WINTER STUDY PROGRAM

REMINDERS ABOUT WSP REGISTRATION

All students who will be on campus during the 2008-2009 academic year must register for WSP. Registration will take place in the early part of fall semester. If you are registered for a senior thesis in the fall which must be continued through Winter Study by departmental rules, you will be registered for your Winter Study Project automatically. In every other case, you must complete registration. First-year students are required to participate in a Winter Study that will take place on campus; they are not allowed to do 99's.

Even if you plan to take a 99, or the instructor of your first choice accepts you during the registration period, there are many things that can happen between registration and the beginning of Winter Study to upset your first choice, so you must list five choices. You should try to make one of your choices a project with a larger enrollment, not that it will guarantee you a project, but it will increase your chances.

If you think your time may be restricted in any way (ski meets, interviews, etc.), clear these restrictions with the instructor before signing up for his/her project.

Remember, for cross-listed projects, you should sign up for the subject you want to appear on your record.

For many beginning language courses, you are required to take the WSP Sustaining Program in addition to your regular project. You will be automatically enrolled in this Sustaining Program, so no one should list this as a choice.

The grade of honors is reserved for outstanding or exceptional work. Individual instructors may specify minimum standards for the grade, but normally, fewer than one out of ten students will qualify. A grade of pass means the student has performed satisfactorily. A grade of perfunctory pass signifies that a student's work has been significantly lacking but is just adequate to deserve a pass.

If you have any questions about a project, see the instructor before you register.

Finally, all work for WSP must be completed and submitted to the instructor no later than Wednesday, January 28th. Only the Dean can grant an extension beyond this date.

WINTER STUDY 99'S

Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible to propose "99's," independent projects arranged with faculty sponsors, conducted in lieu of regular Winter Study courses. Perhaps you have encountered an interesting idea in one of your courses which you would like to study in more depth, or you may have an interest not covered in the regular curriculum. In recent years students have undertaken in-depth studies of particular literary works, interned in government offices, assisted in foreign and domestic medical clinics, conducted field work in economics in developing countries, and given performances illustrating the history of American dance. Although some 99's involve travel away from campus, there are many opportunities to pursue intellectual or artistic goals here in Williamstown.

99 forms are available online: http://web.williams.edu/Registrar/winterstudy/99direct.html

The deadline for submitting the proposals to faculty sponsors is Thursday, 25 September.

AFR 25 Youth, Gender and Social Activism in Tanzania (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 24)

AFR 30 Senior Project

AMST 11 Singing School: Sacred Choral Traditions in the Berkshires and Beyond (Same as English 11 and Music 11)CANCELLED!

AMST 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as Music 17)

AMST 30 Senior Honors Project

ANSO 10 Meditation-Based Stress Reduction: Adopting a Mindfulness Practice (Same as Religion 10)

ANSO 11 Berkshire Farm Center Internship

ANSO 12 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

ANSO 13 Epidemiology, Public Health, and Leadership in the Health Professions"

ANTH 26 Exploring Trade Justice (Same as Economics 26, Environmental Studies 26, Latina/o Studies 26, and Political Science 26)

ANTH 31 Senior Thesis

SOC 11 Wendell Berry and Agrarianism (Same as Environmental Studies 11)

SOC 31 Senior Thesis

ARTH 10 From Stage to Screen

ARTH 11 Photography of the Distant

ARTH 12 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography) (Same as English 12 and Special 27)

ARTH 13 Proving Peiro: Is the Clark Piero Della Francesca the Real McCoy?

ARTH 14 Ramayana: The Great Epic in Indian and Southeast Asian Art

ARTH 25 Fashionable London: Clothing and Fetishism from Victorian Street to Westwood Catwalk (Same as History 25, Theatre 26 and Women's and Gender Studies 25)

ARTH 31 Senior Thesis

ARTH 33 Honors Independent Study

ARTS 10 Chinese Calligraphy: The Art of Beautiful Writing

ARTS 11 The Camera Obscura in Visual Art

ARTS 12 Mural (Same as Mathematics 12)

ARTS 13 Entrepeneurship as an Art Form (Same as Economics 13)

ARTS 14 Sketchbooks!

ARTS 15 Large-Format Photography

ARTS 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as Chemistry 16)

ARTS 17 Collagraphs and Silk Aquatints

ARTS 18 Figure Modeling

ARTS 19 Introduction to the Craft and Art of Blacksmithing

ARTS 20 The Digital Darkroom (Same as Geosciences 10)

ASST 13 The Art of War (Same as Political Science 13)

ASST 31 Senior Thesis

CHIN S.P. Sustaining Program for Chinese 101-102

CHIN 13 Theory and Practice of Chinese Cooking

CHIN 25 Study Tour to Taiwan

CHIN 31 Senior Thesis

JAPN S.P. Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102

JAPN 11 Encountering the Tale of Genji-1000 Years Later

JAPN 12 Kamishibai Workshop

JAPN 25 Exploring Japanese Culture and Language

JAPN 31 Senior Thesis

ASTR 12T Exoplanets: Detection and Details

ASTR 31 Senior Research

ASPH 31 Senior Research

BIOL 10 Electron Microscopy

BIOL 11 Global Health: Why We Should Care

BIOL 12 Diseases of the Heart: Pathophysiology

BIOL 13 Picturebook Illustration

BIOL 14 Gestures of Time: A Visual Exploration

BIOL 15 From Populations to Species: Understanding the Evolution of Diversity

BIOL 21 Science Beyond Williams

BIOL 22 Introduction to Biological Research

BIOL 31 Senior Thesis

CHEM 10 Zymurgy

CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as Special 11)

CHEM 12 GET A JOB! Find a Fulfilling Career Path that Fits Your Personality (Same as Psychology 11 and Special 20)

CHEM 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as ArtS 16)

CHEM 18 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry

CHEM 20 Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry

CHEM 23 Introduction to Research in Organic Chemistry

CHEM 24 Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry

CHEM 31 Senior Research and Thesis

CLAS 31 Senior Thesis

COGS 31 Senior Thesis

COMP 10 The Grand Hotel in Modern Fiction and Film

COMP 12 Welcome to the Dollhouse: Playing with Dolls, From Barbie to The Sims (Same as Computer Science 12 and Theatre 12)

COMP 31 Senior Thesis

LIT 31 Senior Thesis

CSCI 10 Designing and Building a Desktop Computer

CSCI 11 Inside Google: The Technology and Its Impact on Our Culture

CSCI 12 Welcome to the Dollhouse: Playing with Dolls, From Barbie to The Sims (Same as Comparative Literature 12 and Theatre 12)

CSCI 31 Senior Honor Thesis

CMAJ 31 Senior Thesis

ECON 10 Mechanisms of Arbitrage

ECON 11 Public Speaking

ECON 12 Negotiation: Theory and Practice

ECON 13 Entrepeneurship as an Art Form (Same as ArtS 13)

ECON 14 Accounting

ECON 15 Stock Market

ECON 17 Understanding Current Economic Issues

ECON 18 Quantitative Equity Research

ECON 19 The Great Depression: A Storied History (Same as History 15)

ECON 20 Changing the World 101 (Same as Leadership Studies 17 and Political Science 17)

ECON 23 Introduction to the Economics, Geography and Appreciation of Wine

ECON 25 The Political Economy of Social Cohesion: Lessons from South Africa's Miracle

ECON 26 Exploring Trade Justice (Same as Anthropology 26, Environmental Studies 26, Latina/o Studies 26, and Political Science 26)

ECON 51 Tax Policy in Emerging Markets

ECON 52 Political Economy and Applications to Climate Change

ECON 53 Tools for Time Series Econometrics

ECON 30 Honors Project

ECON 31 Honors Thesis

ENGL 10 Jane Austen

ENGL 11 Singing School: Sacred Choral Traditions in the Berkshires and Beyond (Same as American Studies 11 and Music 11) CANCELLED!

ENGL 12 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography (Same as ArtH 12 and Special 27)

ENGL 13 The Taxonomy of the Undead

ENGL 14 Write Now!

ENGL 15 Metafiction: Reimagining the World

ENGL 16 Journalism

ENGL 17 After Katrina: Memoir, Film, and Fiction

ENGL 18 The Life and Works of Beaumarchais

ENGL 25 Shakespeare on the British Stage: Understanding Performance (Same as Theatre 25)

ENGL 29 Peer Writing Tutor Workshop (Same as INTR 29)

ENGL 30 Honors Project: Specialization Route

ENGL 31 Honors Project: Thesis

ENVI 10 The Winter Naturalist's Journal

ENVI 11 Wendell Berry and Agrarianism (Same as Sociology 11)

ENVI 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Geosciences 12)

ENVI 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Roots, Its Uncertain Future (Same as Legal Studies 13)

ENVI 14 Green Design Workshop and LEED Certification Course

ENVI 15 Get Focused and Step It Up-Climate Change Activism

ENVI 16 Problems with Plastics

ENVI 17 The Changing Forest

ENVI 25 Sustainable Eleuthera: Energy, Environment and Economic Development

ENVI 26 Exploring Trade Justice (Same as Anthropology 26, Economics 26, Latina/o Studies 26, and Political Science 26)

ENVI 31 Senior Research and Thesis

GEOS 10 The Digital Darkroom (Same as ArtS 20)

GEOS 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Environmental Studies 12)

GEOS 31 Senior Thesis

GERM S.P. Sustaining Program for German 101-102

GERM 30 Honors Project

GERM 31 Senior Thesis

HIST 10 The Justice of Violence

HIST 12 Reading ChildhoodCANCELLED!

HIST 13 The Historian as Detective

HIST 15 The Great Depression: A Storied History (Same as Economics 19)

HIST 17 The Fight for Free Speech in America

HIST 25 Fashionable London: Clothing and Fetishism from Victorian Street to Westwood Catwalk (Same as ArtH 25, Theatre 26 and Women's and Gender Studies 25)

HIST 31 Senior Thesis

INTR 25 Immigration, Incarceration and Capital Punishment: Texas as a Case Study

INTR 29 Peer Writing Tutor Workshop (Same as English 29)

INST 30 Senior Honors Project

LATS 10 Dance for the Camera: An Introduction

LATS 12 Gender and the Latino Urban Scene

LATS 26 Exploring Trade Justice (Same as Anthropology 26, Economics 26, Environmental Studies 26, and Political Science 26)

LEAD 10 Corporate Leadership and Social Responsibility

LEAD 11 Justice and Public Policy (Same as Political Science 19)

LEAD 12 The Presidential Transition Process: A Political Perspective

LEAD 13 Epidemiology, Public Health, and Leadership in the Health Professions (Same as ANSO 13)

LEAD 17 Changing the World 101 (Same as Economics 20 and Political Science 17)

LEAD 18 Wilderness Leadership

LGST 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Roots, Its Uncertain Future (Same as Environmental Studies 13)

LGST 14 The Work of the Supreme Court

LGST 21 Creating a Non-Profit Organization

LING 12 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 12 and Special 12)

MATH 11 The Hidden Depths of High School Mathematics

MATH 12 Mural (Same as ArtS 12)

MATH 13 Modern Dance-Muller Technique (Same as Special 18)

MATH 16 Knitting: The Social History and Craft Form (Same as Special 16)

MATH 23 Gaudino Winter Study Fellows Program

MATH 26 Resettling Refugees in Maine (Same as Special 26)

MATH 30 Senior Project

MATH 31 Senior Thesis

STAT 13 Roulette

MUS 10 Chamber Music Performance

MUS 11 Singing School: Sacred Choral Traditions in the Berkshires and Beyond (Same as American Studies 11 and English 11)CANCELLED!

MUS 12 Opera Workshop


MUS 13 Math and Music

MUS 14 Folk, Popular, and Classical Cuban Music

MUS 15 Music of Charles Mingus

MUS 16 Music Circus: John Cage and His World (Same as Spanish 16)

MUS 17 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as American Studies 15)

MUS 25 Musical Performance: Cultural Exchange in Argentina

MUS 31 Senior Thesis

NSCI 31 Senior Thesis

PHIL 10 Rhetoric: The Art of Persuasion

PHIL 11 Aikido and the Creation of Ethical Policy (Same as Political Science 11)

PHIL 12 Love: For and Against

PHIL 13 Boxing

PHIL 14 Science Fiction and Philosophy

PHIL 31 Senior Thesis

PHYS 10 Light and Holography

PHYS 12 Meet the Right Side of Your Brain: Drawing as a Learnable Skill

PHYS 14 Electronics

PHYS 15 Livres des Artists-The Artist Book

PHYS 22 Research Participation

PHYS 31 Senior Thesis

POEC 31 Honors Thesis

PSCI 10 Political Campaign Ads-Noise, Trash, or Democracy in Action?

PSCI 11 Aikido and the Creation of Ethical Policy (Same as Philosophy 11)

PSCI 12 Politics, the Press and Human Rights in Hong Kong and China

PSCI 13 The Art of War (Same as Asian Studies 13)

PSCI 14 Women's Leadership in the Civil Rights Movement

PSCI 15 Infectious Diseases, Public Health Crises and Human Development

PSCI 16 Movies with Political Discussions of Elections, Evolution, Presidential Powers and News

PSCI 17 Changing The World 101 (Same as Economics 20 and Leadership Studies 17)

PSCI 19 Justice and Public Policy (Same as Leadership Studies 11))

PSCI 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits/Volunteer Income Tax Preparation

PSCI 25 Williams in NOLA CANCELLED!

PSCI 26 Exploring Trade Justice (Same as Anthropology 26, Economics 26, Environmental Studies 26, and Latina/o Studies 26)

PSCI 31 Senior Thesis

PSCI 32 Individual Project

PSYC 10 Peer Support Training

PSYC 11 GET A JOB! Find a Fulfilling Career Path that Fits Your Personality (Same as Chemistry 12 and Special 20)

PSYC 12 Women's Work: Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Postpartum Experience

PSYC 15 Ephquilts: An Introduction to Traditional Quilting

PSYC 16 Rhythm Based Communication

PSYC 19 Psychology in Action

PSYC 22 Introduction to Research in Psychology

PSYC 31 Senior Thesis

REL 10 Meditation-Based Stress Reduction: Adopting a Mindfulness Practice (Same as ANSO 10)

REL 11 The Films of Ezzatullah Entezami

REL 12 Create Your Life with Yoga

REL 13 Monsters and the Monstrous in Japanese Religion and Popular Culture

REL 25 Jerusalem: One City, Three Faiths, Many Narratives

REL 31 Senior Thesis

RLFR S.P. Sustaining Program for French 101-102

RLFR 10 Ast#rix the Gaul: French Culture through the Prism of the Comic

RLFR 14 Formidable French Film: Contemporary Cinema from France, Morocco, and Qu#bec

RLFR 30 Honors Essay

RLFR 31 Senior Thesis

RLIT S.P. Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102

RLSP S.P. Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102

RLSP 12 The Golden Age of Mexican Film

RLSP 16 Music Circus: John Cage and His World (Same as Music 16)

RLSP 30 Honors Essay

RLSP 31 Senior Thesis

RUSS S.P. Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102

RUSS 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Special 25)CANCELLED!

RUSS 30 Honors Project

RUSS 31 Senior Thesis

THEA 12 Welcome to the Dollhouse: Playing with Dolls, From Barbie to The Sims (Same as Comparative Literature 12 and Computer Science 12)

THEA 13 Ensembles in Classic American and European Musical Theatre

THEA 14 Winter Theatre Lab: Advanced Scene Study

THEA 15 What's Playing on American Stages

THEA 25 Shakespeare on the British Stage: Understanding Performance (Same as English 25)

THEA 26 Fashionable London: Clothing and Fetishism from Victorian Street to Westwood Catwalk (Same as ArtH 25, History 25 and Women's and Gender Studies 25)

THEA 32 Senior Honors Thesis

WGST 12 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Linguistics 12 and Special 12)

WGST 24 Youth, Gender and Social Activism in Tanzania (Same as Africana Studies 25)

WGST 25 Fashionable London: Clothing and Fetishism from Victorian Street to Westwood Catwalk (Same as ArtH 25, History 25 and Theatre 26)

WGST 30 Honors Project

SPEC 10 Quest for College: Early Awareness in Berkshire County Schools

SPEC 11 Science for Kids (Same as Chemistry 11)

SPEC 12 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Linguistics 12 and Women's and Gender 12)

SPEC 13 Bodies in Motion: Introduction to Dance Composition

SPEC 14 Ballroom Dance: History, Practice and Performance

SPEC 15 Ski Patrol Rescue Techniques: Outdoor Emergency Care CPR

SPEC 16 The Social History and Craft Form (Same as Mathematics 16)

SPEC 17 Social Entrepreneurship

SPEC 18 Modern Dance-Muller Technique (Same as Mathematics 13)

SPEC 19 Medical Apprenticeship

SPEC 20 GET A JOB! Find a Fulfilling Career Path that Fits Your Personality (Same as Chemistry 12 and Psychology 11)

SPEC 21 The Psychology of the Workplace; a Field Study with Williams Alumni/Parents

SPEC 24 Eye care and Culture on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua

SPEC 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Russian 25) CANCELLED!

SPEC 26 Resettling Refugees in Maine (Same as Mathematics 26)

SPEC 27 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography) (Same as ArtH 12 and English 12)

SPEC 28 Teaching Practica in New York City Schools

SPEC 35 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel

SPEC 39 "Composing a Life:" Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams

ANSO 11 Berkshire Farm Internship

ANSO 12 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as Special 11)

LING 12 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 12 and Special 12)

SPEC 28 Teaching Practica in New York City Schools

AFRICANA STUDIES

AFR 25 Youth, Gender and Social Activism in Tanzania (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 24)

This course builds on the foundation of the Winter Study Courses and Group WS99 run in January 2006, 2007 and 2008 in Senegal, Uganda, and Senegal respectively. This year we propose to extend our project to a new country and introduce a new group of students to the work of non-governmental and grassroots health and social organizations in Tanzania, East Africa. We plan to expand this project by not only looking at gender roles and social activism, but also the role of youth organizations and their innovative approaches to the critical issues of contemporary Tanzanian society. As proposed in our previous courses, we seek to engage students in a hands-on learning experience that allows them to understand the importance of gender structures in Tanzania and how they shape vulnerability to HIV, while producing collaborative videos to further engage students with these issues. In Tanzania as elsewhere, local and national groups have sprung up in response to concerns about poverty, unemployment, disease, and other pressing issues. Particularly inspiring are a number of AIDS education and awareness groups that women and youth have started up to halt the spread of the disease in their communities and to offer support to those living with it. Students in this course will have the opportunity to meet and learn from social and health education activists and engage with local Tanzanian youth about their activist efforts.
In addition to gaining an understanding of the breadth, purpose and genesis of social activism in Tanzania, students will learn of the mixed effect of Western commerce and tourism on the country. Non-governmental groups (NGOs), both those run by Tanzanians and those directed by foreigners, grapple with the legacy of British colonial structures and the present-day reality of market capitalism vs. socialist ideals and practices in an impoverished country. These circumstances create a politically complex backdrop against which NGOs struggle to achieve their goals. As such, part of the work of our Williams group will be to understand the challenges and practical impediments these NGOs face against a background of pervasive (and invasive) North-South power dynamics and inequality.
Articulated with this analysis will be a review of gender systems and their interaction with the political economy and HIV. Gender has been widely recognized as a crucial component in the African AIDS pandemic; but it is vital to go beyond generalizations about patriarchal African culture to an understanding of the contestation over gender within a specific locale. Looking at gender, economics, and HIV, will be a perfect opportunity to involve local Williams CDE alums who are employed in a wide array of Tanzanian social and governmental institutions. With the help of Danielle Callaway '08, who will be in Tanzania with the Thomas J. Watson Fellowship, we hope to organize a panel discussion with Tanzanian CDE alumni in Dar es Salaam to allow our Williams delegation to get the "inside scoop" about economics, HIV/AIDS, and gender dynamics in Tanzania.
The winter study will start with pre-orientation meetings in the Fall 2008 providing background readings, Swahili language training, and video editing workshops. Then on January 5th, the first day of winter study, the group will meet at the airport in NYC. After a day of traveling, we will spend 4 days in Arusha, Tanzania, being hosted by UAACC (United African Alliance Community Center, a local NGO), which will provide the students with cultural introductions, basic Swahili classes, and background lectures on the landscape of HIV and grassroots activism in Tanzania. They will also organize homestays with Maasai families, an indigenous and one of the most significant tribal cultures in Africa. Danielle Callaway '08 will meet us at the UAACC and will play an instrumental role in helping to facilitate language classes and lectures on culture and activism in Tanzania.
After 3 days of the Maasai homestay, we will return to the UAACC to process our experiences and to visit other local NGOs in Arusha. After 4 more days in Arusha, we will take a two day trip to Dar es Salaam, the capital of Tanzania, to meet with Williams CDE alumni and visit both NGOs and government organizations in the capital. We will then return to Arusha to work on the group video projects for 6 days. Finally, we will go on a two-day Safari to Ngorongoro Crater, considered to be the 8th Wonder of the World. The last day will be a time for debriefing and group reflection before departing Tanzania on Thursday, January 29th, the last day of winter study.
Course requirements: Students will produce a final video, made with an NGO of their choosing, that addresses the role of gender structures and/or activism among youth in Tanzania. Students will be required to keep a journal of their reflections while in Tanzania, and will take part in a public meeting at Williams to report on and discuss their experience and findings.
The course is open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Videography and video editing skills are strongly encouraged but not required. In the event of oversubscription, students will be asked to fill out a standard questionnaire to gage their experience in video editing and their interest in traveling to Tanzania. Enrollment limit: 10. Not open to first-year students.
Estimated cost per student: $3,350.

HONDERICH

AFR 30 Senior Project

To be taken by students registered for Africana Studies 491 who are candidates for honors.

AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 11 Singing School: Sacred Choral Traditions in the Berkshires and Beyond (Same as English 11 and Music 11) CANCELLED!

(See under ENGL 11 for full description.)

AMST 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as Music 17)

This course will focus on learning how to write and perform songs in a contemporary style. Topics addressed will include song structure, how to create a lyric that communicates, vocal and instrument presentation, recording and performing techniques, publicity for events, and today's music industry. This class will culminate in a public performance of material written during the course. To successfully pass this course, students are required to create, edit, perform and possibly record two original songs. These songs must be conceived during the course period (previously written material is not usable.) Students will be guided to create both music and lyrics. They may also be required to participate in a co-write session. One of these songs will be presented during the final performance, preferably by the student. Attendance at classes, feedback sessions, and all officially scheduled events is mandatory. A short writing assignment will be passed in on the last day of class.
No prerequisites. Students with a musical background and the ability to play and instrument may be given preference, but anyone interested is encouraged to register. (Bernice.Lewis@williams.edu). Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $75 for books and xeroxing costs.
Meeting time: M,T,W,R,F 10 a.m.-noon.

BERNICE LEWIS (Instructor)
WONG (Sponsor)

Bernice Lewis is an accomplished singer, songwriter, producer and educator. She has been a national touring artist for over twenty years and has performed her original material at the Kerrville Folk Festival, PBS's Mountain Stage, and the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C. She lives in Williamstown and has released six recordings of original material.

AMST 30 Senior Honors Project

To be taken by students registered for American Studies 491 or 492.

ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

ANSO 10 Meditation-Based Stress Reduction: Adopting a Mindfulness Practice (Same as Religion 10)

This course provides an opportunity to actively participate in your own health and well-being. Students will be introduced to the concept of mindfulness and guided in how to create their own mindfulness practice, one that incorporates meditation and yoga. Mindfulness is a way of relating directly to what is happening in your life, a way of taking charge of your life, a way of doing something for yourself that no one else can do for you-consciously and systematically working with your own stress, pain, illness and the challenges and demands of collegiate life.
We will meet twice per week for 3-hour sessions of meditation, yoga, and inquiry into the interplay of mind and body in health and illness, calm and stress. The origin of meditation and yoga in the Hindu and Buddhist faiths will be explored, with specific emphasis on the influence of Buddhist meditation on this secular stress reduction practice.
Students are required to commit to 45 minutes of mindfulness meditation practice on a daily basis. Additional assignments will include weekly reading of texts relevant to the course as well as brief presentations of concepts from these texts. You will be evaluated on these presentations, as well as a final paper. Attendance and participation will also be taken into account.
Please note: After signing up for the course, please send a brief email statement to the instructor at pbohnert@gmail.com, describing your interest and objectives for the course. In the event of over-subscription, these statements will be used in the selection process. All queries about this course should be directed to the instructor, who can be reached at 617-642-5165 or at pbohnert@gmail.com.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: $50 for a yoga mat and two books. Meditation cushions will be provided by the instructor.

PETER BOHNERT (Instructor)
ANTONIA FOIAS (Sponsor)

Peter Bohnert is an ordained lay Zen Buddhist priest and is an assistant teacher at the Zenki Meditation Center of Harvard, MA. Peter is also a software business executive, where he uses stress reduction techniques to maintain a balance between professional success and personal well-being.

ANSO 11 Berkshire Farm Center Internship

A field placement at Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth in Canaan, New York. Berkshire Farm Center is a residential treatment facility for troubled, at-risk adolescent boys who have been remanded to the Farm by the Family Court. These youths come primarily from lower socio-economic strata, are very ethnically diverse, and hail from both urban and rural areas throughout New York State. The problems that they bring to Berkshire Farm are multiple. These include: the psychological scars of dysfunctional families, including those of physical, emotional, and sexual abuse; chemical dependency; juvenile delinquency; inability to function in school settings; and various other issues. Residential treatment is a multi-modal approach that includes anger-replacement training, social skills training, and behavioral modification.
Williams students will commute to Berkshire Farm and work under supervision in one of the following areas: school, cottage life, chemical dependency unit, research, recreation, performing arts, or in individual tutoring.
Requirements: students will keep a journal reflecting on their experiences, and a weekly seminar with the instructor will draw on service learning experience. Students will also be required to submit a final 10-page paper at the end of the course.
Prerequisites: YOU MUST HAVE A TELEPHONE INTERVIEW WITH THE INSTRUCTOR who can be reached at 518-781-4567 ext. 121. Enrollment limit: 15. Please note: all queries about this course should be directed to the instructor.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting times to be arranged.

DONELLE HAUSER (Instructor)
NOLAN (Sponsor)

Donelle Hauser is Program Coordinator at the Burnham Youth Safe Center at Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth.

ANSO 12 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

The incidence of reported child abuse and neglect has reached epidemic proportions and shows no signs of decreasing. Preventive and prophylactic social programs, court intervention, and legislative mandates have not successfully addressed this crisis. This course allows students to observe the Massachusetts Department of Social Services attorney in courtroom proceedings related to the care and protection of children. Students will have access to Department records for purposes of analysis and will also work with social workers who will provide a clinical perspective on the legal cases under study. The class will meet regularly to discuss court proceedings, assigned readings, and the students' interactions with local human services agencies. Access to an automobile is desirable but not required; some transportation will be provided as part of the course.
Requirements: full participation, a journal, and a 10-page paper to be submitted at the end of the course.
Enrollment limit: 15. Please note: all queries about this course must be directed to the instructor, Judge Locke (phone messages may be left at 458-4833).
Cost to student: $25 for books and photocopies.
Meeting times to be arranged.

JUDITH LOCKE (Instructor)
FOIAS (Sponsor)

Judith Locke is Associate Justice of the Juvenile Court, Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

ANSO 13 Epidemiology, Public Health, and Leadership in the Health Professions (Same as Leadership Studies 13)

Epidemiology, the study of disease and disability in human populations, has been called the basic science of public health and preventive medicine. Epidemiology has made substantial contributions to the advancement of health and improved illness care through a deeper understanding of the natural history of disease, the multiple "causes"of disease, including the role of behavioral factors, and the control of epidemics of both infectious and (later) non-infectious disease. Epidemiological approaches are used constantly to test new medicines and guide prevention and treatment strategies.
Making use of epidemic exercises , selected original papers from the medical and public health literature, and a basic text, this course will begin by examining and reviewing the history, logic, and approaches of epidemiology. We will then turn to a series of seminar discussions of scientific leadership in the health professions.
With the help of guest lecturers/discussion leaders, we will explore aspects of leadership in at least three of the following areas:

  1. · Evaluation of illness care services
  2. · International health, specifically malaria control, drug resistant Tbc, or HIV/AIDS, with special consideration of how best to find the balance between treatment and prevention in high prevalence countries
  3. · HIV/AIDS control, with special reference to the "Down low" culture in the US
  4. · Ethics in international experiments in human populations
  5. · Behavioral issues in prevention and treatment, perhaps with focus on obesity.
  6. · Sports injuries, their incidence, prevention and treatment

The course will meet at least 3 times a week, for approximately 6-8 hours each week. There may be evening meetings, depending on the schedules of individual instructors. Active student participation will be required. After individual consultation with the instructor, students will be asked to write a paper on selected aspects of leadership in health or an epidemiologic analysis based on available original literature concerning a topic of personal interest. Grading will depend on participation and the quality of the paper.
Prerequisites: Curiosity, personal interview, and a (no more than one page) essay stating your reasons for interest in the course and what you think you can contribute. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to students: no more than $150 for books and reading materials
Meeting time: afternoons, Monday, Wednesday and Thursday, for approximately six hours per week. There may be some evening meetings, depending on the schedules of visiting instructors.

NICHOLAS H. WRIGHT '57 (Instructor)
FOIAS (Sponsor)

Dr. Nicholas H. Wright (Williams Class of 1957) is a medical epidemiologist with a longstanding interest in international health issues. He lives in Williamstown.

Nicholas H.Wright '57 MD, MPH,, and others.

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 26 Exploring Trade Justice (Same as Economics 26, Environmental Studies 26, Latina/o Studies 26, and Political Science 26)

(See under ECON 26 for full description.)

ANTH 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Anthropology 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 11 Wendell Berry and Agrarianism (Same as Environmental Studies 11)

Wendell Berry-Kentucky farmer, poet, novelist, and cultural critic-has for decades been writing about topics that have in recent years become matters of growing public concern. The importance of local economy, the impact of new technologies on community and agriculture, sustainability, environmental stewardship, citizenship, and the value of place are among the themes in Berry's work that will be considered in the course. Students will read both Berry's fiction as well as a variety of his non-fiction essays, which address related subject matters. Among those deeply influenced by Berry's writings are such popular environmentalists as Michael Pollan and Bill McKibben, some of whose work will also be explored in the course. Students will have the opportunity to visit a local Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) farm and will be required to write two short essays.
Evaluation: based on class participation and two short essays.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 18.
Cost to student: $75
Meeting time: mornings, TWF.

NOLAN

SOC 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Sociology 493-494.

ART

ART HISTORY

ARTH 10 From Stage to Screen

This course looks at movies of selected live performances, with particular attention to those which were originally conceived for the stage. How might we understand the differences between them? What if, for example, we have seen the play or performance staged? What if we haven't? We will consider changes in actors, setting, and narrative but one of our primary questions is to ask how memorable performances "haunt" (to use Performance Studies scholar Marvin Carlson's term) the stage and screen treatments that come after them. As a coda, we might consider the current popularity of making Broadway plays based on movies. Clearly, plays and roles are continuously reinvented. Our goal is to understand the different experiences of viewing live performances and those on film. The course includes regular screenings as well as meetings. If possible, we will attend a current production in New York, or more locally, that enables us to focus these questions.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, two one-page papers based on materials assigned in the course, and a 10 page-paper or presentation (with approval of the instructor).
No prerequisites, although introductory level course in Art, Film, or Theater preferred. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to student: $150 for trip to New York City and a play.
Meeting time: afternoons, MWR.

OCKMAN

ARTH 11 Photography of the Distant

This course examines the circulation of photographic images of foreign places and people in England and France in the nineteenth century. Students will be introduced to a diverse range of subjects a select number of Western photographers imaged of the Other, including landscapes, views of historic monuments, native types and genre scenes. We will examine the photographer's motives for traveling abroad, his aesthetic treatment of his subject(s), and his methods for presenting work "back home." We will pay particular attention to the physical format in which photographs were presented, as well as the context in which these images were displayed. How did the presentation of a photographic image-whether it was issued as a plate in a subscription album, viewed through lens of a stereoscope, or projected as a magic lantern image-influence the interpretation of the subject? Which publics encountered these images? Students will gain an understanding of how profoundly the camera shaped the nineteenth-century person's view of the world.
This course will meet four times a week. Lectures will address the above, and seek to contextualize photography of the distant within a general history of photography. Portions of each course period will be devoted to a discussion of images and assigned readings. Visits to the Williams College Museum of Art and the Clark Art Institute to study relevant photographs will be an integral part of this course as well.
Evaluation will be based on 10-minute presentation before a photograph in a local art museum; 10-page research paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference given to advanced art history majors.
Cost to student: $45.
Meeting time: mornings.

ALEXIS GOODIN (Instructor)
FILIPCZAK (Sponsor)

Alexis Goodin (M.A. '98) received her Ph.D. from Brown University in May 2008. Her dissertation considers the representation of ancient Egypt at the Sydenham Crystal Palace.

ARTH 12 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography) (Same as English 12 and Special 27)

(See under ENGL 12 for full description.)

ARTH 13 Proving Peiro: Is the Clark Piero Della Francesca the Real McCoy?

One of the most treasured paintings in our Clark Art Institute is the "Madonna and Child with Angels" attributed to the Renaissance artist Piero Della Francesca.
But is it the real McCoy? Is it truly a restored masterpiece-or just a fake remake?
This winter study seminar is offered to a select number of students interested in doing detective work on a famous painting, one that was little known in 1914 when Sterling Clark first purchased it. Because it was in such wretched condition, he got it on the cheap, but then had it expensively restored during the 1950s. Since 1955 it has hung in the Clark Museum. At first, only a few Renaissance art historians were even aware of its existence, and most of these tended to deny it as a true Piero. Only when it was exhibited for the first time abroad in 2004, where it was hung beside several undoubted Pieros was it accepted as genuine.
But doubts still remain, which this seminar may either resolve or sustain.
After three preliminary lectures by the professor, each student will be assigned a special topic directly pertaining to a detail or aspect of the Clark painting that may or may not support its attribution. Students will be expected to do independent research on their chosen topics in the library and archives of the Clark Art Institute and Williamstown Regional Art Conservation Laboratory (WRACL), and meet periodically with the professor in order to fashion written reports which will be orally presented during the final meetings of the seminar. Lastly, we will collectively decide, based on all the presented evidence, whether or not the Clark "Piero" was really a Piero.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper and an oral presentation.
Prerequisites: ArtH 101-102. Enrollment limit: 10. Students will be selected based on an interview.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

SAMUEL EDGERTON (Instructor)
HAXTHAUSEN (Sponsor)

Samuel Edgerton is Williams College Amos Lawrence Professor of Art History Emeritus.

ARTH 14 Ramayana: The Great Epic in Indian and Southeast Asian Art

The Ramayana, or "Travels of Rama", is one of the most popular epics of India. It is a heroic tale involving romance, villainy, and warfare on both the human and cosmic or heavenly scales. To know the Ramayana is to grasp the essentials of Hindu religion, culture, and values.
This course will explore the exciting visual and performing arts inspired by the Ramayana in India, where the story originated, as well as the lands of Southeast Asia, where it spread. Arts to be explored will include the great temple sculptures in stone and bronze, large scale and miniature painting, plays, dance and musical drama, batik, puppet shows, even modern day comic books, and film and television productions of the Ramayana. Social and esthetic issues to be considered may include the role played by the arts in society; methods and aims of artistic expression; ideals of beauty and of virtue; social status and gender; the various transformations of the Ramayana in both literature and art in various parts of India and by various levels of society ("folk" art vs. "high" art), as well as the various different cultures in southeast Asia.
This course will consist partly of art history lectures, and partly of studio art practice.
Evaluation will be based on attendance (mandatory), participation in class discussions based on readings, a short presentation (about 2 minutes in length), and the production of painted illustrations to the story. Exhibition of the work on the last day of Winter Study is required. Students will also be asked to explain the part of the story that they illustrated to a group of school children.
No prerequisites. No prior artistic training or skill will be required, only enthusiasm and effort. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting time: twice a week for three hour sessions. Readings will consist of articles in a reading packet, and a paperback retelling of the Ramayana. Maximum estimated time for reading and painting outside of class: 15 hours per week.

GARY SMITH (Instructor)
FILIPCZAK (Sponsor)

Gary Smith is a local painter and art historian with a M.A. degree in the History of Art from the University of California-Berkeley, specializing in the art of India.

ARTH 25 Fashionable London: Clothing and Fetishism from Victorian Street to Westwood Catwalk (Same as History 25, Theatre 26 and Women's and Gender Studies 25)

(See under HIST 25 for full description.)

ARTH 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for ArtH 493, 494.

ARTH 33 Honors Independent Study

To be taken by candidates for honors by the independent study route.

ART STUDIO

ARTS 10 Chinese Calligraphy: The Art of Beautiful Writing

This course has two components: art history and studio practice, with an emphasis on the latter. The first offers students an opportunity to acquire an understanding of theoretical and aesthetic principles of Chinese calligraphy, one of the highest art forms in China practiced by the literati. Studio practice allows students to apply theories to creating artworks.
Evaluation will be based on weekly assignments, a short quiz, class discussion and attendance, and a final project (artistic or scholarly).
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to student: $120 for writing tools and other materials.
Meeting time: 10-12:50 WR.

JANG

ARTS 11 The Camera Obscura in Visual Art

This will be a collaborative studio-based exploration of the Camera Obscura in concept and practice. The Camera Obscura is a simple and ancient philosophical instrument and precursor to all modern optical theories of vision and representation. We will consider its historical significance, its many applications in high and low culture, and dwell upon its recent appearance across a wide spectrum of contemporary art practices. Students will work together to create a variety of optical constructions, culminating in a large scale group project. Class time will be spent in lecture, visual presentation, discussion and studio work. Time outside of class meetings will be required for studio work, reading, and research. Students will execute a final group installation open to the community.
Evaluation will be based on participation, quality of individual and collaborative work, and final project.
Prerequisites: ArtS 100. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to ArtS Majors, sophomores and juniors.
Cost to student: $50.
Meeting time: twice a week, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. with an hour lunch break.

ETHAN JACKSON (Instructor)
E. GRUDIN (Sponsor)

Ethan Jackson received his MFA from the University of Colorado at Boulder. He works in installation, optics, and photography.

ARTS 12 Mural (Same as Mathematics 12)

(See under MATH 12 for full description.)

ARTS 13 Entrepeneurship as an Art Form (Same as Economics 13)

In what ways is an entrepreneur like an artist? In what ways is starting a company like bringing an artwork into the world? If, as Heidegger says, a work of art is something new that is brought into the world, and which changes the world to allow for the new thing, then many recent start-up companies could be considered in an artistic context. Some companies are not artworks, of course, and some lone, fantastically creative ideas, are not executable. But on this spectrum from economic realism to what Charles Renee MacKintosh calls the seemingly ephemeral "phantasy or caprice" of a newly introduced idea, there is likely room for a liberal arts approach to creative economics. The course combines case studies of entrepreneurs and visual artists as people, and entrepreneurial stories of companies such as Google and Facebook, alongside lectures in economics and entrepreneurial finance and studio activities, to explore the above questions. Coursework will include weekly research and memos, and a final team presentation of an art project (e.g., a business plan).
Additionally, there will be periodic scheduled film viewings, small group meetings with the instructor regarding final projects, and Wednesday afternoon studio/research time that is encouraged but not required. Participants are asked to keep a sketchbook.
Evaluation will be based on weekly memos, participation and a final group project.
Prerequisites: either introductory drawing or introductory economics. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference to seniors, art or economics majors, and to wide disciplinary representation within the course. Students are asked to submit a short description (100 words or less) of their interest.
Cost to student: cost of reading packets plus $20 for materials.
Meeting time: TWR 10-noon; optional Wednesday studio 1-4 p.m.; some scheduled film and small group meetings outside of class.

AMY WHITAKER `96 (Instructor)
M. LEWIS (Sponsor)

Amy Whitaker has an MBA from Yale and an MFA in painting from the Slade School of Fine Art, London.

ARTS 14 Sketchbooks!

Throughout history, artists have used sketchbooks to work through ideas, reflect on life, observe and study the world around them, and to attempt a better understanding of themselves. In this course we will explore the sketchbook as a tool for gaining insight into our thinking process. We will consider what goes on on the pages of sketchbooks, how and why it gets there, and what it can tell us about the mind of the person who created it. We will talk about mark making and page composition, and explore the effects of different formats and drawing/writing implements. To supplement our discussions, about half of our time will be spent in the studio, learning and practicing drawing techniques. Each student will keep a sketchbook that will form the basis of class discussions and presentations. We will also visit WCMA and the Clark to take a close look at sketches by some of the great artists. There will be several short sketching and writing assignments, culminating in a final sketchbook presentation accompanied by a short self-analytical essay.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, a sketchbook, oral presentations, and writing assignments totaling 10 pages.
No prerequisites. Beginners as wells as more experienced artists are welcome. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: approximately $45 for materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

EUGENE KORSUNSKIY '08 (Instructor)
E. GRUDIN (Sponsor)

Eugene Korsunskiy is a recent graduate of Williams College who majored in Art History and Practice.

ARTS 15 Large-Format Photography

The course is designed to introduce students to studio/view cameras, to processing the sheet-film negatives made in them and to making contact and projection prints. Studio exercises will include careful analysis of camera movements to teach their use and a consideration of lighting techniques; dark room exercises will include the tray development of sheet film, determination of effective film speed and control of contrast through development time.
The subject matter of the photographs produced in the course will not be prescribed; it is limited only by the participants' imagination and the weather in January. Working with subjects of their own choosing, students will be instructed in the principles of traditional photographic image making by producing large-format negatives and translating them into effective black-and-white prints in 4x5 and 8x10 formats.
Each student will be expected to make exhibition-quality prints, which may be enlargements or contact prints from 4x5 negatives, or contract prints from 8x10 negatives. The prints will be exhibited in a group show at the end of Winter Study.
Evaluation will be based on commitment to the course, participation in discussion sessions and the quality of the prints. Class will meet as a group for a minimum of six hours a week for lectures, demonstrations in the dark room and studio and crits. In addition to this time, students will be expected to spend at least 20 hours a week in the darkroom working individually, under the supervision of the course instructor and the photography technician.
No prerequisites, although some experience with a camera and dark room work would be an advantage. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to seniors and those not able to get into the course in the recent past
Cost to student: $175 lab fee to cover the cost of film, paper and chemicals.
Meeting time: class will meet as a group for a minimum of six hours a week for lectures, demonstrations in the dark room and studio and crits. In addition to this time, students will be expected to spend at least 20 hours a week in the darkroom working individually, under the supervision of the instructor and the photography technician.

RALPH LIEBERMAN (Instructor)
LALEIAN (Sponsor)

Ralph Lieberman is an art historian and photographer who lives in Williamstown. He has a Ph.D. from the Institute of Fine Arts. His photographs have appeared in many publications and are to be found in major American and European art historical study collections.

ARTS 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as Chemistry 16)

(See under CHEM 16 for full description.)

ARTS 17 Collagraphs and Silk Aquatints

In this course, students will create prints by making collagraphs and silk aquatints, both non-acid approaches. In a collagraph, the surface of the plate is created by adhering assorted materials to a cardboard or aluminum plate to create lines, values, and textures. In a silk aquatint, the image is made by in a reverse method by painting out lighter tones with acrylic painting on a silk covered plate that prints a deep black. The resulting image can be very rich, painterly, and spontaneous. Both kinds of plates will be printed as intaglios-the plates inked, wiped down by hand, and rolled through the press. We will meet twice a week for 3 hour sessions for demonstrations, critiques, and studio time. Students will be expected to put in extra hours during the week to finish assignments. Attendance and one field trip to the Williams College Museum are mandatory.
Evaluation will be based on three assignments (editioned prints).
Prerequisites: ArtS 100. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to student: $50 for supplies, plus individual paper costs.
Meeting time: Monday afternoons and Tuesday mornings.

TAKENAGA

ARTS 18 Figure Modeling

This course is designed as an introduction to the challenges of working with the figure in a sculptural context. The class will be structured as a working studio with the students sculpting in clay from a live model.
The first half of the course will emphasize learning the technical and physiological aspects of the human figure; structure, proportion, gesture, and basic anatomy. The latter half of the course will be concerned with the creative aspects of working with the figure and of developing individual interpretations of the human form.
In addition to working studio sessions, there will be two slide lectures on the human form in art.
Each student will be evaluated on the success of their sculpture, attendance, participation, and effort. This course requires approximately 15 hours per week of individual investigations into the human form.
Prerequisites: ArtS 100. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: $105 lab fee.
Meeting time: afternoons.

PODMORE

ARTS 19 Introduction to the Craft and Art of Blacksmithing

Fire, hammer, and anvil-these three simple tools have been used by blacksmiths for over three thousand years to make the ironwork needed to create towns, civilizations, and most recently, art. While the common blacksmithing processes: bending, tapering, and joining steel are very simple, these methods can be combined to create an incredibly diverse range of work-from imposing gates to delicate jewelry. In the first part of the course, the instructors will demonstrate techniques and the students will practice on small projects such as coat hooks, flowerpot hangers, chisels, trivets, iron flowers, bracelets, napkin rings, etc. In the second part of the course, students will design their own instructor-approved projects. Projects could include mailbox brackets, fireplace tools, hammers, cooking utensils, woodworking tools, door hardware, jewelry, sculpture, or whatever the student can dream up! Expect to spend 2 three-hour sessions in class and approximately 20 additional hours per week in the studio. A slide show of traditional and contemporary work will be given to help students understand the history of the craft and to give them ideas for individual projects. Grades will be based on class attendance and completion of assignments.
No prerequisites, although students must be enthused about working with hot iron. Enrollment limit is 10 with preference given to seniors, studio art majors, and/or those who show the most interest in the class to the instructors (via email) before we select students.
Cost to students is $90 for materials.
Meeting times: mornings.

BRIAN HALL and GARY LOHNES (Instructors)
PODMORE (Sponsor)

Brian Hall has been a blacksmith for 18 years. In that time has worked in a wide variety of venues: as a museum interpreter, doing custom commissions, selling at craft shows, and as an instructor. Gary Lohnes is a trained mechanic and machinist and the sculpture technician at Williams College

ARTS 20 The Digital Darkroom (Same as Geosciences 10)

(See under GEOS 10 for full description.)

ASIAN STUDIES

ASST 13 The Art of War (Same as Political Science 13)

(See under PSCI 13 for full description.)

ASST 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Asian Studies.

CHINESE

CHIN S.P. Sustaining Program for Chinese 101-102

Students registered for Chinese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Chinese Sustaining Program. Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9:00-9:50.
Prerequisite: Chinese 101. Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.

LANGUAGE FELLOWS

CHIN 13 Theory and Practice of Chinese Cooking

Much more than in the U.S., in China people are always talking about food; as the Chinese saying has it, min yi shi wei tian `the people consider eating as heaven'. This hands-on course will foster an appreciation of the historical and cultural background of Chinese cooking, as well as the development of practical skills in preparing a variety of Chinese dishes. To the extent possible, we will use locally available ingredients (organic if possible) to cook authentic Chinese food, primarily Chinese home cooking. Since climate has had a huge impact on availability of ingredients, the course includes an introduction to the four primary regions, or schools, of Chinese cooking- Northern, Eastern, Western, and Southern. Guest chefs may be invited to class to introduce a number of regional dishes. While we will cook most dishes together, every student will also have the opportunity to cook independently. Students will be expected to complete assigned readings, view films outside of class and write film reviews, dine at several Chinese restaurants and write food critiques, shop at an Asian supermarket to learn about the various cooking ingredients, and interview chefs.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, two short papers/reviews, a final project involving the creation and cooking of original recipes, and one 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. In case of oversubscription, preference will be given to senior and junior Chinese majors and those who have taken Chinese language at Williams.
Cost to student: approximately $75 for Xerox packet and materials.
Meeting time: two three-hour sessions per week from 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM. There will also be some required afternoon, evening, and weekend activities, so students who expect to have other commitments at those times should not sign up for this course.

JERLING KUBLER (Instructor)
C. KUBLER (Sponsor)

Jerling Kubler has taught Chinese language and culture at various institutions overseas and in the U.S., including Williams College, where she has served previously as adjunct instructor during Winter Studies and also for several years as Visiting Lecturer in Chinese.

CHIN 25 Study Tour to Taiwan

Interested in learning first-hand about Chinese and Taiwanese culture and becoming acquainted with the so-called Taiwan (economic and political) "miracle"? Want to improve your knowledge of Mandarin, the world's most widely spoken language? Then join us on this 24-day study tour to Taiwan, Republic of China. We'll spend the first two and a half weeks in Taipei, the capital city, where three hours of Mandarin language classes will be scheduled each morning at the Mandarin Center of National Taiwan Normal University. After class each day, we'll meet as a group for lunch and discussion. Activities with Taiwanese university students and visits to cultural and economic sites of interest will be scheduled for some afternoons and Saturdays, with other afternoons, evenings, and Sundays free for self-study and individual exploration of the city. During the last week, we'll conduct a seven-day tour of central and southern Taiwan. Two orientation sessions will be conducted on campus in the fall to help participants prepare for their experience. Requirements: Satisfactory completion of the language course and active participation in the other scheduled activities.
Prerequisite: One year of Chinese or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limit: 10. Not open to first-year students. In case of oversubscription, priority will be given to Chinese and Asian Studies majors.
Cost to student: $2500 (includes round-trip air fare from New York City, tuition, textbooks, accommodations, weekday lunches, local excursions, and tour of central and southern Taiwan; does not include breakfasts, dinners, and weekend lunches while in Taipei, estimated at $400, or incidental expenses.) Participants should note that, to enhance learning and to stay within budget, accommodations and most meals will be local student-not foreign tourist-standard.

C. KUBLER

CHIN 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Chinese.

JAPANESE

JAPN S.P. Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102

Students registered for Japanese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Japanese Sustaining Program. Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9:00-9:50.
Prerequisite: Japanese 101. Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.

LANGUAGE FELLOW

JAPN 11 Encountering the Tale of Genji-1000 Years Later

The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu, a lady who served in the imperial court, is considered by some to be the world's first novel. Kawabata Yasunari called it "the highest pinnacle of Japanese literature" in his 1968 Nobel acceptance speech. The year 2008 marks the millennium celebration of the novel's dissemination, as confirmed in a diary entry by the author. Consisting of 54 chapters, The Tale of Genji spans three generations, depicting intricate human relations, psychology, pathos, love, death, and jealousy. It has influenced and bequeathed traces of itself to later genres of Japanese literature, culture, esthetics, and arts. Over a thousand years later and over ten thousand kilometers away, Winter Study provides us a great opportunity to dive into this monumental work. We will explore its relevance to our lives and the scope of its lasting influence, as evidenced by translations into several languages, modern Japanese adaptations, films, anime, comic books, TV programs, and numerous theatre productions, both traditional and modern. Materials and discussions will be in English (unless you choose otherwise via consultation with the instructor). We will meet in the afternoon as a group an average of three times per week, with allowances made for a few meetings to take place outside the regular class hours.
Evaluation for this course is based on a complete reading of the tale, class participation, oral presentations on some chapters, and a final essay, about five pages long, in response to the tale in its entirety.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. If the course is oversubscribed, students will be selected according to seniority.
Cost to student: $30 to $50.

S. KAGAYA

JAPN 12 Kamishibai Workshop

The kamishibai or "paper play" is a traditional street performance art of Japan. It consists of a stack of large paper cards with colorful illustrations which are inserted in a wooden theater box and pulled out one by one as voice performers hidden behind the box tell or "voice act" the story. Kamishibai stories and artwork were influenced by both Kabuki Theater and the silent films of the early 20th century, and in turn have influenced the development of manga and anime. In this kamishibai workshop, students will learn traditional techniques used in the story, art and performance of kamishibai, and will also be encouraged to experiment with innovative techniques. Small groups will collaborate to create original kamishibai, which we will take to schools and libraries in the area to perform. There will be a final performance at the college for the public. Japanese language students will be encouraged to create a Japanese version of their kamishibai, in addition to the English version.
Evaluation will be based on the successful creation and performance of original kamishibai, with attendance, participation and teamwork also taken into account. We will meet three times a week in the morning for two-hour sessions. Following a few introductory exercises and discussions, the course will be workshop-based, and tutorials will be scheduled to discuss each project. Several hours per week outside of class will be required to work on the stories and art and to rehearse the performances.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. In case of oversubscription, preference will be given to Japanese, studio art, theater, and creative writing majors.
Cost to student: $30 lab fee.

SUSAN MATSUI (Instructor)
YAMADA (Sponsor)

Susan Matsui '81 is a local author of Japanese children's books, kamishibai, and essays, who has published more than thirty books. She is also a composer, having published many children's songs in Japan.

JAPN 25 Exploring Japanese Culture and Language

If you've never been to Japan but always wanted to go, this is an excellent chance. If you want to explore your identity in a totally different cultural setting, this course is also for you. This course is designed to help students develop some level of self-conscious awareness of the cultural differences, traditions, and customs of the Japanese. A total immersion in Japanese culture and society offers students a first-hand experience of the people and culture. The experiential goals of this course are to: (1) communicate in Japanese with native speakers; (2) participate in various cultural activities; (3) experience Japanese home life; and (4) visit historic sites and deepen students' interest in and knowledge of Japanese history. Students will spend the first three weeks in Kanazawa, which is often called `small Kyoto' and is located in Ishikawa prefecture. They will study at the Ishikawa Japanese Studies Center, taking Japanese lessons each morning and then gathering for cultural activities in the afternoon. During this period, students will live with Japanese families and will have an overnight trip to the Noto peninsula on the Japanese coast. The course will end with a trip to Kyoto to visit historical sites.
Requirements: satisfactory completion of the language course, active participation in the other scheduled cultural activities, and submission of a journal.
Prerequisite : Japanese 101 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limit: 12.Not open to first-year students. If overenrolled, priority will be given to Japanese and Asian Studies majors. Not open to first-year students. Cost to student: approximately $3200 (includes round-trip air fare from New York City, tuition, textbooks, accommodations, local excursions, and tour of Noto and Kyoto; does not include lunches during language course [estimated at $150-200] or lunches and dinners while in Kyoto [estimated at $100-300], travel insurance, passport fee [if applicable], or incidental expenses.) Participants should note that, to enhance learning and stay within budget, accommodations and most meals will be local student-not foreign tourist-standard.

R. YAMADA and K. YAMAMOTO

JAPN 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Japanese.

ASTRONOMY

ASTR 12T Exoplanets: Detection and Details

The first planets orbiting stars other than our sun were discovered more than a decade ago via a breakthrough technique and painstaking analysis. We now know of more than 220 exoplanets, though none you would enjoy vacationing on. But the hope is that with refinements in methods of exoplanet detection, including proposed space-borne missions like NASA's SIM PlanetQuest and the European Spaces Agency's GAIA, we might actually detect another "Earth" in the next decade or two. In this tutorial, students will investigate the principles involved in current and future exoplanet detection techniques, and also study the surprising properties of planets already found, and the implications they carry for the development of life.
Pairs of students will meet twice each week giving alternating presentations, for a total of eight tutorial sessions. It is estimated that research, reading and writing will take students approximately 20 hours each week.
Method of evaluation: tutorial presentations and papers (with a total of 15-20 pages of writing).
Prerequisites: Math 105 or 106, Physics 141 or equivalent. Closed to students who have taken ASTR 102 or ASTR 207T. Enrollment limit: 6. In the event of oversubscription, preference will be given to students based on a brief statement of interest.
Cost to student: approximately $25 for photocopied readings
Meeting time: mornings.

KWITTER

ASTR 31 Senior Research

To be taken by students registered for Astronomy 493, 494.

ASTROPHYSICS

ASPH 31 Senior Research

To be taken by students registered for Astrophysics 493, 494.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 10 Electron Microscopy

Students will undertake an independent project to investigate a topic of their choice using the transmission and scanning electron microscopes. They will do their own sample preparation, operate the two electron microscopes, and take micrographs of relevant structures. Class time will give a brief overview of the theory and operation of the microscopes and microtomes. In addition, students will learn how to develop and print their film from the TEM, and learn how to manipulate the digital images from the SEM in Adobe Photoshop. (Do you want your erythrocytes red or blue?)
There will be brief reading assignments, a guest speaker and a 10-page paper with 8 well-focused micrographs required.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8.
Cost to student: $40 for text and readings.
Meeting time: afternoons. Class will meet for two hours, three times a week, plus scope time.

NANCY PIATCZYC (Instructor)
ZOTTOLI (Sponsor)

Nancy Piatcyc received her B.S. in Biology from Tufts University. She attended the school of Electron Microscopy in Albany, NY. She is a trained electron microscopist who operates and maintains the electron microscope facility at Williams.

BIOL 11 Global Health: Why We Should Care

From the Declaration of Alma-Ata to the Millennium Development Goals, there have been 30 years of good will but limited accomplishment in bringing health to all. Health is an essential human right, but much of the world's poor still do not have access to the most basic public health services. This is best illustrated in Africa where there is the double burden of poverty and communicable disease. The failure to provide equitable global health and the emergence of new infectious diseases with pandemic potential also threaten world security. This winter study will explore what is meant by global health, how health is measured and what are the major diseases that particularly affect the poor. It will take a biomedical approach focusing on communicable diseases, e.g. HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and diseases with pandemic potential, but will also look at maternal and child health. After defining the problems, we will explore potential strategies in achieving global health.
A variety of formats will be used to study global health issues including the current medical literature, popular writings and film documentaries. Students will be expected to read material outside of class so that they will be prepared to discuss the topics, and perhaps give short presentations on a focused area. We will meet three times weekly for two hours each session.
Evaluation will be based on contributions to discussions and a ten-page paper that can: analyze a global health issue, be a document defining a public health intervention, or a short story describing the impact of a disease or condition on an individual, family or community.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: approximately $50-75 book and xeroxes.
Meeting time: mornings.

Dr. DAVID HILL (Instructor)
ZOTTOLI (Sponsor)

Dr. David Hill `73 obtained his MD from the University of Rochester School of Medicine. Following training in infectious disease, Dr. Hill was on the faculty of the University of Connecticut School of Medicine for 20 years. He moved to London in 2003 to direct travel medicine services for the United Kingdom, and has a teaching appointment at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

BIOL 12 Diseases of the Heart: Pathophysiology

Cardiovascular disease remains the major overall cause of mortality in the civilized world. This course is designed to familiarize undergraduates with the anatomy and physiology of the heart and blood vessels, followed by a transition to a discussion of the alterations in structure and function that lead to: coronary artery disease, heart attack, stroke, hypertensive vascular disease, valvular heart disease, congestive heart failure, and cardiomyopathy. Some discussions of diagnosis, treatment, and risk factors for the development of these diseases, are also considered.
Evaluation will be based on a paper or a final quiz.
Prerequisites: secondary or college biology and chemistry. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to upper class students.
Cost to student: $42 for text.
Meeting time: mornings.

Dr. SIMON STERTZER (Instructor)
ZOTTOLI (Sponsor)

Dr. Simon H. Stertzer is Professor of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Stertzer performed the first coronary angioplasty in the U.S. in 1978, and has been pioneering techniques in cardiovascular medicine for almost 40 years. He has been teaching and practicing interventional cardiology at Stanford full time since 1994

BIOL 13 Picturebook Illustration

The art for picture books ranges from black and white line art to explosions of color literally lifting off the page. In this course the instructor will demonstrate and show examples of illustrated picture books, including non-fiction and fables. Students will experiment with several illustration techniques including three-dimensional sculpted watercolor art. Each student will create a three dimensional painting of one of Aesop's Fables, incorporating the techniques presented during the course, for display at the end of Winter Study.
The class will meet twice a week in the morning for three hours. There will also be a mandatory field trip to The Eric Carle Museum of Picturebook Art in Amherst, MA.
Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation and effort. Open to all levels of artistic ability with the understanding that this is a studio art course.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Seniors and juniors will be given first preference.
Cost to student: $75.
Meeting time: mornings.

ROBIN BRICKMAN (Instructor)
ZOTTOLI (Sponsor)

Robin Brickman received her Bachelor's degree in graphic arts and botany from Bennington College. She is an award-winning illustrator known for the unique three-dimensional watercolor art she developed for books and for workshops based on that technique. Her picture book client list includes: Charlesbridge, Simon & Schuster, Harper Collins, The Millbrook Press, Rodale Press, and Boyd's Mills Press. Her original art is in public and private collections.

BIOL 14 Gestures of Time: A Visual Exploration

This is an interdisciplinary class that will investigate where Biology and Art intersect in the passage of time. Through on-going detailed observation, drawing, watercolor painting, and digital photography, the class will explore ways of altering time in order to understand and communicate structures of motion in biological processes. We will experiment with drawing and painting botanical and figurative renderings with regards to movement, photographing a time-lapse series, as well as enlisting the Biology department's Motion Xtra high speed video camera to slow down and analyze rapid gestures. The first few classes will emphasize drawing and watercolor technique so that the pencil/paint begins to become a tool rather than an obstacle to capturing impressions. Students will keep an on-going visual and written observations about a chosen botanical form as it grows throughout the month, and produce motion books, botanical illustrations, and digital renderings. Biology Professor Joan Edwards will present her findings on the record-breaking speed of bunchberry dogwood along with her discoveries of the artistic relevance of biological processes in motion. We will also view and discuss relevant artworks (through slides and at local museums) that express chrono-gestural concerns. Readings will be assigned and students will be required to present a topic in conjunction with one or more or their art images. The final project will be a synthesis of what has been observed and internalized. Students will be evaluated based on their final projects, the depth and detail of their renderings and motion books, and their verbal participation in periodic group critiques and discussions.
Evaluation will be based on completed portfolio of work and a final project.
Prerequisites: drawing experience helpful. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference to upper class students.
Cost to student: $75.
Meeting time: mornings.

JULIA MORGAN-LEAMON (Instructor)
J. EDWARDS (Sponsor)

Julia Morgan-Leamon is an interdisciplinary artist and instructor with an MFA in Visual Art.

BIOL 15 From Populations to Species: Understanding the Evolution of Diversity

Evolutionary processes act on populations and have resulted in the present day diversity of life. In this course we will explore how populations change over time and the approaches used by researchers to examine these processes. We will use primary literature and scientific reviews as background information for in-class discussion and assignments. Further, students will analyze real DNA datasets and get hands-on experience using programs for population level genetic analyses. Students will be responsible for completing weekly homework assignments and producing a written research proposal. We will meet three times a week for an hour lecture and then an additional weekly three-hour computer lab.
Evaluation will be based on weekly homework assignments and a final project.
Prerequisites: Biology 101. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings.

CHRISTOPHER HIMES (Instructor)
RAYMOND (Sponsor)

Christopher Himes will receive his Ph.D. from University of Washington in June. He will be a post-doctoral teaching/research fellow in the BigP Program and will be doing research on evolution in the lab of Dr. Jason Wilder.

BIOL 21 Science Beyond Williams

Are you interested in hands-on experience in a science-related field beyond the Purple Valley? Are you curious to explore science in a university or medical school research lab, a government agency, or a not-for-profit organization? This course is designed to help students take part in scientific work or research going on outside of Williams in order to provide them with a broader sense of what it is like to work in a professional scientific setting. Any field of science or technology can be explored via this course.
In consultation with the course instructor, students will use resources such as the Office of Career Counseling, science faculty members, and Williams alumni/ae to locate a mentor in the student's area of interest at a work site in the United States. Once the course instructor approves the arrangement for a mentored, hands-on experience for three weeks of Winter Study, the student will prepare for the internship by reading literature related to the project, and discuss the readings with a faculty sponsor here at Williams in November/December. Once on site, students must remain in contact with their Williams faculty sponsor by having a weekly phone conference. Participating students would not have to be on campus during WSP prior to beginning their fieldwork. Strong interest, enthusiasm and willingness to plan and prepare for the internship are required for this course.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper and post-WSP public presentation to a relevant department or program on the goals and accomplishments of the project.
Prerequisites: two semesters of relevant course work in science and/or mathematics. Enrollment limit: 10.

DEWITT and RAYMOND

BIOL 22 Introduction to Biological Research

An experimental research project will be carried out under the supervision of Biology Department faculty. It is expected that the student will spend 20 hours per week in the lab at a minimum, and a 10-page written report is required. This experience is intended for, but not limited to, first-year students and sophomores. Interested students must submit an application form available on the Biology Department webpage: http://web.williams.edu/Biology/Research/Winter/022Application/022application.shtml.
Prerequisites: Biology 101. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

DEWITT

BIOL 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Biology 493, 494.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 10 Zymurgy

An introduction to the science, history, and practice of brewing beer. This course aims to supply the general chemical concepts and hands-on technical experience necessary to enable creative brewing and an appreciation of diverse beer styles. Lecture topics include the biochemistry of yeast, sanitary practices, analytical methods, malt types and preparation, extract vs. full-grain brewing, hops, water chemistry, the chemistry of off-flavors, and beer judging. In the lab, students progress from brewing a commercially available extract kit to producing a full-grain brew of their own original recipe. The class will also meet professional brewers and microbiologists during a private tour of a local brewery.
Evaluation is based on class/lab participation, a 10-page paper, and a final presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 8 students who are at least 21 years in age. Preference is given to students with a strong background/aptitude in the sciences.
Cost to student: approximately $200 for supplies and equipment.
Meeting time: mornings; three days a week (longer on lab days) and an all-day field trip.

T. SMITH

CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as Special 11)

Are you interested in teaching? Do you enjoy working with kids? Do you like to experiment with new things? Here is a chance for you to do all three! The aim of this Winter Study Project is to design a series of hands-on science workshops for elementary school children and their parents. Working in teams of 2-4, students spend the first two and a half weeks of Winter Study planning the workshops. This involves deciding on a focus for each workshop (based on the interests of the students involved) followed by choosing and designing experiments and presentations that will be suitable for fourth-grade children. On the third weekend of Winter Study (January 24, 25) we bring elementary school kids with their parents to Williams to participate in the workshops.
You get a chance to see what goes into planning classroom demonstrations as well as a sense of what it's like to actually give a presentation. You find that kids at this age are great fun to work with because they are interested in just about everything and their enthusiasm is infectious. You also give the kids and their parents a chance to actually do some fun hands-on science experiments that they may not have seen before, and you are able to explain simple scientific concepts to them in a manner that won't be intimidating. It is a rewarding experience for all involved.
Evaluation is based on participation in planning and running the workshops. Each group is expected to prepare a handout with descriptions of the experiments for the kids, parents, and teachers.
No prerequisites. You need not be a science major; all that is needed is enthusiasm. Enrollment limit: 25.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings. Classes meet three times a week for approximately three hours each session. The workshop is run on the third weekend of Winter Study (January 24, 25) and attendance from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. is mandatory that weekend. There are also one or two brief meetings held in the fall term for preliminary planning.

BINGEMANN and KAPLAN

CHEM 12 GET A JOB! Find a Fulfilling Career Path that Fits Your Personality (Same as Psychology 11 and Special 20)

Since we are an industrious, capitalistic society, our wellness and quality of life are linked to job satisfaction and productivity. So, if you want to be happy and healthy and pay your bills, it is valuable to find a fulfilling career that fits your personality. OK...but where do you begin when you're not really sure what you want to do with your life?! Well, in this course you will explore and link your interests, strengths, likes and dislikes to the world of work. Assisted by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (a well-recognized, valid and reliable inventory of personality preferences), you will learn how to capitalize on your natural abilities, thrive in a diverse work environment, and find a fulfilling career path. Engaging in fun, experiential group exercises, peer review, readings, and reflective journaling, you will expand your resume, interview skills and communication skills. Then, to cross the bridge into the real world of work, with the generous assistance of the Office of Career Counseling and its many resources, you will also be required to go through the real-time process of narrowing your career search, investigating your fields of interest, connecting with respective alumni, and identifying appealing employment and internship possibilities. What you do next with the hot leads is up to you!
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance, class participation, MBTI completion, assigned readings, peer meetings and reviews, journaling, career-related assignments, OCC appointment, alumni interview, final reflective paper and insightful sharing of knowledge gained.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference to seniors.
Cost to student: $100 for books and materials.
Meeting time: afternoons, TR.

RACHELLE SMITH (Instructor)
PEACOCK-LOPEZ

Rachelle Smith, MSW, is a Clinical Social Worker, Consultant and Wellness Educator specializing in Relationships, Wellness, Childbirth, and Integrative Medicine.

CHEM 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as ArtS 16)

This course provides an introduction to both a theoretical consideration of the glassy state of matter and the practical manipulation of glass. We do flameworking with hand torches for at least 12 hours per week. While no previous experience is required, students with patience, good hand-eye coordination, and creative imagination will find the course most rewarding. The class is open to both artistically and scientifically oriented students.
Evaluation is based on class participation, exhibition of glass projects, a 10-page paper, and a presentation to the class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference is given to juniors, sophomores, and those who express the most and earliest interest and enthusiasm by e-mail to Professor Thoman.
Cost to student: $75 for supplies.
Meeting time: 9:00 a.m. to noon, MTWRF.

THOMAN

CHEM 18 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry

An independent experimental project in biochemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in biochemistry. Biochemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the molecular details of living systems including the interaction of biologically important molecules. In the Chemistry Department, studies are underway to investigate the structure/function relationship of proteins, the interaction between proteins and RNA and DNA, and the molecular basis of bacterial gene regulation.
A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

GEHRING

CHEM 20 Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry

An independent experimental project in inorganic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in inorganic chemistry. Opportunities for research in inorganic chemistry at Williams include the study of transition metals as homogeneous catalyst for a variety of chemical transformations, and as building blocks for new materials with interesting electronic (magnetic, conducting) and optical properties. Students working in this area will gain expertise in the synthesis of new compounds and their characterization by modern spectroscopic techniques.
A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

C. GOH

CHEM 23 Introduction to Research in Organic Chemistry

An independent experimental project in organic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in organic chemistry. Representative projects include: (a) The synthesis and evaluation of amphiphilic polymers as delivery vehicles. These self-assembled materials are loaded with protein or small molecule drugs for anti-cancer therapies. Depending upon project, students will use techniques in organic synthesis, materials characterization, biochemical assays, and cell culture. (b) Probing new and efficient methods for the creation of molecules of medicinal interest. Some targets include the kavalactones-the active principles of the herbal extract KAVA KAVA, which is promoted as an alternative anti-anxiety remedy, and octalactin A-an interesting 8-membered ring compound isolated from marine microorganisms that has shown significant toxicity toward human cancer cells.
A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

S. GOH, T. SMITH

CHEM 24 Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry

An independent experimental project in physical chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in physical chemistry. Current research projects in the Department include computer modeling of non-linear, chaotic chemical and biochemical systems, molecular modeling of water clusters, laser spectroscopy of chlorofluorocarbon substitutes, and experimental studies of the oxidation of sulfur dioxide on atmospheric aerosols.
A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

PEACOCK-LOPEZ

CHEM 31 Senior Research and Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Chemistry 493, 494.

CLASSICS

CLAS 31 Senior Thesis

May be taken by students registered for Classics 493, 494.

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

COGS 31 Senior Thesis

May be taken by students registered for Cognitive Science 494.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

COMP 10 The Grand Hotel in Modern Fiction and Film

In this course, we will visit actual hotel spaces in our area, read both contemporary and early twentieth-century hotel fiction, and discuss a broad range of hotel films, from drama to comedy. The grand hotel with its dual promise of luxury and estrangement was considered a theatre of social transformation in the age of travel. We will read novels, short stories, and discuss films that feature the hotel as a space that would either uphold class distinction or give rise to class conflict, allow for sexual taboo breaking, or stage gendered identity performance. Authors and filmmakers in this early period will include Edith Wharton, Thomas Mann, Franz Werfel, Vicki Baum, and F.W. Murnau. We will consider short theoretical readings by Thorstein Veblen, Georg Simmel, Siegfried Kracauer on conspicuous consumption, modernity, and metropolitan spaces. In the present, hotel dramas focus on issues of ethnic violence (Hotel Rwanda), the invisible immigrant worker (Dirty Pretty Things), cultural alienation (Lost in Translation), and the female body at work (A Single Girl). Comedies explore the fantasy of a dramatic social climb through identity confusion in a hotel setting (Maid in Manhattan); satires highlight the confidence man who profits from social pretensions (from Thomas Mann's trickster and sexual adventurer Felix Krull, to the hilarious high- school dropout/runaway posing as the scion of a wealthy executive in Thomas Brussig's Wie es leuchtet). Fantasy writing creates virtual hotel spaces (Robert Coover's The Grand Hotels of Joseph Cornell). Theoretical readings focus on private versus public spaces, social distinction, warped space, and shopping for brands by Pierre Bourdieu, Erving Goffmann, Tony Vidler and Sharon Zukin. We will also study characteristics of real-life upscale area hotels like The Equinox, The Porches and The Orchards through site visits.
Requirements: active class participation, one oral presentation on an aspect of hotel culture, and one 10- page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to Comparative Literature, Literary Studies, and English majors.
Cost to student: $45 for books and xerox package.
Meeting time: TWR 10 a.m.-noon, plus excursions TBA.

DRUXES

COMP 12 Welcome to the Dollhouse: Playing with Dolls, From Barbie to The Sims (Same as Computer Science 12 and Theatre 12)

(See under THEA 12 for full description.)

COMP 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Comparative Literature 493, 494.

LIT 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Literary Studies 493, 494.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CSCI 10 Designing and Building a Desktop Computer

This course introduces the study of computer hardware and the methods used to construct a fully working system with an emphasis on the interconnection between the components and the operating system. There will be in- depth study of the purpose of each part and of the different options available when purchasing. Research will include finding suppliers to acquire the parts online and will require deciphering and explaining the jargon used. The students will have the choice of purchasing their own parts and ending up with their own computer which they can take home, or using existing spare parts from the OIT basement to end up with a computer suitable for donation off campus or to use as a campus email station. The class will be in a lab equipped with the hardware, spare parts and tools for assembly. Students will research and discuss Operating System considerations such as networking, firewalls, anti-virus and software productivity packages for Windows, Mac and Linux. A final step will be the installation of an operating system and finding or downloading appropriate drivers for the hardware.
Evaluation will be based on research papers, quizzes and the completion of a working system and presentation to the class.
There are no prerequisites as the class is aimed at the hardware novice, although familiarity with a screwdriver is recommended. Enrollment limit: 15. Seniors given preference.
Meeting time: afternoons.

SETH ROGERS (Instructor)
MURTAGH (Sponsor)

Seth Rogers is Director of Desktop Systems at the Office of Information Technology. He oversees the computer hardware and software support for personal computers at Williams.

CSCI 11 Inside Google: The Technology and Its Impact on Our Culture

Over the past ten years Google has emerged as the dominant site for searching the web and finding what you need. Without Google or other similar search engines, the vast stores of data available on the web would be largely inaccessible and useless. The first half of this course provides an overview of the technology that underlies Google's operations (in a manner suitable for a nonmajor), which span the core areas of Computer Science, including databases, distributed systems, artificial intelligence, and others. The second half of the course will examine this technology's impact on our culture and economy. For example, is it ethical for Google to prioritize search results for paying advertisers? What is the impact of storing data gathered from the web forever? The technical topics will include an overview of Google's basic infrastructure and techniques, while the cultural topics will include privacy and censorship, Google in China, and Google's interactions with the U.S. government. Class meetings (2 hours, 3 times per week) will consist primarily of discussions and debates based on reading assignments.
Students will write 2-page summaries of the assigned readings before each class, and will take turns leading discussions. Class attendance and participation will be mandatory to receive a passing grade.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference to computer science majors prioritized by seniority; then non- majors by seniority.
Cost to student: $25 for books.
Meeting time: afternoons.

DAVID IRWIN (Instructor)
MURTAGH (Sponsor)

David Irwin is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Computer Science Department at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, working in conjunction with the Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) on the software architecture for geographically-dispersed sensor networks. He received his B.S. in Mathematics and Computer Science from Vanderbilt University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Science from Duke University, where his dissertation research focused on novel system structures and policies for sharing networked resources in clusters and data centers.

CSCI 12 Welcome to the Dollhouse: Playing with Dolls, From Barbie to The Sims (Same as Comparative Literature 12 and Theatre 12)

(See under THEA 12 for full description.)

CSCI 31 Senior Honor Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Computer Science 493-494.

CONTRACT MAJOR

CMAJ 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Contract Major 493, 494.

ECONOMICS

ECON 10 Mechanisms of Arbitrage

Arbitrage is a central concept of economics. This course is an introduction to mechanisms in markets which cause arbitrage to occur in various markets, as well as those which limit arbitrage ,particularly when a mechanism counteracts others. The emphasis will be on markets in public securities and the firms which may issue them as well as markets which overlap with those in public securities.
Requirements: there will be an average of 100 pages of reading per class provided by the instructor and there will be an expectation of 10-12 pages of papers, typically as 1- to 2-page papers for class .
Enrollment limited: 25.
Meeting time: MR, afternoons.

PAUL ISAAC '72 (Instructor)
S. SHEPPARD (Sponsor)

Paul Isaac, Williams Class of '72 and a former Watson fellow, has 35 years of buy and sell investment industry experience in a broad range of securities and markets. He is currently Chief Investment Officer of an $8 billion fund of hedge funds as well as an active portfolio manager. He served as Chair of the Security Industry Association's Capital Rules Committee.

ECON 11 Public Speaking

This course will help students become effective and organized public speakers, whether public speaking means giving a class presentation, participating in a debate, or giving a formal speech before a large audience. We will primarily use extemporaneous and prepared class presentations as a means of learning this skill, but we will also study the great American speeches and presidential debates of the twentieth century for further insights into persuasive public speaking techniques. The class will provide a supportive environment to help each student create his or her own public speaking style that is comfortable, confident, and conversational. We will also focus on organizational techniques, handling visual aids effectively, eye contact and body language. Finally, receiving feedback and providing constructive criticism to other students in the class will be an important part of the course.
Evaluation will be based on in-class presentations, class participation, and a 10-page written critique of the student's own videotaped presentations.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to juniors and seniors.
Cost to student: approximately $25 for materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

SCHMIDT and ZIMMERMAN

ECON 12 Negotiation: Theory and Practice

Life is filled with negotiations. Some opportunities for negotiation are obvious (for example, trying to pay less for a new car), while others are only apparent once you know what to look for. In this course, you will learn how to get more out of life by recognizing opportunities for negotiation and mastering the art of maximizing those opportunities once you've found them. You will learn how to transform your negotiations from haggling over price into open discussions that create value for both parties; when it's wise to make the first offer, and when it's prudent to let the other party state her price; a simple technique to appear open-minded and flexible while increasing your chances of getting what's important to you; and many other strategies that will make you a more successful negotiator in almost any situation. Before each class, you will participate in a group negotiation exercise. You will be evaluated on the results of your out-of-class negotiations (whether you reach an agreement, and how favorable your agreement is to your interests), your participation in class when discussing those negotiations, and a final project.
The final project will be a critical analysis of a real-life negotiation using the principles discussed in class, and will take the form of either a 20-minute class presentation or a paper of approximately 10 pages.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: $65.
Meeting time: afternoons.

LISA FREEMAN and EZRA GOLDSCHLAGER '02 (Instructors)
S. SHEPPARD (Sponsors)

Lisa Freeman is a litigator in the New York office of Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP. She is a graduate of Yale Law School and a former lecturer at the University of California, Berkeley.

Ezra Goldschlager, Williams Class of '02, is an entrepreneur with business in educational consulting, online retail, and marketing. He previously worked in the Megers & Acquisitions group of a multi-national law firm, and traded securities at a hedge fund specializing in emerging markets.

ECON 13 Entrepeneurship as an Art Form (Same as ArtS 13)

(See under ARTS 13 for full description.)

ECON 14 Accounting

The project will examine the theoretical and practical aspects of financial accounting. Although the beginning of the course will explore the mechanics of the information gathering and dissemination process, the course will be oriented mainly towards users, rather than preparers, of accounting information. The project will include discussion of the principles involved in accounting for current assets, plant assets, leases, intangible assets, current liabilities, stockholders' equity, the income statement and the statement of cash flows. Students will be expected to interpret and analyze actual financial statements. The nature of, and career opportunities in, the field of accounting will also be discussed. The project is a "mini course." It will present a substantial body of material and will require a considerable commitment of time by the student, including regular attendance and participation in discussion and homework cases and problems.
The course makes intensive use of web-based resources. The course website will include required readings from various linked web sites, additional downloadable reading material, required homework problems as well as self- study material.
The course grade will be determined on the basis of several quizzes and a written group report presenting an analysis of a company's annual report.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

LEO MCMENIMEN (Instructor)
S. SHEPPARD (Sponsor)

Leo McMenimen has taught in the Winter Study Program at Williams College since 1980. He recently retired as a professor from the School of Business, Montclair State University.

ECON 15 Stock Market

Elementary description and analysis of the stock market. Emphasis will be on the roles of the market in our economy, including evaluation of business firms and the success of particular capital investments, allocating savings to different types of investment, and providing liquid and marketable financial investments for individual savers.
The course will focus on the description of mechanics of trading on various exchanges and other markets, stock market indexes or "averages" (Dow-Jones, S&P, 500, etc.), how to read the financial news, historical rates of return on stocks and portfolios, role of mutual funds, beta coefficients, and "random walk" theory. The course will also involve a brief introduction to financial reports of firms and analysis of financial ratios.
The course makes intensive use of web-based resources. The course website will include required readings from various linked web sites, additional downloadable reading material, required homework problems.
Each student will participate in discussions, do some homework assignments and, as part of a team, give two presentations and write a 10-page report analyzing the wisdom or folly of having chosen a particular investment portfolio. The course grade will be determined on the basis of performance on several quizzes and the written investment portfolio report.
Not intended for students who already know much about the stock market.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

LEO MCMENIMEN (Instructor)
S. SHEPPARD (Sponsor)

Leo McMenimen has taught in the Winter Study Program at Williams College since 1980. He recently retired as a professor from the School of Business, Montclair State University.

ECON 17 Understanding Current Economic Issues

The goal of this course is to leave the students with an understanding of how the economy works and how it interacts with financial markets. We will examine some of the critical issues facing the economy today, in light of historical events and the instructor's extensive experience as a Wall Street economist. The class will explore the dynamic relationship between the financial markets and the economy beginning with a real-time forecast of U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP).
The course will build upon principles of both macro and microeconomics, but welcomes students from other disciplines. It will provide an introduction to the work done by business economists and will examine topics chosen by the students. We will look at relationships between key economic variables, movements in interest rates, the behavior of the dollar, oil prices and inflation. There will be class discussions of business cycles, credit cycles, long waves and past stock-market bubbles. We will also have several invited guests from the Wall Street investment world speaking on various aspects of the stock market.
The class will meet 3-4 times per week in the morning. Each student should expect to spend a reasonable amount of time on homework, to participate in short presentations as well as in class discussions. There will be a formal presentation to Williams faculty and others during the last week, supported by a short written report designed for today's business audience.
An economic database, chart-generating software and a proprietary, statistical analysis program will be available to each student on the Jesup computers. Use will be made of Excel spreadsheets, charts and PowerPoint.
Requirements: 3- to 5-page paper and presentation.
Prerequisites: Economics 110 or another semester course in Economics is strongly recommended. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: about $25 for text and other materials.
Meeting time: mornings. Because essential concepts and tools are covered during the first week, all students are required to attend the first class.

THOMAS SYNNOTT '58 (Instructor)
S. SHEPPARD (Sponsor)

Thomas Synnott, Williams Class of '58, is Chief Economist, Emeritus, U.S. Trust Company of New York.

ECON 18 Quantitative Equity Research

This class will introduce students to applied quantitative equity research. We will briefly review the history and approach of academic research in equity pricing via a reading of selected papers. Students will then learn the best software tools and data sources for conducting such research. Students will work as teams to replicate the results of a published academic paper and then extend those results in a non-trivial manner. This course is designed for two types of students: first, those interested in applied economic research, and second, those curious about how that research is used and evaluated by finance professionals.
Evaluation will be based on a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to seniors.
Cost to student: $50 for photocopies.
Meeting time: afternoons.

DAVID KANE `88 (Instructor)
S. SHEPPARD (Sponsor)

David Kane '88 has a Ph.D. in Political Economy and Government and is an Institute Fellow at IQSS at Harvard University. He is CEO of Kane Capital Management and a former member of the Harvard faculty.

ECON 19 The Great Depression: A Storied History (Same as History 15)

(See under HIST 15 for full description.)

ECON 20 Changing the World 101 (Same as Leadership Studies 17 and Political Science 17)

(See under PSCI 17 for full description.)

ECON 23 Introduction to the Economics, Geography and Appreciation of Wine

This course provides an introduction to the economics, geography and appreciation of wine. We will be studying the economics and geography of wine production, and will also learn to identify, understand and appreciate the major wine types of the world. The course will involve lectures, outside readings, and in-class wine tastings. We will focus primarily on Old World wine styles, namely the world class wine regions of France, Germany, Italy, Austria, Hungry, and Portugal, but will occasionally make comparisons to analogous New World style wines.
Evaluations will be based on a final quiz, which includes blind tastings, and either an oral presentation or 10 page paper at the conclusion of the course.
Enrollment limit: 10. Since the course will include wine tastings, it will also be restricted to those who are of legal age for wine consumption by the date of the first class meeting. In the event that demand exceeds the maximum limit for the course, students will be selected primarily on the basis of their academic record, with some consideration given to creating a balanced mix of backgrounds and interests among participants. Although this course is fun and interesting, it is also a serious course in which students are expected to learn the materials and skills presented in the lectures and wine tastings.
Cost to students: $200. Meeting time: Tuesdays and Thursdays 7-10pm.
Peter Pedroni

ECON 25 The Political Economy of Social Cohesion: Lessons from South Africa's Miracle

In many developing countries around the world, political transitions face significant challenges. Elections are sometimes postponed or stolen, or otherwise fail to meet the standard of "fair and free". South Africa's elections since 1994 provide evidence of conditions under which better electoral outcomes can be achieved. While South Africa has many of the fundamental characteristics sometimes associated with lack of political transparency-including mineral wealth and high inequality, elections while fiercely and sometimes closely contested give way to generally smooth political transitions. One hypothesis explaining this is the substantial progress the country has achieved in meeting social and economic objectives, giving an increasing number of South Africans a real stake in the economy while demonstrating the value of a vibrant political system.
When citizens believe all politicians are corrupt, they have no effective stake in the political process. However, when they experience the concrete benefits of political change, they have an incentive to protect democratic processes. This winter study project will explore South Africa's real but mixed progress in achieving socio-economic delivery for the majority of its population. Since the first democratic elections in 1994, the government's social and economic policies have turned around an economy that was in crisis. Development strategy has reduced poverty, but slowly, and enormous backlogs in social delivery of housing, health care and education still exist. South Africa remains one of the most unequal countries in the world, grappling with the costs and benefits of globalization as the government embraces free trade and financial liberalization, yet attempts to implement policies aimed at reducing poverty and improving social equity.
This course will investigate how South Africa's social and economic progress has contributed to political and social cohesion-and supported democratic processes. Through meetings with Parliamentarians and bureaucrats, businesspeople and social activists, teachers and students, labor leaders and health care workers, the participants in this course will learn about the challenges, successes and failures of South Africa's social development strategy and the political implications. The unifying theme of this course explores how democracy legitimizes and protects itself by supporting inclusive economic growth and social progress. The course will analyze how apartheid's legacy has intensified this challenge, but how South Africa's lessons of experience can inform other countries grappling with these political challenges. Using social and economic data, first-hand observation and meetings with key stakeholders, students will acquire skills in evaluating the effectiveness of the government's approach to socio-economic development and good governance.
The course will be co-taught by Professor Michael Samson and Mr. Kenneth Mac Quene, Executive Director of the Economic Policy Research Institute. Before the trip, there will be a pre-travel orientation session which will include an extensive background reading package.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, a 10-page paper and a class presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 18. Not open to first-year students.
Estimated Cost to student: $3,485 (includes airfare, accommodation, meals, and other expenses).

SAMSON

ECON 26 Exploring Trade Justice (Same as Anthropology 26, Environmental Studies 26, Latina/o Studies 26, and Political Science 26)

This course will introduce students to traditional and contemporary theories of international trade, including Free Market and Fair Trade, in the context of coffee, the second largest commodity in the world. Students will read theoretical journalistic accounts of the economic, environmental and social impacts of competing trade models to evaluate how these models bring or inhibit the search for justice in trade. We will visit and study the organization and administration of a fair trade cooperative, Cecocafen, in Nicaragua, and the students will have the opportunity to pick coffee, experience the lives of coffee farmers and their families, and interview farmers as to the impacts of trade alternatives on their lives. Upon returning, students will have the opportunity to create an awareness campaign for local businesses and institutions concerning trade justice.
Requirements: Students will have a choice of a paper, a presentation to a community or other group, or an outline of a program for trade justice activism.
Prerequisites: some coursework in economics, political science and international relations. The course should be limited to seniors and juniors. Up to date passports needed before the course begins. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to seniors, then juniors. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: $950.
Meeting time: afternoons.

DEAN CYCON '75 (Instructor)
S. SHEPPARD (Sponsor)

Dean Cycon, JD, LL.M '75, founder of Deans Beans, has worked on and off in the area since 1989, and has excellent contacts and associations with the farmers, government administrators, etc. involved with the subject matter of the course.

ECON 51 Tax Policy in Emerging Markets

Governments in developing and transition economies need to raise tax revenue to finance critical public goods, address other market failures and equity issues, and to avoid problems with debt and inflation. Even under ideal conditions, figuring out how to raise taxes in a way that balances efficiency, equity, and administrative feasibility is a hard problem. But taxation is especially challenging in emerging markets, because of the great difficulty involved in taxing much of the economic activity there, serious problems with tax evasion and administration, and the various imperfections in the economic environment in which taxes are collected. Taxes typically consume between a fifth and a third of the proceeds of economic activity in these nations, and they profoundly affect the incentives to undertake all varieties of economic activity. So in terms of economic growth and welfare, the stakes involved in improving tax policy are potentially quite large. This class will build on knowledge developed in basic public economics (Economics 503 or 205) or tax policy (Economics 351) courses to provide a more in-depth investigation of the special problems involved in tax policy in developing and transition economies, and possible approaches to addressing these problems. Examples of specific topics that might be addressed include: how various approaches to the design of taxation affect incentives for both foreign and domestic investment; international aspects of taxation; tax evasion; controlling corruption in the administration of taxation; how various opportunities for tax avoidance and tax shelters affect the optimal design of a tax system; consideration of how the particular conditions in developing and transition economies may affect the optimal structure of the tax system; options for fundamental tax reform; case studies of the experience with tax reforms in various developing and transition economies; tax competition among regions and nations; and the strengths and weaknesses of the empirical evidence that is available on these questions. Class will meet for six hours per week, and students will be expected to read one or two articles on tax policy issues for each class meeting and to be prepared to discuss the articles in class. Students will be evaluated based on short written assignments and a final oral presentation.
Prerequisites: one public economics or tax policy course (Economics 503, 205 or 351), and one empirical methods course (Economics 253, 255, 510, 511, or Statistics 346). Enrollment limit: 19. This course is intended for CDE students and is open to undergraduates only with permission of instructor.
Cost to student: approximately $25 for reading packet.
Meeting time: afternoons.

BAKIJA

ECON 52 Political Economy and Applications to Climate Change 

Achieving economic growth and development requires more than just good policies—success depends on a country’s economic strategy working effectively in an integrated manner. The demands of competent policy-making require balancing competing interests, and policy frameworks need to address difficult trade-offs and enlist the political support of key stakeholders.  This course will explore the political dimension underlying economic policies—with a focus on how policies fit together into broader strategies.  The course will focus on climate change, examining prospects for adaptation policy responses along multiple dimensions, including monetary policy, industrial policy and social protection.  For example, recent sharp food price increases around the world have been attributed in part to climate change.  Policy responses in various countries have included interventions across the range of economic policies. The course will first address each dimension of policy response individually, from both an economic and political perspective.  Then the course will explore the strategic linkages that potentially integrate the policy choices—and examine how a more comprehensive framework can better enlist political support and improve the chances of policy success.  This course will reinforce skills for evaluating policy frameworks, exploring the coherence and interdependence of the economic strategy and its likelihood to achieve public objectives.  Evaluation will be based on class participation, policy papers and a final presentation. Enrollment limited.

SAMSON

ECON 53 Tools for Time Series Econometrics
This winter study course is designed to provide students with an introduction to some of the tools they will need to master in order to learn and implement modern time series techniques, which form the basis for empirical work in macroeconomics and related fields. Specifically, the course will introduce students to a useful computer programming language for time series econometrics known as RATS.
The course will also review important mathematical tools such as matrix algebra and difference equations, and introduce students to some basic conceptual building blocks for time series analysis, such as moving average process and autoregressive processes. Students planning to enroll in Econ
464/514 "Empirical Methods for Macroeconomics" during the spring semester are strongly encouraged to enroll in this winter study course.
Enrollment is 12 expected 15. Preference to CDE students but open to undergraduate.
Cost to students: none.
PABLO CUBA and PETER PEDRONI

ECON 30 Honors Project

The "Specialization Route" to the degree with Honors in Economics requires that each candidate take an Honors Winter Study Project in January of their senior year. Students who wish to begin their honors work in January should submit a detailed proposal. Decisions on admission to the Honors WSP will be made in the fall. Information on the procedures will be mailed to senior majors in economics early in the fall semester.
Seniors who wish to apply for admission to the Honors WSP and thereby to the Honors Program should register for this WSP as their first choice.
Some seniors will have begun honors work in the fall and wish to complete it in the WSP. They will be admitted to the WSP if they have made satisfactory progress. They should register for this WSP as their first choice.

ECON 31 Honors Thesis

To be taken by students participating in year-long thesis research (ECON 493-W31-494).

ENGLISH

ENGL 10 Jane Austen

We will read Pride and Prejudice, Emma, Mansfield Park, and Persuasion. We will meet three times a week for two hours at a time.
Students will write papers amounting to ten pages of writing.
Prerequisites: a 100- and a 200-level English course, or permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 15.

SOKOLSKY

ENGL 11 Singing School: Sacred Choral Traditions in the Berkshires and Beyond (Same as American Studies 11 and Music 11) CANCELLED!

This performance class will explore the history of popular sacred music in the United States, with a special emphasis on music that might have been sung in New England from the eighteenth to the early twentieth century. We will begin by learning Protestant hymns by early New England "singing masters" (Billings, Ingalls, West); in this first part of the course we will also explore Shaker and gospel/revivalist Protestant music of the early nineteenth century. As we move forward in time our attention will broaden to other religious singing traditions that evolved from these and/or that came into New England with new populations of people: what we pursue will partly depend on the particular interests and expertise of members of the class. Our premise will be that this music is a valuable route to understanding the complex religious and social cultures of New England. Outside of class, students will occasionally be asked to investigate different singing traditions: this might involve reading in music and religious history, as well as exploring old hymnals and listening to archival recordings, in part with an eye to selecting particular pieces for interpretation and performance. Class time will be mainly devoted to singing. The class will culminate with a concert, to be held at a local site where some of these hymns were once sung.
Requirements: Students will be expected to meet 8-9 hours a week (three discussions/rehearsals); during the final week, when preparing for the concert, there may be one or two extra or longer rehearsals. In addition to participating in classes and the performance, students will be expected to work on one or two group projects (e.g., an oral report on some aspect of the reading, the interpretation and teaching of one hymn to the class, or the working-up of a small group choral piece).
Evaluation will be based on participation in discussion, the choral performance, and small group projects.
Prerequisites: Singers, conductors, and instrumentalists are of course very welcome; singers with interest in or knowledge of a particular sacred musical tradition or style are also very welcome; but those without much previous singing experience are very welcome too, since we'll be simulating a congregation. Participants must, however, be willing to shout out! Enrollment limit: 25.

SWANN

ENGL 12 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography (Same as ArtH 12 and Special 27)

This course explores the evolution of modern documentary photography. We will start with Robert Frank's The Americans, and how Frank's singular vision deeply shaped the next generation of photographers working the American streets and landscape. Diane Arbus, Bruce Davidson, Lee Freidlander, William Klein, Danny Lyon, Gary Winogrand are some of the photographers whose work we will get to know well . Discussions will include the new wave of independent and Magnum photojournalists (Phillip Jones Griffiths, Josef Koudleka, Susan Meiselas, Gilles Peress, James Nachtwey, Alex Webb, Ron Haviv and Tyler Hicks) and the wars from Vietnam to Bosnia to Iraq they cover as well as the personal visions they explore. Insight into the diverse currents of documentary photography will be covered through the work of Bill Burke, Larry Clark, Larry Fink, Nan Goldin, Emmet Gowin, Sally Mann, Mary Ellen Mark, Nicholas Nixon , Richard Misrach, Joel Sternfeld, Birney Imes, Regan Louie, Edward Burtynsky, Laura Letinsky and Simon Norfolk.
The class will meet three mornings a week for two hours. Slide presentations will occupy half of the first meetings and give way to discussion of issues in documentary photography. Students will be encouraged to work on individual projects of their own choice. Each student will be required to make a brief presentation to the class on a documentary topic of their choice. A final paper expanding on this documentary topic will be due at the end of the course. Students will be evaluated on their classroom presentation, general participation and their written work. A field trip to New York will let us see first hand works from the collections at the Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American Art and the International Center of Photography.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Priority to upper class students.
Cost to student: $30 ( for NYC fieldtrip personal expenses)
Meeting time: 10 a.m.-noon TWR.

KEVIN BUBRISKI (Instructor)
MURPHY (Sponsor)

Kevin Bubriski has received photography fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. His photographs are in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. His books include Portrait of Nepal (Chronicle Books 1993) and Pilgrimage: Looking at Ground Zero (powerHouse 2002).

ENGL 13 The Taxonomy of the Undead

This is the age of the zombie movie. The movies, like the dead themselves, have started arriving in packs. It's time we tried to figure out why. Films will include: the Romero quintet, the Dawn remake, The Howling, 30 Days of Night, I Am Legend, the second Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Fido, 28 Days Later.
Requirements: A strong stomach and a keen sense of subtext. Enrollment limit 15.

THORNE

ENGL 14 Write Now!

This is a creative writing course in what poet Robert Creeley called the imagination of procedure. Writers have always relied on tricks to get words on the page, disabling those structures of mind and behavior that keep ourselves from ourselves. W. B. Yeats and Gertrude Stein experimented with spirit writing and automatic writing, Dadaists and surrealists invented games and methods that free unconscious expression under pressures of form. In this course we will follow the constrained writing techniques associated with the Oulipo group ("ouvroir de la littérature potentielle" or "workshop of literature-in-the-making"), including lipograms (writing that excludes certain letters) and the "N + 7" method (in which each noun is replaced by that noun appearing seven entries after it in the dictionary). We will take a page from John Cage, using the roll of dice and the I Ching to build chance into the creative process. We will play surrealist games including the exquisite corpse, echo verse, étrécissement (or "cutting away"), dream resumé and time traveler's potlatch. We will read Stein's Tender Buttons (1914) and excerpts from A Vision (1925) by Yeats and his wife, George; selections from Ludwig Wittgenstein; Raymond Queneau's Exercices de style (1947) and Cent mille milliards de poèmes (1961); works by Harry Mathews and John Ashbery. Recent works will include Christian Bok, Eunoia (2001) and 99 Ways to Tell a Story (2005), Matt Madden's graphic novel tribute to Raymond Queneau. For all our reading of theories and models, however, this course is above all an occasion to write: often, copiously, joyfully.
Evaluation will be based on 10 pages of polished work gleaned and revised from reams of daily writing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Creative writers in all genres welcome; poets priviledged in the case of overenrollment.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: TBA.

CLEGHORN

ENGL 15 Metafiction: Reimagining the World

Students will study two or three works from a list including Beowulf, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Little Women, Hamlet, and Treasure Island-side by side with their metafictional offspring: Grendel, Finn, March, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, and Silver. Class discussion-two meetings per week-will be important, as well as short responses to each work and a single larger paper that may be either analytical or creative.
Evaluation will be based on a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $50-$75 in texts.
Meeting time: TBA.

JON CLINCH (Instructor)
MURPHY (Sponsor)

Jon Clinch has taught American Literature, been Creative Director for a Philadelphia ad agency, and run his own agency in the Philadelphia suburbs. Finn, his first novel, was named an ALA Notable Book for 2008 and was chosen as one of the year's best novels by the Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, the Christian Science Monitor.

ENGL 16 Journalism

An introduction to newspaper and magazine journalism. By reporting, writing and editing, students will learn how to gather information and present it for publication. Assignments will include a news story, a feature article, a review and an editorial; class exercises will focus on skills such as copy editing and rewriting. The class will study how different styles of writing serve different needs, and the practical, ethical and legal limits within which journalists work.
Requirements: Each student will submit articles on deadline; read current newspapers and magazines and be prepared to analyze them; and attend all classes.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference will be given to first-year students.
Cost to student: less than $40.
Meeting time: mornings.

DUSTY BAHLMAN (Instructor)
MURPHY (Sponsor)

Dusty Bahlman is a freelance writer and a columnist for The Berkshire Eagle. He was a news reporter for 28 years before retiring in 2005.

ENGL 17 After Katrina: Memoir, Film, and Fiction

In 2005 Hurricane Katrina, and its aftermath-the flooding, the federal and state's bureaucratic bungling-led to loss on a grand scale. Out of the ruins there has been an incredible and varied artistic response. Hundreds of memoirs have been published, songs recorded and documentaries filmed. In this course we will explore the nature and effectiveness of the art created in reaction to the wreckage. The first-person "witnessing"-the memoirs, historical documentation, documentaries and journalism-preceded publication of fictional novels and stories. Such a trajectory raises questions about the function of storytelling, the compensations as well as the limitations of narratives that spring up immediately after such a disaster. What are we to make of the evolutionary process of creative responses to tragedy? We will explore the need to tell and the communal solace found in stories.
We will read 1 Dead in Attic by Chris Rose; Code Blue, A Katrina Physician's Memoir by Richard Deichmann; New Orleans Noir, an anthology of stories written after the storm; and view Spike Lee's documentary, When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts.
Requirements: participation in class discussion, 1-page informal response paper to the day's reading each class period, one final paper (6-8 pages) that draws from the assigned reading material, reveals a level of insight gained from the reading, the discussions and one's on going conversation with the texts and the questions posed during class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $55 for books.
Meeting time: mornings.

MARSHA RECKNAGEL (Instructor)
MURPHY (Sponsor)

Marsha Recknagel is the author of the memoir If Nights Could Talk. She is writer-in-residence at Rice University.

ENGL 18 The Life and Works of Beaumarchais

Pierre-Augustin Caron de Beaumarchais was a court watchmaker to Louis XV of France, as well as an inventor, court musician, businessman, spy, publisher, fugitive from justice, arms-dealer, and American as well as French revolutionary. But to posterity he is better known as a brilliant and innovative playwright, the author of two dramas and several comedies, most famously "The Barber of Seville" and "The Marriage of Figaro." In both Beaumarchais' life and his works, the cataclysmic events culminating in the French Revolution, as well as the deeper historical shifts of this era, may be seen obliquely reflected. After several classes focussed on historiographic readings to gain an overview of this period - particularly of changing class and gender relations-we will study Beaumarchais' life, through biographies and a film, and his works; we may also look at the operas made from the Figaro plays. All readings in English. Two-hour classes three times a week.
Evaluation will be based on a series of short papers totaling 10-12 pages.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $25-50.
Meeting time: afternoons.

TIFFT

ENGL 25 Shakespeare on the British Stage: Understanding Performance (Same as Theatre 25)

This course will study a selection of Shakespeare's plays in the context of contemporary stage performance, culminatiing in a 10-day trip to London and Stratford-on-Avon to see as many performances of Shakespeare plays as we can . The on-campus portion of the course will consist of two weeks of VERY INTENSIVE study of the plays to be seen in England-class will meet twice a day, in the morning and again in the afternoon. In the first week, we will discuss the texts and selected criticism of the plays, working toward a broad understanding of major themes, conflicts, and characters. Though the whole class will read and discuss all the plays, each student will focus intensively on one play, and will be responsible for researching and presenting additional materials about it to the class. Students will then be introduced to the basics of a dramaturgical versus a literary approach to interpreting a play, in part through discussion and critique of films and filmed performances of the plays. Each student will then develop their own dramatic interpretation of their play, and choose a key scene to direct as a representative sample of it, to be presented to the class for discussion and critique.
In England, in addition to the plays, we will attend a specially-arranged workshop in the Globe theatre, and other lectures, discussions, or backstage tours with theatre professionals. We anticipate seeing 7-9 different Shakespeare productions, depending on what is available, supplemented by 0-2 plays by predecessors or contemporaries of Shakespeare, for a total of 9 productions. Whenever possible, class discussion of the productions we see will take place directly after the play, so students should not anticipate a lot of opportunities to explore London's night life.
Goals of the course:
1. To deepen students' understanding and appreciation of Shakespeare's dramatic works.
2. To give students practical, hands-on understanding of the different priorities and practices involved in literary analysis of a play versus developing an effective stage production, as well as of the ways the two inform and enrich each other.
3. To equip students to perform and articulate sophisticated analysis and critique of theatrical productions.
Requirements: Very active participation in discussion; two class presentations; direction of one scene; two 6-8 page papers due during the on-campus segment of the course, and a 3-4 page theatrical review due after we return from England.
Prerequisites: 100-level English course or equivalent; further background in theater and/or Shakespeare a plus. Enrollment limit: 15. Not open to first-year students. Students will be selected based on a written application and interview, academic background, prior theatrical experience, and evidence of strong interest and commitment. English and Theater majors will get strong consideration but will not be guaranteed priority over other qualified applicants.

CASE and MILOS MLADENOVIC

ENGL 29 Peer Writing Tutor Workshop (Same as INTR 29)

The purpose of this course is to train peer writing tutors and assistants to be more effective reviewers and editors of student work. Format: workshop/discussion. Students will read and discuss literature on the teaching of writing; they will also do analytical writing assignments, which they will then bring into the workshop.
Evaluation will be based on analytic writing assignments and course participation. Students who complete this training will be eligible for assignment as Writing Workshop tutors and/or as Writing Assistants for selected Williams classes.
Prerequisites: admission to Williams Writing Peer Tutor Program or Writing Pilot. Enrollment limit: 13.
Cost to student: under $50.
Meeting time: afternoons, MWF 2-4 p.m..

Deborah Schneer, Ph.D., Writing Coordinator at Williams

ENGL 30 Honors Project: Specialization Route

Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the specialization route.

ENGL 31 Honors Project: Thesis

Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the thesis route.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

ENVI 10 The Winter Naturalist's Journal

This course will explore the tools for studying the natural world through various uses of writing, literature, and drawing. Students will spend time outdoors learning the ecosystem of the Williamstown area and time indoors doing observational drawing, reflective writing, and reading and discussions of nature literature. The writing component of the journal will be the equivalent of a 10-page paper. The drawing part will consist of ongoing entries contained in a nature journal, to be displayed and discussed as part of the final project. Designed for students with interests in environmental studies, natural history writing, and drawing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: $20 for books and art supplies.
Meeting time: mornings.

CHRISTIAN MCEWEN and CLARE WALKER LESLIE (Instructors)
GOLLIN (Sponsor)

Christian McEwen is the editor of Jo's Girls: Tomboy Tales of High Adventure, True Grit & Real Life, and co-editor of The Alphabet of the Trees: A Guide to Nature Writing. She divides her time between teaching in the USA and Scotland. Clare Walker Leslie has taught this Winter Term Course since l993. She is the author/illustrator of 8 books on drawing and observing nature, including: Nature Drawing: A Tool For Learning and Keeping A Naturalist's Journal. Clare is a nationally recognized educator, author, artist, and naturalist living in Cambridge, MA and Granville, VT.

ENVI 11 Wendell Berry and Agrarianism (Same as Sociology 11)

(See under SOC 11 for full description.)

ENVI 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Geosciences 12)

(See under GEOS 12 for full description.)

ENVI 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Roots, Its Uncertain Future (Same as Legal Studies 13)

(See under LGST 13 for full description.)

ENVI 14 Green Design Workshop and LEED Certification Course

This course is a workshop in sustainable building design as well as a LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification course. It is being offered in conjunction with the Thoreau Fellows program, a project funded by the Thoreau Foundation and co-directed by Stephanie Boyd of the Zilkha Center and Sarah Gardner of the Center for Environmental Studies. There will be 10 Thoreau Fellows participating in a green design symposium in fall 2008. These students will be encouraged but not required to take this course. The course is intended to introduce students to the basics of sustainable building design and will include a day-long workshop led by official LEED instructors. The other classes will include guest experts and will expand upon aspects of green design to provide students an interdisciplinary perspective.  Topics will include innovative high performance materials and systems along with new approaches to energy systems. There will also be field trips to tour green buildings. At the end of the course there will be a trip to Albany, to the LEED testing center where students will take the test. We expect many students to pass the test but passing is not required to get a passing grade in the class.
Evaluation will be based on active participation in class, homework assignments, field trips, and completing the LEED certification exam. Passing the exam is not required, since many do not pass the first time.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.  Priority to Thoreau Fellows and Environmental Studies concentrators.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings; Monday, 10:30-1:30 and Wednesdays, 10-1. 1 full day field trip.

Instructors: Stephanie Boyd and Oliver Holmes

Stephanie Boyd is a LEED Accredited Professional and a Civil Engineer, MBA.

ENVI 15 Get Focused and Step It Up-Climate Change Activism

Students will learn about and participate in grassroots activism addressing global climate change. We will read in-depth about the range of grassroots efforts with an emphasis on looking at community-based initiatives, political action, and the use of the internet as a tool for promoting engagement around climate change. Grassroots organizing and activism have been critical in the U.S. given the lack of governmental leadership on this issue to date. Students will be asked to think critically about which grassroots organizing efforts are most effective, and engage intensively in an activism project. Students may work individually or in groups. Examples of a final project include staging a rally or educational event, creating a public service announcement, video, or public information campaign, or conducting a research project (e.g, an observational study, survey or questionnaire) and using it as the basis for an educational project such as a brochure or website. Class will meet twice a week for three hours. Some course time will be spent on project work. Field trips, speakers, and videos will inform class discussions.
Evaluation will be based on a climate change activism project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost to student: $50.
Meeting time: TBA.

WENDY PENNER (Instructor)
D. GOLLIN (Sponsor)

Wendy Penner is a Ph.D. organizational psychologist and a climate change activist. She is interested in how problem framing, group and organizational dynamics, and evaluation methodologies contribute to our ability to address climate change.

ENVI 16 Problems with Plastics

In this course, we will explore the life cycle of plastics, particularly plastic in the food chain, from the perspectives of both public health and ecotoxicology. Our focus will be on endocrine disruption, the emerging toxicological paradigm of low-dose interactions between our hormones and environmental exposures. We will explore potential solutions, such as green chemistry, cradle-to-cradle manufacturing and the precautionary principle. Course requirements include readings (which will be sent electronically), active participation in class discussions, weekly hands-on activities (such as a waste audit), and one outside research project (which can be theoretical or applied).
No prerequisites. One goal of this course is to facilitate communication of complex scientific ideas across disciplines without sacrificing precision. Enrollment limit: 25.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons, MTWR 1-3 p.m.

TAMARA ADKINS (Instrcutor)
D. GOLLIN (Sponsor)

Tamara Adkins, MPH, is a researcher with Environmental Health Sciences and a Ph.D. candidate in environmental studies at Antioch University.

ENVI 17 The Changing Forest

This field-oriented course explores (first hand and through readings and discussions) the history, ecology and environmental stresses that affect New England's most abundant natural resource: the forest. An historical approach to the region's forest communities will be taken: we will investigate how humans and the physical environment have interacted to influence the composition and structure of forests across the New England landscape through time; we will assess the current condition of the forest and consider what the forests of tomorrow may resemble given current environmental trends. Specific topics will include structure, composition and dynamics of forest communities, tree and shrub identification, adaptations, wildlife, threats to the forest, management and conservation issues. There will be three to four meetings per week, at least two of which will be outdoors (some field trips will require students to be engaged in the class beyond normal WSP class hours). The course will culminate in a two to three day visit to a more distant forest region. Accordingly, students should be prepared to spend many hours in the outdoors coping with the elements.
Prerequisites: ability and willingness to hike 5 miles over rugged terrain in mid-winter conditions; a healthy interest in natural history and the outdoors.
Evaluation: a paper, technical report or comparable creative work on a topic relevant to the course.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference will be given to seniors.
Cost to student: approximately $125 (covers field trips, equipment, readings).
Meeting time: TBA.

DREW JONES (Instructor)
D. GOLLIN (Sponsor)

Drew Jones, Manager of the Hopkins Memorial Forest since 1999, has a Master of Forestry degree from Duke University. He has worked as a naturalist and conservationist from the Southern Appalachians to the North Woods.

ENVI 25 Sustainable Eleuthera: Energy, Environment and Economic Development

Eleuthera is an undeveloped and economically depressed island that is largely ignored by the national government because of its lack of tourism and banking, which are the principle sources of revenue for the Bahamas. There is little industry, a high unemployment rate (there is no official statistic but many claim that it exceeds 50%), and much of the population receives public assistance. The island's advantages are its undeveloped beauty, remoteness, and friendliness. The landscape is clear blue waters, miles of pristine deserted beaches, and huge tracts of coppice (forest land). There is virtually no crime and people wave at everyone as they pass on the road. Despite the poor economy, Eleutherans are not as a group discontent and they love their island. (The national government ensures that everyone has a decent standard of living.) But Eleuthera is poised on the brink of becoming a major tourist destination: the Florida real estate industry has turned its attention to the island and calls it "the new Florida." U.S. corporations are buying up land and planning mega-golf and marina resorts. Many island residents, academics, environmentalists and public officials feel under threat: they fear the onslaught of American tourism and anticipate the attendant environmental and cultural destruction. The goal of this class, and of the Cape Eleuthera Institute (CEI) with which the class is affiliated, is to develop and promote a model for tourism that provides maximum benefit to the residents and which is environmentally sound, culturally appropriate, and economically viable. This is an experiential course in which students will learn the principles of sustainable development, will learn about the ecology, economics, politics and culture of the island, and will work on a group project that develops models for environmentally sound and culturally appropriate forms of economic development. Students will learn about renewable energy and sustainable resource management (e.g. marine resources, agriculture, waste, water resources) from the experts at the Cape Eleuthera Institute (CEI). They will also learn about the history, economics and politics of the island in addition to going on several field trips to become familiar with the island, and they will conduct primary research and collect qualitative and quantitative data through interviews. The class project will focus on developing guidelines for environmentally sustainable economic development for the island. Our research project is part of a larger initiative of the CEI, Freedom 2030, which CEI has spearheaded, in conjunction with the Bahamas National Government. The goal of the project is for Eleuthera to become energy independent, with 100% of the energy generated from local clean renewable sources, by 2030. Our piece of the Freedom 2030 initiative focuses on developing a model for low-impact, economically viable tourism (e.g.: sustainable tourism or ecotourism). In addition to learning about these subjects outlined above, students will learn survey research techniques: how to develop a research plan, design a survey, conduct an interview, and tabulate, organize and analyze data. Prior to the trip, students are required to read "A Small Place," Jamaica Kincaid's first-hand account of an Antiguan's experience of American tourism. On the island, students will be assigned some articles on theories of tourism, such as "self destruct tourism" and "tourism as neo-colonialism." Students will also conduct their own research on the socioeconomics and politics of the island during and after the trip for their contribution to the group report, which will be submitted to the CEI.
Students will be evaluated on their class work, independent projects, and participation in all activities on Eleuthera. They will also prepare and present a group presentation to the Williams community scheduled for February 2009.
Enrollment limit: 10. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: approximately $2700.

SARAH GARDNER (Instructor)
D. GOLLIN (Sponsor)

Sarah Gardner is Associate Director of the Center for Environmental Studies and Lecturer in Environmental Studies.

ENVI 26 Exploring Trade Justice (Same as Anthropology 26, Economics 26, Latina/o Studies 26, and Political Science 26)

(See under ECON 26 for full description.)

ENVI 31 Senior Research and Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Environmental Studies 493-494.

GEOSCIENCES

GEOS 10 The Digital Darkroom (Same as ArtS 20)

The camera is an imperfect tool. Film and digital sensors record only a fraction of the range of tones and colours the human eye can perceive, and today's monitors and printers can display only a small portion of the information present in a well-exposed photograph. Digital processing is about optimizing the basic image for electronic display or print.
The digital darkroom allows the photographer complete control over his or her images. This course will demystify its principles and practices by teaching the basics of digital image manipulation and optimization.
Students will learn what makes a digital image, and how the tools they use affect the image data itself. They will learn about digital file formats and how to use their camera's histogram to ensure that they capture the maximum amount of information from the scene in their viewfinder. They will also learn how to scan 35 mm slides and negatives for digital post-processing.
Using Photoshop, students will learn how to bring out the best in their images. This can range from simple tone and colour adjustments to complex layering and masking to bring out hidden detail or to maximize the aesthetic nature of the print. They will learn how to remove dust and blemishes from their images. The basics of digital printing and colour management will also be taught.
The students will produce a series of image pairs-processed images and their raw photo counterparts-which will be mounted on a class web page. Each student will keep a journal recording the processes they applied and the results achieved.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation and journal quality and completeness.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: digital camera required; plus $30 for books/materials.
Meeting time: mornings for two hours, four times a week

PETER COX (Instructor)
COX (Sponsor)

Peter Cox is a professional landscape photographer in Ireland. He makes fine art prints from digital images, and runs regular workshops on digital photography.

GEOS 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Environmental Studies 12)

This class will broaden students' appreciation for the appearance and history of the landscape and teach the skills of making a successful photograph. Williamstown, situated in a valley between the Green and Taconic Mountains and bisected by the Green and Hoosic Rivers, is a place of great natural beauty. The local landscape is a subject that inspires both professional and amateur photographers alike. While Williamstown will be the subject of most of our work, we will use it to learn principles of universal application. Students will discover the importance of light in making a photograph. They will also learn camera skills and the mechanics of digital photography, which will be reviewed at biweekly class meetings. In addition to photographing and critiquing images, the class will visit collections at the Clark Art Institute and WCMA to see original work and examine and discuss books on reserve at Sawyer Library. An overview of the history of landscape photography will be provided with an emphasis on American workers such as Carlton Watkins, Eadweard Muybridge, Alfred Stieglitz, Eliot Porter and Ansel Adams. We will also demonstrate examples of different cameras such as medium format, view cameras, and panorama cameras. Students will produce a body of successful photographs that will be projected at the Winter Study presentation day. Students will submit short written explanations with each of their photographic assignments.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, the student's photography, and their presentation.
Prerequisites: students will need a digital single lens reflex camera (DSLR).
http://digital-photography-school.com/blog/how-to-buy-a-dslr-camera/
Enrollment limit:15. Preference given to first-year students and sophomores.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 days a week for the first two weeks and 2 days a week after that; short field trips will supplement the morning meetings.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for materials.

NICHOLAS WHITMAN (Instructor)
DETHIER (Sponsor)

Nicholas Whitman is a professional photographer and the former Curator of Photography at the New Bedford Whaling Museum. A 1977 graduate of the Rochester Institute of Technology, he has honed his craft to make landscape photographs of power and depth. See more at www.nwphoto.com.

GEOS 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Geology 493-494.

GERMAN

GERM S.P. Sustaining Program for German 101-102

Something new and different for students enrolled in German 101-102. Practice in the use of German for everyday purposes; creation and performance of short dramatic sketches through group collaboration; games; songs; storytelling; reading. No homework.
Requirements: active participation and regular attendance earn a "Pass" grade.
Prerequisites: German 101 or equivalent. Limited to German 101-102 students.
Cost to student: approximately $5 for photocopied materials.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week 9-9:50 a.m.

PUNTIGAM, WESS

GERM 30 Honors Project

To be taken by honors candidates following other than the normal thesis route.

GERM 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for German 493-494.

HISTORY

HIST 10 The Justice of Violence

The Nuremberg trial of the major Nazi war criminals established a legal framework for adjudicating extraordinary acts of violence in the post-World War II world. Indeed, the international court established at Nuremberg and the adoption of the United Nations Genocide Convention and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948 signified the extent to which the victorious Allied powers sought to avoid repeating the flagrant missteps they had taken in the wake of World War I. Their abysmal failure to devise an effective legal framework in response to the atrocities committed during World War I and in its wake contributed to the violence, in general, and to the spate of political assassinations, in particular, which were among the hallmarks of European interwar political culture. We will read historical, legal, and philosophical scholarship in an effort to understand the history of politico-legal responses to genocide and mass atrocity-and the notions of violence and justice that underpinned them-in the years leading up to Nuremberg and the creation of the UN.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, active class participation based on the assigned reading, and a 10-page paper to be submitted at the end of the course.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: $50 for books and photocopies.
Meeting time: mornings; 2-3 sessions per week.

GARBARINI

HIST 12 Reading Childhood CANCELLED!

What books did you love when you were a kid? What books did you read over and over? Were there book characters you knew as well as real people? As adults, how does the literature we read as kids continue to influence us emotionally and intellectually? How significant a part of childhood is reading? In this class, we will re-visit the books we loved as children with children. Each college student will work with an elementary school student. Together you will both read each other's favorite books and talk and write about them-and maybe do some illustrations as well. As a class we will discuss readings on memory and the history of childhood, but your primary work will be the literature you read with your school age reading partner.
Evaluation will be based on attendance at class sessions and meetings with your school-age reading partner, a book list of recommended books drawn up by you and your school-age reading partner, book reviews co-authored by you and your school-age reading partner, and two short papers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: 1-2 formal class meetings per week, along with shorter meetings with reading partner, to occur during the regular hours of the elementary school day.

LONG

HIST 13 The Historian as Detective

This course will bring students into close physical and intellectual contact with the papers of notable nineteenth- century Americans: presidents, literary figures, and leading social reformers. Students will have a rare opportunity to work with original manuscripts of people like Governor Thomas Hutchinson, Thomas Jefferson, John Qunicy Adams, Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, William Cullen Bryant, John Brown, and Dorothea Dix, to cite a few representative examples. All documents are part of the Chapin Library's manuscript holdings, and all work for this course will be done in Williamstown. Research into any historical topic requires some knowledge of what historical editors do and frequently calls for editing on the part of the researcher. It is detective work that begins with the simple existence of a document but then turns it over, analyzes it, relates it, evaluates it, and finally draws conclusions. In this course students will learn to transcribe a document accurately and to make sense of it as well. In the first week daily classes will introduce past and present editorial practices and rationales and allow work on more easily read Presidential letters. In sessions during each of the second and third weeks, additional points of historical editing will be discussed, while work is done on somewhat more challenging letters in the William Cullen Bryant papers and the "reformer files" of the Julia Ward and Samuel Gridley Howe papers. Class sessions will be held at the end of the fourth week in which students will present and discuss an important historical or literary document or letter series each has earlier selected for editing.
Requirements: students will be expected to attend all class meetings and present a medium-length paper on the document or letter series each student selects as his or her special editing project. The instructors also expect everyone who registers for this course to commit themselves to the hard work and high research standards required in serious historical editing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8.
Cost to student: less than $50 for books and photocopied materials.
Meeting time: every morning for the first five days, and thereafter every other morning; the final day we will meet both morning and afternoon for a total of five hours for a unified presentation of student-edited manuscripts. (Classes and daily afternoon consultation time with the original documents and discussions with Mr. Volz and Prof. Dew will be held in the temporary quarters of the Chapin Library at the Southworth Schoolhouse, 96 School Street, conveniently located just down a block from Dodd House).

CHARLES DEW and ROBERT VOLZ (Instructors)

HIST 15 The Great Depression: A Storied History (Same as Economics 19)

This course will deal with selected events of the late 1920s and 1930s from both an historical and a personal perspective. Through a blend of books, films, recordings, and anecdotal material-including oral histories of both the lecturer and others-the course will seek to penetrate the mindset of those who lived through this terrifying and bewildering but formative period in our history. For example, our examination of how a besieged Herbert Hoover sought unsuccessfully to cope with the disastrous economic downturn will also consider the resultant cultural phenomenon that developed along the rails in this country as vividly described by participants such as Eric Severeid. Consideration of the explosion of acronyms that accompanied the Roosevelt Administration will focus not only on the lifting of the nation's spirit, if not its economy, but on how tectonic shifts in the banking system effected a middle-class family flirting with financial ruin. The successes and failures of FDR Administration programs will be viewed not only as Washington envisioned them, but from the perspective of a child growing up with a classmate of WPA parents and of an actor in a freezing WPA Federal Theatre Project in a converted garage near the shores of Lake Erie in the dead of winter.
Requirements: students will be expected to read portions of The Great Depression by Robert Mc Elvaine and Freedom From Fear by David Kennedy, to focus in depth on at least one of the subjects covered, and will be encouraged to seek out and share oral histories from persons who lived through the Depression.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and one 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: $35-$50 for books and other readings.
Meeting time: WRF, 10:30-12:30.

DAVID AUERBACH (Instructor)
WATERS (Sponsor)

David L. Auerbach, a practicing attorney in New York City and a graduate of Harvard and Harvard Law School, has given three courses in American History at the Osher Institute of Lifetime Learning (OLLI), one of which, "The Great Depression: A Storied History," was the first course chosen by OLLI to be shown on public television in the Berkshires. Mr Auerbach frequently presents lectures to the American History study group at the Harvard Club of New York City.

HIST 17 The Fight for Free Speech in America

There is nothing free about free speech. Although the First Amendment to the Constitution guarantees freedom of speech and freedom of the press, these rights exist only to the extent that people are willing to fight for them. The war on terrorism and the USA Patriot Act pose the greatest threat to free speech since the Red Scare of the 1950s. But the censors are active in many other areas of American life: they challenge books in the public schools and seek to restrict the content of radio, television and the Internet. This course will examine how free speech has grown over the last century as well as the battles that are being fought today.
Requirements: regular attendance, class participation and a 10-12 page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: $50 for books and duplicating.
Meeting time: late mornings, twice a week for three hours.

CHRIS FINAN (Instructor)
WATERS (Sponsor)

Christopher Finan is president of the American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression, and is the author of several books, including From the Palmer Raids to the PATRIOT Act: A History of the Fight for Free Speech in America.

HIST 25 Fashionable London: Clothing and Fetishism from Victorian Street to Westwood Catwalk (Same as ArtH 25, Theatre 26 and Women's and Gender Studies 25)

Drawing on London's long history as a fashion capital-its museums, galleries, designer shops and punk scenes-this course explores the role fetishist fashion practices play in shaping identity and subverting social norms. Fashionable dress both reflects shared social fantasies and helps delineate gender; trends in dress serve as barometers of sexual politics and push the boundaries of "perverse" and "normal." We will examine fetishistic fashion historically, beginning with the corset controversy and tattooing in the Victorian and Edwardian periods and ending with the contemporary sartorial statements of neo-gothic pierced hipsters in corsets and leather, and motorcycle-booted punk street styles of recent years. We will read theoretical and historical literature on fetishism and consumption and look at fashion magazines and plates from various periods to evaluate both the finery of Savile Row and the subversive theatricality of Carnaby Street. We will watch films and explore London's neighborhoods and museums as we discuss the sartorial dissent of personas like Oscar Wilde and David Bowie, and the social politics of fashions by Mary Quant and Vivienne Westwood. Field trips to museums and other institutions and stores, including the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and the Fashion Museum in Bath will enable students to study corsets and other garments in paintings and original surviving examples. While gallery and exhibition visits will provide intimate, tactile knowledge of historical dress and help us learn about textiles and consumption (as well as the special problems associated with historical garments in museums), exploration of London's clubs, fashion shops and street life will allow us to chart current fashion (and fetish) trends, as well as relationships among specific styles/looks, various forms of adornment, and identities.
No prerequisites (preference given to juniors and seniors). Enrollment limit: 10. Not open to first-year students.
Evaluation will be based on class attendance in Williamstown during the first week of the course, a journal based on field work undertaken in London during the second two weeks of the course, and a 10-page paper based on the journal.
Cost to student: approximately $1,825.

FISHZON and BROTHERS

HIST 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for History 493-494. WATERS

INTERDEPARTMENTAL PROGRAM FOR EXPERIMENTAL AND CROSS-DISCIPLINARY STUDIES

INTR 25 Immigration, Incarceration and Capital Punishment: Texas as a Case Study

Texas is one of the most influential states in the nation concerning penal politics that address immigration, incarceration and executions. This winter session course takes place in Austin and "border" communities/cities. Exploring issues of human rights and social justice, students will meet with legal scholars, elected officials, filmmakers/documentarians, prison officials, community activists (from organizations such as PODER) and NGO representatives (from groups such as Amnesty International, ACLU).
On site visits include: the Texas Youth Commission; and Taylor which houses the Hutto "Residential Center"; operated by Corrections Corporation of America, this former high-security state prison is one of the only two U.S. facilities authorized to hold immigrant families and children (including pregnant women and infants), from nearly 40 countries, on noncriminal charges.
Students will participate in seminar lectures and presentations with UT students and faculty. Course requirements: e-journal entries, 2 brief e-papers, participation and presentation(s) in UT seminar based on readings and site visits.
Permission of instructor required. Enrollment limit: 4. Not open to first-year students. Cost to student (daily expenses).

JAMES

INTR 29 Peer Writing Tutor Workshop (Same as English 29)

(See under ENGL 29 for full description.)

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

INST 30 Senior Honors Project

To be taken by candidates for honors in International Studies.

LATINA/O STUDIES

LATS 10 Dance for the Camera: An Introduction

This introductory course explores dance via video recordings. We examine the relationship between the body in motion and the moving image of video recordings. We will see a broad range of choreographies done for the camera in order to think about space, time, and identity. We will analyze foundational works by artists, such as Bill T. Jones, Maya Deren, and Pina Bauch, as well as other young filmmakers, such as Alla Kovgan, Gaelen and Danya Hanson.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, short research assignments, a class presentation, one three-page review and one seven page final paper analyzing a particular film/video.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Open to all students, preference given to seniors.
Cost to student: $30.
Meeting time: mornings.

JOTTAR

LATS 12 Gender and the Latino Urban Scene

Conventionally the urban scene has been imagined and portrayed in strictly masculine terms. In this course, we will review classic and more contemporary texts about Latino city life in an effort to think more critically about how males and females, specifically Latinos and Latinas, experience, navigate, and possess urban milieus. Working with ethnography, literature, critical essays, and film, we will consider how gender-as well as race and class-is depicted, performed, and inscribed in notions of urbanity. Course materials include, but are not limited to, fiction by Piri Thomas and Angie Cruz, and the films Girlfight and Raising Victor Vargas.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, class presentations, short research assignments, and 3 short essays.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference to Latina/o Studies concentrators.
Estimated Cost to student: $30.
Meeting time: mornings.

RUA

LATS 26 Exploring Trade Justice (Same as Anthropology 26, Economics 26, Environmental Studies 26, and Political Science 26)

(See under ECON 26 for full description.)

LEADERSHIP STUDIES

LEAD 10 Corporate Leadership and Social Responsibility

This course considers the responsibilities of leadership in corporate life through the perspectives of visiting alumni who hold leadership positions in American corporations. It examines the social obligations created by success in business, with special emphasis on the social and environmental duties of contemporary business. We will also explore the organizational, professional, social, and personal dilemmas faced by leading figures in modern corporations and institutions. Readings will include material from organizational sociology and economics, as well as relevant biography and autobiography.
Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation in class discussions, and a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: approximately $30 for reading materials.

CARL W. VOGT '58 and JOHN W. CHANDLER '45 (Instructors)
MCALLISTER (Sponsor)

Carl Vogt and John Chandler are both former presidents of Williams College.

LEAD 11 Justice and Public Policy (Same as Political Science 19)

The course will examine several significant public policy issues which have been resolved by the judicial system. These may include affirmative action and other gender and racial issues, death penalty, free speech/obscenity, and environmental issues. The focus of the course will be on the process involved in resolving the issues in the courts, including the importance of the trial courts in that process, the competing interests involved, the public impact of the decisions and, in most cases, the difficulty of resolution. Students will spend the second week in Boston where they will have the opportunity to witness activities at the Office of the Attorney General for Massachusetts and meet with representatives of the federal and state judiciary.
Requirements: 10-page paper/oral report and regular participation in class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. If the course is overenrolled, students will be asked to write a short essay to determine selection.
Cost to student: none, but students will be responsible for obtaining lodging for four nights in Boston, Massachusetts and will be responsible for transportation to and from Boston and most meals.
Meeting time: At Williams, one morning and one afternoon, the first and third week; in Boston, Monday through Thursday, all day during the second week. Students will meet in December prior to the break to discuss logistics and expectations for the course.

MICHAEL B. KEATING '62 and MARTHA COAKLEY '75 (Instructors)
MCALLISTER (Sponsor)

The course will be taught by Michael B. Keating '62, a trial lawyer with the Boston law firm of Foley Hoag LLP, and Martha Coakley '75, Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

LEAD 12 The Presidential Transition Process: A Political Perspective

On January 21, 2009 the United States will swear in the 44th President of the United States. The peaceful transfer of power is one of the hallmarks of our democracy...but what are the practical and political issues, tasks and considerations facing the President-elect and his team. In this course, we will use the unfolding events of the Presidential transition to explore one important and public event to further our understanding of political leadership. How does the new President incorporate political promises-to individuals, interest groups and the public-into the key decisions of the transition process? What is the relative importance of issues and initiatives versus personnel appointments? We will draw on guest speakers who have participated in previous Presidential transitions, follow news coverage and blogs and selected readings to become engaged in the preparations for the inauguration and beginning of a new Presidential term. We will also re-visit key moments in the Presidential election and look to draw connections between those events and important decisions and developments in the transition process. Students will be required to write a final 10-page paper which would serve to advise the new President on an important issue of event.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: $40.
Meeting time: afternoons.

Honorable JANE SWIFT (Instructor)
MCALLISTER (Sponsor)

Jane Swift is a former governor of Massachusetts.

LEAD 17 Changing the World 101 (Same as Economics 20 and Political Science 17)

(See under PSCI 17 for full description.)

LEAD 18 Wilderness Leadership

This Winter Study project is for students who would like to participate in an off-campus experiential education opportunity. Students will be required to research an appropriate accredited program i.e. National Outdoor Leadership School, Outward Bound etc., that will provide a suitable learning environment and be at least 22 days in length. The Director of the Williams Outing Club will assist students in their search if necessary. Upon choosing a program and being accepted, students will meet with the Director in a pre-program meeting in December to create a framework for observing group dynamics and studying a variety of leadership styles. A required 10-page paper based on their journals will be required immediately after their return to campus for the start of third quarter. There will also be a follow up class to debrief the experience in the first week of February. All programs must meet with the approval of the Outing Club Director.
In addition to off-campus opportunities, there will be a Wilderness First Responder Emergency Care course that will take place on campus. Contact Scott Lewis for details.
Requirements: course approval by WOC Director, daily journal writing with focus on leadership and group dynamics, 10-page paper and 2 class meetings pre and post trip. Student assessment will be based on ten page paper and class discussions.
No prerequisites. Not open to first-year students. Interested sophomores, juniors and seniors must consult with WOC Director before registration. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student will vary depending on the program selected-range is generally from $1,500-3,000.

SCOTT LEWIS, Director of the Outing Club

LEGAL STUDIES

LGST 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Roots, Its Uncertain Future (Same as Environmental Studies 13)

Taught from the perspective of an experienced trial attorney, this course will examine the role environmental law plays in the United States today in light of how that role has developed during the nearly forty years since the modern era of environmental law began. As a preface, we will consider the significantly more limited influence of environmental law in our national affairs before 1970 and some of the historical and political reasons for that situation. We will examine the reasons why the law's early application in the first half of the 20th century almost exclusively to the conservation and preservation of natural resources took on in the second half a markedly different approach, one emphasizing pollution control and all but ignoring resource conservation. This course will begin by tracing the development of an American consciousness towards the environment through an examination of our law and our literature. The term "law" includes state and federal judicial decisions and legislation, particularly during the presidency of Theodore Roosevelt and during the decades which followed the year 1970 when much of the legal basis for the American environmental protection movement was established. The term "literature" includes not just the written word (the first book we look at is "The Lorax" by your favorite childhood author, Dr. Seuss) but also painting, sculpture, and music. Nothing too heavy! We will examine the historical and legal choices we as Americans have made which have put our environment on trial. What has occurred in our development as a people that explains this quintessentially American phenomenon? Our journey begins with the Puritans of New England and the planters of Virginia and their predecessors in the New World and then moves swiftly to the beginning of the modern era in environmental law and to its now uncertain future.
In light of this historical situation students will examine state and federal legislative and judicial attempts to address environmental problems and then try to reach informed, rational conclusions as to whether those attempts were successful. What were the political, social and economic issues involved and, ultimately, how did their context affect the legal solutions imposed. Cases decided at the appellate level will be introduced and examined through their trial court memoranda opinions in order to observe how the legal system actually works and how frequently the reasoning behind the trial judge's decision changes as the case works its way through the appellate process.
This course will be presented from a litigator's point of view, that is to say, both the practical and the theoretical, emphasizing what is possible to achieve in the litigator's real world as informed by what the academician would present from the security of the classroom. Evaluation will be based on attendance and classroom participation. Students will prepare several short papers, including single page "clerk's notes," which will present one or more sides of an issue and form the basis for classroom discussion. They will be asked to defend or reject the conclusions reached or approaches taken by our courts and legislatures and by our literature, as broadly defined, on environmental issues.
No prerequisites. This course is appropriate for students eager to explore the material presented and prepared to argue assigned positions on important legal, literary and historical issues. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: Approximately $60 for books and materials.
Meeting time: mornings. 3 two-hour sessions a week.

PHILIP R. MCKNIGHT '65 (Instructor)
L. KAPLAN (Sponsor)

Philip R. McKnight '65 is a trial and appellate attorney. At Williams he completed the honors program for both American History and Literature and European History. He earned his law degree from The University of Chicago Law School and then practiced in the state and federal courts of New York and Connecticut, as well as in Europe.

LGST 14 The Work of the Supreme Court

The aim of this course is to provide a sense of the personal, theoretical, and institutional characteristics of judicial decision making at the highest level. At the beginning of the course, all students will be furnished with a set of the briefs for an actual pending Supreme Court case. Four students (two per side) will be assigned to make oral arguments to the "Court," which will be composed of eight students, each playing a role of a sitting justice, and the instructor, who will act as chief justice for purposes of coordination. After hearing arguments, the "Court" will confer and prepare majority and other opinions and announce them in "open courts" at the conclusion of the term.
Evaluation will be based on the overall credibility in assigned role; effective argument, questions, performance in conference, drafting, etc. and a 3- to 5-page "reflective" essay in which students will be expected to identify and comment on some aspect of the work of the Court.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: less than $30.
Meeting time: afternoons.

ROBERT S. GROBAN, Jr. '70, JOHN NELSON '70 and THOMAS SWEENEY '70(Instructors)
L. KAPLAN (Sponsor)

Bob Groban, Williams Class of '70, is a former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York and former adjunct prosecutor on the Office of Special Investigations, the Justice Department's Nazi War Criminal task force. He is currently a member of the national law firm and practices out of its New York office.

John (Jay) Nelson, Williams Class of '70, has taught a number of Winter Study courses and practices law in Houston, Texas. He is a member of the Texas and District of Columbia bars and has taught at the University of Texas Law School.

Tom Sweeney, Williams Class of '70, is a partner in a New York law firm and practices in both state and federal courts.

LGST 21 Creating a Non-Profit Organization

This course will provide students with the opportunity to learn how to structure a non-profit organization based on a combination of class work and site visits to Boston non-profit organizations. The course will begin on campus with classroom instruction and reading assignments on the laws governing non-profit organizations and the processes for incorporating and obtaining tax-exempt status. The course will then move to Boston for two weeks, where students will have the opportunity to meet with leaders of a variety of non-profit organizations, ranging from small start-up non-profits to "venture philanthropy" groups to large, well-established charities and grantmaking foundations. Possible topics of discussion with these non-profit leaders include preparing an effective business plan, building a leadership team, fundraising techniques, volunteer management, program development and measuring program effectiveness. During this time, students will work in teams to create proposals for new non-profit organizations. They will prepare a mission statement, business plan, corporate documents and application for tax exemption. The course will return to campus for a final meeting, where the teams will present their non-profit proposals.
Students will be evaluated based on the final presentation, class participation and a short reflective paper on what they have learned through the site visits and discussions with non-profit leaders.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to juniors and seniors and to those who have demonstrated an interest in the area.
Cost to student: $700-$800. First-year students are not eligible. This course is not classified as a "travel course" and therefore students on Financial Aid will only be eligible for up to $300 to offset the cost of this course.

SUSAN ABBOTT `90 (Instructor)
L. KAPLAN (Sponsor)

Susan Abbott, Williams Class of 1990, is a lawyer at Goodwin Procter in Boston who has taught seminars on creating non-profit organizations at Harvard Law School, at her own law firm and through other pro bono organizations to people who are interested in starting non-profits. She advises non-profit organizations on issues related to their formation, operations and planned giving programs and has worked with a number of charities in a volunteer capacity.

LINGUISTICS

LING 12 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 12 and Special 12)

This course introduces students to basic knowledge about American Sign Language and deaf people. Emphasis in this preliminary introduction to ASL is on developing rudimentary receptive, expressive, and interactive skills through an intensive immersion in ASL. Students will also be introduced to deaf history, culture, and politics. This course is designed to help nonsigners develop rudimentary skills, to introduce them to the complexity of ASL, and to cultivate interest in further study of the language.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation, quizzes, and student produced videotapes of their own expressive skills. Students will also be expected to spend an hour outside of class each week viewing native ASL signers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15 (expected: 15).
Cost to student: $40.
Meeting time: afternoons, three two-hour meetings per week.

LAURIE BENJAMIN (Instructor)
SANDERS (Sponsor)

Laurie Benjamin is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts in multicultural and international education. Ms. Benjamin has taught deaf students at the secondary level. She is a nationally certified ASL interpreter with extensive experience in a wide range of interpreter settings including mental health, legal, and performance interpreting. In addition to working as a free-lance interpreter for the deaf, she is currently teaching ASL to students at Williamstown Elementary School.

MATHEMATICS and STATISTICS

MATH 11 The Hidden Depths of High School Mathematics

Have you ever wondered what is really happening at a graph's asymptote or why tests for divisibility work? Have you always enjoyed those moments in mathematics when you can completely see why something is true? In this course we will investigate topics in secondary mathematics from an advanced perspective. Often even apparently simple topics reveal complex and fascinating nuances when considered closely, as they must be in order to be fully understood. We will collaboratively investigate polynomial and rational functions, geometric justifications of trigonometric identities, and why such techniques as synthetic division, tests for divisibility, and Descartes' Rule of signs work. This course is an opportunity for students of all disciplines to look again at some of their favorite mathematics from high school and develop a more complete understanding of its inner workings. Each student will select a topic for independent investigation. Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page portfolio containing the independent project and several shorter assignments.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16. Preference will be given to students with a possible interest in a career in teaching.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for textbooks.
Meeting time: afternoons: 3:30-5:30 p.m.

A. DEKEL (Instructor)
C. SILVA (Sponsor)

Alexis Dekel is an experienced high school mathematics teacher and consultant. She has a particular interest in the various representations of mathematics and the connections between mathematics and other disciplines. She has recently been investigating these ties with her Math Dance Team, a group of students and teachers who express their mathematics through movement. She currently teaches at Pittsfield High School. Certified by National Board for Professional Teaching Standards in Adolescent/Young Adulthood Mathematics, 2002. M.A. in Mathematics Education from the University of California at Berkeley, 1998. Sc.B. in Mathematics from Brown University, 1996. Ten years full-time teaching experience, 1998-present.

MATH 12 Mural (Same as ArtS 12)

The Renaissance was a time which saw no polarity between the sciences and the arts. This is most notably seen in the works of Leonardo da Vinci, ranging from paintings, sculptures, inventions and scientific study. Leonardo was an unparalleled genius at bringing together artistic vision and scientific design. This course will attempt, in a small way, to restore the world view of those days.
We will work on a large wall mural in the Bronfman Science Center, with the vision of communicating ideas of shape, pattern, and design appearing in mathematics. We explore site-specific artwork to see how lighting, position, and the observer's viewpoint affects the design of the mural. Students will also gain experience by talking with faculty in mathematics, studio art, and art history, along with trips to WCMA and Mass MOCA. There will be full involvement in the project, from overall design to final construction.
Experience in any kind of mathematics is not expected. However, a strong visual imagination and artistic talent is a definite plus.
The overall evaluation is based heavily on attendance, participation, and the overall project.
Prerequisites: Experience in studio art is preferred. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to student: approximately $35 for textbook.
Meeting time: mornings.

DEVADOSS

MATH 13 Modern Dance-Muller Technique (Same as Special 18)

This dance class will be based on the modern dance technique developed by Jennifer Muller, with whom I danced professionally for 5 years in New York City and in Europe. Jennifer Muller was a soloist in the dance company of Jos\'e Lim\'on before she started her own company in 1974. She has added her own style of movement to the Lim\'on technique, creating an expansive, free-flowing dance that is wonderful to do and to watch.
The class will be multi-leveled and open to both men and women alike. Previous dance experience preferred, but not required.
Students will have the opportunity to choreograph a short piece either as a soloist or in small groups.
We will finish the course with a short lecture-demonstration illustrating what we have learned.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 24.
Cost to student: $20.
Meeting time: 10 a.m.-noon, MTRF.

LOGAN (instructor)
C. SILVA (sponsor)

Sylvia Logan received her B.A. in Slavic Literature from Stanford University. She danced professionally with the Jennifer Muller Dance Company, a modern company based in New York City for five years.

MATH 16 Knitting: The Social History and Craft Form (Same as Special 16)

Creating fabric out of interlocking loops can be traced back to the Neolithic period, and knitted artifacts 1600 to over 2000 years old have been found in Egypt, Peru, and Sweden. Knitting requires little machinery and can be done almost anywhere yet requires a significant amount of learned skill. Knitting techniques have been handed down through generations, shared in small groups, and transferred between cultures as trade routes emerged. The social history of knitting in America is a rich reflection of our history of culture. We will examine the social history of knitting through a sequence of readings and discussions, and explore knitting technique through a series of projects. Our textbook is No Idle Hands: The History of American Knitting, by Anne L. MacDonald, and additional readings will be handed out in class. We will engage in a series of project samples designed to introduce and improve skills of beginning knitters, starting with simple washcloths, a knitted cap, and culminating in a final project of felted mittens.
Evaluation will be based on mandatory attendance, participation, projects, posting and responses on Blackboard.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Enrollment is restricted to beginning knitters and preference will be given to first-year students.
Cost to student: approximately $125 for materials kit and for textbooks.
Meeting time: MTR 4-6 p.m.

M. JOHNSON (Instructor)
C. SILVA (Sponsor)

Mary Johnson, M. Ed., is highly experienced and has worked as a professional knitter for NYC designers KnitWits, Lane Borgesia, and Storey Publishing. Mrs. Johnson is a kindergarten teacher at Williamstown Elementary School.

MATH 23 Gaudino Winter Study Fellows Program

The Gaudino Winter Study Fellow designation is available to up to fifteen students who create their own independent projects that involve critical, reflective, and experiential learning during Winter Study. Each student works independently under the direction of a faculty sponsor, who will help shape and monitor the project. The project must receive approval from the Winter Study Committee, as well as from the Gaudino Scholar and Gaudino Board of Trustees. The Gaudino Board is looking for projects that address specific intellectual problems through direct experience, undertaken preferably in a social milieu that is previously unfamiliar or even uncomfortable to the applicant. Projects must be academically rigorous and worked out carefully with faculty sponsors. Projects should also entail systematic self-reflection on how the experiences affect students personally, and students may be asked to discuss their project with the Gaudino Board after it is completed. The Gaudino Scholar will meet with students as a group before and after Winter Study. All students whose projects are approved will receive the Gaudino Fellow designation. In addition, students on Financial Aid will receive Gaudino funding from a minimum of 50% to a maximum of 90% of the budget for the project up to $2,500, as determined by the Financial Aid office. No additional funding for students' projects will be provided by the College. Students selecting this course will register for MATH 23. More information about the Gaudino Fellows Winter Study Program and guidelines for applying can be found at: http://web.williams.edu/resources/gaudino/overview.php.

BURGER

MATH 26 Resettling Refugees in Maine (Same as Special 26)

(See under SPEC 26 for full description.)

MATH 30 Senior Project

MATH 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Mathematics 493-494.

STAT 13 Roulette

Roulette is a traditional and intriguing game, having its roots in 17th century France. It remains very popular in Europe, where due to a slightly different design of the Roulette wheel it offers better odds than in the United States. Part of the fascination for that game, besides its aristocratic feel, is that it allows for both small and huge wins and offers bets at relatively favorable odds. This course takes a closer, analytical look at this elegant game. We will study basic probability concepts to derive odds for various bets and learn how to use the free computer software R to program and simulate various playing strategies. A statistical analysis will reveal what strategies suit your type of play. A field trip to one of the casinos in the vicinity is planned.
Evaluation will be based on homework (49%), short quizzes (49%), and total chips at the end of class (2%).
Prerequisites: some basic exposure to computer programming. Enrollment limit: 15. Enrollment will be selected randomly.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for transportation to and from casino. (Note: Some casinos have an age limit of 21.)
Meeting time: three times weekly (classes and computer lab) plus field trip.

KLINGENBERG

MUSIC

MUS 10 Chamber Music Performance

This course will be for students who wish to play chamber music and will focus on one or more works of large or mixed wind/string chamber music (e.g. , Beethoven Septet, Schubert Octet, Francaix Octet, Mozart Clarinet Quintet). Class will meet for three coached two-hour rehearsals per week and culminate in a performance. Individual practice and uncoached rehearsals will be expected of all participants. Additionally, students will be taught how to effectively study the score of the works they perform. If feasible, a field trip to hear a concert will be scheduled. Students will be evaluated on their preparation, participation and performance.
Prerequisites: Advanced instrumental students will be accepted into the course by permission of the instructor. Enrollment limit: 16.
Cost to student: $75.
Meeting time: mornings.

STEPHEN WALT (Instructor)
KECHLEY (Sponsor)

Stephen Walt is Director of Woodwind Chamber Music at Williams and Artist-Teacher of Bassoon at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

MUS 11 Singing School: Sacred Choral Traditions in the Berkshires and Beyond (Same as American Studies 11 and English 11) CANCELLED!

(See under ENGL 11 for full description.)

MUS 12 Opera Workshop

This course provides an opportunity for singers to explore operatic repertoire appropriate to their ability and voice type. Participation in the course will help improve students' abilities to relate physically and emotionally with a character, feel at ease on stage within the context of an operatic scene, and imaginatively and dramatically connect to the music. Once enrolled, all students will be cast in scenes with their classmates. Students will then be expected to prepare their assigned music outside of class, and to attend in-class rehearsals for their scene once scenes have been cast. Musical preparation to be done outside of class will include research to the specific opera, role, and scene, as well as a complete lyrical translation if the scene is in a language other than English. (Outside research and preparation should require approximately 20 hours per week.) Students will also be asked to study two or more video or audio productions of their opera and write a 3-4 page paper comparing each singer's portrayal of the role they've been assigned. Evaluation will be based upon effort, attendance, individual progress, and the quality of the singers' final performance. Participation in the final performance is mandatory. Class will be held twice for a week for three hours, with each class session divided into rehearsals for individual scenes. Extra rehearsals will be arranged if and when they are deemed necessary by the instructor.
Enrollment is limited to 12 students and acceptance is determined based upon live audition for course instructor. Those students interested in registering for Erin Casey's Opera Workshop class should contact her via email at Erin.Casey@williams.edu to schedule a brief audition during the Winter Study Registration period.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

ERIN CASEY (Instructor)
KECHLEY (Sponsor)

Erin Casey has been a Voice Instructor at Williams for the past two years and has taught privately for four years. She holds a Masters degree in Vocal Performance from Northwestern University and has performed in operas with the BASOTI opera company of San Francisco and the Aspen Opera Theater Center.

MUS 13 Math and Music

The course examines some of the myriad ways that mathematics can shape and inform the ways we think about musical structure, and conversely, how music can instantiate a number of beautiful mathematical structures and ideas. We will consider how group theory, number theory, probability and stochastic methods can offer insights into the structure of musical systems (like tonality, and diatonic sets and scales), into the analysis of individual pieces of music, and into the ways that music can be created and perceived. We will explore, for example, how the mathematically unique properties of the diatonic set (the collection of tones that underlies the major and minor scales) permit or give rise to tonality, whether other musical universes (those with more or fewer chromatic tones) might exist that would offer the same riches as our familiar 12-tone universe, and whether and how computers can be taught to compose meaningful harmonic progressions. For non-math types, musical examples will be used to present all relevant mathematical concepts.
Evaluation will be based on a series of short musical problem sets, designed to illustrate relevant mathematical concepts and techniques. Students will then work on a topic of their choice (analysis of a musical work, a composition based on a mathematical model, or on a speculative topic) about which they will write a short (ca. 5 page) paper and give a class presentation.
Prerequisites: students need to be able to read musical notation. Preference will be given to math majors with musical performance experience or students who have taken a music theory course. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

E. GOLLIN

MUS 14 Folk, Popular, and Classical Cuban Music

This class will cover genres of Cuban folk, popular, and classical music and the impact that Cuban history has had on Cuban music, art, and culture in general. Topics to be discussed will include; the African influence on Cuban music between the 15th and 16th centuries, the contemporary coexistence of old African musical practices with new musical manifestations now purely Cuban that has resulted, and Spanish influence on the Punto Cubano or Punto Guajiro that flourished at the end of the 18th century as a family-neighborhood activity. We will also discuss the strong bonds between Cuban music and North American music during the 20th century, and the connection between folk music and the utilization of European techniques that gave as a result the danzon, the mambo, and the cha cha cha, as well as multiple genres of the Cuban cancion (song). Other topics of discussion will include how the combination of folk music/professional music imparts a dynamic to contemporary Cuban classical music and Afro-Cuban jazz.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

PEREZ VELAZQUEZ

MUS 15 Music of Charles Mingus

Students will take part in an ensemble course primarily devoted to studying and playing the music of Charles Mingus. Instrumentalists needed include piano, bass, drums, trumpet, saxophone, trombone, etc. as well as voice, but all are welcome. In addition to performing the music, the course will give students an in-depth look at the life of Charles Mingus as a composer and bassist. Each composition will be explored as to its structure and improvisational concepts. The focus of improvisation will be from an historical point of view (taking in the music of Dixieland, New Orleans traditional jazz, etc.) and will lead to collective improvising, using the Mingus Jazz Workshop as an example. Music to be presented and performed will include: "Better Get Hit In Your Soul," "Goodbye Porkpie Hat," "Haitian Fight Song," "Nostalgia in Times Square" and "Duke Ellington's Sound Of Love." "Triumph of the Underdog," a video by filmmaker Don McGlynn, will be shown and discussed. Evaluation will be based on faithful attendance at rehearsals, classes, coaching sessions, and appropriate performances.
The students taking this course will be exposed to an African American jazz legend who struggled under the racial injustices of our time. Students will learn how musicians lived, and how they functioned within the system that they were brought up in. They will see how musicians survived on a highly creative level, and how perseverance can lead to great things. These are all great examples to give the students of today. The story of Mingus is inspirational and demonstrates pure genius. This is an opportunity for the students to feel connected to the past, and will give them something to draw from in their own experiences. This is more than a music course; it is an inspiring story of achievement.
Enrollment limit: 17.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

JOHN MENEGON
KECHLEY

John Menegon is a professional bassist, composer and arranger who has been involved in teaching jazz studies and workshops for over 12 years. John has been playing and recording professionally for 25 years.

MUS 16 Music Circus: John Cage and His World (Same as Spanish 16)

(See under RLSP 16 for full description.)

MUS 17 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as American Studies 15)

(See under AMST 15 for full description.)

MUS 25 Musical Performance: Cultural Exchange in Argentina

The Jazz Ensemble, Symphonics Winds, Concert Choir and Berkshire Symphony will be participating in this winter study course leading up to a musical performance-based cultural exchange in Argentina.
During the fall semester each ensemble will prepare music by a wide range of significant Argentine composers (Ginatera, Guastavino, Davidovsky, Kagel, Golijov, Piazolla and Gao Barbieri, among others) as well as music by composers from the United States. Specially featured will be composers with ties to the Berkshires and, specifically, Williams College (Copland, Bernstein, Shawn, Kechley, Freddie Bryant, etc.) For the first two and a half weeks of Winter Study the students will rehearse and refine this music on campus. In addition, they will attend several lectures on the culture and history of Argentina. All students will have the option to travel to Argentina for the last week of Winter Study (and several days beyond).
Section 01: for students traveling to Argentina:
On January 21 student performers will depart for Argentina where they will perform concerts, attend workshops and coaching sessions, attend concerts and visit with Argentine singers and instrumentalists. Students will be required to keep a travel journal that records and reflects on their musical experiences in various parts of the country.
Approximate cost to student: $2200.
Section 02: for students opting not to travel to Argentina:
Each student will write a 10-page paper on a major Argentine musical work and/or composer and perform this work in an end-of-term concert.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: TBA. Students should discuss specifics with your ensemble instructor.

BODNER(Symphonic Winds), FELDMAN (Berkshire Symphony), JAFFE (Jazz Ensemble), B. WELLS (Concert Choir)

MUS 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Music 493, 494.

NEUROSCIENCE

NSCI 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Neuroscience 493-494.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 10 Rhetoric: The Art of Persuasion

Can't get a date? Need an extension? Parents fail to recognize your brilliance? Looking for a job? You need rhetoric: the art of persuasion. This course will be a practical workshop in the craft of speaking well. Students will prepare, deliver, and analyze speeches, with the aim of becoming effective, powerful, and perhaps even brilliant orators. Students will conclude the course by competing to persuade a distinguished panel of judges of a thesis of their choosing.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation, and the quality of oral presentations made throughout the course.
Regular class meetings will be held three times per week. A fourth weekly meeting will be devoted entirely to the giving of speeches.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference based on seniority and demonstrable interest in excellent speaking.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for books.
Meeting time: afternoons.

DUDLEY

PHIL 11 Aikido and the Creation of Ethical Policy (Same as Political Science 11)

Aikido is a Japanese martial tradition that combines the samurai arts of sword and grappling with the philosophical desire to manifest harmony in the face of conflict. As such, it addresses situations of conflict that manifest themselves physically, but also offers insight into how to prevent or redirect the energies-social, political, or psychological-that might otherwise become conflict in one or another aspect of our lives. By integrating physical and intellectual components, the course seeks to forge in each student a more coherent perspective on the difficult questions, broadly formulated as "How should we live?", that the study of Ethics and the challenge of Government put before us. The course also seeks to provide an opportunity for students to live, for one intensive month, as if they were 21st Century Samurai.
The academic component of the course will take advantage of the fact that a new administration will be moving into the White House on January 20. Students will divide into 4 or 5 groups that will each develop a policy position paper which attempts to bring ethically sound thinking to an issue of their choosing (such as Education Financing, Nuclear Waste, Health Care, Middle East, etc.), a survey of the legislative opposition to that policy, an Aikido-informed plan to frame the issue and overcome that opposition, and speech text to help establish our chosen framing and generate an enthusiastic consensus. Obviously, which administration will be moving into the White House will influence what issues we decide to pursue, and thus students will choose topics after the election (but before January so as to have time to scout out Williams alumni in the incoming administration or Congress for feedback during policy and strategy development). At the end of Winter Study there may be an opportunity to travel down to DC to present the policy initiatives to relevant personnel.
The physical training (two hours daily in the wrestling room) will improve each student's strength, balance, posture, and flexibility. Everyone will also learn how to throw their friends across the room. About 25% of training time will be devoted to sword and staff techniques.
Candidates need to understand that this course entails more of a commitment than most Winter Study options. There is simply no other way to transmit and integrate the course's physical and intellectual components. Students will be expected to want to immerse themselves in experiencing life as a (peaceful) warrior and as an apprentice policy wonk. Additional relevant experiences, such as meditation practice, misogi, Samurai films, and episodes of West Wing, will be an integral part of the course.
Students will be evaluated on the quality of their participation in both physical and intellectual course components, and each team's policy output - position outline, policy prescriptions, framing plan, legislative tactical review, and speech text. Students interested in the course should visit http://www.aikidokids.com/williamsaikido.htm before registration begins.
Prerequisites: same physician's approval on file as the school requires to participate on sports teams. Students do not have to be especially athletic, and in Aikido women train as equals with men. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: approximately $100 for uniform and wooden training weapons. $35 for books. Travel to DC, if arranged, will be optional.
Meeting time: Aikido sessions 2 hrs/day depending on availability (typically 10-12 or 1-3) of the wrestling room. Policy groups will meet on their own regularly, and for at least two hours each week with the instructor.

ROBERT KENT '84 (Instructor)
SAWICKI (Sponsor)

Robert Kent '84 spent 3 years in Kyoto, Japan earning his Sho Dan (first degree black belt), directly after majoring in both Philosophy and Religion at Williams. He currently holds a San Dan rank (third degree black belt) and runs the youth program at Aikido West in Redwood City, CA. He also runs the website AikidoKids.com, and is founding coordinator for The PeaceCamp Initiative (a scholarship program that seeks to use Aikido principles to heal the Israeli/Palestinian conflict a few kids at a time). He earned a Masters degree in Philosophy at Claremont Graduate School in 1993, writing his thesis on the Ethics of Authenticity. This will be the fourth time he has offered an Aikido-based Winter Study course.

PHIL 12 Love: For and Against

Plato's Symposium is one of the most widely read texts in the Western philosophical tradition-a profound celebration of love and the source of our everyday understanding of "Platonic love." Freud too wrote about love; but his story of love is certainly not celebratory. In this short course we will read the entire "Symposium" and excerpts from various texts by Freud and compare the accounts of these two influential thinkers. We will conclude with Laura Kipnis's contemporary polemic Against Love in which she offers a quasi-Marxist challenge to idealistic notions of love and fidelity. Students will be asked to recommend films about love that are especially insightful. We will choose two or three and incorporate them into our discussions.
Evaluation will be based upon contributions to class discussion in the form of presentations of short (2-3 page) weekly papers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference will be given to Philosophy majors and students who have done advanced work in Women's and Gender Studies.
Meetings times: 2-3 meetings each week (depending upon the week) and film screenings.

SAWICKI

PHIL 13 Boxing

Boxing is one of the world's oldest sports, and there are 3000 year old artistic representations of boxing from ancient Egypt. The history of boxing in the United States during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries reflects the history of the nation. Issues of class, ethnicity, race, and gender have played a central role in the sport. Stories about boxing also play a central role in the popular culture. In this course we will look at some treatments of boxing by social historians, examine some depictions of boxing in documentary and dramatic films, and watch some classic fights.
We will also learn some of the fundamental skills involved in boxing. Training as a boxer will give men and women a better appreciation of the physical demands involved. Four days a week we will engage in an intensive training regimen working on basic punching technique, footwork, defense and conditioning. The workouts will involve minimal contact, but will be physically demanding. Students will need to purchase boxing gloves, handwraps, and a jump rope.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation, and a 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: $150.
Meeting time: mornings workouts; movies, discussions and seminars in the afternoon and evening

MCPARTLAND

PHIL 14 Science Fiction and Philosophy

Is it possible for you to be your own mother? Could you travel back in time and kill your grandfather, years before your own father was born? Could a very sophisticated android fulfill the criteria for personhood? Should we allow one to be punished now for crimes that one has not yet, but is predetermined to commit in the future? Is it possible that you are living your entire life in an elaborate simulation? If you are in such a simulation, what, if anything, would be wrong with that? These questions are but a few raised in works of the genre of science fiction. Authors of science fiction use these questions, and answers to them, to develop compelling, and frequently illuminating, storylines. At their core, these stories exploit classic philosophical issues, and whereas the authors of science-fiction raise these issues in a popular context, philosophers have long attempted more systematic investigation of the questions and their possible answers in order to shed light on some of the fundamental concepts we use to make sense of the world. In this course, we will examine some of the philosophical problems and paradoxes raised in works of contemporary science fiction by reading from well-known novels, short stories and watching popular films. Our exploration of the science-fiction literature will be accompanied by readings from classic and contemporary philosophers carefully discussing the central philosophical issues raised therein. The result will be a brief survey of some classic problems in metaphysics and epistemology. We shall examine the nature of personhood, the possibility of free will, the paradoxes of time travel, and philosophical skepticism and its implications for how we should live our lives. Material will be drawn from readings by Philip K. Dick and Robert Heinlein, as well as from the films The Matrix, Bladerunner, and 12 Monkeys.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, class participation, short weekly assignments, and a 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost to student: under $75 for books and/or course packet.
Meeting time: mornings.

GREGORY JANSSEN (Instructor)
SAWICKI (Sponsor)

Gregory Janssen is a lecturer in philosophy at Hobart-William Smith College. He works primarily in analytic metaphysics, particularly on the metaphysics of mind.

PHIL 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Philosophy 493-494.

PHYSICS

PHYS 10 Light and Holography

This course will examine the art and science of holography. It will introduce modern optics at a level appropriate for a non-science major, giving the necessary theoretical background in lectures and discussion. Demonstrations will be presented and students will make several kinds of holograms in the lab. Thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation, we have 7 well-equipped holography darkrooms available for student use.
Students will be evaluated on the basis of regular attendance, completion of 4 laboratory exercises, and a holography laboratory project or a 10-page paper. Attendance at all classes and labs is required for a passing grade.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference will be given to students with no previous college course in physics more advanced than Physics 109.
Cost to student: about $50 for holographic film, chemicals, and photocopies.
Meeting time: At the beginning of WSP, the class will meet for lecture and discussion three mornings a week and for lab 2 afternoons a week. Later classes will be mainly laboratory.

TUCKER-SMITH

PHYS 12 Meet the Right Side of Your Brain: Drawing as a Learnable Skill

Representational drawing is not merely a gift of birth or a magical ability, but a learnable skill. If you ever wanted to draw, but doubted you had the ability or believed you could not learn, then this course is for you. This intensive course utilizes discoveries in brain research to teach representational drawing. By using simple techniques and extensive exercises you will discover and develop the perceptual shift from your symbol based left hemisphere to your visually based right hemisphere. This cognitive shift enables you to accurately see and realistically represent the physical world. You will learn to draw a convincing portrait, self-portrait, and still life. This course is designed to develop your powers of observation and enhance your innate creative problem solving abilities, which are applicable in any field. Students need no previous artistic experience, just the willingness and desire to learn a new skill. Students will be expected to attend and participate in all sessions. They will also be required to keep a sketchbook recording their progress and complete a final project.
Evaluation will be based on participation, effort, and development. There will be an exhibition of coursework on the final day of Winter Study.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15, with preference given to juniors and seniors.
Cost to student: cost of text and (approximately) $15 for drawing materials.
Meeting time: mornings, two times per week with substantial additional independent student work.

STELLA EHRICH (Instructor)
S. BOLTON (Sponsor)

Stella Ehrich holds an M.F.A. in painting from Bennington College. She teaches drawing at Bennington and other local colleges. She has had solo exhibits from Rutland, VT to Dallas, Texas to Mobile, Alabama.

PHYS 14 Electronics

Electronic instruments are an indispensable part of modern laboratory work throughout the sciences. This course will cover the basics of analog electronic circuits, including transistors and operational amplifiers, and will briefly introduce digital circuits. Students will build and test a variety of circuits chosen to illustrate the kinds of electronic devices and design problems a scientist is apt to encounter. Evaluation will be based on participation, completion of both laboratory work and occasional homework, and the quality of the final project or paper.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 or equivalent calculus. No prior experience with electronics is required. Enrollment limit: 16.
Cost to student: $50 for course packet and electronic parts.
Meeting time: afternoons, for a mixture of lab, lecture, and discussion, providing ample opportunity for hands-on experience. In the last week, students will design and build a final project, or will write a 10-page paper.

STRAIT

PHYS 15 Livres des Artists-The Artist Book

In this multidisciplinary class, students will explore and explode the boundaries that traditionally define the ancient art of bookmaking. They will step outside of traditional assumptions and preconceived ideas as the class explores a mode of expression that is creative, graphic, sculptural and very personal. The first half of the course will explore bookmaking and binding techniques paper decoration, drawing, printmaking (including monoprint, stamping, photocopy transfers and transfer drawings) and book structures (such as the many variations on the accordion, the codex, pop-up, tunnel, carousel and inventive), collage and creative writing in order to develop a plan for the creation of an individual artist's book, a multi-media expression of self that will be designed and executed in the last half of the class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: $100 plus another $50/75 dependent on the types of supplies/paper/books that students end up making.
Meeting time: During the first two weeks, students will meet every day in a studio/workshop like setting. The second two weeks will be more open, allowing the student to develop and create their own artist book, with two three hour meetings at the beginning and end of the week. Field trips to Chapin Library, MassMoca, and the Smith College Museum of Art will be required and scheduled according to class needs.

MELANIE MOWINSKI (Instructor)
S. BOLTON (Sponsor)

Melanie Mowinski holds an M.F.A. in Book Arts and Printmaking from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia and a M.A. in Religion and the Visual Arts from Yale University. Her work has been exhibited both nationally and abroad, most recently in San Francisco, Pittsfield and Venice. She teaches studio art at the Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts.

PHYS 22 Research Participation

Several members of the department will have student projects available dealing with their own research or that of current senior thesis students. Approximately 35 hours per week of study and actual research participation will be expected from each student.
Students will be required to keep a notebook and write a five-page paper summarizing their work. Those interested should consult with members of the department as early as possible in the registration period or before to determine details of projects then expected to be available.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 1 or 2 per project.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: to be arranged with instructor.

S. BOLTON and members of the department

PHYS 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Physics 493, 494.

POLITICAL ECONOMY

POEC 31 Honors Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Political Economy 493.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

PSCI 10 Political Campaign Ads-Noise, Trash, or Democracy in Action?

American political campaigns have many elements, fund-raising, rallies, lawn signs, and much more. The focus of this winter study course is on campaign television ads. Some have, it is often claimed, determined the outcome of elections. Lyndon Johnson's famous 1964 campaign ad of young child plucking flower petals, shown only once, or the Bush campaign's Willie Horton ad in 1988, are two such examples. The course will examine campaign ads, and the research on how, why, and when they work. One of the charges often leveled against democracy is that the people are easily seduced by clever and devious leaders, the power of rhetoric and images to mislead (among those who have made this argument are Plato and Hobbes). What does it mean to delude or mislead? What does a "good" campaign ad accomplish? Do campaign ads delude or do they educate, or both? Each student will write a paper analyzing a campaign ad (or the ads used in a campaign) of their choosing.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper, presentation and attendance.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to Political Science majors.
Costs to students: texts for course (under $100).
Meeting time: four times a week, 10-noon, MTWR.

MARCUS

PSCI 11 Aikido and the Creation of Ethical Policy (Same as Philosophy 11)

(See under PHIL 11 for full description.)

PSCI 12 Politics, the Press and Human Rights in Hong Kong and China

Drawing on the instructor's long experience as a print and broadcast journalist in Hong Kong, this class will examine the political and human rights issues that have arisen there, focusing especially on the period of time since 1997 when Hong Kong was transformed from British colony to Chinese Special Autonomous Region. What kinds of rights of expression and press freedom were articulated and defended before 1997 and how have they fared under Chinese sovereignty? Course work will focus on understanding the general political, legal and constitutional situation in Hong Kong and analyzing specific cases of press freedom, censorship and self-censorship in the post-colonial period. Comparisons and contrasts to the condition of journalism in the PRC will be made.
Evaluation will be based on a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

FRANCIS MORIARTY (Instructor)
C. JOHNSON (Sponsor)

Francis Moriarty has worked for the past two decades as a print and broadcast journalist in Hong Kong.

PSCI 13 The Art of War (Same as Asian Studies 13)

This course will examine the meaning and uses of the classical Chinese text, The Art of War, by Sun Tzu. Students will consider Sun Tzu's insights both in the context of ancient Chinese philosophy and in terms of their contemporary relevance. The first half of the course will concentrate on placing Sun Tzu in historical and philosophical context; the second half will examine how The Art of War has been used in a variety of modern fields.
Evaluation will include mandatory class attendance and participation, and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Seniors and juniors will have priority.
Cost to student: price of books.
Meeting time: mornings.

CRANE

PSCI 14 Women's Leadership in the Civil Rights Movement

African American women served in many respects as the true leaders of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement, which for this course begins in the early 1950s and culminates in the late 1960s. Women played multiple and diverse leadership roles, generally at the grassroots level, but occasionally, as with Fannie Lou Hamer, at the national level as well as state-wide in Mississippi. We begin with teenager Claudette Colvin, arguably the instigator of the Montgomery bus boycott; then look at Jo Ann Robinson and other leaders of the Women's Political Council who organized the bus boycott; next to civil rights pioneers Ella Baker and Septima Clark; then to l960s' activists Dorothy Cotton (SCLC), Hamer, Diane Nash, Ruby Doris Robinson (SNCC), and NAACP attorney Marian Wright Edelman, who subsequently founded and led the Children's Defense Fund. Dorothy Cotton, MLK confidante and SCLC leader, will give a guest lecture to the class on the MLK holiday. The course will focus both on the individual leaders and on the complex phenomenon of black women's leadership in general, especially involving their struggles against patriarchal norms and the special risks they took. The course will combine lectures with abundant discussion, along with several films to be viewed outside of class.
Evaluation: Regular attendance, careful study of readings, full class participation, view several films, and a 10-page paper comparing two or more of the women leaders.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost to student: $60.
Meeting time: afternoons, TRF 2-4 p.m.

STEWART BURNS (Instructor)
C. JOHNSON (Sponsor)

Historian Stewart Burns is a nationally recognized scholar of the Civil Rights Movement and biographer of Martin Luther King Jr. former Boskey Professor of Leadership Studies and History, and currently Williams Coordinator of Community Engagement.

PSCI 15 Infectious Diseases, Public Health Crises and Human Development

Compared to war, infectious diseases and public health crises have consistently accounted for the greatest proportion of human morbidity and mortality. For instance, of the 50 million deaths recorded in 1990, infectious diseases claimed about 17 million compared with 322, 000 from war. Through documentaries and scholarly work, we examine how infectious diseases and public health crises have impacted and shaped the course of human development. Writers include Jared Diamond, William H. McNeil, Andrew Prince-Smith and Helen Epstein.
Evaluation: Class participation and a 10-page paper
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30
Cost to student: $60.
Meeting time: mornings.

MUNEMO

PSCI 16 Movies with Political Discussions of Elections, Evolution, Presidential Powers and News

This course features movies for a class discussion of the political content of each movie and its relevancy to politics today. The movies to be shown are: Inherit The Wind (a depiction of the Scopes trial otherwise known as the Tennessee Monkey Trial) with a class discussion of the religious right's political movement to the present to discredit the teaching of the theory of evolution); The Candidate (a story about a senatorial campaign) with a class discussion of today's negative and superficial political election campaigns; All the President's Men (a dramatization of Nixon's Watergate coverup), and Wag the Dog (a story of a fabricated war to cover-up presidential misdeeds) with a class discussion of President George W. Bush's run-up to the invasion of Iraq, conduct of the war, and his constitutional use of presidential powers; Good Night, and Good Luck (the story of Edward R. Murrow, an icon of broadcast journalism, taking on Sen. Joseph McCarthy) with a class discussion of the state of political coverage by journalist today.
Evaluation will be based on class participation in discussions and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference given to Political Science majors.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

ROBERT JAKUBOWICZ (Instructor)
C. JOHNSON (Sponsor)

Mr. Jakubowicz served as Massachusetts state legislator, Pittsfield city counselor, and Berkshire County commissioner. A lawyer, former assistant district attorney, and FBI agent. A columnist for the Berkshire Eagle, his columns have appeared in the Boston Globe and Herald, The Cape Cod Times and The Bedford Standard Times. He has actively participated in local, state and national political campaigns.

PSCI 17 Changing The World 101 (Same as Economics 20 and Leadership Studies 17)

Most people want to have an impact in the world-but not that many do. Steve Case helped make the Internet a part of everyday life and has been an active participant in business, philanthropy and government for the past two decades. He will share some of the lessons he has learned since graduating from Williams in 1980-and lead a discussion to encourage each student to begin to shape their own thinking about how they can change the world. Requirements: attend all sessions, actively participate in class and give a final presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference to Leadership Studies concentrators.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons, 1:30-3:30 MWF.

STEVE CASE '80 (Instructor)
C. JOHNSON (Sponsor)

Steve Case graduated from Williams in 1980 and went on to start AOL, a company that helped drive mainstream consumer acceptance of the Internet. He then went on to launch The Case Foundation, an innovative philanthropic organization, and Revolution, a company that aims to disrupt major industries by empowering consumers.

PSCI 19 Justice and Public Policy (Same as Leadership Studies 11))

(See under LEAD 11 for full description.)

PSCI 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits/Volunteer Income Tax Preparation

This course is a participant-observation experience in which students work full-time for a governmental agency, nongovernmental (including voluntary, activist, and grassroots) organization, or for a political campaign. Students may find placements in government and nonprofit organizations in which their work involves significant involvement with public issues. Examples include: town government offices; state or federal administrative offices (e.g., environmental agencies, housing authorities); interest groups that lobby government (e.g., ACLU, NRA); nonprofit organizations such as service providers or think tanks (e.g., Habitat for Humanity; Cato Institute); and grassroots, activist or community development organizations (e.g., Greenpeace or neighborhood association). In 2009, students are especially encouraged to train and become certified IRS Volunteer Income Tax Preparers through a special section of the course. The instructors will work with each student to arrange a placement; such arrangements must be made in advance of the Winter Term. Students should first make their own contacts with an institution or agency. The instructors and members of the Political Science department are available to help students find placements, if necessary. Each student's fieldwork mentor shall send a confirmation letter to the instructors verifying the placement and describing the nature of the work to be performed by the student. Students will read a few short articles distributed at the beginning of Winter Term and must agree to keep a journal, maintain weekly contact with the instructors, and write a final paper summarizing and reflecting upon the experience. A group meeting of all students will occur after winter study to discuss the experiences.
Requirements: 90 hours of fieldwork; satisfactory evaluation from the institutional sponsor; 10-page final paper or equivalent; participation in final meeting.
At the time of registration, interested students should send a resume and letter of interest to Paula Consolini.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost to student: approximately $15 for readings, student covers transportation costs to and from internship site.

CATHY JOHNSON and PAULA CONSOLINI (Instructors)

Paula Consolini, Ph.D, (UC Berkeley, 1992) is the Coordinator of Experiential Education at Williams and supervisor of the North Berkshire Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program.

PSCI 25 Williams in NOLA CANCELLED!

This winter study will give students a first-hand, community level understanding of New Orleans culture and the impact of Hurricane Katrina, framed by an academic understanding of the same. Students will be in New Orleans for the first two weeks of the Winter Study period. During that time, they will be involved in rebuilding projects in New Orleans through Common Ground (a grass-roots recovery organization), Tulane's Semester in NOLA program, or possibly Habitat for Humanity. Projects may involve demolition, rough carpentry, painting, landscaping, or other manual labor in residential areas, or assisting in restoration of city facilities such as libraries, museums, schools, etc.
Concurrent with the rebuilding/restoration projects, students will also participate in interdisciplinary studies (coordinated through Tulane's Semester in NOLA) looking at New Orleans' culture, heritage, and geography, the evolution of the city's pre-Katrina configuration, the events of Katrina's onslaught and its aftermath, and the political, economic, and social impact of Katrina.
In addition to the exposure through their own work, students will have a tour/lecture on the construction and geology of the levee system, and how and where it failed, and a tour of some of the area outside New Orleans proper, where the storm alone (as opposed to levee failure) was responsible for the damage. Students will be given readings from Breach of Faith by Jed Horne, One Dead in Attic by Chris Rose, and Rising Tide by John Barry, and possibly other references, as well as viewings of Spike Lee's documentary "When the Levees Broke." Speakers will include faculty from Tulane, a state representative from New Orleans, and residents of New Orleans, including the Lower Ninth Ward.
Students will also have the opportunity to have discussions, both amongst themselves and facilitated by faculty, about their experiences. When students return to Williams for the third of winter study, they will continue these discussions and some students will do presentations for the class.
Written requirements and grading: Students will be expected to keep a journal during their stay in New Orleans, reflecting on and (ideally) integrating their readings and their experiences. If appropriate, students may also choose to develop a presentation to be offered to the Williams community early in the second semester.
Enrollment limit: 15. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: $1000.

JAMES SAMENFELD-SPECHT '74 (Instructor)
C. JOHNSON (Sponsor)

James Samenfeld-Specht graduated from Williams in 1974 and was one of 17 participants in Williams at Home in 1972. He is now a child psychiatrist, currently practicing and living in Maine.

PSCI 26 Exploring Trade Justice (Same as Anthropology 26, Economics 26, Environmental Studies 26, and Latina/o Studies 26)

(See under ECON 26 for full description.)

PSCI 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 493-494.

PSCI 32 Individual Project

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 495 or 496.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 10 Peer Support Training

Peer Support Programs are being implemented at colleges and universities here and abroad. The Psychological Counseling Service is developing such a program for our campus, the Good Neighbor Program. Good Neighbors will be students trained to offer support to others over a range of personal difficulties. This course will prepare you to be an active listener, to help others feel more comfortable with social, academic, and personal relationships, and to assist others in making decisions without giving advice. You will learn how to communicate about sensitive issues and develop identity in the helping role. Emphasis will be given to learning one's limits within a given situation, knowing when to refer to other resources, and what resources are available to students. This course is a prerequisite for the Good Neighbor Program as well as providing broadly applicable helping skills that you can apply in any interpersonal role such as Peer Health, Junior Advisor, or Baxter Fellow.
We will meet twice a week for 4 hour sessions. As a largely experiential training, most of the work comes in class, but there will also be regular out of class assignments designed to deepen your understanding and practice of helping skills.
Evaluation is based on participation, attendance (mandatory for the Good Neighbor Program), and a final class project.
Open to first-years, sophomores, and juniors. Enrollment limit: 16.
Cost to student: $20.
Meeting time: TBA.

KAREN THEILING (Instructor)
HEATHERINGTON (Sponsor)

Karen Theiling is a staff psychotherapist at Williams College Psychological Counseling Services and a licensed mental health counselor in private practice in North Hampton, Massachusetts.

PSYC 11 GET A JOB! Find a Fulfilling Career Path that Fits Your Personality (Same as Chemistry 12 and Special 20)

(See under CHEM 12 for full description.)

PSYC 12 Women's Work: Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Postpartum Experience

This course will consider the range of women's experiences surrounding pregnancy and childbirth. Among the topics we will cover are alternative birthing choices (midwifery, homebirth, water-birth), the medicalization of childbirth, the experiences of infertility and post-partum depression, and attitudes regarding breastfeeding. We will view documentaries about pregnancy and childbirth, including films of labor and delivery, hear from a number of local professionals, such as a midwife, a doula, a childbirth educator, and a lactation consultant, and take a tour of a birthing center.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper, class presentation, and participation in class discussions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference based on seniority.
Cost to student: $30 for photocopying expenses.
Meeting time: afternoons.

KRISTEN SAVITSKY(Instructor)
HEATHERINGTON (Sponsor)

Kristen Savitsky holds a Bachelor's of Science degree in nursing and has worked as a labor and delivery nurse.

PSYC 15 Ephquilts: An Introduction to Traditional Quilting

This studio course will lead the student through various piecing, appliqué and quilting styles and techniques, with some non-traditional methods included. Samples will be made of techniques learned, culminating in the completion of a sizeable project of the student's choosing (wall quilt or lap-size quilt). There will be an exhibit of all work (ephquilts), at the end of winter study. "Woven" into the classes will be discussions of the history of quilting, the controversy of "art" quilts vs. "traditional" quilts, machine vs. hand-quilting and the growing quilting market. Reading list: Pieces of the Past by Nancy J. Martin; Stitching Memories: African-American Story Quilts by Eva Ungar Grudin; Sunshine and Shadow: The Amish and Their Quilts by Phyllis Haders; A People and Their Quilts by John Rice Irwin; Treasury of American Quilts by Cyril Nelson and Carter Houck; The Quilt: New Directions for an American Tradition, Nancy Roe, Editor. Requirements: attendance of all classes (two field trips inc), a love of fabric, design and color, an enthusiasm for handwork, participation in exhibit. Extensive time will be spent outside of class working on assigned projects.
Evaluation will be based on 2 projects: a techniques sampler quilt and a quilt of student's choosing (to be approved by instructor) and participation in exhibit.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $200 for materials and supplies.
Meeting time: 2-4 p.m., three days each week.

DEBRA ROGERS-GILLIG (Instructor)
HEATHERINGTON (Sponsor)

Debra Rogers-Gillig, one of the top quilters in New England, has been quilting for 30 years, and teaching classes and coordinating shows and exhibits for 25 years. She has received numerous prizes and awards from quilt shows in New York and New England and been published in quilt magazines.

PSYC 16 Rhythm Based Communication

This course will explore the theoretical and practical intersections of rhythm-based communication, conflict studies, and conflict resolution. Students will study the foundations of each discipline and practice the tools, techniques, and strategies associated with drum circles and mediation, such as mindful listening, reflective inquiry, and facilitation. This course will culminate in an original curricular design project and students will be encouraged to pilot their projects with local school-aged youth in order to realize the emerging potential for future educational applications of rhythm based conflict resolution. Evaluation: group public presentation of final project.
No prerequisites. Beginning and experienced drummers welcomed. Enrollment limit: 20. If the course is overenrolled, students will be asked to write a brief interest statement to determine eligibility.
Cost to student: $75 for drums and materials.
Meeting time: afternoons.

OTHA DAY (Instructor)
HEATHERINGTON (Sponsor)

Otha Day leads drum and rhythm circles for pre-schools, elementary and high schools, colleges, libraries, private family gatherings, wellness centers, spiritual and religious events, and corporate functions. Otha is a trained teacher and professional musician who has been operating a successful private piano teaching studio for more than 25 years teaching Classical and Jazz piano to students of all ages and levels from pre-school through university piano performance majors.

PSYC 19 Psychology in Action

This course gives students two opportunities do to a full-time placement during winter study either in a hospital, mental health or social service agency, legal firm, industry, consulting, or research setting in which work of a psychological nature is done, or in a classroom at Mt. Greylock Regional High School or at Williamstown Elementary School. For the former, during the fall semester, students are responsible for locating their own potential placements and consulting with the course instructor about the suitability of the placement before the winter study registration period. Students should provide the course instructor with a brief description of the proposed placement, noting its relevance to psychology, and the name of the agency supervisor. Before Thanksgiving break, the student must provide a letter from the agency supervisor which describes the agency, and the student's role and responsibilities during winter study. For the latter (school placements), those accepted will work under the supervision of a regular member of the teaching staff and submit a report on their work at the end of the Winter Study Period. This project involves a four-week commitment to full-time affiliation with the school. Before winter study registration, interested students should consult with Professor Zaki, Bronfman 300. She will assist in arranging placements and monitor students' progress during the four-week period.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page minimum final paper summarizing the student's experiences and reflections as drawn from a daily journal, and the supervisor's evaluation.
Prerequisite: Approval of Professor Zaki is required. Enrollment limit: number of places available at the two participating schools up to a total of 20 in both placements.
Cost to student: travel expenses in some cases.

ZAKI

PSYC 22 Introduction to Research in Psychology

This course provides a research opportunity for students who want to understand how psychologists ask compelling questions and find answers about behavior. Several faculty members, whose subfields include behavioral neuroscience, cognitive psychology, social psychology clinical psychology, developmental psychology, and the psychology of education, will have student projects available. Since projects involve faculty research, interested students must consult with members of the Psychology Department before electing this course.
Evaluation will be based on the quality of research participation, student's lab journal and either an oral presentation or a written 10 page report of the research project.
Required activities: A minimum of 20 hours per week of research participation will be expected of each student.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: space available in faculty research labs.
Student selection criteria: Decision will be based on evaluation of departmental application and number of faculty available as mentors.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

KIRBY

PSYC 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Psychology 493-494.

N. SANDSTROM

RELIGION

REL 10 Meditation-Based Stress Reduction: Adopting a Mindfulness Practice (Same as ANSO 10)

(See under ANSO 10 for full description.)

REL 11 The Films of Ezzatullah Entezami

Most approaches to contemporary Iranian cinema focus on the great directors. This course will attempt to cut a different line through that material by focusing on the films of one actor. No actor has been more central to the efflorescence of Iranian film that Ezzatullah Entezami. He has worked with almost all of Iran's greatest directors. From his debut film in 1969, Cow, (directed by Dariush Mehrjui) in which he played a simple peasant driven mad by the loss of his beloved cow and the well-meaning duplicity of his fellow villagers to his riff on that role in Nasir ud-Din Shah, Cinema Actor (1992) (with Makhmalbaf) to his more recent roles of old age including Twilight (2001) and Judgment (2005) (with Masud Kimiai) his films have traversed both a personal and historical arc central to understanding contemporary Iran. In this course we will view and discuss eight of his films, setting them in both their historical and cultural context. We will meet eight times to watch a total of eight films. Students will read selected articles on the history of Iranian cinema and prepare two page responses to each film.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to student: $20 for readings.
Meeting time: TBA.

DARROW

REL 12 Create Your Life with Yoga

This class explores the multifarious yoga tradition to lay out resources and techniques you can use to create your life. By integrating textual studies and personal practice, you take your place as a creative innovator employing the resources of yoga. Analysis of classic yoga texts from India provides a historical, cultural, and philosophical background. Class discussions consider key yogic concepts and how they relate to contemporary life, and yoga practice sessions explore how these themes play out, both on and off the yoga mat. Based on the powerful technology of Anusara Yoga, you learn how to create your own effective home practice. As you gain familiarity with the basics of human anatomy and receive individualized attention on how to work with your particular body, your practice becomes even more effective. Creatively interacting with the yoga tradition can facilitate greater physical accomplishment and ease, prompt explorations of ethical dilemmas and philosophical questions, and reveal ways to reduce stress and optimize your energy. This class aims to provide an overview of the traditional and contemporary dimensions of yoga, and to empower each participant to draw upon this tradition to manifest a fulfilling, life-enhancing personal yoga practice.
Required Texts: The Yoga Sutras, The Bhagavad Gita, Hatha Yoga Illustrated, and related articles.
Evaluation is based on attendance and participation in all classes and sessions, as well as a personal practice journal, a research bibliography and oral presentation, and a final paper reflecting on the course.
Prerequisites: Apply by email explaining your experience and interest in the class to Natasha.Judson@gmail.com.
Cost to student: approximately $70. For your health, please bring your own yoga mat.
Meeting time: afternoons, three two-hour sessions/week.

NATASHA JUDSON (Instructor)
BUELL (Sponsor)

Natasha Judson, M.Ed., RYT, Certified Anusara Yoga Instructor has been teaching yoga in Williamstown since 1999. She first practiced yoga as a teen in Pittsburgh, and took it up again when she became a high school teacher in Vermont. She has practiced Ashtanga and Iyengar Yoga, completing a two-year teacher training with Patricia Walden. She completed an internship in Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction at UMASS Medical School and helps facilitate the annual Teen Retreat at Insight Meditation Society. Currently she studies several times each year with John Friend, the founder of Anusara Yoga.

REL 13 Monsters and the Monstrous in Japanese Religion and Popular Culture

Monsters have long figured prominently in Japanese cultural history. In the earliest chronicles, Japanese emperors did battle with giant spiders and married shape-shifting serpents. In medieval histories, wrathful demons attacked the imperial palace, winged-goblins haunted abandoned temples, and ghosts infiltrated the bedrooms of royal concubines. These creatures persisted into the modern era when nineteenth century tabloids reported the existence of demon-foxes, giant serpents and cannibalistic ogresses. In the later half of the nineteenth century, monsters began crossing over into the realm of fiction, but nonetheless popular novels and films continued to crawl with dark beasts.
This course will investigate the role of monsters and the monstrous in Japanese religion and popular culture. We will use a range of materials, including folktales, Buddhist exorcism manuals, short stories, medieval bestiaries, woodcut prints, and films, to explore central themes, such as the connection between the grotesque and the erotic, the problem of evil, the trauma of memory, the commodification of the supernatural, and the boundaries of the human.
Requirements: participation, short responses and a 10-page paper to be submitted at the end of the course.
No prerequisites. All material is translated or subtitled in English. Enrollment limit: 19. Preference given to Religion and Asian studies majors.
Cost to student: approximately $40.
Meeting time: afternoons.

JOSEPHSON

REL 25 Jerusalem: One City, Three Faiths, Many Narratives

Jerusalem excites the imagination, the emotions, and the spiritual aspirations for many people. An ancient city that was the locus of holiness and conflict for one hundred generations still retains that description today. Through the first half of Winter Study, we will engage readings, (primarily Karen Armstrong's JERUSALEM), class discussions, and additional study, to prepare for travel to Jerusalem. We will leave Williamstown on January 11, taking up residence in Jerusalem on Monday morning, the 12th, through Thursday the 22nd. Our study in Jerusalem will feature many walking tours to various neighborhoods and historic sites, and will bring Christian, Jewish, and Muslim teachers to present the complicated series of narratives that describe the mosaic of Jerusalem's three thousand year history. Our educational program in Jerusalem will be led by Ophir Yarden, education director for the Interreligious Coordinating Council of Israel. When this course was offered in 2007, many students agreed that it was "the most amazing experience of my life!" Further information available from the instructor, Cantor Bob Scherr, Jewish Chaplain for the College: rscherr@williams.edu, x2483. Not open to first-year students.

Cantor ROBERT SCHERR (Instructor)
BUELL (Sponsor)

The instructor is Cantor Robert Scherr, Jewish Associate Chaplain for the College. I have traveled to Israel many times, led group tours there, and lived in Jerusalem for most of a year (1988-89). In 1998, traveling on the West Bank with the Compassionate Listening Project, I developed contacts with many people in East Jerusalem and the Palestinian neighborhoods nearby, with whom I have been in touch to develop the program for this trip. During my years as an instructor at Framingham State College, I frequently taught overviews of historical and contemporary Israel as a part of my own course on Judaism/Christianity/Islam, and in consultation with other instructors who sought my participation in teaching about the historical and political nuances of Israel and Palestine.

REL 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Religion 493 or 494.

ROMANCE LANGUAGES

FRENCH

RLFR S.P. Sustaining Program for French 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study period. There are three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

LIBERT and RENOUARD (Teaching Associates)

RLFR 10 Astérix the Gaul: French Culture through the Prism of the Comic

The longevity and popularity of the Astérix comic strip series over successive generations of an international readership can be explained, in part, by its subtle and penetrating rendering of Europeanism through caricature. This course will examine some of the most enduring texts in the Astérix saga as interpretations, first, of French culture and the way the French view themselves with respect to the rest of Europe and, second, of the way they view Europe in dialogue with French cultural norms. Such issues as "la Patrie" (homeland), linguistic characteristics, the idea of France, French provincial distinctiveness, France's view of a homogeneous national character seen through its own cultural diversity, and the relationship of France to other specific regional cultures will be studied as a way not only of defining the nation's historic legacy, but of coming to terms with the way it sees its place within the vision of the European Union. Among the texts to be studied will be Astérix the Gaul, Astérix and the Normans, Astérix and the Mansions of the Gods, Astérix in Corsica, Astérix in Britain, Astérix in Switzerland, Astérix and the Goths, and Astérix in Belgium. Analysis of the primary texts will be complemented by secondary cultural readings, especially those of Fernand Braudel and other prominent interpreters of French culture. Readings will be in English, but those students who wish to read the texts in the original French should make arrangements in advance with the instructor. Conducted in English.
Requirements: class participation and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to student: books and reading packet only.
Meeting time: mornings; 3 two-hour sessions per week.

NORTON

RLFR 14 Formidable French Film: Contemporary Cinema from France, Morocco, and Québec

While the English word formidable means "difficult to deal with," "inspiring respect or wonder," or "causing fear and alarm," the French word formidable signifies "marvelous," "amazing," and "extraordinary." This course proposes to look at recent French film that is formidable in every sense of the word. From the cobblestoned streets to the sprawling suburbs of Paris, from the beaches of Brittany to the cafés of Rouen, from the deserts of Morocco to the snows of Québec, French-language cinema has produced a number of politically and culturally formidable films during the past ten years. Many of the most dynamic films of the past decade have expressed the Francophone world's growing concerns with the effects of globalization on such diverse issues as: immigration, education, and employment; poverty, housing, and healthcare; sexuality, ethnicity, and family; the environment, imperialism, and war. This course will center on recent film from France and the Francophone world which addresses many of these current anxieties with great humor, emotional sensitivity, and political engagement. Among the colorful cast of characters we will encounter are a recent college graduate, a primary school teacher, a seductive stage actress, a platoon of young soldiers, a missing young musician, a frustrated young chef, a lovable truck driver, a vengeful governess, a cabaret singer, a handsome young farmer, a fashion photographer, a motorcycling rebel, and a pair of French-American lovers in Paris. Our film discussions will be complemented by readings from French film criticism, politics, and theory. Films to include Laurent Cantet's Resources Humaines (1999), Bertrand Tavernier's Ça commence aujourd'hui (1999), François Dupeyron's C'est quoi la vie? (1999), Agnès Jaoui's Le Goût des autres (2000), François Ozon's Le Temps qui reste (2005), Jean-Marc Vallée's C.R.A.Z.Y. (2005), Rachid Bouchareb's Indigènes (2006), Denis Dercourt's La tourneuse de pages (2006), Bernard Émond's Contre toute espérance (2007), Philippe Lioret's Je vais bien ne t'en fais pas (2006), Anna Gavalda's Ensemble c'est tout (2007), Olivier Dahan's La Môme: Ma vie en rose (2007) and Julie Delpy's Deux jours à Paris (2007). Films in French with English subtitles. Discussions in English.
Evaluation and requirements: active class participation and a 10-page paper in English.
No prerequisites: Enrollment limit: 12. If overenrolled, preference given to Romance Languages,
Comparative Literature, and Women's and Gender Studies majors.
Cost to student: approximately $35 for readings.
Meeting time: 2-3 mornings per week.

MARTIN

RLFR 30 Honors Essay

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLFR 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for French 493-494.

ITALIAN

RLIT S.P. Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

NICASTRO

SPANISH

RLSP S.P. Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

TEACHING ASSOCIATES

RLSP 12 The Golden Age of Mexican Film

After the arrival of cinematography in Mexico City in 1896, images of daily life in Mexico were seen around the globe. By the mid-Thirties, the Mexican film industry was a strong producer of films. In this course students will have the opportunity to view and discuss a variety of films directed in Mexico during the Golden Age (30's-60's) and the independent period of the 70's by prominent contemporary Mexican film-makers such as Fernando de Fuentes, Juan Bustillo Oro, Emilio "El Indio" Fernandez, Arturo Ripstein and others. Our discussions will be based on the films themselves and how they portray the country's values, folklore, and approach to exposing social evil at the time.
This class will be conducted in Spanish. The theoretical and background readings will be provided both in English and Spanish, however most of the films to be screened are in Spanish.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a final 10-page paper will be due at the end of the course.
Prerequisites: any RSP 200-level or higher course. Students must prove proficiency in language either with Placement Test results or evidence of classes taken at required levels. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

PAULINA SALAS-SCHOOFIELD (Instructor)
ROUHI (Sponsor)

Paulina Salas-Schoofield is resident of Oaxaca, Mexico. During the past 12 years she has taught courses on Mexican Culture and Spanish Language at the Language Center of the Benito Juarez University, the Canadian International College and the Instituto Cultural Oaxaca. Paulina Salas-Schoofield studied art history at the Instituto de Cultura Superior in Mexico City, and film studies at Edinburgh University.

RLSP 16 Music Circus: John Cage and His World (Same as Music 16)

This course will explore the works, ideas, and influence of John Cage, possibly the most important American composer of the twentieth century, and other composers, artists, and movements such as Fluxus with which he was associated. Students will study his work through scores and writings as well as perform his music, create compositions using procedures such as chance operations, and build and work with many of his instrumental inventions and innovations, from the prepared piano to the amplified cactus. The class will conclude with a "Music Circus," a multi-location musical performance using instruments, radios, organic matter, and found sounds, and incorporating poetry, dance, and art, often simultaneously. This class is open to all instrumentalists, vocalists, and composers with an interest in Cage, as well as students with a background in dance, theater, writing, or visual arts. While the focus will be on Cage's music, students from other disciplines will be welcome to contribute final projects in their chosen medium. Class will meet three times a week with sessions divided between presentations, discussion, listening, and rehearsal. Additional time will be required for practice and rehearsal outside of class.
Evaluation will be based on preparation for class meetings and rehearsals, smaller projects on class topics, and final projects for the "Music Circus."
Prerequisites: Students must have a background in music, dance, writing, or visual arts. Enrollment limit: 20. If the course is overenrolled, prospective students will be asked to submit a statement of interest and description of their previous experience.
Cost to student: $30.
Meeting time: mornings.

MATTHEW GOLD (Instructor)
ROUHI (Sponsor)

Matthew Gold is a member of the percussion trio TimeTable, the Glass Farm Ensemble, and the multi-media chamber group Sequitur. An advocate of new music, he has commissioned and premiered numerous new works and has performed frequently with the Argento Chamber Ensemble, Da Capo Chamber Players, New York New Music Ensemble, Ahn Trio, SEM Ensemble, Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Alarm Will Sound, New Juilliard Ensemble, and has been a member of the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble. He appears regularly with the Mark Morris Dance Group, and was the percussionist for the Lincoln Center Theater production, The Light in the Piazza. While based in New York City, Mr. Gold is an instructor of percussion at Williams College where he directs the Williams Percussion Ensemble and serves as principal percussionist in the Berkshire Symphony.

RLSP 30 Honors Essay

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLSP 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Spanish 493-494.

RUSSIAN

RUSS S.P. Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102

Required of all students enrolled in Russian 101-102. Three meetings per week, 50 minutes per session. Practice in speaking and comprehension based on material already covered as well as some new vocabulary and constructions. Designed to maintain and enhance what was acquired during fall semester, using new approaches in a relaxed atmosphere. No homework.
Regular attendance and active participation required to earn a "Pass." Open to all.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

INYASHKIN

RUSS 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Special 25) CANCELLED!

Williams has a unique program in the Republic of Georgia, which offers students the opportunity to engage in internships in their chosen field of interest in a country that is undergoing the transition to a market economy and democracy. Past students have worked in the Georgian Parliament, helped in humanitarian relief organizations like Save the Children, interned in journalism at The Georgian Times, taught unemployed women computer skills at The Rustavi Project, documented wildlife, studied with a Georgian sculptor, done rounds at the Institute of Cardiology, and learned about transitional economies at the Georgian National Bank. Students experience Georgian culture through museum visits, concerts, lectures, meetings with Georgian students, and excursions. Visit the sacred eleventh-century Cathedral of Sveti-tskhoveli and the twentieth-century Stalin Museum, take the ancient Georgian Military Highway to ski in the Caucasus Range, see the birthplace of the wine grape in Kakheti and the region where Jason sought the Golden Fleece. Participants are housed in pairs with English-speaking families in Tbilisi, Georgia's capital city. At the end of the course students will write a 10-page paper assessing their internship experience. Knowledge of Russian or Georgian is not required.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper assessing the internship experience.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: approximately $2000.

GOLDSTEIN

RUSS 30 Honors Project

May be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RUSS 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Russian 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY-See under ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

THEATRE

THEA 12 Welcome to the Dollhouse: Playing with Dolls, From Barbie to The Sims (Same as Comparative Literature 12 and Computer Science 12)

Ready to play? This interdisciplinary course will explore how and why we play with dolls, ending with a creative project in which students will design and construct their own dolls in either virtual or material form. From Raggedy Ann and G.I. Joe to Cartoon Dolls and Mortal Kombat, dolls promote imagination in children but also encode social and behavioral patterns that can remain with us into adulthood. How are these patterns established through active play, performance and narration? How does doll playing reify or subvert racial, gender or class-based stereotypes? What are the spatial or virtual habitations of dolls and how do they govern a player's behavior? How does virtual doll playing promote the construction of alternative identities? We will study this topic through historical research, web-based interaction, film viewing, active and virtual play with dolls, attendance at a local American Girl Club meeting, and a field trip to The Strong Museum (National Museum of Play) in Rochester, NY.
Evaluation will be based on participation in all required activities, active reading, a 5-page "performance history" paper, and a creative "doll making" project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: $10.
Meeting time: mornings.

HOLZAPFEL

THEA 13 Ensembles in Classic American and European Musical Theatre

This Winter Study will give participants an opportunity to study and perform numbers for one or more singers in great American musicals and European light operas. You have sung a solo, you have sung in chorus-now practice the exacting art of singing an ensemble on stage. Music from Stephen Sondheim's "A Little Night Music" will be the central focus. The course will culminate with a performance of ensembles, solos, and duets from a variety of musical theater shows. Other ensembles from European models such as Franz Lehar's The Merry Widow may also be included. Singers, actors, and pianists are all welcome to participate.
A student may fulfill the requirements of the course by performing, writing a 10-page discursive paper, or some combination of the two approved by the teacher.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

KEITH KIBLER (Instructor)
BAKER-WHITE (Sponsor)

Keith Kibler has performed under some of the finest directors currently working including David Alden, Peter Sellars, Galina Vishnevskaya. He sang a major role in Kurt Weill's "Die Kleine Mahagonny" under Alvin Epstein with the American Repertory Theatre. He has been a featured soloist with the Boston Pops in American theater music. Keith Kibler is an adjunct teacher of singing at Williams College. He can be reached at kibler@verizon.net.

THEA 14 Winter Theatre Lab: Advanced Scene Study

This course will focus on crafting a theatrical performance through the exploration of the relationships and personal engagement inherent in two person scenes. Texts will include Miller, Williams, Chekhov and Wilson, as well as more contemporary playwrights. Classwork will concentrate on breaking down individual scenes and performances, embracing new perspectives, and developing the emotional and intellectual foundation that allows an actor to "live" the given circumstances of the scene. The goal is to train and develop the actor's instinctual approach to performance as well as his or her vocal and physical instrument. Students will be expected to do extensive text work, and memorize and rehearse (with an assigned partner) outside of class. Students will also engage in basic Meisner, clown and relaxation exercises as a group. Class will meet twice a week for three hours with additional class time as needed.
Evaluation will be based on a public presentation.
Prerequisites: Theatre 103. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

KEVIN O'ROURKE '78 (Instructor)
BAKER-WHITE (Sponsor)

Kevin O'Rourke, has performed on Broadway, off-Broadway, in television and motion pictures and has directed at the Williamstown Theatre Festival, Acadia Rep and other regional and off-Broadway companies. He serves as the Artistic Director of the Williams College Summer Theatre Lab.

THEA 15 What's Playing on American Stages

The course will look at which plays are being done in regional theatres across the coutnry as well as in New York City. Students will be expected to read and discuss several of these plays. We will visit New York as a class twice: once at the beginning of Winter Study for a weekend of play-going and information gathering; once toward the end, to see a final production-to be decided by the class.
Evaluation will be based on a theatrical review of one of the productions we will have seen.
Prerequisites: any Theatre course. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to student: $150 for theatre admissions.
Meeting time: afternoons.

EPPEL

THEA 25 Shakespeare on the British Stage: Understanding Performance (Same as English 25)

(See under ENGL 25 for full description.)

THEA 26 Fashionable London: Clothing and Fetishism from Victorian Street to Westwood Catwalk (Same as ArtH 25, History 25 and Women's and Gender Studies 25)

(See under HIST 25 for full description.)

THEA 32 Senior Honors Thesis

(See description of Degree with Honors in Theatre on page #.)

WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES

WGST 12 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Linguistics 12 and Special 12)

(See under LING 12 for full description.)

WGST 24 Youth, Gender and Social Activism in Tanzania (Same as Africana Studies 25)

(See under AFR 25 for full description.)

WGST 25 Fashionable London: Clothing and Fetishism from Victorian Street to Westwood Catwalk (Same as ArtH 25, History 25 and Theatre 26)

(See under HIST 25 for full description.)

WGST 30 Honors Project

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

SPECIALS

SPEC 10 Quest for College: Early Awareness in Berkshire County Schools

Today's extremely competitive higher education market places significant pressure on students nationwide to start planning for college at an increasingly early age while simultaneously demanding ever-higher standards of excellence for admission to top schools. "Early Awareness" initiatives aim to educate middle school students as to what lies ahead on the college horizon, empowering them to make sound academic and extracurricular choices that will keep open a maximum of options. The first week of this course will be spent in the classroom, exploring and discussing problems and issues germane to the national trends towards greater (and earlier) college-related pressures.
Students will respond to a series of readings dealing with such issues as tracking, paid test preparation and untimed testing, early decision, parental and peer pressures, special interests, misrepresentation of information, independent counseling, and others. Class time will also be devoted to familiarizing students with both the nuances of the college admission process, visiting other higher educational institutions in Berkshire County, and learning how to facilitate the early awareness game, Quest for College. Students will spend the next two weeks visiting 10-12 Berkshire County middle classes, administering the game. If student and community interest is sufficient, the course may culminate in a public presentation and open forum regarding early college awareness initiatives.
Evaluation will be based on completion of field work (school visits), organization and a final paper (approximately 10 pages) reflecting on a course-related issue of the student's choosing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Preference given to a) students with prior experience working with middle school aged youth, b) students who can be approved to operate college vehicles c) juniors and seniors. Interested students must consult with the instructor prior to registration.
Cost to student: reading packet and meals while off campus.
Meeting time: mornings.

GINA COLEMAN `90 (Instructor)
WSP COMMITTEE (Sponsor

Gina Coleman `90 is Associate Dean of Students and Head Women's Rugby Coach. Coleman, who holds a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership and Policy from the University of Nebraska, designed the early college awareness board game used in the course, Quest for College.

SPEC 11 Science for Kids (Same as Chemistry 11)

(See under CHEM 11 for full description.)

SPEC 12 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Linguistics 12 and Women's and Gender 12)

(See under LING 12 for full description.)

SPEC 13 Bodies in Motion: Introduction to Dance Composition

This studio course is a workshop in creating dance choreography. We will focus on unlocking students' individual creativity through improvisation, characterization, imagery, collaboration, explorations of space, etc. We will also study the work of master dance makers from diverse forms of dance through film viewings and readings, including Stuart Hodes' text, The Map of Making Dances.
Requirements: Attendance, active participation in showings and feedback sessions, and performance of a final project. Students will be expected to view film assignments and to work on their choreographic studies and final projects outside of class time. Students will keep a process notebook to be handed in at the end of the course. We will meet for 2 three-hour sessions a week, which will include a movement warm-up and in-classs composition exercises.
Evaluation will be based on attendance and final project showing.
Prerequisites: experience in a form of dance performance and/or technique. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to members of campus dance performing groups.
Cost to student: $30.
Meeting time: afternoons.

ERICA DANKMEYER '91 (Instructor)
BURTON (Sponsor)

Erica Dankmeyer (Williams Class of '91) dancer, choreographer and teacher, was a Soloist with the Martha Graham Dance Company for 10 years, is a faculty member of the Martha Graham School of Contemporary Dance in NYC, and has taught and performed internationally. She creates and produces her own work for her group, Dankmeyer Dance Company. She will be Visiting Lecturer in Humanities and Dance at Williams beginning Fall 2008.

SPEC 14 Ballroom Dance: History, Practice and Performance

Students will learn the history of Ballroom Dance, starting with the court of Louie XIV through to the present revival. We will learn how to Waltz, Fox-trot, Swing, Cha Cha, and Tango. Each student will be responsible for a research paper on an aspect of ballroom dance (e.g., Fred Astair's contribution). Each student, along with a partner, will prepare a choreographed ballroom dance performance for the end of Winter Study.
Evaluation will be based on the extent and quality of their research paper and the inventiveness of their choreography.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost to student: $100.
Meeting time: two hours, three afternoons a week. Students will be expected to spend an additional two hours a day on their research paper and/or their choreography.

BARBARA ROAN (Instructor)
S. BURTON and H. SILVA (Sponsors)

Barbara Roan has danced and toured in the companies of Erick Hawkins, Don Redlich, Remy Charlip, Rudy Perez, and Rod Rogers. She is currently the director of Fall Folliage Follies, a musical/dance review. Ms. Roan, with partner Danny Michaelson, teaches ballroom dance in Bennington and Manchester, Vermont and Williamstown, Massachusetts.

SPEC 15 Ski Patrol Rescue Techniques: Outdoor Emergency Care CPR

The course is in three parts. When successfully completed, it will lead to certification as a National Ski Patrol member and certification in Professional Rescue CPR. It will also be designed to teach wilderness and outdoor emergency techniques.
The Winter Outdoor Emergency Care Course designed by the National Ski Patrol is the main ingredient. It will be supplemented by the Red Cross CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer. An additional 18-hour outdoor on hill course in Ski Patrol rescue techniques will be taught. Passing all three courses will certify the student as a National Ski Patrol member if he/she is a competent skier.
The course will deal with and teach how to treat wounds of all types, shock, respiratory emergencies, poisoning, drug and alcohol emergencies, burns, frostbite and other exposures to cold, also bone, joint, and back injuries, and sudden illnesses such as heart attacks, strokes, convulsions, etc. It will also teach the use of all splints, backboards, bandages, and other rescue equipment. It will teach extrication and unusual emergency situations and the use of oxygen.
The outdoor course will include rescue toboggan handling, organization of rescues, and outdoor practical emergency care.
Classroom work will include lectures, seminars, and practical work. There will be a mid-term and a final exam which will be both written and practical. Attendance at all classes is mandatory. Enrollment limit: 18. Students will be chosen on the basis of skiing interest and ability and prior first aid experience.
Cost to student: approximately $100 for materials, books, and registration fees.
Meeting time: Each week, there will be 17 hours of classroom work plus 8 hours of practical outdoor work at Jiminy Peak ski area.

JAMES BRIGGS and SUE BRIGGS (Instructors)
WSP COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Jim Briggs is a certified OEC instructor, CPR instructor and former Director of the Williams Outing Club. Sue Briggs is a certified OEC Instructor.

SPEC 16 The Social History and Craft Form (Same as Mathematics 16)

(See under MATH 16 for full description.)

SPEC 17 Social Entrepreneurship

This course will use interactive case studies, guest appearances, readings, and extensive discussion to introduce the burgeoning field of social entrepreneurship. For this course, social entrepreneurship will be defined as individuals and organizations that develop innovative and systematic solutions to social problems. The focus of the course will be on the following areas: (1) entrepreneurs, their motivations, skill sets, and leadership capabilities and limitations; (2) innovative solutions that are either working or have promise to solve some of society's intractable problems; and (3) various organizational models that are being employed to advance these creative solutions. The study of these models will include the role of mission, objectives, strategy, and tactics as well as the challenges and opportunities social enterprises face as they attempt to take their solutions to scale. We will discuss the various sources of funding, including venture philanthropy and income generation, and how success and "return on investment" is measured. Finally, we will discuss the trends, challenges, and major players in the social entrepreneurship arena.
Students should expect to make a significant time commitment to the course. Classes will meet an average of three times per week for three hours in the morning. For those who desire, discussion and conversations will continue over lunch. Guests will be involved with the day's case(s) and will stay through lunch after class to discuss their professions and daily work lives.
Students will be evaluated 85% discussion, 15% final 10 page paper or the equivalent.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: $50-$75, which will cover the costs of books and cases.

MIKE STEVENS '73 (Instructor)
WSP Committee (Sponsor)

Mike Stevens '73 was President of New England Capital Management, Inc., an acquisition company in Boston, MA that he co-founded in 1989. In 2005, he and his partner sold the bulk of the firm's holdings. Since then he has been involved in various pursuits, including aiding non-profits and social entrepreneurs and teaching. He is a 1976 graduate of Stanford Business School and a 2005 graduate of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government.

SPEC 18 Modern Dance-Muller Technique (Same as Mathematics 13)

(See under MATH 13 for full description.)

SPEC 19 Medical Apprenticeship

Firsthand experience is a critical component of the decision to enter the health professions. Through this apprenticeship, students can clarify their understanding of the rewards and challenges that accompany the practice of all types of medicine. Apprenticeships are arranged in two distinct ways: some students live on campus and are matched with a local practitioner, while others make independent arrangements to shadow a distant professional. The expectation is that each student will observe some aspect of medicine for the better part of the day, five days per week. In recent years, students have shadowed physicians, veterinarians, dentists, nurses, and public health experts.
A 5-page reflective paper is required, as is attendance (for those shadowing near campus) at three Tuesday evening programs. Students will meet from 6:30-8:30 p.m. over dinner to hear from invited speakers from the medical community as a stimulus to discussion about their apprenticeship experiences.
Prerequisites: Interested students must attend an information meeting in early October.
Local enrollment is limited by the number of available practitioners. Preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the health professions.
Cost to student: Local apprenticeships-vaccinations and local transportation. Distant apprenticeships-costs will vary based upon location.

TEACHING ASSOCIATES (Instructors): DAVID ARMET. P.T.; CHILDSY ART, M.D.; VICTORIA CAVALLI, M.D.; JENNIIFER DEGRENIER, M.D.; MARIANNE DEMARCO, M.D.; PAUL DONOVAN, D.O.; STUART DUBUFF, M.D.; RONALD DURNING, M.D.; DAVID ELPERN, M.D.; ROBERT FANELLI, M.D.; MICHAEL GERRITY, M.D.; WADE GEBARA, M.D.; DAVID GORSON, M.D.; EUGENE GRABOWSKI, M.D.; LAURA JONES, D.V.M.; JOSHUA KLEEDERMAN, D.M.D.; WILLIAM KOBER, M.D.; JONATHAN KRANT, M.D.; WILLIAM LEVY, M.D.; PAUL MAHER, M.D.; RONALD MENSH, M.D.; CHARLES O'NEILL, M.D.; JUDY ORTON, M.D.; FERNANDO PONCE, M.D.; DANIEL ROBBINS, M.D.; OSCAR RODRIGUEZ, M.D.; SCOTT ROGGE, M.D.; PAUL ROSENTHAL, M.D.; ANTHONY SMEGLIN, M.D.; KATHERINE WISEMAN, M.D.; JEFFREY YUCHT, M.D.; CHI ZHANG, M.D. and others.

JANE CARY
Health Professions Advisor

SPEC 20 GET A JOB! Find a Fulfilling Career Path that Fits Your Personality (Same as Chemistry 12 and Psychology 11)

(See under CHEM 12 for full description.)

SPEC 21 The Psychology of the Workplace; a Field Study with Williams Alumni/Parents

Field experience is a critical component of the decision to enter a profession. Through this field study, students can clarify their understanding of the rewards and challenges that accompany the practice of many different aspects within a profession, and understand the psychology of the workplace. Field placements are arranged in two distinct ways: some students live on campus and are matched with a local professional, while others make independent arrangements to work with a distant professional. The expectation is that each student will observe some aspect of the profession for the better part of the day, five days per week. It is also expected that the teaching associate will assign a specific project to be completed within the three-and-a-half week duration of the course depending upon appropriateness.
Participation in this winter study will require the student to quickly assess the work environment, make inferences about corporate culture, performance norms and expectations, and to take initiative not only to learn from this experience, but also to contribute where and when appropriate. Understanding the dynamics within a work environment is critical to success in any organization and this hands-on experience will illuminate lessons learned in the classroom. Upon completion of the winter study, it is expected that the student write a thorough report evaluating and interpreting the experience.
Method of evaluation: It is expected that students will complete assigned readings, keep a daily journal, and write a 5-page expository review and evaluation that will become public record as a resource for other students. Finally, the student will be expected to create a 20-minute Powerpoint presentation on his/her experience due at the end of Winter Study. If possible the student will make a presentation to fellow students at some time during the spring semester.
Required activities and Meeting time: The expectation is that each student will be in the field to observe some aspect of the profession for the better part of the day, five days per week. In addition to observation there may be an opportunity to work on distinct projects generated by the instructor depending upon appropriateness.
Prerequisites: interested students must attend an information meeting in early October, and meet individually with John Noble to go over the details of their placements. Preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the profession of interest.
Enrollment is limited by the number of available teaching associates (maximum 20). Preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the profession of interest.
Meeting time: each student will be in the field to observe some aspect of the profession five days per week, at least 6 hours per day.
Cost to student: Local apprenticeships-local transportation. Distant apprenticeships-costs will vary based upon location, but are the responsibility of the student.
Teaching Associates (instructors): Williams College alumni and parents of current Williams students will be recruited to become instructors for this course. A broad range of professions will be represented as the course develops. Alumni and parents will receive a training packet and individual orientations with the course director in person or via telephone conference.

JOHN NOBLE, Director of Career Counseling (Sponsor)

SPEC 24 Eye care and Culture on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua

Continuing the model of recent eye care winter studies in Nicaragua, the trip will follow a similar protocol. In cooperation with Ray Hooker, President of FADCANIC (The Foundation for the Autonomy and Development of the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua) who has assisted us in all of our previous course and certain professors of the New England College of Optometry (specifically Dr. Bruce Moore, Dr. Nicole Quinn and Dr. Elise Harb) who have previously trained our students in the prescription of reading and distance glasses and have accompanied our trips, we are proposing a follow up course continuing our work of prescribing glasses and also the training of local medical personnel to prescribe and distribute glasses as a sustaining project. In preparation for this proposed trip, at the conclusion of our 2007 trip, we left approximately 2500 pairs of glasses and other materials and supplies in Pearl Lagoon for future work.
After a partial week of classes on campus on the culture and politics of Nicaragua and a weekend of training in the prescribing of glasses we would travel to Managua for a day of cultural visits (national museum, Masaya Volcano, Huembes market). We would then travel to Bluefields to continue our work of clinics as well as training local health care workers to prescribe and distribute reading and distance glasses. We would train and conduct clinics around Bluefields as well as in Pearl Lagoon.
Finally we would travel to Corn Island and possibly Little Corn Island to conduct some clinics as well as some training of health care workers. We would then return to Managua to spend the night and then return to the U.S. the next day.
The course would conclude with the sharing of specific incidents and insights that were important learning about ourselves and the developing world.
Enrollment limit: 14. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: $2500.

ROBERT PECK (Instructor)
WSP COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Dr. Robert Peck, retired Director of Athletics at Williams (1971-2001), is a 24-year visitor and observer of Nicaraguan politics.

SPEC 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Russian 25) CANCELLED!

(See under RUSS 25 for full description.)

SPEC 26 Resettling Refugees in Maine (Same as Mathematics 26)

Sponsored by the Gaudino Scholar and the Gaudino Fund in 2008 and now again for 2009, this Winter Study travel course will allow a small group of students to live in Portland, Maine for the month of January, where they will explore the impact of over thirty years of refugee resettlement in the 'whitest' of the United States. Each student will live with a refugee family from one of the over two dozen countries represented by the refugee communities of Portland, and during her or his home stay will encounter first-hand the issues confronting recent immigrants to the United States from Southeast Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe or Latin America. Students will keep a daily journal to record their experiences working with their refugee family and the organizations that serve them. Students will be exposed to such issues as race, ethnicity, and national identity; the interplay of public and private values; the wide variety of educational, health, governmental, and religious agencies and providers serving refugee families; and how these services are perceived and received by family members. Students will meet weekly with the course instructor to discuss how their experiences are going; they will also have a chance to meet with a group of refugee and international students at the local community college, and with some State officials serving the multicultural communities. Students as a group will also have time in Maine at the beginning of the program for an orientation session, and at the conclusion to share experiences with each other and write a short reflection paper..
No prerequisites. If student interest exceeds the enrollment limit, preference will be given to those students who demonstrate, in a short conversation with and essay submitted to the instructor, their interest in experiential learning generally and the problems confronting recent immigrants to the United States specifically. Enrollment limit: 6. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: $550 plus travel to and from Portland, Me.

JEFF THALER '74 (Instructor)
BURGER (Sponsor)

Jeff Thaler '74 participated in Williams-at-Home with Professor Robert Gaudino in 1971-72. After Professor Gaudino's death in 1974, Jeff and some other alumni developed an initiative that eventually became the Gaudino Memorial Fund. Jeff served on the Board of the Fund for many years, including service as its Chair. Since 1974, Jeff graduated from Yale Law School in 1977, worked as a public defender in New York City from 1977-79, and has lived in Maine since 1979, where he has worked as a trial and environmental attorney. He has taught environmental law as an adjunct professor at the Maine Law School, as well as family law as an adjunct professor at Bowdoin College. Jeff directed this WSP in January 2008; has worked as a mentor for a Sudanese student attending Portland High School; and has worked as a group facilitator for the past seven years at the Center for Grieving Children in Portland.

SPEC 27 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography) (Same as ArtH 12 and English 12)

(See under ENGL 12 for full description.)

SPEC 28 Teaching Practica in New York City Schools

Open to Sophomores, juniors and seniors who are interested in working in various kinds of public schools in New York City. Participants will be expected to pursue a full day's program of observing, teaching, tutoring and mentoring in their choice of more than 20 different school situations in NYC from elementary through high school. Each of the participating schools will have a resident supervisor who will meet with the January interns to arrange individual schedules and provide mentoring during the month. There will be weekly seminar meetings of all the interns who are expected to participate in group discussions, keep a journal and write a 5 page paper reflecting upon their experience.
The Course Instructor will conduct orientation meetings with students prior to January, matching each student's interests with appropriate teaching subject area(s) and a host school.
Dormitory-style housing will be provided along with some assistance with transportation and food costs-estimated at $400 for the term. Further assistance is available for financial aid students.
Evaluation will be based on a journal and a 5-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: $400.
Meeting time: off-campus fieldwork: daily 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. and weekly seminar dinners.

TRACY FINNEGAN (Instructor)
WSP COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Tracy Finnegan is a master's level teacher with training and teaching experience in a variety of approaches and settings.

SPEC 35 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel

Each class will begin with a lecture-demonstration, followed by practice on the potter's wheel. Each student will have the use of a potter's wheel for each class. We will work on mugs, bowls, pitchers, plates, jars, lids, vases, and bottles, and will finish these shapes as required by trimming and adding handles, lugs, lids, spouts, and knobs. We will also work on several different handbuilding projects. After the tenth class session, all class work will be biscuit-fired. The eleventh class will be devoted to glazing the biscuited pieces. Glazing techniques will include pouring, dipping, layering, brushing, and stamping, and using wax resist and other masking techniques to develop pattern and design. The completed work will then be glaze-fired. The last meeting will be devoted to a "final project" gallery show of your best work. Woven into lecture-demonstrations will be presentations on various topics relating to the science and history of pottery making.
Requirements: attendance at all class sessions and enthusiasm for learning the craft of pottery making.
No prerequisites or potterymaking experience necessary. Enrollment limit: 9.
Cost to student: $215 lab fee, plus makeup class fees ($37.50 per class) if applicable.
Meeting time: mornings.

RAY BUB (Instructor)
WSP Committee (Sponsor)

Ray Bub is a ceramic artist and teacher at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery in Pownal, Vermont, 10 minutes north of the Williams College campus. All classes except the final project exhibition take place at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery.

SPEC 39 "Composing a Life:" Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams

To be at Williams you have learned to be a successful student, but how do you learn to be successful in life? How will you define success in both your career and in your personal life? How will you achieve balance between the two? In short, what will constitute the "good life" for you? We borrow the concept of "composing a life" from Mary Catherine Bateson, as an apt metaphor for the ongoing process of defining success and balance in life. This course is designed: (1) To offer college students an opportunity to examine and define their beliefs, values, and assumptions about their future personal and professional lives before entering the "real" world; (2) To encourage students to gain a better understanding of how culture, ideology, and opportunity affect their life choices; (3) To provide an opportunity for students to consider different models of success and balance through "living cases" (in the form of guests from various professions and lifestyles); and (4) To aid students in contemplating their career options through individual advising and introducing various career and life planning resources. Using selected readings, cases, and guest speakers, we will explore both the public context of the workplace as well as the private context of individuals and their personal relationships in determining life choices.
Requirements: regular attendance, class participation, field interview, and a 10-page final paper. Weekly assignments include cases and readings from a variety of related fields, and some self-reflection exercises
No prerequisites. Questions about the course: please contact Michele Moeller Chandler at 458-8106 or michele.chandler2@verizon.net Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for cases/reading materials.
Meeting time: mornings-two-hour classes three times a week

MICHELE MOELLER CHANDLER and CHIP CHANDLER (Instructors)
TOOMAJIAN (Sponsor)

Michele Moeller Chandler (`73) and Chip Chandler (`72) have taught this Winter Study course for the past twelve years. They have been both personally and professionally engaged in the course topic. Michele, a former college administrator, has an M.A. from Columbia, and a Ph.D. from Northwestern. Chip, a retired McKinsey senior partner, has an M.B.A. from Harvard, and currently teaches in the Leadership Studies Program.

WILLIAMS PROGRAM IN TEACHING

Students interested in exploring one or more of the following courses related to teaching and/or working with children and adolescents should contact Susan Engel, Director of Education Programs, who will be able to help you choose one that best suits your educational goals.

ANSO 11 Berkshire Farm Internship

(See under ANSO 11 for full description.)

ANSO 12 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

(See under ANSO 12 for full description.)

CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as Special 11)

(See under CHEM 11 for full description.)

LING 12 Preliminary Introduction to American Sign Language (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 12 and Special 12)

(See under LING 12 for full description.)

SPEC 28 Teaching Practica in New York City Schools

(See under SPEC 28 for full description.)

WILLIAMS-MYSTIC PROGRAM IN AMERICAN MARITIME STUDIES

An interdisciplinary one-semester program co-sponsored by Williams College and Mystic Seaport which includes credit for one winter study. Classes in maritime history, literature of the sea, marine ecology, oceanography, and marine policy are supplemented by field seminars: offshore sailing, Pacific Coast and Louisiana. For details, see "Williams-Mystic Maritime Studies Program" or our website: web.williams.edu/williamsmystic.