, Peru, and Sweden. Knitting requires little machinery and can be done almost anywhere yet requires a significant amount of learned skill. Knitting techniques have been handed down through generations, shared in small groups, and transferred between cultures as trade routes emerged. The social history of knitting is a rich reflection of the history of culture.
This course examines the social history and technique of this important craft. We will examine the social history of knitting through a sequence of readings, lectures, and discussions. Reading list includes: No Idle Hands: The History of American Knitting, by Anne L. MacDonald, related articles provided by the instructor, and Reader's Digest Knitter's Handbook, by Montse Stanley.
We will engage a series of project samples designed to introduce and improve skills of beginning knitters, starting with simple blanket squares, a knitted cap, and culminating in a final project of a basic sweater. Students will also be required to select and research some aspect of knitting and write a 10-page research paper. Topics will need pre-approval of the instructor.
Evaluation will be based on participation, projects and a final 10-page research paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference will be given to first-year and beginning knitters.
Cost to student: approximately $70 for materials kit and $45 for textbooks.
Meeting time: three days per week from 4-6 p.m.

M. JOHNSON (Instructor)
BURGER (Sponsor)

Mary Johnson, M. Ed., an experienced knitter who has worked professionally for the NYC designers KnitWits, Lane Borgesia, and is currently a project knitter for Storey Publishing. Mrs. Johnson is a third grade teacher at Williamstown Elementary School.

MATH 17 Humor Writing (Same as Special 29)

What is humor? The dichotomy inherent in the pursuit of comedic intent while confronting the herculean task implicit in the comprehension of the transient nature of adversity can ratchet up the devolving psyche's penchant for explication to a catastrophic threshold, thwarting the ecstatic impulse and pushing the natural proclivity for causative norms beyond the possibility of pre-situational adaptation.
Do you know what that means? If so, this is not the course for you. No, we will write funny stuff, day in and day out. Or at the very least, we will think it's funny. Stories, essays, plays, fiction, nonfiction, we'll try a little of each.
Is laughter the body's attempt to eject excess phlegm? Why did Plato write dialogues instead of monologues? Who backed into my car in the Bronfman parking lot on the afternoon of March 2, 2004? These are just a few of the questions we will explore in this course. Plan to meet 6 hours a week in the morning, and to spend at least 20 hours a week on the course. No slackers need apply. Produce or become produce. All students will submit at least one piece of work for publication.
Requirements: reading, attendance, participation and writing at least 20 pages of material.
Prerequisites: sense of humor (broadly interpreted.) Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: no more than $30.
Meeting time: mornings.

C. ADAMS

MATH 18 Introductory Photography: People and Places (Same as Special 18)

This is an introductory course in photography, with an emphasis on color photography and using the digital camera. The main themes will be portraiture and the landscape. No previous knowledge is assumed, but students are expected to have access to a 35 mm (or equivalent) digital camera, preferably with manual override or aperture priority. The topics covered will include composition, exposure, camera use, direction and properties of light, and digital imaging. Students will develop their eye through the study of the work of well-known photographers and the critical analysis of their own work. We will discuss the work of contemporary photographers such as Mary Ellen Mark, Joel Meyerowitz, Constantine Manos, and Eugene Richards. Students will be expected to spend a considerable amount of time practicing their own photography outside of class. There will be one required local half-day field trip. Students will also be introduced to the program Photoshop, and will work on their own pictures with this program.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, an in-class quiz and a final project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to the student: $50 for the purchase of a text.
Meetings time: mornings.

SILVA

MATH 30 Senior Project

To be taken by candidates for honors in Mathematics other than by thesis route.

MATH 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Mathematics 493-494.

MUSIC

MUS 10 Symphonic Winds

Students enrolled in Symphonic Winds will rehearse and prepare music in preparation for a February 2005 concert performance. Students will participate in a variety of performance settings from full ensemble to various chamber ensemble settings (both conducted and unconducted). Students will be responsible for preparing their individual parts (including both instrumental practice and required listening/reading) and attending all rehearsals and composer lectures to which they are assigned by the instructor.
Evaluation will be based on individual performance and preparation, and, as necessary, written assignments.
Repertoire will be selected based on enrollment. Possible repertoire to be studied during Winter Study includes, but is not limited to: W. A. Mozart: Don Giovanni and/or Idomeneo; Robert Saxton: Paraphrase on "Idomeneo," Kurt Weill: Little Threepenny Music, Daron Hagen: Bandanna, Adam Gorb: Towards Nirvana, Dana Wilson: Piece of Mind, and music of John Adams, Louis Andriessen, Susan Botti, Richard Danielpour, Jean Francaix, Don Freund, Peter Fricker, Michael Gordon, Charles Ives, David Lang, Steve Martland, David Maslanka, Einojuhani Rautavaara, Steve Reich, Sylvestre Revueltas, Roberto Sierra, Jan Sweelinck, and Michael Torke. In addition, the ensemble will prepare the premiere of a percussion concerto by Williams College Assistant Professor Ileana Perez-Velazquez, as well as selections from Leonard Bernstein's West Side Story (in conjunction with Keith Kibler). Students are welcomed and encouraged to offer repertoire suggestions.
Symphonic Winds is open to students of all musical abilities, including wind, brass, and percussion players, as well as vocalists, string players (including harp), and pianists. Instructor permission is necessary to enroll in this winter study course. Enrollment limit: 30.
Meeting time: A specific, detailed schedule will be constructed once the repertoire is determined; however, rehearsals/lectures will most likely be scheduled on Monday-Thursday afternoons. Students should be expected to be in rehearsal for approximately 5-10 hours a week; for every hour of rehearsal time, students will be expected to have prepared for approximately 1-4 hours, as necessary.

STEVEN BODNER (Instructor)
KECHLEY (Sponsor)

Since 2000, Steven Bodner has been the music director of the Symphonic Winds at Williams College, where he also teaches classical saxophone and music theory, and performs regularly with the Williams Chamber Players. He earned a B.A. in philosophy and B. Mus. in saxophone performance and Miami (OH) University in 1997, an M.M. in wind ensemble conducting with academic honors and distinction in performance from New England Conservatory in 1999, and he is pursuing his Ph.D. in Music Education at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

MUS 11 Beethoven

This course provides an introduction to the life and music of Ludwig van Beethoven. The composer's difficult childhood, tragic loss of hearing, clandestine affair with the "Immoral Beloved," tempestuous relationship with his suicidal nephew Karl-biographical elements such as these, together with the French Revolution and emergence of Romanticism, will form the backdrop for our study of his titanic artistic struggles and monumental achievements. Students will listen to a broad cross section of Beethoven's music, including piano sonatas, string quartets, symphonies, overtures, concertos, choral works, and opera. We will explore his ties to Haydn, Mozart, and other composers, his fierce individualism, and his impact on later generations, subjects linked to notions of artistic genius and the sublime.
No prerequisites. An ability to read music is not required.
Evaluation will be based on two tests and class participation. Attendance is mandatory. If possible, we will take a field trip to hear a performance of Beethoven's music. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to first-year students and students with a demonstrated interest in music.
Cost to student: $75.
Meeting time: Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 10-noon.

M. HIRSCH

MUS 12 Ensembles in Classic American Musical Theatre (Same as Theatre 12)

This Winter Study will give participants an opportunity to study and perform numbers for one or more singers in great American musicals and European light operas. You have sung a solo, you have sung in chorus-now practice the exacting art of singing an ensemble on stage. Music from Leonard Bernstein's West Side Story will be the central focus. The course will culminate with a performance of ensembles, solos, and duets from a variety of musical theatre shows. Other ensembles from European models such as Franz Lehar's The Merry Widow may also be included. Singers, actors, and pianists are all welcome to participate.
A student may fulfill the requirements of the course by performing, writing a 10-page discursive paper, or some combination of the two approved by the teacher.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting times: Monday and Wednesday afternoons.

KEITH KIBLER (Instructor)
KECHLEY (Sponsor)

Keith Kibler has performed under some of the finest directors currently working including David Alden, Peter Sellars, Galina Vishnevskaya. He sang a major role in Kurt Weill's "Die Kleine Mahagonny" under Alvin Epstein with the American Repertory Theatre. He has been a featured soloist with the Boston Pops in American theater music. Keith Kibler is an adjunct teacher of singing at Williams College. He can be reached at kibler@verizon.net.

MUS 13 Voice Workshop

Singers of all levels of experience will increase their skills in vocal technique, interpretation and performance. In a combination of private voice lessons coaching with an accompanist, and a performance/discussion workshop session, students will immerse themselves in repertoire towards the goal of a culminating concert at the end of Winter Study.
Preference will be given to students currently studying voice or with some musical background. Pianists interested in accompanying singers are also welcome. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time to be determined.

KERRY RYER-PARKE (Instructor)
KECHLEY (Sponsor)

Kerry Ryer-Parke is known as an skilled and intuitive performer of many musical styles. She is a frequent soprano soloist, the Director of the Bennington Children's Chorus, and maintains a private teaching studio as well as serving as an Adjunct Instructor of Voice at Williams.

MUS 14 The Music of Billy Strayhorn

Students will take part in an ensemble course primarily devoted to studying and playing the music of Billy Strayhorn. All instruments and voices are welcome to participate. Vocalists are encouraged to participate in this workshop. In addition to performing music, the course will give students an in-depth look at the life of Billy Strayhorn, who was a close associate of Duke Ellington. Each composition will be explored as to its structure and improvisational concepts. Vocal and instrumental music to be performed will be chosen from the following Strayhorn compositions: Take The A Train, Lush Life, Maybe, Just A Sittin' And A Rockin', A Flower Is A Lovesome Thing, Daydream, Bittersweet, Grievin, Imagine My Frustration, Lotus Blossum, Passed Me By, Something To Live For, Star Crossed Lovers, My Little Brown Book. Students will be required to read Lush Life: A Biography of Billy Strayhorn by David Hajdu. Students should have the ability to completely play the music, plus permission of the instructor. Students may contact the instructor by email: Tess251@aol.com or phone (845-331-9835).
Enrollment limit: 12-15.
Meeting time: 2-3:50 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Outside listening assignments and preparation of individual parts will also be required. Participation in a concluding concert during the last week of Winter Study is required. Students will be evaluated on their performance at this concert of Strayhorn's music. Students will be expected to practice the material outside of class and will also be evaluated on mastery of the material, class participation and attendance.

TERI ROIGER (Instructor)
KECHLEY (Sponsor)

Teri Roiger is an Adjunct Teacher of Jazz Voice at Williams College, and a professional singer, pianist and lyricist.

MUS 15 Math and Music (Same as Mathematics 15)

The course examines some of the myriad ways that mathematics can shaper and inform ways we think about musical structure, and conversely, how music can instantiate a number of beautiful mathematical structures and ideas. We will consider how group theory, number theory, probability and stochastic methods can offer insights into the structure of musical systems (like tonality, and diatonic sets and scales), into the analysis of individual pieces of music, and into the ways that music can be created and perceived. We will explore, for example, how the mathematically unique properties of the diatonic set (the collection of tones that underlies the major and minor scales) permit or give rise to tonality, whether other musical universes (those with more or fewer chromatic tones) could exist that would offer the same riches as our familiar 12-tone universe, and whether and how computers can be taught to compose meaningful harmonic progressions. For non-math types, musical examples will be used to present all relevant mathematical concepts.
Evaluation will be based on a series of musical/mathematical problem sets, designed to illustrate relevant mathematical concepts and techniques. Students will then work on a topic of their choice (analysis of a musical work, a composition based on a mathematical model, or on a speculative topic) about which they will write a short (ca. 5 page) paper and give a class presentation.
Prerequisites: students need to be able to read musical notation. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference will be given to math majors with musical performance experience or students who have taken a music theory course.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings, Monday, Wednesday and Friday 10-noon.

E. GOLLIN

MUS 16 Percussion for Non-Percussionists

This study will introduce participants to the basic techniques of playing percussion instruments. Students with experience on other instruments, or who have played drums, will learn to play a variety of percussion instruments including drums, keyboard percussion such as marimba, vibraphone, and xylophone, orchestral percussion instruments, and some instruments from other musical cultures. Classes will involve group instruction, study of important works for percussion through scores and listening, the theory and history of the instruments, group improvisation, and regular rehearsal of a work for percussion ensemble. The project will culminate with a performance of a percussion ensemble work in collaboration with the percussion trio TimeTable. Students will be expected to practice individually in preparation for classes and the concert.
Evaluation will focus on participation in class and preparation for the final concert.
Prerequisites: Students should already be proficient on an instrument (percussion or other) and read music. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to student: $30 (for course pack materials).
Meeting times to be determined.

MATTHEW GOLD (Instructor)
KECHLEY (Sponsor)

Matthew Gold is based in New York City and is a member of the TimeTable percussion trio and Sequitur. He performs with the Ahn Trio, Speculum Musicae, Counter)Induction, the S.E.M. Ensemble, the Glass Farm Ensemble, and has been a member of the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble. He also performs regularly with the American Symphony Orchestra, the Westchester Philharmonic, and on Broadway. He has recorded for, among others, EMI Classics, Koch International, Albany Records, and CRI.

MUS 17 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as American Studies 15)

(See under American Studies for full description.)

MUS 18 Chamber Music Performance

The course is designed to offer an intense three week immersion in chamber
music, focusing on all aspects of ensemble playing.  Repertoire will be
assigned to accommodate the personnel involved.  Trios, quartets, quintets,
etc. using assorted combinations of instruments are possible.  The groups will
rehearse every day.  They will be coached twice a week.  There will be a
recital at the end of Winter Study. 

RONALD FELDMAN
Artist in Residence in Orchestral and Instrumental Performance

MUS 21 Individual Vocal and Instrumental Instruction

Can only be taken IN ADDITION to a regular WSP course. CONTACT THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT ABOUT SIGNING UP FOR THIS COURSE!!!
Intended for students who are continuing Music 251-258 lessons taken during fall semester. Must be taken in addition to a regular WSP course. Individual lessons in voice, keyboard, and most orchestral and jazz instruments, offered during Winter Study. Four lessons, given at approximately one week intervals (TBA). Student is expected to practice at least two hours per day. All individual instruction involves an extra fee which is partially subsidized by the department. Contact the Music Office for contract/permission forms which must be submitted in order to take this course.
Prerequisites: permission of Department Chair and Instructor, completion of Music 251 or higher during the previous semester.

STAFF

MUS 25 Ghanaian Music, Dance, and Textiles: Interdisciplinary Studies

This course provides students with the opportunity to learn Ghanaian xylophone playing, singing, drumming, dancing, or textile making at the Dagara School of Music, Dance, and the Arts in Accra, Ghana (www.bernardwoma.com/school). Founded by Ghanaian master xylophonist, Bernard Woma, this school focuses on the arts of the Dagara people of northwestern Ghana. Students will receive 6 hours per day of individual and group instruction. Students will focus on learning one art form but will choose a second art form in which they complete some work. Students will write a paper on the connections, parallels, or contrasts that exist between the two art forms. For example, a student studying textiles and music may write about the rhythms used in both; a student studying music and dance may write about the understanding of dance they have gained through studying music or vice versa.
Evaluation will be based upon one 5- to 7-paper, participation, and progress in learning Ghanaian music, dance, or art. Field trips relevant to the arts being studied will be arranged.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: approximately $2951. Additional costs paid directly by Students: $240-480 for 1 meal per day ($10/day) and entertainment and miscellaneous expenses ($240).

E. D. BROWN and BERNARD WOMA

MUS 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Music 493, 494.

NEUROSCIENCE

NSCI 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Neuroscience 493-494.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 10 Formal Logic

This course will introduce students to sentential and predicate logic. Its major goal is to give them the ability to understand the kinds of formalization used in ordinary works of philosophy, i.e., texts that are not intended primarily for specialists in logic. Depending upon the interests and rates of progression of the students, there may be some consideration of more advanced topics, such as modal and tense logic.
Requirements: there will be readings for each class meeting, and usually problem sets.
Method of evaluation: problem sets, some to be completed in class.
Prerequisites: students who have taken courses in logic should not take this course without consulting with the instructor. Math majors are unlikely to be challenged, but are welcome, particularly if they are willing to try to help those in the class with less formal sophistication (including the instructor, who is far from an expert and anticipates honing his relatively modest skills by "teaching" this course). Enrollment limit: 15. Preference to actual and possible philosophy majors; non-majors who are considering declaring or adding the major in philosophy should so inform the instructor by email.
Cost to student: maximum of $50 (but probably less); for photocopies and/or books.
Meeting times: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, 10:30-noon.

WHITE

PHIL 11 Aikido and Ethics

Aikido is a Japanese martial tradition that combines the samurai arts of sword and grappling with the philosophical desire to create harmony in the midst of chaos. As such, it addresses situations of conflict that manifest themselves physically, but also offers insight into how to prevent or redirect the energies -social, political, or psychological-that might otherwise become conflict in one or another aspect of our lives.
The physical training will improve each student's strength, balance, posture, fitness, and flexibility. They will also learn how to throw their friends across the room. Wooden training weapons will be used regularly to demonstrate the historical origin of various techniques and to visually amplify the forces at work. Intellectually, students will engage with topics ranging from virtue ethics to conflict resolution to the proper role of the Warrior/Knight in a just society. Students will train for 2 hours 4 out of 5 mornings a week, and participate in 2 out of 3 guided philosophical conversations each week held in a casual setting in the early evenings. Additional relevant experiences, such as meditation practice, misogi, and Samurai films, will also be scheduled.
Students will be evaluated on the quality of their participation in both physical and intellectual course components, and a final 10-page paper or project which entails a significant investigation of a topic emerging from the course experience.
Prerequisites: Prior martial arts training is welcome but not required. Students do not have to be especially athletic, but they must meet all Williams requirements (e.g. have passed a recent physical, etc.) for participation in intercollegiate sports. Enrollment limit: 25.
Cost to student: $100 (which buys gi (the uniform), bokken (wooden training sword), and jo (staff).
Meeting time: mornings.

ROBERT KENT '84 (Instructor)
SAWICKI (Sponsor)

Robert Kent '84 spent 3 years in Kyoto, Japan earning his Sho Dan (first degree black belt), directly after majoring in both Philosophy and Religion at Williams. He currently holds a San Dan rank (third degree black belt) and runs the youth program at Aikido West in Redwood City, CA. He also runs the website AikidoKids.com, and writes a regular column for the largest English language Aikido magazine. He earned a Masters degree in Philosophy at Claremont Graduate School in 1993, writing his thesis on the Ethics of Authenticity.

PHIL 29 Philosophy in Literature (Same as English 29)


What is it for a novel, a story or a play to be a philosophical novel, story or play? It is not enough for it merely to be about a character who happens to be a philosopher; nor is it just that philosophical theories are reviewed in the narrative, as in Gaarder's Sophie's World. Milan Kundera tried to answer this question by saying that a good philosophical novel does not serve philosophy but, on the contrary, tries to "get hold of a domain that (...) philosophy had kept for itself. There are metaphysical problems, problems of human existence, that philosophy has never known how to grasp in all their concreteness and that only the novel can seize." If Kundera is right, literature at its best does the philosophical work that philosophy cannot do for itself. What kind of work is that, and how is it accomplished? Why can't argumentative prose -philosophers' preferred form of expression - clearly say, and moreover prove, what literature illustrates, shows and displays? One possible answer which we will examine is that, while many philosophers recognize that there are intimate connections between what we believe, feel and do, philosophical argumentation by its very nature appeals to belief alone; literature, by contrast, can simultaneously engage our reason, emotions, imagination and will, thus resulting not only in deeper understanding, but also in transformation of the self.
The class will require close readings of a (necessarily small) sample of philosophical novels, stories and plays, and a selection of theoretical works on the nature of the relationship between philosophy and literature (Murdoch, Danto, Goodman, Rorty, Nussbaum, and others). We will start with Voltaire's Candide, a straightforward illustration and dramatization of conflicting philosophical systems, and proceed to discuss the works in which literature and philosophy interact in more complex and more interesting ways: Eliot's Middlemarch, Kafka's Metamorphosis, Musil's The Man Without Qualities, Woolf's To the Lighthouse, Sartre's No Exit, several stories by Thomas Mann and J.L. Borges, Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Pirandello's Six Characters in Search of an Author and, time permitting, Pirsig's Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance or Ecco's The Name of the Rose.
Format: seminar. Requirements: Class participation, frequent short assignments and a longer final paper.
Class size limit: 15 (expected : 15). Preference given to students with strong background and interest in both philosophy and literature.
Estimated cost to the student: $60 for books.
Meeting time: mornings.

CASE and MLADENOVIC

PHIL 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Philosophy 493-494.

PHYSICS

PHYS 10 Light and Holography

This course will examine the art and science of holography. It will introduce modern optics at a level appropriate for a non-science major, giving the necessary theoretical background in lectures and discussion. Demonstrations will be presented and students will make several kinds of holograms in the lab. Thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation, we have 7 well-equipped holography darkrooms available for student use. Students will be evaluated on the basis of regular attendance, completion of 4 laboratory exercises, and a holography laboratory project or a 10-page paper. Attendance at all classes and labs is required for a passing grade.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference will be given to students with no previous college course in physics more advanced than Physics 100.
Cost to student: about $50 for holographic film, chemicals, and photocopies.
Meeting time: At the beginning of WSP, the class will meet for lecture and discussion three mornings a week and for lab 2 afternoons a week. Later classes will be mainly laboratory.

WHITAKER and FORKEY

PHYS 11 Computational Methods for Science and Engineering

Students in this course will learn a number of computational techniques that have important applications in science and engineering. Each student will carry out a series of exercises using Mathematica, C, or a computer language of the student's choice (no previous programming experience is required). These exercises will incorporate topics that may include numerical integration, root finding, minimization and maximization of functions, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, boundary value problems, Monte Carlo methods, and the fast Fourier transform. An effort will be made to allow each student to work on problems appropriate to his or her interests and background. Students will be evaluated on the basis of regular attendance, completion of the exercises, and a larger final project or 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost: approximately $50 for the course textbook.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week.

TUCKER-SMITH

PHYS 12 Meet the Right Side of Your Brain: Drawing as a Learnable Skill

Representational drawing is not merely a gift of birth or a magical ability, but a learnable skill. If you ever wanted to draw, but doubted you had the ability or believed you could not learn, then this course is for you. This intensive course utilizes discoveries in brain research to teach representational drawing. By using simple techniques and extensive exercises you will discover and develop the perceptual shift from your symbol based left hemisphere to your visually based right hemisphere. This cognitive shift enables you to accurately see and realistically represent the physical world. You will learn to draw a convincing portrait, self-portrait, and still life. This course is designed to develop your powers of observation and enhance your innate creative problem solving abilities, which are applicable in any field. Students need no previous artistic experience, just the willingness and desire to learn a new skill. Students will be expected to attend and participate in all sessions. They will also be required to keep a sketchbook recording their progress and complete a final project.
Evaluation will be based on participation, effort, and development. There will be an exhibition of coursework on the final day of Winter Study.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15, with preference given to juniors and seniors.
Cost to student: cost of text and (approximately) $15 for drawing materials.
Meeting time: mornings, two times per week with substantial additional independent student work.

STELLA EHRICH (Instructor)
JONES (Sponsor)

Stella Ehrich holds an M.F.A. in painting from Bennington College. She teaches drawing at Bennington and other local colleges. She has had solo exhibits from Rutland, VT to Dallas, Texas to Mobile, Alabama.

PHYS 13 Automotive Mechanics (CANCELLED!)

PHYS 14 Electronics

Electronic instruments are an indispensable part of modern laboratory work throughout the sciences. This course will cover the basics of analog electronic circuits, including transistors and operational amplifiers, and will briefly introduce digital circuits. Students will build and test a variety of circuits chosen to illustrate the kinds of electronic devices and design problems a scientist is apt to encounter. Evaluation will be based on participation, completion of both laboratory work and occasional homework, and the quality of the final project or paper.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 or equivalent calculus. No prior experience with electronics is required. Enrollment limit: 16.
Cost to student: $50 for course packet and electronic parts.
Meeting time: afternoons, for a mixture of lab, lecture, and discussion, providing ample opportunity for hands-on experience. In the last week, students will design and build a final project, or will write a 10-page paper.

STRAIT

PHYS 15 Livres des Artists-The Artist Book

In this multidisciplinary class, students will explore and explode the boundaries that traditionally define the ancient art of bookmaking. They will step outside of traditional assumptions and preconceived ideas as the class explores a mode of expression that is creative, graphic, sculptural and very personal. The first half of the course will explore bookmaking and binding techniques paper decoration, drawing, printmaking (including monoprint, stamping, photocopy transfers and transfer drawings) and book structures (such as the many variations on the accordion, the codex, pop-up, tunnel, carousel and inventive), collage and creative writing in order to develop a plan for the creation of an individual artist's book, a multi-media expression of self that will be designed and executed in the last half of the class.
During the first two weeks, students will meet every day in a studio/workshop like setting. The second two weeks will be more open, allowing the student to develop and create their own artist book, with two three hour meetings at the beginning and end of the week. Field trips to Chapin Library, MassMoca, and the Smith College Museum of Art will be required and scheduled according to class needs.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 12.
Cost to student: $100 plus another $50/75 dependent on the types of supplies/paper/books that students end up making.

MELANIE MOWINSKI (Instructor)
JONES (Sponsor)

PHYS 22 Research Participation

Several members of the department will have student projects available dealing with their own research or that of current senior thesis students. Approximately 35 hours per week of study and actual research participation will be expected from each student.
Students will be required to keep a notebook and write a five-page paper summarizing their work. Those interested should consult with members of the department as early as possible in the registration period or before to determine details of projects then expected to be available.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 1 or 2 per project.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: to be arranged with instructor.

K. JONES and members of the department

PHYS 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Physics 493, 494.

POLITICAL ECONOMY

POEC 31 Honors Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Political Economy 493.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

PSCI 10 Adventures in Disabilities (Same as Psychology 10)

(See under Psychology for full description.)

PSCI 11 The Gospel According to U2

It has been said that U2 is the "world's greatest rock band"-but is it also (unknown to most) the world's greatest-and most unusual-Christian rock band? This course explores the theology, spirituality and politics of U2 expressed through the group's songs, stage performances and human right campaigns. We will travel from the band's origins in the Shalom Christian fellowship in Dublin to their overtly Christian second album October (1981); the culmination of their superstardom in Joshua Tree (1987); through their techno and ultra-ironic 1990s marked by ZOO-TV and Bono's "mock the devil" phase as Mr. MacPhisto; and a return to their roots in All That You Can't Leave Behind (2000) and How To Dismantle An Atomic Bomb (2004). Along the way, we will listen to a lot of U2, watch some videos and tour footage-but it's not all fun and games. We will also read serious theological and philosophical tracts on U2 lyrics and explore the band's complicated interweaving of faith, sexuality, grace, fame, doubt, justice, and the meaning of America in a way which makes them a surprisingly popular and poignant spiritual voice in our superficial and materialistic age. We will also delve into the group's human rights and social justice work, from Band Aid in the 80s to Debt, AIDS, Trade in Africa (DATA) today, and in particular explore Bono's Catholic social justice moorings.
How does a band which quotes psalms at the Super Bowl and routinely stirs millions at its concerts to chant an Old Testament lament ("how long? how long?) get into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame? How does Bono simultaneously play the role of rock idol and prophet, prompting professions of love from both star-struck teenage girls and conservative U.S. Senators? Is U2 following the Church, leading it or rivaling it? How far can you go with a red guitar, three chords and the truth? Answers will come in the form of regular and active participation as well as two short papers.
Prerequisites: none beyond a familiarity with U2. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

PAUL

PSCI 12 Constitution Making

The last decade has witnessed an extraordinary amount of "constitution making" across the globe. Many regimes have sought to reorder themselves by way of creating written constitutions. Indeed, written constitutions, once deemed an "experiment," have become synonymous with legitimate government. But is written constitutionalism actually a viable way to bring the polity into being and order it? Is there something inherently absurd in attempting to base a government on a written text? This course will get at such question by comparing different constitutions. While examining particular constitutional ideas and practices, we'll be asking what we want from written constitutionalism, what this entails of written constitutionalism, and whether written constitutionalism can in fact deliver.
Requirements: 10-page paper and active class participation.
No prerequisite. Enrollment limit: 15. Seniors and juniors will have priority.
Cost to student: books.
Meeting time: afternoons.

G. THOMAS

PSCI 13 Politics and the Novel in South Asia (CANCELLED!)

The story of Saleem and his fellow midnight's children in the eponymous book by Salman Rushdie artfully suggests the ways that individual lives are impacted by the fate of nations. Taking inspiration from Rushdie, this course will consider works of fiction as lenses through which to engage the post-Independence politics of South Asia, with a particular emphasis on issues of ethnicity and nationalism. In addition to Midnight's Children, we will read two to three other novels that consider the meaning of borders and identities in South Asia. We will also view documentaries and Bollywood films that present themes of the books in celluloid. Our goal is to gain a sense of how stories about the trauma of conflict and aspirations of nationhood are told. How are characters' identities informed by their political and historical milieu, and in turn, how are historical contexts illuminated through stories? Lectures and several short articles will help provide context for the fiction; other class meetings will include a mix of discussion and film viewing.
Evaluation will be based on participation in class discussion, a brief (fifteen minute) presentation, and a ten page paper that analyzes a theoretical concept explored in the course (nationalism, ethnic conflict, secession) in the context of one or more of the novels.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to students: $60 (three to four novels and one small course packet of articles).
Meeting time: afternoons, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday for 2-hour sessions during the first three weeks of the winter study period.

SUNILA S. KALE (Instructor)
MELLOW (Sponsor)

Sunila S. Kale will finish her doctoral degree in 2006 in the Government Department at University of Texas, Austin. Her work compares the trajectories of economic liberalization in four Indian states, focusing specifically on privatization of the electric utility industries. She has published articles on the politics of economic reform in India in Pacific Affairs and Journal of Strategic Studies and is a contributing editor to the journal India Review.

PSCI 15 Globalization: Good or Evil?

In 1999, thousands of people from around the world protested a meeting of the World Trade Organization in Seattle, shutting down the city by blocking traffic, smashing in storefronts, and vandalizing public places. Since then, such demonstrations have become commonplace at high-level international meetings. Why? The protestors believe globalization is evil, and that it must be stopped. Yet a recent poll shows that most ordinary Americans believe globalization benefits the country. And the World Bank argues that globalization reduces poverty and increases overall welfare throughout the world.
Is globalization good or is it evil? To help us understand what globalization is, what it means, and what we think about it, we'll begin by reading Manfred Steger's Globalization: A Very Short Introduction. We'll then consider the impact of two specific cases of globalization: McDonald's and movies. McDonald's has become a symbol of globalization, changing societies all over the world. Movies go both ways-Hollywood blockbusters play from Berlin to Bangkok, but foreign films play every week at Images in Williamstown.
Students will then pick one particular aspect of these cases to investigate (such as the impact of American movies on the French film industry, or the affect of McDonald's on daily life in China), and will present their conclusions to the class. Students will then write a short paper based on their presentation topic.
Evaluation will be based on each student's attendance, participation, presentation, and six-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. If enrollment exceeds 15, students will be selected by lottery.
Cost to student: $40 for books and photocopies.
Meeting time: two hours a day, three mornings a week. Some movies and documentaries will be shown outside of regular class time.

PAM BROMLEY '98 (Instructor)
SHANKS (Sponsor)

Pam Bromley '98 is a Ph.D. candidate in Politics at Princeton, where she has taught courses on international relations, ethics, and public policy.

PSCI 18 State Environmental Politics (Same as Environmental Studies 18)

(See under Environmental Studies for full description.)

PSCI 19 Justice and Public Policy (Same as Leadership Studies 11)

(See under Leadership Studies for full description.)

PSCI 21 Fieldwork in Public and Private Non-Profits

This course is an internship experience in which students work full-time in a governmental or nongovernmental (including voluntary, activist, and grassroots) organization. Students may find internships in government and nonprofit organizations in which their work involves significant involvement with public issues. Examples include: town government offices; state or federal administrative offices such as environmental agencies or housing authorities; interest groups that lobby government such as the ACLU or Natural Resources Defense Council; nonprofit organizations such as think tanks or service providers such as Habitat for Humanity; and grassroots, activist or community development organizations such as Greenpeace or neighborhood associations. The instructor will work with each student to arrange an internship; such arrangements must be made in advance of the Winter Term. Students should first make their own contacts with an institution or agency. The instructor and and members of the Political Science department and Environmental Studies program are available to help students find placements, if necessary. Each student's internship mentor shall send a confirmation letter to the instructor verifying the internship and describing the nature of the work to be performed by the intern. Students will read a few short articles distributed at the beginning of Winter Term and must agree to keep a journal, maintain weekly contact with the instructor, and write a final paper summarizing and reflecting upon the experience. A group meeting of all students will occur after winter study to discuss the experiences.
Requirements: internship work; satisfactory evaluation from the institutional sponsor; 10 page final paper; participation in final meeting.
At the time of registration, interested students should send a resume and letter of interest to Paula Consolini.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit:15
Cost to student: approximately $15 for readings, student covers transportation costs to and from internship site.

PAULA CONSOLINI (Instructor)
SHANKS (Sponsor)

Paula Consolini is the Coordinator of Experiential Education at Williams.

PSCI 23 Experiential Learning

The Gaudino Fund offers four students the opportunity to carry out projects that involve critical, reflective, experiential learning. Each student selected for this course will register for Political Science 23, but will work independently of other students in the course. Each student will have his or her own faculty sponsor who will help shape and monitor the project. Professor McAllister and the Gaudino Board of Trustees will select the four students. The Board places a premium on proposals that foster the development of habits of mind that illuminate direct experience, undertaken preferably in social milieux previously unfamiliar to applicants. Students' projects must be academically rigorous and focused on intellectual problems worked out carefully with faculty sponsors. Projects must also entail systematic self-reflective examinations of how students' experiences affected them personally. Preference will be given to projects unconnected with regular course work.
Professor McAllister will meet with the students as a group before and after January. The Gaudino Fund will defray expenses for all students in the course up to $1000 per student.

MCALLISTER

PSCI 25 Social Activism in Senegal (Same as Economics 25)

This course introduces students to the work of non-governmental and grassroots health, social and environmental organizations in Senegal, in French West Africa. In Senegal as elsewhere, local and national groups have sprung up in response to concerns about poverty, unemployment, disease, and other pressing issues. Students will meet with activists, and where possible contribute to their work. In addition to gaining an understanding of the breadth, purpose and genesis of social activism in Senegal, students will learn of the mixed effect of Western commerce and tourism on the country. Non-governmental groups, both those run by Senegalese and those directed by foreigners, grapple with the legacy of French colonial structures and the present-day reality of market capitalism in an impoverished country. These circumstances create a politically complex backdrop against which social organizations struggle to achieve their goals. As such, part of the work of our Williams group will be to understand the challenges and practical impediments these groups face against a background of pervasive North-South power dynamics and inequality. The first week of the course will be held at Williams, during which time students will learn about Senegal's history and culture; be exposed to some of the literature on social activism and grassroots social justice; and learn of Senegal's place in the North- South economy. This will be followed by 15 days in Senegal, with Dakar as our base. A 2-3 day de-briefing back in Williamstown will follow.
Requirements: Students will submit a final paper discussing the work of one or two groups whose work they observed, and are expected to keep a journal of their reflections whilst in Senegal.
Prerequisites: basic, conversational French strongly recommended. Those students who have no French at all are encouraged to enroll in a French language course in the fall 2005.
Enrollment limit: 8 (expected: 8).
Dates: January 3-January 26.
Cost to student: approximately $2940.

DEVEAUX and HONDERICH

PSCI 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 493-494.

PSCI 32 Individual Project

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 495 or 496.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 10 Adventures in Disabilities (Same as Political Science 10) (CANCELLED!)

A dramatic shift in the laws and values shaping the participation of persons with disabilities in American society has led to motorized carts in Professional Golf Association tournaments and modified exam procedures for some college students. With the help of guest speakers who themselves have disabilities as well as through readings and films, we will explore past and present understandings of disabilities (physical, sensory, cognitive, mental health) and the changing responses to those who have them. Each student will conduct an investigation, using interviews and site visits, to learn how current understandings of disabilities have impacted a field in which they are interested. Alternatively, a student may focus an inquiry on his or her own disability or that of a family member. The underlying premise of this course is that we no longer expect the individual with a disability to "overcome her/his handicap." Rather; it is the role of citizens and leaders to remove barriers to participation and redesign the environments in which we learn, communicate, work, and use our leisure time to access everyone's gifts and talents. This is not a burden but an adventure.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, a final 10-page paper, and an oral presentation about your investigation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: approximately $60.
Meeting time: afternoons.

DALE BORMAN FINK (Instructor)
HEATHERINGTON (Sponsor)

Dale Borman Fink earned his B.A. from Harvard and his Ph.D. in special education from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of Making a Place for Kids with Disabilities (2000, Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers) and the creator of a popular workshop for teachers called "Environmental Deficit Disorder: Are You Creating the Behavior Problems You Want to Avoid?"

PSYC 11 The Exonerated

Due to recent developments in DNA testing, increasing numbers of wrongful convictions are being discovered, sometimes involving prisoners on death row. Post-conviction analyses of these tragic cases by the Department of Justice, the Innocence Project, and social science and legal researchers, have cast a critical spotlight on eyewitness errors, forensic junk science, false confessions, perjured testimony from snitches, police and prosecutorial misconduct, and other problems. This course will examine this group of cases through readings and first-hand research. Each student will be expected to review a number of cases, conduct an in-depth analysis of a single case, and write a 10-page research report of that analysis.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to student: approximately $250 field trip and books.
Meeting time: mornings.

KASSIN

PSYC 12 How To Think Like a Social Psychologist

This is a course about the field of social psychology, the scientific study of everyday social life. In this course we will read and discuss classic and contemporary journal articles, discuss the various methodologies and techniques employed by social psychologists, and consider the role of theory in social psychological investigation-all in the service of better understanding how to think like a social psychologist. The centerpiece of the course will be an opportunity to collect some data in a social psychological experiment of our own design. This course is appropriate for students who are considering graduate study in psychology or other social sciences or for students who simply wish to learn more about the field.
Requirements: readings, active class participation and attendance, 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to student: $10 for readings.
Meeting time: mornings.

SAVITSKY

PSYC 13 Fictional Worlds

This course explores the role of fantasy, imagination, and magic in the lives of both children and adults. We will examine why children love fairy tales, develop imaginary companions, and believe in supernatural phenomena. We consider why some children are more prone to believe in fiction and fantasy than others, and what happens to these beliefs in adulthood. For example, are adults who had a childhood imaginary companion different from those who did not? Does belief in magic disappear entirely in adulthood? Students should be prepared for active participation in class discussions.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: approximately $20
Meeting time: mornings.

KAVANAUGH

PSYC 15 Designing for People (Same as Computer Science 15)

Many technologically-innovative and aesthetically-beautiful products fail because they are not sensitive to the attitudes and behaviors of the humans who interact with them. The field of Human Factors combines aspects of psychology and sociology with information technology, education, architecture, and physiology, to design objects and information that are easy for people to learn and easy for people to use. The course will provide students with a theoretical framework for analyzing ease-of-learning and ease-of-use, as well as practical knowledge of a variety of human factors testing methodologies. The course will examine usability of a wide variety of designed objects, including buildings, publications, websites, software applications, and consumer electronics gadgets. Students will perform two usability projects-a heuristic analysis and a usability test with 8-10 human test subjects-and present their findings in two short presentations. Students will demonstrate their understanding of human factors theory through participation in class discussion.
Evaluation will be based on two 5-page papers and possibly 1 or 2 in-class PowerPoint presentations.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $75 (for text books: Interaction Design, by Jennifer Preece, Yvonne Rogers, Helen Sharp and The Design of Everyday Things, by Donald A. Norman)
Meeting time: 10-noon, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

RICH COHEN '82 (Instructor)
HEATHERINGTON (Sponsor)

Rich Cohen '82 is an independent consultant and Berkshires resident. He holds masters degrees from Harvard and Brown. He has designed computer and telecommunications products used by over 100 million people and has conducted usability research on four continents.

PSYC 16 Community Screening for Alzheimer's Disease

This course will consider memory screening as a strategy to address the increasing prevalence and importance of early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in Williamstown and surrounding communities. Students will learn how to administer and interpret neuropsychological instruments used to screen for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The class will then design and conduct a community screening day for AD. This will include selecting appropriate screening instruments, selecting an appropriate venue, raising community awareness of memory problems, and working with local community agencies to encourage individuals to participate in memory screening. Following the screening day, each student will analyze the data collected on the screening day and submit a report.
Evaluation will be based upon engagement in the design of the screening day, proficiency in learning to administer screening instruments, and a 10-page written report of the result of the screening day.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to students: $50.00 for books.
The class will meet 6 hours per week. Meeting will typically be in the morning. Some of these meeting will be as a class and other meeting will be in smaller groups. Students will be expected to visit The Memory Clinic in Bennington, Vermont (20 minute drive) to observe the administration of screening tests and to become familiar with individuals experiencing memory problems.

P. SOLOMON and CYNTHIA A. MURPHY

Cynthia Murphy is Executive Director of the Memory Clinic in Bennington VT. She Holds an MBA from Columbia University and is currently a doctoral candidate in Clinical Psychology at Antioch New England Graduate School. She has conducted numerous memory screening days and is co-author of a widely used screening instrument for Alzheimer's disease.

PSYC 17 Teaching Practicum

Students interested in teaching may submit applications for a Winter Study assignment as a teacher's aide at Mt. Greylock Regional High School or at the Williamstown Elementary School. Those accepted will work under the supervision of a regular member of the teaching staff and submit a report on their work at the end of the Winter Study Period. This project involves a four-week commitment to full-time affiliation with the school. Interested students should consult before winter study registration with Professor Zimmerberg, Bronfman 309. She will assist in arranging placements and monitor students' progress during the four-week period. Criteria for pass include full time affiliation with the school and a final 10-page report. The final report should summarize the student's experiences and reflections as drawn from a daily journal.
Prerequisite: Approval of Professor Zimmerberg is required. Enrollment limited to number of places available at the two participating schools.
Cost to student: none.

ZIMMERBERG

PSYC 18 Institutional Placement

Students interested in a full time January placement in a mental health, social service or applied psychology (e.g., advertising, law) setting may consult with members of the Psychology Department to make appropriate arrangements. Students should first make their own contacts with an institution or agency. They should also arrange to obtain a letter from a sponsor at the institution who will outline and supervise the student's duties during January. The student must agree to keep a journal and to submit a final paper summarizing and reflecting upon the experiences outlined in the journal.
Requirements for a passing grade are a satisfactory evaluation from the institutional sponsor and a 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: none.

ZIMMERBERG

PSYC 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Psychology 493-494.

RELIGION

REL 11 The Religions of the Roman Empire and Christianity (Same as Classics 11)

(See under Classics for full description.)

REL 12 Yoga: A Mind-Body Connection

This class provides an orientation to yoga and builds a foundation for an effective and rewarding personal yoga practice by integrating textual studies and personal practice. Analysis and comparison of classic yoga texts from India provide a historical, cultural, and philosophical background for yoga. As well as discussion of key yogic concepts, class meetings experientially explore philosophical themes through practicing selected sequences of yoga poses. Poses may include standing poses, inversions, abdominals, hip-openers, backbends, twists, forward bends, and restoratives. Students receive individualized attention on how to work with principles of alignment for their particular bodies and needs. You learn to express poses with balanced energy, and to energize a variety of heart qualities in the poses and sequences they practice. In this way students build strength, flexibility, and awareness. Yoga training is complementary to sports, athletics, and dance. It aids in pursuing academic studies and creative endeavors, gives tools for handling stress, and cultivates a sense of well- being and balance.
Required texts: Patanjali's Yoga Sutras, The Bhagavad Gita, Yoga the Iyengar Way, and related articles.
Evaluation is based importantly on attendance and participation in all classes and sessions, a personal practice journal demonstrating particular intentions for practice and appropriate poses and sequencing to support those intentions, and a ten-page paper including textual analysis as well as personal reflections on the nature of yoga.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for three books and yoga mat.
Meeting time: afternoons, three two-hour sessions/week, plus one evening session/week.

NATASHA JUDSON (Instructor)
BUELL (Sponsor)

Natasha Judson, M.Ed. RYT, has taught yoga for the Williams College Physical Education Program since 2003. She has practiced yoga for over twenty years and meditation for fifteen. She trained in Iyengar and Anusara yoga and is an Affiliated Anusara yoga teacher. She began teaching yoga in 1999 and offers classes through her business Sunflower Yoga in Williamstown, and in Bennington at the Southwest Vermont Supervisory Union school district and Southwestern Vermont Medical Center.

REL 25 Religion, Culture and Performance in Bali

Students in this course will spend the winter study period on the Indonesian island of Bali. The course will offer an experientially grounded introduction to Balinese culture, religion and the performing arts.
After an initial period of orientation, students will stay with Balinese families in Singapadu, a small community in the southern half of the island renowned for its excellence in both the plastic (e.g., wood carving, mask making) and performing arts (traditional opera, dance and theatre). Local accommodation and transport will be coordinated with the assistance of an experienced American tour organizer, who has worked with student groups including the School for International Training.
In the first week, emphasis will be placed on learning the basics of Balinese religion, culture and etiquette. Through a brief but intensive course of language instruction, they will learn to speak rudimentary Indonesian, providing access to a world beyond that accessible to the casual tourist or traveler. Throughout the course of our stay in Bali, students will be encouraged to engage with the local community, and to learn about day-to-day life in Bali by participating in it. At the end of the first week, we will take a short `holiday' at the beach, and attend a seminar on the history of Bali's northern coastline and the growing threats to its unique marine ecology.
In the second week, through lectures and hands-on instruction, students will study the theory and practice of gamelan orchestra, shadow theatre and other classical performative genres. Emphasis will be placed on the ways in which these various art forms are used in Balinese religious and cultural life. At the end of the second week, we will take a two-day trip to Besakih, the massive temple complex in the central mountainous region of the island. Through on- site study and an archaeological tour, students will be introduced to the history and cultural significance of Balinese temple architecture.
In the third week we shall return to Singapadu. Students will have the opportunity to study with a local mentor and conduct an independent research project on a topic of their choice. This period of supervised independent research will comprise the basis for a final paper of 10-15 pages. Preference will be given to students who have taken Religion 240, in which they will have studied the history of Balinese Hinduism in some depth.
Students will come away with an experiential understanding of a foreign culture that would take years to develop by any other means. Through a series of lectures, seminar discussions, practica and independent research, they will develop a critical appreciation for a range of topics, including: the plastic and performing arts, religion, local history, politics, economy, gastronomy, mass media, gender relations and the impact of the tourist industry on how Balinese represent themselves both to themselves and to others.
Enrollment limit: 8.
Cost to student: approximately $3000-$3300.

FOX

REL 26 Explorations in Solidarity: A Meeting of Minds and Hearts in Nicaragua

This course will explore the lived realities of the hemisphere's second most impoverished nation, and the relevance of faith and religious community to the struggle for social justice. Students will reflect on these realities and struggles in the company of subsistence farmers, urban factory laborers, and those working for progressive social change. The effects of an increasingly globalized economy, a series of natural disasters (most notably hurricane Mitch), and the changeable attentions of the developed world will be explored through conversations with ordinary people, using some of the methods of popular education and oral history. Significant attention will also be given to the efficacy of liberation theology and the base Christian community movement, as well as other influences-Christian, Marxist and neo- Liberal-on the material and spiritual well-being of Nicaraguan people.
The experience of the course will include approximately ten days of living (with minimal amenities) in a subsistence farming community. Students will also attend a number of Christian religious services. (The course is open to students of any religious background or no affiliation.) Travels and encounters in Nicaragua will be facilitated by Elena Hendrick and Luis Aguirre of the Asociacion Kairos para la Formacion, an organization that links Christian communities north and south through solidarity toward the goal of permanent transformative relationships. Throughout, students will be invited to enter as deeply as possible the story of Nicaraguans and to reflect on their own stories as North Americans and the sometimes- volatile interaction between these stories. The goal is to explore the relevance of religious community to the possibilities for restorative justice, and to discover what it would mean to shape a relationship with the people of Nicaragua according to a paradigm of solidarity-contrasted with the more familiar paradigms of charity and national self-interest.
The course will entail daily reflection sessions, for which a journal will be kept. Other requirements include attendance at at least three orientation sessions and approximately 150 pages of reading on Nicaraguan history and the current political, economic and religious situation prior to departure; participation in a group oral presentation to the college community upon return to Williamstown; and a final 10-page paper, due before the first day of second semester, 2006.
Conversational knowledge of Spanish, though not required, is helpful. Willingness to live in physically demanding situations is essential. The cost of the trip to the student will be no more than $2,150 (depending on airfare, and including all food, lodging, round-trip airfare from Miami, all in-country transportation, fees, etc.). Students are individually responsible for the cost of travel to and from Miami at the beginning and at the conclusion of the program. Enrollment limit: 10.

RICK SPALDING (Instructor)
BUELL (Sponsor)

Rick Spalding is Chaplain and Coordinator of Community Service at Williams.

REL 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Religion 493 or 494.

ROMANCE LANGUAGES

FRENCH

RLFR S.P. Sustaining Program for French 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study period. There are three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

LIBERT and RENOUARD (Teaching Associates)

RLFR 11 Arabs on Atlantic Avenue: Arab-American Communities, Literature and Art (Same as American Studies 11 and English 24)

What does it mean to be Arab-American? Through a study of recent novels, short stories, performance art, and ethnography, this course will explore the complex identities that this hyphenated category represents and often erases. From texts of Iraqi-Americans in L.A. to that of Lebanese-Christians in Toledo to that of Brooklyn's Atlantic Avenue, this class will examine negotiations of ethnic signification, stories of immigration and assimilation, the "Othering" of Arabs in America and nostalgic visions of distant homelands. The class will take a day-trip to Brooklyn to visit the Atlantic Ave. neighborhood and meet with Arab-American writers living in New York.
Students will be evaluated on their active participation and on a final project for the course which can range from a 10-page essay, to an art piece and written commentary.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: $75.
Meeting time: afternoons, 2-3 meetings per week.

PIEPRZAK

RLFR 12 Contemporary Queer Cinema in France (Same as Comparative Literature 12 and Women's and Gender Studies 11)

From the wild streets of "Gay Paris" to the cinematic premieres of the Cannes Film Festival, France has long been a beacon and a refuge for queer identity. French writers as diverse as Gide, Proust, Colette, and Genet have celebrated gay and lesbian identity in their novels. American expatriates Gertrude Stein and Natalie Barney have mentored queer writers and artists in their Parisian salons. And openly gay couturiers Jean-Paul Gaultier and Yves Saint-Laurent have projected fabulous French fashion out into the world. In more recent years, queer political activism in France has led to the creation of the national "PACS" or domestic partnership law, as well as greater rights and protections for queer men, women, and people living with HIV/AIDS. This course will examine representations of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered identity in French cinema from 1968 to 2002. Among the many topics to be discussed will include cinematic representations of the closet, coming-out, race and ethnicity, lesbian identity and invisibility, bisexuality, trans/gender identity, butch-femme aesthetics, drag queens, queer political identity, and HIV/AIDS. Our film discussions will be complemented by readings from contemporary French and American queer theory. Films to include Claude Chabrol's Les Biches (1968), Édouard Molinaro's La Cage aux folles (1978), Rainer Werner Fassbinder's Querelle (1982), Cyril Collard's Les Nuits fauves (1992), André Téchiné's Les Roseaux sauvages (1994), Josiane Balasko's Gazon maudit (1995), Alain Berliner's Ma vie en rose (1997), Claire Denis's Beau travail (1999), Olivier Ducastel and Jacques Martineau's Drôle de Félix (2000) and Ma vraie vie à Rouen (2002), Sébastien Lifshitz's Presque rien (2000), Francis Veber's Le Placard (2001), and François Ozon's 8 Femmes (2002).
Evaluation and requirements: active class participation and a 10-page paper in English.
No prerequisites: Films in French with English subtitles. Discussions in English. Enrollment limit: 15. In case of overenrollment, preference given to majors in Romance Languages, Comparative Literature, and Women's and Gender Studies.
Cost to student: approximately $30 for readings.
Meeting time: 2-3 mornings per week.

MARTIN

RLFR 30 Honors Essay

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLFR 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for French 493-494.

ITALIAN

RLIT S.P. Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

NICASTRO

SPANISH

RLSP S.P. Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

TEACHING ASSOCIATES

RLSP 30 Honors Essay

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLSP 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Spanish 493-494.

RUSSIAN

RUSS S.P. Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102

Required of all students enrolled in Russian 101-102. Three meetings per week, 50 minutes per session. Practice in speaking and comprehension based on material already covered as well as some new vocabulary and constructions. Designed to maintain and enhance what was acquired during fall semester, using new approaches in a relaxed atmosphere. No homework.
Regular attendance and active participation required to earn a "Pass." Open to all.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

BORISOVA

RUSS 14 Food Writing Workshop (Same as Special 14)

(See under Special for full description.)

RUSS 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Special 25)

Williams has a unique program in the Republic of Georgia, which offers students the opportunity to engage in three-week-long internships in any field. Our students have worked in the Georgian Parliament, helped in humanitarian relief organizations like Save the Children, interned in journalism at The Georgian Times, taught unemployed women computer skills at The Rustavi Project, documented wildlife, studied with a Georgian sculptor, done rounds at the Institute of Cardiology, and learned about transitional economies at the Georgian National Bank. In addition to working in their chosen fields, students experience Georgian culture through museum visits, concerts, lectures, meetings with Georgian students, and excursions. Visit the sacred eleventh-century Cathedral of Sveti-tskhoveli and the twentieth-century Stalin Museum, take the ancient Georgian Military Highway to ski in the Caucasus Range, see the birthplace of the wine grape in Kakheti and the region where Jason sought the Golden Fleece. Participants are housed in pairs with English-speaking families in Tbilisi, Georgia's capital city. At the end of the course students will write a 10-page paper assessing their internship experience.
No prerequisites. Knowledge of Russia or Georgia is not required. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: approximately $2000.

GOLDSTEIN

RUSS 30 Honors Project

May be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RUSS 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Russian 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY-See under ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

THEATRE

THEA 10 Self-Production at Williams

This course examines various means of theatrical self-production and how artists may exploit this model in the pursuit of their ambitions. The primary focus of the class will be to determine how specific self-production techniques might serve as the foundation for an annual or bi-annual student initiated festival of theatrical works to be performed in the new '62 Center for Theater and Dance. Members of the class, in a group effort, will be responsible for determining the very nature of the proposed festival, including but not limited to overall theme, play or material selection, design, faculty mentoring, production assignments, publicity, and technical feasibility. Guest speakers from the profession will provide valuable insight into the complexity of producing one's own material.
Evaluation will be based on committed and thoughtful class participation and group effort, as well as the quality of contribution to final proposals.
In the future, the Williams College Department of Theatre seeks to diversify and expand its seasonal production offerings. The blueprints generated by this class will be an integral part of this initiative.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to underclassmen.
Meeting time: Tuesday and Thursday, 1-3:50.

LIEBERMAN

THEA 12 Ensembles in Classic American Musical Theatre (Same as Music 12)

(See under Music for full description.)

THEA 31 Senior Project

May be taken to augment Theatre 401/402, depending on the scope of the project. Permission of the Department Chair required.

BUCKY

THEA 32 Senior Honors Thesis

(See description of Degree with Honors in Theatre on page #.)

WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES

WGST 10 "Queer" in the 'Fifties: British Histories and Identities (Same as History 10)

(See under History for full description.)

WGST 11 Contemporary Queer Cinema in France (Same as Comparative Literature 12 and French 12)

(See under Romance Languages-RLFR 12 for full description.)

WGST 12 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Linguistics 12 and Special 12)

(See under Linguistics for full description.)

WGST 19 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) (Same as Economics 19)

(See under Economics for full description.)

WGST 30 Honors Project

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

SPECIALS

SPEC 10 Quest for College: Early Awareness in Berkshire County Schools

Today's extremely competitive higher education market places significant pressure on students nationwide to start planning for college at an increasingly early age while simultaneously demanding ever-higher standards of excellence for admission to top schools. "Early Awareness" initiatives aim to educate middle school students as to what lies ahead on the college horizon, empowering them to make sound academic and extracurricular choices that will keep open a maximum of options. The first week of this course will be spent in the classroom, exploring and discussing problems and issues germane to the national trends towards greater (and earlier) college-related pressures. Students will respond to a series of readings dealing with such issues as tracking, paid test preparation and untimed testing, early decision, parental and peer pressures, special interests, misrepresentation of information, independent counseling, and others. Class time will also be devoted to familiarizing students with both the nuances of the college admission process and the administration of the early awareness game, Quest for College. Students will spend the next two weeks visiting 10-12 Berkshire County middle schools, administering the game and inviting students to the culminating College Day. All 8 students will then work together to plan and run College Day activities for students and their parents. This day will include a) campus tours, b) general higher education info sessions, and c) financial aid/scholarship info for the parents. If student and community interest is sufficient, the course may culminate in a public presentation and open forum early second semester.
Evaluation will be based on completion of field work (school visits), organization and execution of project to bring local middle school students to the Williams Campus for a day of early-awareness related activities and a final paper (approximately 10 pages) reflecting on a course-related issue of the student's choosing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Preference given to a) students with prior education/admission experience, b) students with access to transportation c) juniors and seniors. Interested students must consult with instructors prior to registration. Students will be selected according to the following criteria: a) experience in teaching or admission, b) access to transportation, and c) seniority. Provision will be stated that interested students must consult the instructors before registration, that instructors may determine depth of experience and focus of interest.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Cost to student: transportation to field work sites and purchase of text.

GINA COLEMAN `90 (Instructor)
WSP COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Gina Coleman `90, is Associate Director of Admission, Director of Multicultural Recruitment, and in her fifth year as women's rugby coach. Coleman, who holds an M.A. in education from MCLA, designed the game, Quest for College.

SPEC 11 Science for Kids (Same as Chemistry 11)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

SPEC 12 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Linguistics 12 and Women's and Gender 12)

(See under Linguistics for full description.)

SPEC 13 In the Beginning: Fundamentals of Hebrew (Same as Jewish Studies 13) (CANCELLED!)

(See under Jewish Studies for full description.)

SPEC 14 Food Writing Workshop (Same as Russian 14)

This course is designed as an intensive writing workshop that focuses on the skills needed for producing different genres of food writing. Students will explore the various voices and styles required by the writing projects and will have the opportunity to try their hands at restaurant reviews, press releases, wine reviews, book reviews, policy statements, culinary autobiography, and food history. Topics for discussion include the vocabulary of food and wine, the politics of food, marketing and consumer psychology, and research methods in food studies.
The class will meet three times a week for two-hour sessions at which students will discuss the reading and present their own work for discussion.
Evaluation will be based on individual tri-weekly writing assignments and their presentation in workshop format. Students should allow ample time to research the assignments outside of class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: approximately $50.
Meeting time: afternoons.

GOLDSTEIN

SPEC 15 American Colleges and Universities Past and Present

Did you know that only 3% of American college students receive their degrees from small residential liberal arts colleges like Williams? This course will help you broaden your understanding of the American higher education system past and present. We'll begin by tracing the evolution of higher education in this country from the liberal arts college's ascendancy in the early days through the rise of the research university in the late 1800s, the post-World War II proliferation of community colleges, and the recent growth in for profit universities. We'll then explore current topics in the field of higher education including: athletics and the academy, admission and affirmative action, financial aid, gender and Title IX, multiculturalism/diversity, the curriculum, and faculty hiring and retention. Classes will meet four times a week and will consist of discussion and guest lectures. In addition, there will be two required films and a half-day field trip. The class will culminate in each student and/or small student groups researching a topic of interest, writing a 10-page paper, and sharing the findings in a class presentation.
Requirements: regular attendance, 10-page paper, class presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting time: 10-noon, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday plus field trip and two evening films.

JULIE GREENWOOD (Instructor)
HARRY SHEEHY (Sponsor)

Julie Greenwood is an Assistant Professor of Athletics and Coach of Women's Tennis at Williams.

SPEC 16 Knitting: The Social History and Craft Form (Same as Mathematics 16)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

SPEC 17 Printmaking on Ceramics

This course introduces the technical and creative possibilities of printmaking on ceramic paperclay without the use of a press. Students will learn how to make their own paperclay and will explore monoprinting, relief printing and offset printing. Historical examples of printmaking on clay will be introduced and explored through slide lectures, videos and assignments.
Students will receive feedback on their work through supervised group critiques and open studio sessions and will be evaluated based on completion of assignments with attention to content, detail and development of their work. Attendance and participation will also be taken into account. Exhibition of final work will be required on the last day of Winter Study.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: $75.
Meeting time: 1-3:50 p.m., Tuesday and Thursday with extra supervised open studio times scheduled in accordance to our needs. Firing of ceramic prints will take place at the instructor's studio in North Adams. A field trip to the studio is planned.

DIANE SULLIVAN (Instructor)
LEVIN (Sponsor)

Diane Sullivan, a local ceramic artist, holds a M.F.A. from the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth. She has taught ceramics at a variety of institutions including The Colorado College, Pikes Peak Community College and Yavapai College

SPEC 18 Introductory Photography: People and Places (Same as Mathematics 18)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

SPEC 19 Medical Apprenticeship

Firsthand experience is a critical component of the decision to enter the health professions. Through this apprenticeship, students can clarify their understanding of the rewards and challenges that accompany the practice of all types of medicine. Apprenticeships are arranged in two distinct ways: some students live on campus and are matched with a local practitioner, while others make independent arrangements to shadow a distant professional. The expectation is that each student will observe some aspect of medicine for the better part of the day, five days per week. In recent years, students have shadowed physicians, veterinarians, dentists, nurses, and public health experts.
In addition to observation in clinical settings, there will be discussion sessions and optional evening events on campus which give participants further opportunity to reflect upon their experiences.
A 10-page reflective paper is required.
Prerequisites: Interested students must attend an information meeting in early October.
Local enrollment is limited by the number of available practitioners. Preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the health professions.
Cost to students: Local apprenticeships-vaccinations and local transportation. Distant apprenticeships-costs will vary based upon location.

  1. TEACHING ASSOCIATES (Instructors): DAVID ARMET. P.T.; CHILDSY ART, M.D.; PEGGY CARON, D.V.M.; VICTORIA CAVALLI, M.D.; JENNIIFER DEGRENIER, M.D.; MARIANNE DEMARCO, M.D.; PAUL DONOVAN, D.O.; STUART DUBUFF, M.D.; RONALD DURNING, M.D.; DAVID ELPERN, M.D.; ROBERT FANELLI, M.D.; ERIC SCOTT FROST, M.D.; MICHAEL GERRITY, M.D.; WADE GEBARA, M.D.; DAVID GORSON, M.D.; EUGENE GRABOWSKI, M.D.; LAURA JONES, D.V.M.; JOSHUA KLEEDERMAN, D.M.D.; WILLIAM KOBER, M.D.; JONATHAN KRANT, M.D.; JOAN LISTER, M.D.; PAUL MAHER, M.D.; RONALD MENSH, M.D.; JOANNE MORRISON, D.V.M.; STEPHEN NELSON, M.D.; CHARLES O'NEILL, M.D.; JUDY ORTON, M.D.; FERNANDO PONCE, M.D.; DANIEL ROBBINS, M.D.; OSCAR RODRIGUEZ, M.D.; SCOTT ROGGE, M.D.; PAUL ROSENTHAL, M.D.; ANTHONY SMEGLIN, M.D.; JESSE SPECTOR, M.D.; KATHERINE WISEMAN, M.D.; JEFFREY YUCHT, M.D.; CHI ZHANG, M.D.

CHARLEY STEVENSON
Health Professions Advisor

SPEC 20 Students Teaching AIDS to Students (STATS) (Same as Biology 15)

(See under Biology for full description.)

SPEC 23 Introduction to Sports Writing

This course provides an introduction to the craft of sportwriting and the many different aspects of creating a well-written sports article, be it for newspaper or magazine purposes.
Students will learn first hand the art of creating several different types of ledes to an article, the correct chronological order of a great sports article, how to obtain quotes, the proper place in the article for those quotes, how to creatively and properly intersperse play-by-play in a solid "game coverage" article and much more.
Students will also learn the differences between writing for a newspaper and magazine, community journalism versus big city journalism (are there any?) and ethics in journalism (are there any?).
There will be several in-class assignments, some homework assignments, and one final project that, along with attendance, will be the major part of the grade.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: Monday, Wednesday and Thursday, 1-3 p.m. Enrollment limit: 25.

KRIS DUFOUR (Instructor)
HARRY SHEEHY (Sponsor)

Kris Dufour, the assistant sports information director at Williams College, wrote sports for eight different newspapers over a 15-year career and remains a freelance writer for the North Adams Transcript after seven years as that paper's sports editor.

SPEC 24 Eyecare and Culture in the Rural Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua

Continuing the model of recent eyecare Winter Studys to Nicaragua, this trip will follow a similar protocol utilizing readings, videos and lectures in preparation for the cultural experience to be encountered. The class will be trained in the prescribing of reading and distance glasses by Dr. Bruce Moore of the New England College of Optometry. In past missions we have dispensed 2000-3000 pairs of glasses to persons in need of vision correction in our week of clinics. The students will be supervised by volunteer optometrists joining the trip.
After a week of study and preparation in Williamstown we will travel to Managua and participate in cultural experiences such as The National Museum, Masaya Volcano and various native markets. We will then fly to Bluefields and from this base we will conduct clinics in some river communities for two days and then fly to Big Corn Island(15 minute flight out in the Atlantic) and continue our clinics there for 4-5 days. We will then return to the USA and conclude our study with further reflections on our experiences.
The requirements will be 100% attendance at all classes and the completion of "readings" in preparation for the trip. Students will keep a detailed journal during the trip to facilitate their reflections on their experiences in the context of their lives at Williams, in the USA and future career goals and plans.
In addition to the rewarding experience of providing the service of enhancing the vision of 2000-3000 people during our week of clinics, it is hoped that our students will learn a great deal about the realities of the "developing world" that will inform their attitudes and possibly their actions in the future.

ROBERT PECK (Instructor)
WSP COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Dr. Robert Peck, retired Director of Athletics at Williams (1971-2001), is a 24-year visitor and observer of Nicaraguan politics.

SPEC 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Russian 25)

(See under Russian for full description.)

SPEC 27 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography) (Same as English 12)

(See under English for full description.)

SPEC 28 Teaching Practicums in New York City Schools

Open to sopohmores, juniors and seniors who are interested in working in public schools or charter schools in New York City. Participants will be expected to pursue a full day's program of observing, teaching, tutoring and mentoring in their choice of more than 20 different school situations in NYC from elementary through high school. Each of the participating schools will have a resident supervisor who will meet with the January interns to arrange individual schedules and to provide mentoring during the month.
There will be weekly meetings of all the interns, who are expected to keep a journal and to write a 5 page paper reflecting on their month's experience.
Orientation meetings prior to January will enable students to select which subject areas and which participating school might be best for him or her.
Housing will be provided for those needing it and some assistance with transportation and food costs-estimated at about $400. for the month. Further assistance available for financial aid students.

P. SMITH
Coordinator of High School/College Partnerships

SPEC 29 Humor Writing (Same as Mathematics 17)

(See under Mathematics for full description.)

SPEC 35 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel

Each class will begin with a lecture-demonstration, followed by practice on the potter's wheel. Each student will have the use of a potter's wheel for each class. We will work on mugs, bowls, pitchers, plates, jars, lids, vases, and bottles, and will finish these shapes as required by trimming and adding handles, lugs, lids, spouts, and knobs. We will also work on several different handbuilding projects. After the tenth class session, all class work will be biscuit-fired. The eleventh class will be devoted to glazing the biscuited pieces. Glazing techniques will include pouring, dipping, layering, brushing, and stamping, and using wax resist and other masking techniques to develop pattern and design. The completed work will then be glaze-fired. The last meeting will be devoted to a "final project" gallery show of your best work. Woven into lecture-demonstrations will be presentations on various topics relating to the science and history of pottery making.
Requirements: attendance at all class sessions and enthusiasm for learning the craft of pottery making. No prerequisites or potterymaking experience necessary. Enrollment limit: 9.
Cost to student: $175 lab fee, plus makeup class fees ($35 per class) if applicable.
Meeting time: mornings.

RAY BUB (Instructor)
Winter Study Committee (Sponsor)

Ray Bub is a ceramic artist and teacher at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery in Pownal, Vermont, 10 minutes north of the Williams College campus. All classes except the final project exhibition take place at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery.

SPEC 39 "Composing a Life:" Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams

To be at Williams you have learned to be a successful student, but how do you learn to be successful in life? How will you define success in both your career and in your personal life? How will you achieve balance between the two? In short, what will constitute the "good life" for you? We borrow the concept of "composing a life" from Mary Catherine Bateson, as an apt metaphor for the ongoing process of defining success and balance in life. This course is designed: (1) To offer college students an opportunity to examine and define their beliefs, values, and assumptions about their future personal and professional lives before entering the "real" world; (2) To encourage students to gain a better understanding of how culture, ideology, and opportunity affect their life choices; (3) To provide an opportunity for students to consider different models of success and balance through "living cases" (in the form of guests from various professions and lifestyles); and (4) To aid students in contemplating their career options through individual advising and introducing various career and life planning resources. Using selected readings, cases, and guest speakers, we will explore both the public context of the workplace as well as the private context of individuals and their personal relationships in determining life choices.
Requirements: regular attendance, class participation, field interview, and a 10-page final paper
No prerequisites. Questions about the course: please contact Michele Moeller Chandler (458-8106 or michele.chandler2@verizon.net). Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: approximately $30 for case materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

MICHELE MOELLER CHANDLER and CHIP CHANDLER (Instructors)
TOOMAJIAN (Sponsor)

Michele Moeller Chandler ('73) and Chip Chandler ('72) have taught this Winter Study course for the past nine years. They have been both personally and professionally engaged in the course topic. Michele's career has been in college administration, and she has an M.A. from Columbia, and a Ph.D. from Northwestern. Her Ph.D. dissertation focused upon professional women who altered their careers because of family obligations. Chip spent 25 years at McKinsey & Company, where he was a senior partner, and he has an MBA from Harvard. He currently teaches in the Leadership Studies Program at Williams.

SPEC 43 Introduction to Scientific Cynicism #43 (Same as German 43) (CANCELLED!)

(See under German for full description.)

WILLIAMS PROGRAM IN TEACHING

Students interested in exploring one or more of the following courses related to teaching and/or working with children and adolescents should contact Susan Engel, Director of Education Programs, who will be able to help you choose one that best suits your educational goals.

ANSO 11 Berkshire Farm Internship

(See under Anthropology/Sociology for full description.)

ANSO 12 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

(See under Anthropology/Sociology for full description.)

BIOL 15 Students Teaching AIDS to Students (STATS) (Same as Special 20)

(See under Biology for full description.)

CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as Special 11)

(See under Chemistry for full description.)

LING 12 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 12 and Special 12)

(See under Linguistics for full description.)

PSYC 17 Teaching Practicum

(See under Psychology for full description.)

SPEC 28 Teaching Practicums in New York City Schools

(See under Special for full description.)

WILLIAMS-MYSTIC PROGRAM IN AMERICAN MARITIME STUDIES

An interdisciplinary one-semester program co-sponsored by Williams College and Mystic Seaport which includes credit for one winter study. Classes in maritime history, literature of the sea, marine ecology, oceanography, and marine policy are supplemented by field seminars: offshore sailing, Pacific Coast and Nantucket Island. For details, see "Williams-Mystic Maritime Studies Program" or our website: www.williamsmystic.org.

 


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