WINTER STUDY PROGRAM

REMINDERS ABOUT WSP REGISTRATION

All students who will be on campus during the 2009-2010 academic year must register for WSP. Registration will take place in the early part of fall semester. If you are registered for a senior thesis in the fall which must be continued through Winter Study by departmental rules, you will be registered for your Winter Study Project automatically. In every other case, you must complete registration. First-year students are required to participate in a Winter Study that will take place on campus; they are not allowed to do 99's.

Even if you plan to take a 99, or the instructor of your first choice accepts you during the registration period, there are many things that can happen between registration and the beginning of Winter Study to upset your first choice, so you must list five choices. You should try to make one of your choices a project with a larger enrollment, not that it will guarantee you a project, but it will increase your chances.

If you think your time may be restricted in any way (ski meets, interviews, etc.), clear these restrictions with the instructor before signing up for his/her project.

Remember, for cross-listed projects, you should sign up for the subject you want to appear on your record.

For many beginning language courses, you are required to take the WSP Sustaining Program in addition to your regular project. You will be automatically enrolled in this Sustaining Program, so no one should list this as a choice.

The grade of honors is reserved for outstanding or exceptional work. Individual instructors may specify minimum standards for the grade, but normally, fewer than one out of ten students will qualify. A grade of pass means the student has performed satisfactorily. A grade of perfunctory pass signifies that a student's work has been significantly lacking but is just adequate to deserve a pass.

If you have any questions about a project, see the instructor before you register.

Finally, all work for WSP must be completed and submitted to the instructor no later than January 28, 2010. Only the Dean can grant an extension beyond this date.

WINTER STUDY 99'S

Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible to propose "99's," independent projects arranged with faculty sponsors, conducted in lieu of regular Winter Study courses. Perhaps you have encountered an interesting idea in one of your courses which you would like to study in more depth, or you may have an interest not covered in the regular curriculum. In recent years students have undertaken in-depth studies of particular literary works, interned in government offices, assisted in foreign and domestic medical clinics, conducted field work in economics in developing countries, and given performances illustrating the history of American dance. Although some 99's involve travel away from campus, there are many opportunities to pursue intellectual or artistic goals here in Williamstown.

99 forms are available online: http://web.williams.edu/Registrar/winterstudy/99direct.html

The deadline for submitting the proposals to faculty sponsors is October 1, 2009.

Winter Study Courses

AFR 15 Black Independent Cinema (Same as American Studies 17 and English 15)

AFR 18 Douglass, Davis, Obama: Fugitive Democratic Theory (Same as Political Science 18)

AFR 25 Gender, Video, and Social Activism in Senegal

AFR 30 Senior Project

AMST 10 What Does It Really Mean to “Want Your MTV”?: Reading Race, Gender, and Sexuality in U.S. Music Video (Same as Latina/o Studies 10 and Women's and Gender Studies 10)

AMST 12 Island at the Center of the World: Early and Contemporary Views of New York City Using Google Earth (Same as Economics 12, Environmental Studies 11 and History 12) CANCELLED!


AMST 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as Special 15)

AMST 16 Education for Liberation: An Introduction to Social Justice Education (Same as Political Science 16 and Women's and Gender Studies 16)

AMST 17 Black Independent Cinema (Same as Africana Studies 15 and English 15)

AMST 20 Pictures and Words: Documentary Storytelling (Same as ArtS 20 and Political Science 20)

AMST 30 Senior Honors Project

AMST 35 Singing School: Sacred Choral Traditions in the Berkshires and Beyond (Same as Music 35 and Special 35)

ANSO 10 Meditation-Based Stress Reduction: Adopting a Mindfulness Practice (Same as Religion 10)

ANSO 11 Berkshire Farm Internship

ANSO 12 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

ANSO 13 Epidemiology, Public Health, and Leadership in the Health Professions (Same as Leadership Studies 13 and Chemistry 17)

ANTH 25 Archaeology in Ethiopia (Same as Chemistry 25)

ANTH 31 Senior Thesis

SOC 11 Verbatim: Adventures in Ethnographic Theater (Same as Theater 11)

SOC 31 Senior Thesis

ARAB S.P. Sustaining Program for Arabic 101-102

ARTH 12 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography) (Same as English 12 and Special 27)

ARTH 13 Masterpieces of French Cinema (Same as French 13)

ARTH 31 Senior Thesis

ARTH 33 Honors Independent Study

ARTS 10 Art in Community

ARTS 11 Sources of Inspiration: Shamans, Beatniks and Analysts

ARTS 13 The Visual Display of Information: Building Timelines

ARTS 14 A Smaller Better Home

ARTS 15 The Glass Art Movement: Experiencing Glass Through History and Practice CANCELLED!

ARTS 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as Chemistry 16)

ARTS 17 Cardboard Pop-Imagining the Consumber Object

ARTS 18 Figure Drawing

ARTS 19 Art and Disability (Same as Special 12)

ARTS 20 Pictures and Words: Documentary Storytelling (Same as American Studies 20 and Political Science 20)

ARTS 22 In the Blink of an Eye (Same as Biology 14)

ARTS 27 Printmaking on Paper Clay (Same as English 27)

ARTS 33 Senior Studio: Independent Project

ASST 31 Senior Thesis

CHIN 88 Sustaining Program for Chinese 101-102

CHIN 10 Chinese Painting

CHIN 11 Introduction to Chinese Wellness

CHIN 31 Senior Thesis

JAPN 88 Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102

JAPN 31 Senior Thesis

ASTR 10 Applied Aerodynamics

ASTR 12 Pluto and Other Dwarf Planets

ASTR 31 Senior Research

ASPH 31 Senior Research

BIOL 10 Electron Microscopy

BIOL 11 Global Health: Why We Should Care

BIOL 12 Aspects of Cardiovascular Medicine

BIOL 14 In the Blink of an Eye (Same as ArtS 22)

BIOL 16 The Zen of Bicycle Maintenance at Mt. Greylock

BIOL 21 Science Beyond Williams

BIOL 22 Introduction to Biological Research

BIOL 31 Senior Thesis

CHEM 10 Zymurgy

CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as Special 11)

CHEM 12 Current Research in Renewable Energy and Energy Storage CANCELLED!

CHEM 13 The Chemistry in Art or the Art of Chemistry

CHEM 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as Psychology 14 and Special 14)

CHEM 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as ArtS 16)

CHEM 17 Epidemiology, Public Health, and Leadership in the Health Professions (Same as ANSO 13 and Leadership Studies 13)

CHEM 18 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry

CHEM 20 Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry

CHEM 23 Introduction to Research in Organic Chemistry

CHEM 25 Archaeology in Ethiopia (Same as Anthropology 25)

CHEM 31 Senior Research and Thesis

CLAS 12 The History of Words

CLAS 31 Senior Thesis

COGS 31 Senior Thesis

COMP 10 The Grand Hotel in Modern Fiction and Film

COMP 12T Nikolai Gogol's Petersburg Tales (Same as Russian 12T)

COMP 20 What Was Monet Thinking?-Understanding Art, for Non-Art Majors (Same as Special 20)

COMP 31 Senior Thesis

LIT 31 Senior Thesis

CSCI 10 Introduction to Unix, Programming Tools and C

CSCI 12 Computer Animation Production

CSCI 14 LEGO Robot Engineering CANCELLED!

CSCI 31 Senior Honor Thesis

CMAJ 31 Senior Thesis

ECON 11 Public Speaking

ECON 12 Island at the Center of the World: Early and Contemporary Views of New York City Using Google Earth (Same as American Studies 12, Environmental Studies 11 and History 12)CANCELLED!


ECON 13 Introduction to Indian Cinema

ECON 14 Accounting

ECON 15 Stock Market

ECON 16 AIG and the Global Financial Crisis

ECON 17 Understanding Current Economic Issues

ECON 18 Discover Modern Chinese Economy through the Lens of Data

ECON 19 LaTeX for the Rest of Us

ECON 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (Same as Political Economy 22)

ECON 23 Introduction to the Economics, Geography and Appreciation of Wine

ECON 30 Honors Project

ECON 31 Honors Thesis

ECON 51 The Practice of Monetary Policy

ECON 52 Research in Development Economics

ECON 53 Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Modeling: Construction and Analysis

ECON 57 Tools for Time Series Econometrics

ENGL 10 Silent Film Comedy CANCELLED!

ENGL 11 The Pictures of Dorian Gray

ENGL 12 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography (Same as ArtH 12 and Special 27)

ENGL 13 Obsession

ENGL 14 Teaching High School English

ENGL 15 Black Independent Cinema (Same as Africana Studies 15 and American Studies 17)

ENGL 16 Journalism

ENGL 17 Virtual Realities

ENGL 18 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel

ENGL 19 Words and Music by Bob Dylan (Same as Music 11)

ENGL 20 The Art of Ingmar Bergman (Same as Philosophy 14 and Theatre 14)

ENGL 25 Morocco (Same as International Studies 25 and Philosophy 25)

ENGL 27 Printmaking on Paper Clay (Same as ArtS 27)

ENGL 29 Peer Writing Tutor Workshop (Same as INTR 29)

ENGL 30 Honors Project: Specialization Route

ENGL 31 Honors Project: Thesis

ENVI 10 Geology of the National Parks (Same as Geosciences 14)

ENVI 11 Island at the Center of the World: Early and Contemporary Views of New York City Using Google Earth (Same as American Studies 12, Economics 12 and History 12) CANCELLED!

ENVI 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Geosciences 12)

ENVI 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Roots, Its Uncertain Future (Same as Legal Studies 13)

ENVI 14 Sustainable Agriculture: On The Farm

ENVI 15 Williams' Sustainability and Student Engagement CANCELLED!

ENVI 25 Sustainable Tourism: Ecological Development in a Small Island Nation

ENVI 26 Vermont's Northeast Kingdom: the 19th Century Meets the 21st Century

ENVI 31 Senior Research and Thesis

GEOS 10 The Digital Darkroom

GEOS 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Environmental Studies 12)

GEOS 14 Geology of the National Parks (Same as Environmental Studies 10)

GEOS 25 Monitoring a Coral Reef Complex

GEOS 31 Senior Thesis

GERM 88 Sustaining Program for German 101-102

GERM 25 Changing Vienna

GERM 30 Honors Project

GERM 31 Senior Thesis

HIST 10 "The Fatherland in Cleats": Soccer and Identities in the Americas

HIST 11 Waste

HIST 12 Island at the Center of the World: Early and Contemporary Views of New York City Using Google Earth (Same as American Studies 12, Economics 12 and Environmental Studies 11) CANCELLED!

HIST 16 Genealogy

HIST 17 The Fight for Free Speech in America

HIST 18 The Guitar in American Culture

HIST 19 The Vietnam War in Literature and Film

HIST 20 1972-73

HIST 23 Investigative Tips for the Incurably Curious

HIST 31 Senior Thesis

INTR 29 Peer Writing Tutor Workshop (Same as English 29)

INST 25 Morocco (Same as English 25 and Philosophy 25)

INST 30 Senior Honors Project

LATS 10 What Does It Really Mean to “Want Your MTV”?: Reading Race, Gender, and Sexuality in U.S. Music Video (Same as American Studies 10 and Women's and Gender Studies 10)

LATS 12 Waking the Dead: Funeral Homes and Funerals as Sites of Identity and Community


LEAD 10 Institutional Leadership and Social Responsibility

LEAD 12 Making Sense of the CIA (Same as Political Science 12)

LEAD 13 Epidemiology, Public Health, and Leadership in the Health Professions (Same as ANSO 13 and Chemistry 17)

LEAD 18 Wilderness Leadership

LGST 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Roots, Its Uncertain Future (Same as Environmental Studies 13)

LING 10 Linguistic Typology and the Science of Constructed Languages

MATH 10 LQWURGXFWLRQ WR FUBSWRJUDSKB

MATH 11 Teaching Mathematics at BArT (Same as Special 17)

MATH 12 Contemporary Movie Criticism

MATH 13 Atheism (Same as Religion 13)

MATH 14 The Art and Science of Baking

MATH 15 Mathematics of the Rubik's Cube

MATH 23 Gaudino Winter Study Fellows Program

MATH 25 Graduate School Blog

MATH 26 Resettling Refugees in Maine (Same as Special 26)

MATH 30 Senior Project

MATH 31 Senior Thesis

MUS 10 Symphonic Winds

MUS 11 Words and Music by Bob Dylan (Same as English 19)

MUS 12 "Wherefore Art Thou?": Musical Explorations of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

MUS 13 Microtonal Eartraining, Performance and Composition

MUS 14 Soul of Jazz

MUS 31 Senior Thesis

MUS 35 Singing School: Sacred Choral Traditions in the Berkshires and Beyond (Same as American Studies 35 and Special 35)

NSCI 31 Senior Thesis

PHIL 10 The Philosophy of Chess

PHIL 11 Two Great Board Games: Chess and Go

PHIL 12 Ethics Bowl: Case-based Reasoning in Ethics

PHIL 13 God in Philosophy

PHIL 14 The Art of Ingmar Bergman (Same as English 20 and Theatre 14)

PHIL 25 Morocco (Same as English 25 and International Studies 25)

PHIL 31 Senior Thesis

PHYS 10 Light and Holography

PHYS 12 Meet the Right Side of Your Brain: Drawing as a Learnable Skill

PHYS 13 Scientific Computing and Visualization

PHYS 22 Research Participation

PHYS 31 Senior Thesis

POEC 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as Political Science 21)

POEC 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (Same as Economics 22)

POEC 23 Institutional Investment

POEC 25 Eye Care and Culture on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua

POEC 31 Honors Thesis

PSCI 10 War in American Cinema

PSCI 12 Making Sense of the CIA (Same as Leadership Studies 12)

PSCI 13 The Third World City

PSCI 14 The Federal Bench

PSCI 15 Catholic Political Economy (Same as Religion 15)

PSCI 16 Education for Liberation: An Introduction to Social Justice Education (Same as American Studies 16 and Women's and Gender Studies 16)

PSCI 18 Douglass, Davis, Obama: Fugitive Democratic Theory (Same as Africana Studies 18)

PSCI 19 In Treatment: Exploring the Path Back from Debt Addiction and Financial Stress

PSCI 20 Pictures and Words: Documentary Storytelling (Same as ArtS 20 and American Studies 20)

PSCI 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as Political Economy 21)

PSCI 23 Great Writing, Great Teaching (Same as Special 23) CANCELLED!

PSCI 31 Senior Thesis

PSCI 32 Individual Project

PSYC 10 Immortality Bites: Meaning and Metaphor in Vampire Mythology

PSYC 11 Community Screening for Alzheimer's Disease

PSYC 12 Alternative Birth Choices (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 12)

PSYC 13 Animal Personality: Theory and Research

PSYC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as Chemistry 14 and Special 14)

PSYC 15 Ephquilts: An Introduction to Traditional Quilting

PSYC 19 Psychology in Action

PSYC 22 Introduction to Research in Psychology

PSYC 31 Senior Thesis

REL 10 Meditation-Based Stress Reduction: Adopting a Mindfulness Practice (Same as ANSO 10)

REL 11 Kierkegaard and Religion

REL 12 Create Your Life with Yoga

REL 13 Atheism (Same as Mathematics 13)

REL 15 Catholic Political Economy (Same as Political Science 15)

REL 25 Explorations in Solidarity: a Meeting of Minds and Hearts in Nicaragua

REL 31 Senior Thesis

RLFR 88 Sustaining Program for French 101-102

RLFR 13 Masterpieces of French Cinema (Same as ArtH 13)

RLFR 30 Honors Essay

RLFR 31 Senior Thesis

RLIT 88 Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102

RLSP 88 Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102

RLSP 30 Honors Essay

RLSP 31 Senior Thesis

RUSS 88 Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102

RUSS 12T Nikolai Gogol's Petersburg Tales (Same as Comparative Literature 12)

RUSS 13 Humane Medicine and the Medical Humanities

RUSS 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Special 25)

RUSS 30 Honors Project

RUSS 31 Senior Thesis

THEA 10 Theatrical Lighting Design

THEA 11 Verbatim: Adventures in Ethnographic Theater (Same as Sociology 11)

THEA 14 The Art of Ingmar Bergman (Same as English 20 and Philosophy 14)

THEA 32 Senior Honors Thesis

WGST 10 What Does It Really Mean to “Want Your MTV”?: Reading Race, Gender, and Sexuality in U.S. Music Video (Same as American Studies 10 and Latina/o Studies 10)

WGST 12 Alternative Birth Choices (Same as Psychology 12)

WGST 16 Education for Liberation: An Introduction to Social Justice Education (Same as American Studies 16 and Political Science 16)

WGST 30 Honors Project

SPEC 10 Quest for College: Early Awareness in Berkshire County Schools

SPEC 11 Science for Kids (Same as Chemistry 11)

SPEC 12 Art and Disability (Same as ArtS 19)

SPEC 13 Literary Journalism in Practice

SPEC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as Chemistry 14 and Psychology 14)

SPEC 15 Contemporary American Songwriter (Same as American Studies 15)

SPEC 16 Peer Support/Counseling Skills Training

SPEC 17 Teaching Mathematics at BArT (Same as Mathematics 11)

SPEC 18 Ernest Becker: The Denial of Death

SPEC 19 Medical Apprenticeship

SPEC 20 What Was Monet Thinking?-Understanding Art, for Non-Art Majors (Same as Comparative Literature 20)

SPEC 21 The Psychology of the Workplace; a Field Study with Williams Alumni/Parents

SPEC 23 Great Writing, Great Teaching (Same as Political Science 23) CANCELLED!

SPEC 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Russian 25)

SPEC 26 Resettling Refugees in Maine (Same as Mathematics 26)

SPEC 27 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography) (Same as ArtH 12 and English 12)

SPEC 28 Teaching Practica in New York City Schools

SPEC 29 Applied Data Analysis

SPEC 39 "Composing a Life:" Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams

SPEC 35 Singing School: Sacred Choral Traditions in the Berkshires and Beyond (Same as American Studies 35 and Musicl 35)


AFRICANA STUDIES

AFR 15 Black Independent Cinema (Same as American Studies 17 and English 15)

(See under ENGL 15 for full description.)

AFR 18 Douglass, Davis, Obama: Fugitive Democratic Theory (Same as Political Science 18)

The political theorist Sheldon S. Wolin has asserted that the American republic is a fugitive democracy, a democracy that is unsustainable due to the coercive norms of political elites and corporate CEOs who rule in advanced industrial capitalist societies. While Wolin's theory is probing, a much more radical critique and reconstructive conception of American democracy had been developed in the tradition of African-American political thought over two hundred years earlier. This course shall investigate the life and work of the fugitive-turned-ex-slave Frederick Douglass, the imprisoned intellectual and socialist black feminist Angela Y. Davis, and the liberal constitutional lawyer-politician Barack Hussein Obama as three examples of fugitive thinkers seeking to refashion the meaning of democracy in dark times. We will focus our class discussions primarily on Douglass's middle autobiography, My Bondage and My Freedom, Davis's Angela Davis: An Autobiography, and Obama's Dreams from My Father. We shall supplement analysis of these autobiographical writings with selections from the authors' critical public speeches, interviews, and essays. Additionally, the class will integrate the viewing of films and documentaries to complement the written texts. The course shall end with students proposing via an autobiographical video their own vision of what democracy means and what life in a democracy should look like.
Evaluation will be based upon class participation, composition of an autobiographical democracy time capsule video, and an 8-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $50 for books.
Meeting time: afternoons, two hours per session, TWR.

ROBERTS

AFR 25 Gender, Video, and Social Activism in Senegal

This course builds on the foundation of previous Winter Study Courses run in Senegal, Uganda and Tanzania. This year we propose to introduce students to the work of non-governmental and grassroots health and social organizations in Senegal, in French West Africa. We will deepen and further develop the model of collaborative video work with AIDS activists, working with new groups of activists and expanding the work in two important ways. First, we will now train our African partners in editing as well as filming, leaving them able to make their own videos after we leave. And secondly, we will engage throughout the course in an explicit and theoretically informed discussion of the use of video in activism, and diverse representations of Africa and HIV in film and video.
The collaborative video work we have been building is proving to be a very powerful tool, both for our students and the African groups we have been partnering with. One of the videos we made in Senegal in 2008 is now being used nationally to persuade youth to be tested for HIV (the youtube version has already had over 2,500 views:)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDdCRDdg5Xo&feature=channel
and this summer WIT will be developing a webpage to collect and display the videos.
In Senegal as elsewhere, local and national groups have sprung up in response to concerns about poverty, unemployment, disease, and other pressing issues. Particularly inspiring are a number of AIDS education and awareness groups that women have started up to halt the spread of the disease in their communities and to offer support to those living with it. Students in this course will get to meet and learn from social and health education activists, such as the DEGGO organization in Mbour, a fishing port south of Dakar; Xel ak Xalaat, based in Rufisque, nearer the capital; and AWA, in Dakar.
In addition to gaining an understanding of the breadth, purpose and genesis of social activism in Senegal, students will learn of the mixed effects of Western commerce and tourism on the country. Non-governmental groups (NGOs), both those run by Senegalese and those directed by foreigners, grapple with the legacy of French colonial structures and the present-day reality of market capitalism in an impoverished country. These circumstances create a politically complex backdrop against which NGOs struggle to achieve their goals. As such, part of the work of our Williams group will be to understand the challenges and practical impediments these NGOs face against a background of pervasive North-South power dynamics and inequality.
Articulated with that analysis will be an analysis of Senegalese gender systems, and their interaction with the political economy and with HIV. Gender has been widely recognized as a crucial component in the African AIDS pandemic; but it is vital to go beyond generalizations about patriarchal African culture to an understanding of the contestation over gender within a specific locale. Senegal is a particularly rich case study as a Muslim country where women play a central role in anti-poverty and AIDS activism.
The winter study will start with 5 days in Williamstown, reading, training in video editing, and preparing background for the experience. After a day of traveling, we will spend 5 days in Dakar being hosted by ACI (Africa Consultants International, a local NGO), who will provide the students with cultural introductions, basic Wolof classes, and background lectures on the landscape of HIV and grassroots activism in Senegal. They will also organize homestays with Senegalese families. We will then move to either Kaolack or Louga, to spend 8 days working with members of 3 or 4 Senegalese NGOs to make collaborative video projects. Students will be in homestays here again. We will end the trip with a day of debriefing and screening our videos before returning to the US.
Requirements: As well as working on the video projects, students are encouraged to keep a journal of their reflections whilst in Senegal. They will also participate in a video screening and report back to the Williams community upon return to campus.
Prerequisites: The course is open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Basic, conversational French strongly recommended and preference will go to students with some French. Those students who have no French at all are encouraged to enroll in a French language course in fall 2009 if at all possible. Video editing skills will also be recommended. Enrollment limit: 10. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: approximately $3,740.

HONDERICH and MUTONGI

AFR 30 Senior Project

To be taken by students registered for Africana Studies 491 who are candidates for honors.

AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 10 What Does It Really Mean to “Want Your MTV”?: Reading Race, Gender, and Sexuality in U.S. Music Video (Same as Latina/o Studies 10 and Women's and Gender Studies 10)

(See under LATS 10 for full description.)

AMST 12 Island at the Center of the World: Early and Contemporary Views of New York City Using Google Earth (Same as Economics 12, Environmental Studies 11 and History 12)

(See under ECON 12 for full description.)

AMST 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as Special 15)

(See under SPEC 15 for full description.)

AMST 16 Education for Liberation: An Introduction to Social Justice Education (Same as Political Science 16 and Women's and Gender Studies 16)

(See under PSCI 16 for full description.)

AMST 17 Black Independent Cinema (Same as Africana Studies 15 and English 15)

(See under ENGL 15 for full description.)

AMST 20 Pictures and Words: Documentary Storytelling (Same as ArtS 20 and Political Science 20)

(See under PSCI 20 for full description.)

AMST 30 Senior Honors Project

To be taken by students registered for American Studies 491 or 492.

AMST 35 Singing School: Sacred Choral Traditions in the Berkshires and Beyond (Same as Music 35 and Special 35)

(See under SPEC 35 for full description.)

ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

ANSO 10 Meditation-Based Stress Reduction: Adopting a Mindfulness Practice (Same as Religion 10)

This course provides an opportunity to actively participate in your own health and well-being. You will be introduced to the concept of mindfulness and guided in how to create your own mindfulness practice, one that incorporates meditation and yoga. Mindfulness is a way of relating directly to what is happening in your life, a way of taking charge of your life, a way of doing something for yourself that no one else can do for you-consciously and systematically working with your own stress, pain, illness and the challenges and demands of collegiate life.
We will meet twice per week for 3-hour sessions of meditation, yoga, and inquiry into the interplay of mind and body in health and illness, calm and stress. We will also look at the roots of this practice in the Hindu and Buddhist faiths, with specific emphasis on the influence of Buddhist meditation on this secular stress reduction practice.
Students are required to commit to 30 minutes of mindfulness meditation practice on a daily basis. Additional assignments will include weekly reading of texts relevant to the course as well as brief presentations of concepts from these texts. You will be evaluated on these presentations, as well as a final paper. Attendance and participation will also be taken into account.
No prerequisites. Please note: After signing up for the course, please send a brief email statement to the instructor at pbohnert@gmail.com, describing your interest and objectives for the course. In the event of over-subscription, these statements will be used in the selection process. All queries about this course should be directed to the instructor, who can be reached at 617-642-5165 or at pbohnert@gmail.com. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: $50 for a yoga mat and two books. Meditation cushions will be provided by the instructor.
Meeting time: twice per week for 3-hour sessions.

PETER BOHNERT (Instructor)
FOIAS (Sponsor)

Peter Bohnert is an ordained lay Zen Buddhist priest and is an assistant teacher at the Zenki Meditation Center of Harvard, MA. Peter is also a software business executive, where he uses stress reduction techniques to maintain a balance between professional success and personal well-being.

ANSO 11 Berkshire Farm Internship

A field placement at Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth in Canaan, New York. Berkshire Farm Center is a residential treatment facility for troubled, at-risk adolescent boys who have been remanded by the Family Court for treatment and intervention. These youths come primarily from lower socio-economic strata, are very ethnically diverse, and hail from both urban and rural areas throughout New York State. The issues that bring them to placement are mainly a result of the psychological scars developed from physical, emotional, and sexual abuse. The manifested behaviors include chemical dependency, juvenile delinquency, inability to function in the school setting, inability to follow the rules at home, running away and/or mental health issues. The residential treatment model is strength based and focuses on teaching healthy decision making.
Williams students will commute to Berkshire Farm and work under supervision in various settings including school, cottage life, substance abuse program, recreation, adeventure-based therapy, performing arts, animal husbandry or inidividual tutoring. The students are responsible to be proactive in developing their learning experience.
Requirements: students will keep a journal reflecting on their experiences, and a weekly seminar with the instructor will draw on service learning experience. Students will also be required to submit a final 10-page paper at the end of the course.
Prerequisites: YOU MUST HAVE A TELEPHONE INTERVIEW WITH THE INSTRUCTOR, who can be reached at 518-265-6218. Enrollment limit: 15. Please note: all queries about this course should be directed to the instructor.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting times to be arranged.

DONELLE HAUSER (Instructor)
FOIAS (Sponsor)

Donelle Hauser, LMSW, is the Non-Secure Detension Program Coordinator, Burnham Youth Safe Center, Berkshire Farm Center.

ANSO 12 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

The incidence of reported child abuse and neglect has reached epidemic proportions and shows no signs of decreasing. Preventive and prophylactic social programs, court intervention, and legislative mandates have not successfully addressed this crisis. This course allows students to observe the Massachusetts Department of Social Services attorney in courtroom proceedings related to the care and protection of children. Students will have access to Department records for purposes of analysis and will also work with social workers who will provide a clinical perspective on the legal cases under study. The class will meet regularly to discuss court proceedings, assigned readings, and the students' interactions with local human services agencies. Access to an automobile is desirable but not required; some transportation will be provided as part of the course.
Requirements: full participation, a journal, and a 10-page paper to be submitted at the end of the course.
Enrollment limit: 15. Please note: all queries about this course must be directed to the instructor, Judge Locke (phone messages may be left at 458-4833).
Cost to student: $25 for books and photocopies.
Meeting times to be arranged.

JUDITH LOCKE (Instructor)
FOIAS (Sponsor)

Judith Locke is Associate Justice of the Juvenile Court, Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

ANSO 13 Epidemiology, Public Health, and Leadership in the Health Professions (Same as Leadership Studies 13 and Chemistry 17)

Epidemiology, the study of disease and disability in human populations, has been called the basic science of public health and preventive medicine. Epidemiology has made substantial contributions to the advancement of public health and improved illness care through a deeper understanding of the natural history of disease, the multiple causes of disease, including the role of behavioral factors, evaluation of the effectiveness of drugs and medical proceedures, and the control of epidemics of both infectious and (later) non-infectious disease. Making use of unknown epidemic exercies, selected original papers from the medical and public health literature, and a basic text, this course will begin by examining and reviewing the history, logic, and approaches of epidemiology. We will then turn to a series of seminar discussions of leadership in the health professions based upon historical documents, research papers, videotape, and profiles in the current media.
With the help of guest lecturers/discussion leaders, we will explore aspects of leadership in at least three of the following areas:

Evaluation will be based on active participation, especially leadership in group discussions, and a written epidemiologic analysis/critique of a published research article, perhaps on a topic of personal interest, or a written profile of leadership that is bookworthy (topic to be selected in consultation with instructor).
Prerequisites: curiosity, personal interview, and/or a short essay (1 page or less) stating your reasons for interest in the course and what you think you can contribute. Enrollment limit: 18. Questions about the course can be directed to the instructor (wrightnh@adelphia.net, 458-5841).
Cost to student: $200 for copying and reading materials.
Meeting time: afternoons, at least 3 times a week, for approximately 8 hours each week, with some late afternoon/evening meetings, depending on the schedule of guest speakers.

NICHOLAS H. WRIGHT '57 (Instructor)
FOIAS (Sponsor)

Nicholas H.Wright '57 MD, MPH is a medical epidemiologist who lives in Williamstown. He spent his career in international health, with particular focus on maternal and child health, including familty planning, in South and Southeast Asia.

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 25 Archaeology in Ethiopia (Same as Chemistry 25)

(See under CHEM for full descriptioni)

ANTH 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Anthropology 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 11 Verbatim: Adventures in Ethnographic Theater (Same as Theater 11)

Theater, like ethnography, is an art of listening. Documentary theatre, or "verbatim theater," as it is also known, develops this art to an utmost extent: it is a form in which actor-conducted interviews become the basis for the play, with the interview transcripts providing material for playwriting, as well as the actors' interpretation of the characters. This course will explore the verbatim technique in practice: after a brief introduction into the history and methods of documentary theater, the students will choose a theme for a play, develop the framework and conduct their own ethnographic interviews, transform the interview transcripts into a short play, and finally, collaboratively put on a production that will give new life to the words they hear from their subjects.
Evaluation will be based on the students' production journal, and on their contribution to the creation and performance of the verbatim play, with attendance, participation and teamwork also taken into account.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to Anthropology and Sociology, Theatre and Creative Writing majors.
Cost to student: no more than $50 for books; additional $100 to cover xeroxing costs and a possible trip to New York to see a documentary play.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week for two-hour sessions. Following the introductory meeting, the course will be workshop-based. Expect to spend about ten hours per week outside of class to collect and process the interviews and to work on the performance.

SHEVCHENKO

SOC 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Sociology 493-494.

ARABIC

ARAB S.P. Sustaining Program for Arabic 101-102
Students registered for Arabic 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Arabic Sustaining Program.
Prerequisite: Arabic 101.
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation.
Meeting time: mornings, 9:00-9:50.

ART

ART HISTORY

ARTH 12 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography) (Same as English 12 and Special 27)

(See under ENGL 12 for full description.)

ARTH 13 Masterpieces of French Cinema (Same as French 13)

It is well known that France, a small country of 65 million inhabitants, is the world's third largest film producer, after the U.S. and India. This class proposes a look at some of the highlights of that national cinema, from the 1930s to the present day. Can the term, "masterpiece," borrowed from the history of art, be applied to film? If so, what are the criteria for judging a masterpiece? Why is it that Jean Renoir produced a string of masterpieces in France in the 1930s and in the U.S. in the 1940s, only mediocre fare? Can we consider Henri-Georges Clouzot's 1943 film, Le Corbeau [The Raven] a masterpiece, if we know that the film is ideologically compromised because produced by the occupying German forces? Is age a pre-requisite for considering a work of art a masterpiece? What is the difference between a masterpiece and a commercial success? Are there any French women who have created masterpieces in film? Finally, can we discern any common elements in the background of filmmakers who produce great films? The class will focus primarily on examples of the genre, art cinema, and will feature works by the following filmmakers: Renoir, Clouzot, Carné, Bresson, Godard, Varda, Kurys, Dumont and Kechiche.
Requirements: attendance, participation and three 2-page papers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: $60.
Meeting time: afternoons, plus screenings in the morning.

SALLY SHAFTO (Instructor)
GRUDIN (Sponsor)

Sally Shafto is an independent scholar and specialist of French cinema.

ARTH 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for ArtH 493, 494.

ARTH 33 Honors Independent Study

To be taken by candidates for honors by the independent study route.

ART STUDIO

ARTS 10 Art in Community

Today, there are many artists who work in and with communities to create works of art that connect creativity directly to people's lives. Their art arises out of relationships they build and research they carry out with and within a community. This approach, often referred to as community-based public art, has a set of demands and challenges that are very different from traditional art-making practices. It involves data collection using personal interviews and oral histories, observation, and investigation into the cultural context of a specific place or group. It also requires the ability to negotiate difference-race, class, gender-in order to make a space for dialogue.
This course is designed to develop an understanding of these community-based public-art-making practices. The class will be taught in and beyond the classroom, expanding the context of the Williams campus into the broader Berkshire regional community. Students will work with Macarthur Fellow Pepon Osorio, renowned for his community-based public art projects, to get first-hand experiences of how he works and how he collaborates with his subjects. They will also study similar projects by other artists working in the United States and abroad.
Students will learn the skills necessary for interviewing community members, local leaders, and fellow students. They will use their research and study of Osorio's method to create a conceptual design for an art project of their own based on journals they keep during the course and an original theme that arises from their experiences.
The class will explore a number of challenging questions, and emphasis will be placed on an artist's responsibility when working with communities and in neighborhoods. How is this practice a form of public art as opposed to social work? Where is the "object" of art located in community-based practice? What is at stake when an artist goes into a relatively unknown environment and engages it in an artwork? How can the artist be sure that the collaboration does not exploit the participants for the artist's own gain? Can art that claims to be socially responsible really be socially transformative?
This class is a hands-on, experiential course. Students will work in groups and one-on-one with the instructor to develop a personal approach to community space and personal narrative. Students will be required to keep a journal record of their experiences and to participate in orchestrating the dialogues described above. For the final project each student will be expected to make a substantial presentation that both summarizes the research that was carried out and reflects on the student's artistic and personal growth through the process.
Students will be expected to work with the artist in the field as well as to engage in active discussion about the artistic process described above. During the days when the artist is not in residence in Williamstown they will be assigned specific research to carry out to be presented during the class sessions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Darra Goldstein and Lisa Corrin will interview prospective students.
Cost to student: no more than $50.
Meeting time: an intensive workshop that meets 2 days each week of the winter study period.

PEPON OSORIO (Instructor)
GOLDSTEIN (Sponsor)

MacArthur Fellow Pepon Osorio is an internationally known artist whose large-scale installations merge conceptual art and community-based art practices. He is a professor at Temple University's Tyler School of Art. He is currently working on a project in the Berkshires focusing on food-how it unites and divides us as a community. As one aspect of their practicum, students will orchestrate a series of dialogues to bring people from widely diverging backgrounds into conversation about food and identity. These conversations will ultimately be integrated into an installation that WCMA has commissioned for the summer of 2010.

ARTS 11 Sources of Inspiration: Shamans, Beatniks and Analysts

Artists have often turned to other cultures and earlier time periods for inspiration. This course is an introduction to a diverse range of influential sources such as alchemy, shamanic rituals, automatic writing, outsider art, collective consciousness and mysticism. Focus will be on using these primary sources as catalysts for making art. By linking form or content to contemporary ideas, original material can be transformed. The resulting work can resonate in new and relevant ways. Classes will evolve from slide lectures and group discussions to more open-ended studio time, group critiques and individual conferences.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, assignments and a final project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: variable.
Meet time: afternoons, twice a week. Some outside reading and an additional 6 to 8 hours a week of studio time will be expected.

ANN GLAZER (Instructor)
TAKENAGA (Sponsor)

Ann Glazer has an MFA in Painting from the Art Institute of Chicago and a BA in Art from Brown University.

ARTS 13 The Visual Display of Information: Building Timelines

Information graphics attempt to look at complex information or data of variously layered and dense construction in order to build visual strategies for organizing that information and re-presenting it in clear forms. Diagrams, maps and sign systems are asked to present this information quickly and in easily accessible visual terms. This course will examine the selection of those design choices (color, shape, text, font, static or dynamic feeds, levels of interactivity, etc.).
The specific project of the class will be to assemble static and dynamic timelines that reveal the history of diversity at Williams College and to contextualize these events with regional, national and international proceedings. Good infographics can reveal information long lost, provide easy access to events and participants (journalistic reporting, film and audio documentation, interviews). This project offers our community access to a past-honoring those who helped shape diversity at Williams- and help reveal what remains to be yet accomplished.
Students will be expected to complete original research, develop best means of graphically translating that research and participate in design discussions about best practice means of visual communication. Readings, study of information graphic systems, design studio work (primarily computer based) and classroom discussions will occupy our studio work sessions of six hours per week. Students should expect to commit a minimum of 20 additional hours per week of work.
Studio sessions will be combined with lectures and visiting designers.
Evaluation will be based on individual work/research contributed to development of overall project; exhibition of finished visual project, written documentation/analysis of overall project.
Prerequisites: familiarity with Illustrator, Photoshop required; knowledge of web platform software, WordPress, desirable. Enrollment limit: 12. If overenrolled, selection will be based on portfolio review.
Cost to student: $100.
Meeting time: afternoons.

EPPING

ARTS 14 A Smaller Better Home

Members of this seminar/studio will inquire into residential architecture's power to shape individual lives as well as to make a positive difference on the way that people live on the earth. As we look at the American Home function by function, students will design or write about a home, room by room. We'll discuss what works and what doesn't serve life in the present. We will explore and apply architecture's intersection with behavioral science, psychology and philosophy in words and/ or designs. Selected reading in support of seminar topics will be requried.
Our funal project will be the design, collage or written description of a 1500 SF home. Although beauty matters, our focus will be on ideas and spaces that shape healthier, happier and more affordable lifestyles rather than designing objets d'art.
As they design or write, students will be encouraged to stretch their imaginations by considering questions such as: What are the greatest stressors and irritants in modern life? What conditions stimulate happiness and contribution? How do we design and arrange rooms so that they work for people and for neighborhoods? How does a home shape a "good life"? The intended outcome of this course is that participants will gain an exponential increase in their ability to impact the future through writing, speaking and design.
Format: seminar. Evaluation will be based on presentations, participation, short papers, sketches and a final project. The final project is to design and present the plans or collage or a 10-page written description of a 3- to 4-bedroom home of 1,500 SF.
Prerequisites: ArtS 220 Architectural Design I or ArtS 211 The Sample or ArtS 100 Drawing I or ArtH 562 Themes in Domestic Architecture. EXPR/ArtS/MATH/MUS 309/PHIL 307 Exploring Creativity. Students who have completed one of the following: AMST 201, 405, 221, 364 may apply but must demonstrate an ability to draw or write four 3-page papers in lieu of the sketch problems. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference will be given to juniors and senior majors in Art, Architecture, American Studies, Psychology and Philosophy. If overenrolled, final selection will be based on an interview/portfolio review.
Meeting time: afternoons and occassional evenings, two 2-hour seminars per week; following each seminar will be a 2- to 3-hour long studio for pin ups and/or brief oral presentations; students have the option of working on their weekly assignments in studio (during that time, individual critiques will be given.

MELANIE TAYLOR (Instructor)
MCCALLUM (Sponsor)

Winner of the NAHB home builder 's "Pioneer Award", architect of "The Best Small House in America", Melanie Taylor is known as a "trend spotter" who forges new directions for homes and neighborhoods. Ms. Taylor is also well versed in transformational psychology and behavioral psychology as it relates to the home.

ARTS 15 The Glass Art Movement: Experiencing Glass Through History and Practice

CANCELLED!

ARTS 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as Chemistry 16)

(See under CHEM 16 for full description.)

ARTS 17 Cardboard Pop-Imagining the Consumber Object

In this course students will create super scaled objects of their choice from cardboard, hot glue and paint, with the larger goal Instruction will be given in drawing, scaling-up and sculptingtechniques. Class will meet in two 3 hour sessions each week where the bulk of the project will be executed. There will be a requirement of 2-3 additional hours spent by students working individualy on their own schedule.
There is no reading requirement, but there will be an introductory slide lecture and books to cover thehistorical context of pop art and sculptural instalation. At the completion of the collaborative project, we will hold a public exhibition of the work and then students can take their own elements of it home.
Students will be evaluated on attendance, quality of work and effort.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. If overenrolled, selection will be by lottery.
Cost to student: $25.
Meeting time: Monday afternoons and Tuesday mornings.

TOM BURKHARDT (Instructor)
TAKENAGA (Sponsor)

Tom Burckhardt is an artist who has shown his paintings and sculpturesin New York for 20 years. He holds a BFA from SUNY Purchase.

ARTS 18 Figure Drawing

In this course students will develop representational, technical, and expressive skills through studies in drawing from the life model. We will inform our practice in drawing through the study of accomplished figure drawings from the history of western art. Creating your own studies "in the manner of" such drawings, you will learn to develop methods suitable for varied approaches to the human figure. In addition to working directly from the model during class meetings, you will also be expected to develop drawings outside of class times, including anatomical studies, self portraiture, and working up figure sketches into more developed compositions. In addition to studio work we will allow some time for brief slide lectures and for critique.
Evaluation will be based on the level of achievement in the drawings, attendance, participation, and effort. Satisfactory performance in the course will require a commitment of at least 5 hours per week in addition to class meetings.
Prerequisites: ArtS 100. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: approximately $75 for materials and model fees.
Meeting time: mornings; six hours each week. .

LEVIN

ARTS 19 Art and Disability (Same as Special 12)

(See under SPEC 12 for full description.)

ARTS 20 Pictures and Words: Documentary Storytelling (Same as American Studies 20 and Political Science 20)

(See under PSCI 20 for full description.)

ARTS 22 In the Blink of an Eye (Same as Biology 14)

(See under BIOL 14 for full description.)

ARTS 27 Printmaking on Paper Clay (Same as English 27)

(See under ENGL for full description.)

ARTS 33 Senior Studio: Independent Project

Permission of instructor required.

TAKENAGA

ASIAN STUDIES

ASST 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Asian Studies.

CHINESE

CHIN S.P. Sustaining Program for Chinese 101-102

Students registered for Chinese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Chinese Sustaining Program. Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9:00-9:50.
Prerequisite: Chinese 101. Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.

LANGUAGE FELLOWS

CHIN 10 Chinese Painting

This hands-on course will foster an appreciation and understanding of the aesthetics of Chinese painting and calligraphy. Participants will gain a broad knowledge of Chinese art, as well as the basic skills for further practice. Students will learn how to use gradations of black ink and some limited color, using the brush on rice paper. Participants will learn how to draw the "four gentlemen" series, which stands for the four seasons of the year: plum blossom, mountain orchid, bamboo, and chrysanthemum; and learn how to draw mountains, trees, and water in Chinese landscape painting. This course will also cover the use of the seal and Chinese mounting.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a final presentation.
No prerequisites; no prior background in art required. Enrollment limit: 12. In case of overenrollment, preference will be given to upper-class students.
Cost to student: approximately $30 for materials.
Meeting time: mornings, Tuesdays and Thursdays.

YING-LEI ZHANG (Instructor)
CECILIA CHANG (Sponsor)

Ying-lei Zhang is an artist who lives in Middlebury, Vermont, where she has taught at various colleges and schools. She taught Chinese language at Williams during 2008-09 and has previously taught Chinese painting several times during Winter Studies.

CHIN 11 Introduction to Chinese Wellness

The topic of this course is Chinese approaches to healthy living, both from theoretical and practical perspectives. We will briefly cover traditional Confucius, Taoist, and Buddhist thinking about issues of modern-day life; the relationship between humans and nature; the human body within different geographic locations and the seasons; aspects of traditional Chinese medicine; and Chinese views about the human body. Essential acupoints will be introduced for self-massage so as to prevent sickness. Students will practice 24-form Taiji and "eight-body movement"; they will also have opportunities to taste different varieties of Chinese tea. A major purpose of the course is to help students acquire positive modes of thinking and healthy ways of eating and sleeping, and thereby reduce stress.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, performance of Taiji and other body movements, and a final presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. In case of overenrollment, preference will be given to upper-class students.
Cost to student: approximately $5 for materials. Each student will bring his or her own mat or towel to use.
Meeting time: afternoons, Mondays and Wednesdays.

YING-LEI ZHANG (Instructor)
CECILIA CHANG (Sponsor)

Ying-lei Zhang is an artist who lives in Middlebury, Vermont, where she has taught at various colleges and schools. She taught Chinese language at Williams during 2008-09 and has previously taught Chinese painting several times during Winter Studies.

CHIN 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Chinese.

JAPANESE

JAPN S.P. Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102

Students registered for Japanese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Japanese Sustaining Program. Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9:00-9:50.
Prerequisite: Japanese 101. Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.

LANGUAGE FELLOW

JAPN 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Japanese.

ASTRONOMY

ASTR 10 Applied Aerodynamics

The myth of Icarus illustrates the powerful attraction of flight. Some of us love the very notion of moving through the air with three full spatial degrees of freedom. While many of us do this routinely inside large aluminum tubes, personally flying an aircraft adds another dimension of excitement. Though we will not be flying full-size airplanes, we can do a great deal with miniature aircraft in an indoor setting. The course will be conducted in semi-tutorial fashion, with student presentations, construction sessions, flying sessions, and traditional lectures. We will cover the history and physics of heavier-than-air flight (balloons are boring!). No previous experience or coursework is required-students will learn the necessary fundamentals in class. On the practical side, students will start out building and flying simple gliders. Students will eventually build a remote-controlled aircraft (fixed- or rotary-wing), and learn to fly it. The course will culminate with our own airshow.
Evaluation will be based on completion of projects, student presentations, and a 5-page paper on some aspect of the material.
No prerequisites other than enthusiasm for flight and willingness to learn some basic physics. Enrollment limit: 6. Selection will be based on a one-paragraph essay on why the student wants to take the course.
Cost to student: approximately $250-300 for materials.
Meeting time: approximately six 2-hour sessions per week (some mornings and some afternoons) for lectures, flight instruction, and construction; outside-class work will include reading and preparation of presentations.

SOUZA

ASTR 12 Pluto and Other Dwarf Planets

The repercussions of the International Astronomical Union's reclassification of Pluto from "planet" to "dwarf planet" have not settled down, with worldwide discussions continuing and books being published about the process and the result. In 2008, the outer dwarf planets were named Plutoids, to give Pluto some additional honor; the ones now known are Pluto, Eris, Makemake, and Haumea. Haumea is now undergoing eclipses and transits with its moon Namaka, which should lead to improved understanding of Haumea and its system. We will discuss not only the objects itself and related science (Williams College faculty and students have been studying Pluto's atmosphere with telescope observations) but also the philosophy of naming and of classification. Why is Europe a continent? Why is India a subcontinent? Classification problems extend into biological naming and into many other systems. And how should names be chosen? The Plutoids include names from Roman, Greek, Easter Island, and Hawaiian mythologies. In this Winter Study course, students will have flexibility to consider aspects of the overall subject that interest them. On a field trip to New York, we will visit the Rose Center for Earth and Space in its architectural wonder of a glass enclosure surrounding its Hayden Sphere, which contains the planetarium. The Rose Center was a first place where Pluto was "demoted," leading to a front-page article in The New York Times on the subject. We will also visit the Rubin Museum of Art, with its scheduled exhibition Envisioning the Cosmos: from Milky Ocean to Black Hole, to which Prof. Pasachoff is lending books. ["The exhibition spans a diversity of religions, cultures and epochs, examining the ways in which we have interpreted our place in the universe. The first part of the exhibition will display the theocentric cosmologies of Buddhist, Hindu, and Jain religions, which envision deities as creators, preservers, and primary players in the cosmic construct. The second section will trace how Western medieval anthropocentric cosmology, which envisioned humans at the center of a static universe, was replaced in the Renaissance by a heliocentric universe, which gave rise to the present evolving astrophysical world-view. The exhibition will include manuscripts, books, paintings, and sculptures depicting the various and frequently complex concepts, diagrams, systems, and stories that describe the creation and structure of the universe. In addition to original artworks, the exhibition will feature educational models of the universe. This will allow visitors to better understand the cosmological objects presented in the show, but also how modern we view the cosmos in this age of science. There will be a room that allows virtual travel through the universe, using an interactive device produced by the American Museum of Natural History and adapted for the RMA show. There will also be a computer animation of the Buddhist cosmos (Kalacakra)."]
Students will be expected to participate in all activities, to read at least two books about the Pluto/dwarf-planet situation, and to write a 5-page paper and a concluding 10-page paper on a subject of individual choice.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference awarded on the basis of a brief email letter, if oversubscribed.
Cost to student: $100 for the field trip to New York; optional $25 for books .
Meeting times: Monday and Thursday mornings, with the week surrounding January 15 replaced with individual work.

PASACHOFF

ASTR 31 Senior Research

To be taken by students registered for Astronomy 493, 494.

ASTROPHYSICS

ASPH 31 Senior Research

To be taken by students registered for Astrophysics 493, 494.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 10 Electron Microscopy

Students will undertake an independent project to investigate a topic of their choice using the transmission and scanning electron microscopes. They will do their own sample preparation, operate the two electron microscopes, and take micrographs of relevant structures. Class time will give a brief overview of the theory and operation of the microscopes and microtomes. In addition, students will learn how to develop and print their film from the TEM, and learn how to manipulate the digital images from the SEM in Adobe Photoshop. (Do you want your erythrocytes red or blue?)
There will be brief reading assignments, a guest speaker and a 10-page paper with 8 well-focused micrographs required.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8.
Cost to student: $40 for text and readings.
Meeting time: afternoons. Class will meet for two hours, three times a week, plus scope time.

NANCY PIATCZYC (Instructor)
ZOTTOLI (Sponsor)

Nancy Piatcyc received her B.S. in Biology from Tufts University. She attended the school of Electron Microscopy in Albany, NY. She is a trained electron microscopist who operates and maintains the electron microscope facility at Williams.

BIOL 11 Global Health: Why We Should Care

From the Declaration of Alma-Ata to the Millennium Development Goals, there have been 30 years of good will but limited accomplishment in bringing health to all. Health is an essential human right, but much of the world's poor still do not have access to the most basic public health services. This is best illustrated in Africa where there is the double burden of poverty and communicable disease. The failure to provide equitable health and the emergence of new infectious diseases with pandemic potential also threaten world security. This winter study will explore what is meant by global health, how health is measured and what are the major diseases that particularly affect the poor. It will take a biomedical approach focusing on communicable diseases, e.g. HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis, and pandemic influenza, but will also look at maternal and child health, and bringing humanitarian aid to those in need. After defining the problems, we will explore strategies in the control of disease and achieving global health.
A variety of formats will be used to study global health issues including the current medical literature, popular writings and film documentaries. We will look at the science of global health and the story of those most affected by the inequalities of health. Students are expected to read assigned material outside of class so that they will be prepared to discuss the topics. Short presentations on a focused area will also be expected. We will formally meet three times weekly for two hours each session.
Evaluation will be based on contributions to class discussions, informal presentations and a 10-page paper that can: analyze a global health issue, be a document defining a public health intervention, or a short story describing the impact of a disease or condition on an individual, family or community.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: approximately $25-35 book and article packet.
Meeting time: mornings.

Dr. DAVID HILL (Instructor)
ZOTTOLI (Sponsor)

Dr. David Hill '73 obtained his MD from the University of Rochester School of Medicine. Following training in infectious disease, Dr. Hill was on the faculty of the University of Connecticut School of Medicine for 20 years. He moved to London in 2003 to direct travel medicine services for the United Kingdom, and has a teaching appointment at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

BIOL 12 Aspects of Cardiovascular Medicine

This course will deal with a brief survey of the anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology of the heart function in normal, and various abnormal conditions. Seminar type discussions of specific areas, (i.e., inflammation, atherosclerosis, myocarditis, acute coronary syndromes, congestive cardiac failure, and hypertension) will be covered in detail. In lieu of an assigned textbook, there will be handouts covering the general topic formats.
Evaluation will be based on a brief paper, a presentation, or an objective summary exam.
Prerequisites: secondary or college biology and chemistry. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to upper class students.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings, MTW 10-noon.

Dr. SIMON STERTZER (Instructor)
ZOTTOLI (Sponsor)

Dr. Simon H. Stertzer is Professor of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Stertzer performed the first coronary angioplasty in the U.S. in 1978, and has been pioneering techniques in cardiovascular medicine for almost 40 years. He has been teaching and practicing interventional cardiology at Stanford full time since 1994.

BIOL 14 In the Blink of an Eye (Same as ArtS 22)

In this interdisciplinary course where Art and Science intersect, we will use drawing and video to investigate structures of motion in animate and inanimate objects. Assuming that even the simplest gesture is a dynamic event, we will examine the transitory expressions of the human face and bodily gesture in their response to stimuli. We will also look at gestures of inanimate objects in motion. When enlisting the Biology Department's high-speed video camera (with the capacity to film upwards of 50,000 frames per second), ordinary events appear startlingly unordinary. In addition to filming, we will use drawing as a tool to examine gesture. Using a figure model and our own bodies for reference, we will draw sequences based on a gesture's trajectory. To contextualize this study we will examine the work of artists and scientists whose work responds to structures of motion in time and space.
Students are expected to attend class, complete weekly assignments, and keep an on-going journal of motion studies. Students will be evaluated on their class attendance, their participation in discussions, and the quality of their assignments and final presentation.
No prerequisites but some drawing experience helpful. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference based on individual letters of interest.
Cost to student: $75.
Meeting time: mornings.

JULIA MORGAN-LEAMON (Instructor)
J. EDWARDS (Sponsor)

Julia Morgan-Leamon is an interdisciplinary artist and media producer. She received her MFA in Visual Arts from Vermont College of Fine Arts.

BIOL 16 The Zen of Bicycle Maintenance at Mt. Greylock

This course will provide you with tools and knowledge that you can use to repair and maintain your own or others' bicycles. Working with a student grader at Mt. Greylock, you will repair and refit a donated bicycle so as to turn it into a functional machine that can be donated to someone in need of basic transportation. Demonstrations and explanations will be provided and the historical context of specific aspects of bicycle design will be covered, but the majority of the class time will be spent working with your partner, your tools, and the bicycle.
Requirements: participation in all course sessions plus a presentation of the finished bicycle with explanation of maintenance.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. If overenrolled, selection will be made based on an 1-page essay.
Cost to student: $75 for tools, text and materials.
Meeting time: mornings plus one field trip each week.

PAUL RINEHART (Instructor)
ZOTTOLI (Sponsor)

Paul Rinehart has extensive experience in bicycle maintenance and repair and has run his own bicycle shop, The Spoke, for 25 years. He has also served as race mechanic at events suc as Parish-Roubaix and the Tour of California.

BIOL 21 Science Beyond Williams

Are you interested in hands-on experience in a science-related field beyond the Purple Valley? Are you curious to explore science in a university or medical school research lab, a government agency, or a not-for-profit organization? This course is designed to help students take part in scientific work or research going on outside of Williams in order to provide them with a broader sense of what it is like to work in a professional scientific setting. Any field of science or technology can be explored via this course.
In consultation with the course instructor, students will use resources such as the Office of Career Counseling, science faculty members, and Williams alumni/ae to locate a mentor in the student's area of interest at a work site in the United States. Once the course instructor approves the arrangement for a mentored, hands-on experience for three weeks of Winter Study, the student will prepare for the internship by reading literature related to the project, and discuss the readings with a faculty sponsor here at Williams in November/December. Once on site, students must remain in contact with their Williams faculty sponsor by having a weekly phone conference. Participating students would not have to be on campus during WSP prior to beginning their fieldwork. Strong interest, enthusiasm and willingness to plan and prepare for the internship are required for this course.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper and post-WSP public presentation to a relevant department or program on the goals and accomplishments of the project.
Prerequisites: two semesters of relevant course work in science and/or mathematics. Enrollment limit: 10.

DEWITT and RAYMOND

BIOL 22 Introduction to Biological Research

An experimental research project will be carried out under the supervision of Biology Department faculty. It is expected that the student will spend 20 hours per week in the lab at a minimum, and a 10-page written report is required. This experience is intended for, but not limited to, first-year students and sophomores. Interested students must submit an application form available on the Biology Department webpage: http://web.williams.edu/Biology/Research/Winter/022Application/022application.shtml.
Prerequisites: Biology 101. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

DEWITT

BIOL 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Biology 493, 494.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 10 Zymurgy

An introduction to the science, history, and practice of brewing beer. This course aims to supply the general chemical concepts and hands-on technical experience necessary to enable creative brewing and an appreciation of diverse beer styles. Lecture topics include the biochemistry of yeast, sanitary practices, analytical methods, malt types and preparation, extract vs. all-grain brewing, hops, water chemistry, the chemistry of off-flavors, and beer judging. In the lab, students progress from brewing a commercially available extract kit to producing a full-grain brew of their own original recipe. The class will also meet professional brewers and microbiologists during a private tour of a local brewery.
Evaluation is based on class/lab participation, a 10-page paper, and a final presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10 students who are at least 21 years in age. Preference is given to students with a strong background/aptitude in the sciences.
Cost to student: approximately $400 for supplies and equipment.
Meeting time: mornings (longer on lab days) and an all-day field trip.

T. SMITH

CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as Special 11)

Are you interested in teaching? Do you enjoy working with kids? Do you like to experiment with new things? Here is a chance for you to do all three! The aim of this Winter Study Project is to design a series of hands-on science workshops for elementary school children and their parents. Working in teams of 2-4, students spend the first two and a half weeks of Winter Study planning the workshops. This involves deciding on a focus for each workshop (based on the interests of the students involved) followed by choosing and designing experiments and presentations that will be suitable for fourth-grade children. On the third weekend of Winter Study (January 23, 24) we bring elementary school kids with their parents to Williams to participate in the workshops.
You get a chance to see what goes into planning classroom demonstrations as well as a sense of what it's like to actually give a presentation. You find that kids at this age are great fun to work with because they are interested in just about everything and their enthusiasm is infectious. You also give the kids and their parents a chance to actually do some fun hands-on science experiments that they may not have seen before, and you are able to explain simple scientific concepts to them in a manner that won't be intimidating. It is a rewarding experience for all involved.
Evaluation is based on participation in planning and running the workshops. Each group is expected to prepare a handout with descriptions of the experiments for the kids, parents, and teachers.
No prerequisites. You need not be a science major; all that is needed is enthusiasm. Enrollment limit: 25.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings. Classes meet three times a week for approximately three hours each session. The workshop is run on the third weekend of Winter Study (January 23, 24) and attendance from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. is mandatory that weekend. There are also one or two brief meetings held in the fall term for preliminary planning.

D. RICHARDSON and KRISTEN BALDIGA

CHEM 12 Current Research in Renewable Energy and Energy Storage

CANCELLED!

CHEM 13 The Chemistry in Art or the Art of Chemistry

The first part of this course provides an introduction to both theoretical considerations of the physico-chemical techniques use in authetication protocols as well as specific cases of fraud. The second part of the course covers chemical properties of matrials and their relevance to different restoration techniques. While previous chemistry is not required, students with solid background in physical chemistry and material sciences will find the course most rewarding. The class is open to both artistically and scientifically oriented students.
Evaluation is based on class participation, final projects, a 10-page paper, and a presentation to the class.
No prerequisites, but some high school chemistry is recommended. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference is given to seniors and juniors who are double majors in chemistry and art, and those who express the most and earliest interest and enthusiasm by e-mail to Professor Peacock-López.
Cost to student: $50 for supplies.
Meeting time: 9:00 a.m. to noon, three days per week.

PEACOCK-LOPEZ

CHEM 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as Psychology 14 and Special 14)

Looking back on past loves and crushes, have you ever wondered "What on earth was I thinking?!" or "Why do I keep picking the wrong guys/girls for me?" While intense sexual attraction may once have been calling the shots, research actually shows that people who are in loving relationships tend to be happier, healthier and more productive in their lives than those who aren't. So how do we get there from here and make sense of all this? Well, no matter where you are on the dating spectrum, this course is for you if you are ready to learn how to follow your heart, your mind and co-create a fulfilling relationship. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and the AWARE Inventory will guide this interactive relationship mastery course through meaningful discussions and exercises that explore the common issues, dirty fighting tactics, hidden expectations and emotional allergies that often sabotage relationships. Experiential exercises, personal experiences and journaling will also give you the opportunity to practice effective communication and conflict resolution skills that honor the constructive use of differences and promote intimacy.
Evaluation is based on attendance, class participation, inventory completion, assigned readings, journaling, assignments, 1:1 consultations, and final 10-page reflective paper. Email your statement of interest if you are ready and willing to take your relationships to the next level (Sherie.F.Smith@williams.edu).
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16.
Cost to student: $100 for books and materials.
Meeting time: 8 hours a week (TBA).

RACHELLE SMITH (Instructor)
D. RICHARDSON (Sponsor)

Rachelle Smith, MSW, is a holistic, strengths-based Clinical Social Worker, Consultant, Educator & Mentor bridging Relationships, Wellness, Childbirth, and Energy Medicine.

CHEM 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as ArtS 16)

This course provides an introduction to both a theoretical consideration of the glassy state of matter and the practical manipulation of glass. We do flameworking with hand torches for at least 12 hours per week. While no previous experience is required, students with patience, good hand-eye coordination, and creative imagination will find the course most rewarding. The class is open to both artistically and scientifically oriented students.
Evaluation is based on class participation, exhibition of glass projects, a 10-page paper, and a presentation to the class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference is given to juniors, sophomores, and those who express the most and earliest interest and enthusiasm by e-mail to Professor Thoman.
Cost to student: $75 for supplies.
Meeting time: 9:00 a.m. to noon, M-F.

THOMAN

CHEM 17 Epidemiology, Public Health, and Leadership in the Health Professions (Same as ANSO 13 and Leadership Studies 13)

(See under ANSO 13 for full description.)

CHEM 18 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry

An independent experimental project in biochemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in biochemistry. Biochemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the molecular details of living systems including the interaction of biologically important molecules. In the Chemistry Department, studies are underway to investigate the structure/function relationship of proteins, the interaction between proteins and RNA and DNA, and the molecular basis of bacterial gene regulation.
A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

LOVETT

CHEM 20 Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry

An independent experimental project in inorganic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in inorganic chemistry. Opportunities for research in inorganic chemistry at Williams include the study of complexes of transition metals as catalysts for polymerization and oxidations. Students working in this area will gain expertise in the synthesis and characterization of a diverse range of compounds, including organic molecules, metal containing complexes and polymers. The research addresses problems of applied, industrial significance.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

C. GOH and L. PARK

CHEM 23 Introduction to Research in Organic Chemistry

An independent experimental project in organic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in organic chemistry. Representatitve projects include: (a) The synthesis and evaluation of amphiphilic polymers as delivery vehicles. These self-assembled materials are loaded with protein or small molecule drugs for anti-cancer therapies. Depending upon project, students will use techniques in organic synthesis, materials characterization, biochemical assays, and cell culture. (b) Probing new and efficient methods for the creation of molecules of medicinal interest. Some targets include the kavalactones-the active principles of the herbal extract KAVA KAVA, which is promoted as an alternative anti-anxiety remedy, and octalactin A-an interesting 8-membered ring compound isolated from marine microorganisms that has shown significant toxicity toward human cancer cells.
A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

S. GOH

CHEM 25 Archaeology in Ethiopia (Same as Anthropology 25)

Professor Kappelman, paleontologist at UT-Austin, has invited students to participate in his excavations in northwest Ethiopia in January 2010. Longstanding debates in human evolution concern where our species, modern Homo sapiens, originated, and how the species dispersed throughout Europe and Asia. The oldest fossils of modern human aspect have all come from Ethiopia; at 195 kyr from Kibish and at 160 kyr from Herto in the Middle Awash. A potential dispersal route over the southern end of the Red Sea was recently strengthened by the discovery of a coastal site in Eritrea dated to 125 kyr. Professor Kappelman's site contains Middle Stone Age tools, and evidence that the area might have served as a refugium during times of climate stress. Dating the occupation would indicate whether the site might have been one of the essential ones in human development.
We will meet before the December break to go over a reading packet that includes both theoretical and practical aspects of the trip. We will leave on January 5, be on site from January 7-21, and returning on January 24, 2010. Most of the time will be spent in site activities such as excavation, cataloging, and artifact conservation. However, we will also take some excursions to local villages and, at the end of the time, visit Gondar, an Ethiopian capital in the 19th century.
Evaluation will be based primarily on participation in site activities. Upon return (or earlier if possible) students will write a 5-10 page paper on either the dig or on some other aspect of Ethiopian culture covered during side trips.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 6. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: approximately $2000 for travel and supplies. Students will need a current passport.
Meeting time: daily for at least 6 hours, depending on weather.

ANNE SKINNER (Instructor)
D. RICHARDSON (Sponsor)

CHEM 31 Senior Research and Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Chemistry 493, 494.

CLASSICS

CLAS 12 The History of Words

This course will explore the fascinating history of words from a variety of linguistic and cultural perspectives. We will examine the methods and tools of etymological research and apply them to several fields of study including historical phonology and morphology, alphabets and other writing systems, dictionaries, dialectal studies, slang and jargon, personal names, geographic names, word puzzles, and more. We will also consider the role of literary, social, and political forces in shaping the development of languages and even individual lexical items. Our goal throughout will be to gain familiarity with a broad range of issues concerning the internal and external history of words.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, several short writing assignments, and one longer research project. 
No prerequisites.  Enrollment limit: 15. 
Cost to students: approximately $30.
Meeting time: afternoons.

DEKEL

CLAS 31 Senior Thesis

May be taken by students registered for Classics 493, 494.

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

COGS 31 Senior Thesis

May be taken by students registered for Cognitive Science 494.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

COMP 10 The Grand Hotel in Modern Fiction and Film

In this course, we will visit actual hotel spaces in our area, read both contemporary and early twentieth-century hotel fiction, and discuss a broad range of hotel films, from drama to comedy. The grand hotel with its dual promise of luxury and estrangement was considered a theatre of social transformation in the age of travel. We will read novels, short stories, and discuss films that feature the hotel as a space that would either uphold class distinction or give rise to class conflict, allow for sexual taboo breaking, or stage gendered identity performance. Authors and filmmakers in this early period will include Edith Wharton, Thomas Mann, Franz Werfel, Vicki Baum, and F.W. Murnau. We will consider short theoretical readings by Thorstein Veblen, Georg Simmel, Siegfried Kracauer on conspicuous consumption, modernity, and metropolitan spaces. In the present, hotel dramas focus on issues of ethnic violence (Hotel Rwanda), the invisible immigrant worker (Dirty Pretty Things), cultural alienation (Lost in Translation), and the female body at work (A Single Girl). Comedies explore the fantasy of a dramatic social climb through identity confusion in a hotel setting (Maid in Manhattan); satires highlight the confidence man who profits from social pretensions (from Thomas Mann's trickster and sexual adventurer Felix Krull, to the hilarious high- school dropout/runaway posing as the scion of a wealthy executive in Thomas Brussig's Wie es leuchtet). Fantasy writing creates virtual hotel spaces (Robert Coover's The Grand Hotels of Joseph Cornell). Theoretical readings focus on private versus public spaces, social distinction, warped space, and shopping for brands by Pierre Bourdieu, Erving Goffmann, Tony Vidler and Sharon Zukin. We will also study characteristics of real-life upscale area hotels like The Equinox, The Porches and The Orchards through site visits.
Requirements: active class participation, one oral presentation on an aspect of hotel culture, and one 10- page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to Comparative Literature, Literary Studies, and English majors.
Cost to student: $45 for books and xerox package.
Meeting time: TWR 10 a.m.-noon, plus excursions TBA.

DRUXES

COMP 12T Nikolai Gogol's Petersburg Tales (Same as Russian 12T)

(See under RUSS 12T for full description.)

COMP 20 What Was Monet Thinking?-Understanding Art, for Non-Art Majors (Same as Special 20)

(See under SPEC 20 for full description.)

COMP 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Comparative Literature 493, 494.

LIT 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Literary Studies 493, 494.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CSCI 10 Introduction to Unix, Programming Tools and C

This course serves as a guided tour of the unix operating system, commonly used unix tools, and C programming language. The course is designed for individuals who wish to become familiar with unix and its data processing capabilities. Students will also use various scripting languages to write filters for transforming data from a variety of sources. By the end of the course, students will have developed a proficiency for UNIX, a basic understanding of the C programming language and a familiarity with tools including AWK, SVN and Make. This course will meet three times a week for lectures and experiments in the department's unix laboratory. Evaluation will be based on programming assignments.
Prerequisites: Computer Science 134 (or equivalent programming experience). Enrollment limit: 20. Preference will be given to students who have not yet completed a CSCI course at the 300 level or above.
Cost to student: texts.
Meeting time: afternoons.

MARY BAILEY (Instructor)
MURTAGH (Sponsor)

Mary Bailey is the systems administrator for the Computer Science Department. She holds a BS in Computer Science from the University of New Hampshire and an MBA from the University of Massachusetts.

CSCI 12 Computer Animation Production

This course will introduce the stages of computer animation production including design, storyboarding, modeling, texturing, rigging, animation, lighting and compositing. The course will consist of lectures in which the field of computer animation will be explored from an historical context, using video examples. In addition, students will partipate in actual production projects on an intern level, and learn how software development initiatives are applied to solve real-world production problems. Evaluation will be based on active participation in lecture and projects as well as a final project.
Prerequisites: strong interest in computer animation and graphics. Enrollment limit: 8. Preference will be given to students with background in Computer Science or Studio Art.
Cost to student: $50 for reference books.
Meeting time: mornings.

JEFF KLEISER (Instructor)
MURTAGH (Sponsor)

Jeff Kleiser is CEO of Synthespian Studios. His pioneering work in the field includes feature films (Tron, Flight of the Navigator, X-Men #1-3, Clear and Present Danger, Fantastic Four, Scary Movie #3-4, and many others), theme park projects (The Amazing Adventures of Spider-Man, Corkscrew Hill, Monsters of Grace) and many commercial projects.

CSCI 14 LEGO Robot Engineering

CANCELLED!

CSCI 31 Senior Honor Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Computer Science 493-494.

CONTRACT MAJOR

CMAJ 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Contract Major 493, 494.

ECONOMICS

ECON 11 Public Speaking

This course will help students become effective and organized public speakers, whether public speaking means giving a class presentation, participating in a debate, or giving a formal speech before a large audience. We will primarily use extemporaneous and prepared class presentations as a means of learning this skill, but we will also study the great American speeches and presidential debates of the twentieth century for further insights into persuasive public speaking techniques. The class will provide a supportive environment to help each student create his or her own public speaking style that is comfortable, confident, and conversational. We will also focus on organizational techniques, handling visual aids effectively, eye contact and body language. Finally, receiving feedback and providing constructive criticism to other students in the class will be an important part of the course.
Requirements: 5-6 oral presentations to the class, most of which will be videotaped and critiqued. Evaluation will be based on in-class presentations, class participation, and a 10-page written critique of the student's own videotaped presentations.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to juniors and seniors.
Cost to student: approximately $25 for materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

CAPRIO and MONTIEL

ECON 12 Island at the Center of the World: Early and Contemporary Views of New York City Using Google Earth (Same as American Studies 12, Environmental Studies 11 and History 12)

The course provides an introduction to the special characteristics of the "Island at the Center of the World" and methodologies to interpret its built form. The students will develop a working understanding of the characteristics of lower Manhattan's residential, vacant and publicly-owned land markets setting the framework for examining land price trends from the days of New Amsterdam to the Wall Street of the future for the world's financial center through the study of primary source documents. Student will learn the use of geographic information tools such as Sketch-up and Google Earth 4.3 to examine the evidence of a prototype area of 17th century New Amsterdam, later named New York City, and compare it to today's built form.
Examination of the evidence of its built form and the use of primary source documents to enable the students to develop their own interpretation of the settlement patterns and economic conditions that have influenced the development of the "Island at the Center of the World" today and yesterday is the subject matter of the course. Training in the use of Sketch-up and Google Earth 4.3 will be part of the curriculum.
Initially, the course will focus on historical land price change and the current land market to assess the impact of September 11, 2001 on the course of such trends. Examination of smart growth options, community preservation and policy change within this urban land market in transition requires an understanding of the influence that transportation improvements, waterfront access and land value change have on housing development, the cost and benefit of open space and the potential for preservation and re-use of old buildings for housing.
Land policy options will be analyzed using spatial analysis techniques and geographic information systems to assess the importance of location, land use regulation, property tax policy, public investment, open space and other economic factors on land value and property development potential.
Particular attention will be paid to land form and function, infrastructure and economic development, trading practices, and land policies and financing strategies. The material culture and population characteristics of the Native American, African American and European settlers will be examined through a review of geographic, economic and environmental conditions that have influenced regional development.
Supervised lab sessions and group critiques will provide feedback on student work. Evaluation will be based on completion of a "digital" interpretive model of a selected building that was part of the New Amsterdam's 1660 Castello Plan with attention to content, effort and development of the "digital model", based on individual review of primary source documents and archaeological evidence and the student's preparation of a minimum 10 page final paper. Attendance and participation will also be taken into account. Exhibition and presentation of the work on the last day of the Winter Study is required.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: $75 including approximately $50 for books.
Students must have access to a College computer with Google Earth and Sketchup or supply their own lap top computer equipped with this.
Meeting times: mornings, twice a week for three-hour sessions. Most of the development work will be completed outside the classroom..

COURTNEY HAFF (Instructor)
SHEPPARD (Sponsor)

Courtney Alfred Haff, AICP, Ph.D. is a consultant and president of Haff Associates, Inc., based in Northampton, MA, a firm specializing in investment banking, real estate market analysis, and town plans. He is currently the project director for the New Amsterdam History Center and provides economic and planning consulting services in Western Massachusetts. After receiving his doctorate at New York University in public finance, he began as a property tax and housing policy senior analyst with Abt Associates, Inc. in Cambridge, MA and has been working in municipal finance on Wall Street as an investment banker with extensive experience in economic development finance, land planning, environmental protection and historic preservation for the past 25 years. He is currently a member of the Southampton, MA Conservation Commission.
He has taught at a variety of institutions including New York University's Wagner School of Public Service, Westfield State College and has been a guest lecturer at Williams College Winter Study program during 2005 and 2006, and a David C. Lincoln Fellow of the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.
During the Vietnam War period, he was an armored calvary platoon leader with the 3rd Armored Cavalry.

ECON 13 Introduction to Indian Cinema

Popular Indian cinema ("Bollywood") is arguably India's premier cultural export. Audiences across the world, including the Indian diaspora, enjoy the spectacle: the song-and-dance, the family melodrama, and the "dialogues." Most of us don't think analytically about these films, but there is a small but growing academic literature that does. This work has identified some recurring themes: the idea of the nation, the threats it faces, and the ideological responses. The course will be organized around representation of the nation in Indian cinema, and will introduce you to both the analysis and the sheer fun.
We will meet twice a week to watch the films (a total of seven) and twice a week for discussion. Students will write a 2 page response to each film. Reading will consist of film analysis and also some background reading on India.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. If over-enrolled, preference will be given to students who have previously taken a course on South Asia.
Cost to student: $25 for readings.
Meeting time: afternoons.

SWAMY

ECON 14 Accounting

The project will examine the theoretical and practical aspects of financial accounting. Although the beginning of the course will explore the mechanics of the information gathering and dissemination process, the course will be oriented mainly towards users, rather than preparers, of accounting information. The project will include discussion of the principles involved in accounting for current assets, plant assets, leases, intangible assets, current liabilities, stockholders' equity, the income statement and the statement of cash flows. Students will be expected to interpret and analyze actual financial statements. The nature of, and career opportunities in, the field of accounting will also be discussed. The project is a "mini course." It will present a substantial body of material and will require a considerable commitment of time by the student, including regular attendance and participation in discussion and homework cases and problems.
The course is a web-based course. The course website will include required readings from various linked web sites, additional downloadable reading material, required homework problems as well as self study material.
The course should meet for two hours on each Monday, Tuesday and Thursday of every week of Winter Study except the last week when classes should meet on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.
The course grade will be determined on the basis of several quizzes and a written group report presenting an analysis of a company's annual report.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost to student: downloading from course website approx. 200 pages of material.
Meeting time: mornings.

LEO MCMENIMEN (Instructor)
S. SHEPPARD (Sponsor)

Leo McMenimen has taught in the Winter Study Program at Williams College since 1980. He retired as a professor emeritus from the School of Business, Montclair State University.

ECON 15 Stock Market

Elementary description and analysis of the stock market. Emphasis will be on the roles of the market in our economy, including evaluation of business firms and the success of particular capital investments, allocating savings to different types of investment, and providing liquid and marketable financial investments for individual savers.
The course will focus on the description of mechanics of trading on various exchanges and other markets, stock market indexes or "averages" (Dow-Jones, S&P, 500, etc.), how to read the financial news, historical rates of return on stocks and portfolios, role of mutual funds, beta coefficients, and "random walk" theory. The course will also involve a brief introduction to financial reports of firms and analysis of financial ratios.
The course is a web-based course. The course website will include required readings from various linked web sites and required homework problems.
Each student will participate in discussions, do some homework assignments and, as part of a team, give two presentations and write a 10-page report analyzing the wisdom or folly of having chosen a particular investment portfolio.
Not intended for students who already know much about the stock market; students who have had Economics 317 not admitted.
The course should meet for two hours on each Monday, Tuesday and Thursday of every week of Winter Study except last week when classes should meet Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.
The course grade will be determined on the basis of performance on several quizzes and a written group investment portfolio report.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost to student: Pdownloading from course website approx. 100 pages of material.
Meeting time: afternoons.

LEO MCMENIMEN (Instructor)
S. SHEPPARD (Sponsor)

Leo McMenimen has taught in the Winter Study Program at Williams College since 1980. He recently retired as a professor from the School of Business, Montclair State University.

ECON 16 AIG and the Global Financial Crisis

Focusing particularly on the role of derivatives, and particularly the credit default swaps created and sold by AIG, in the unfolding global financial crisis, this course will give an overview of the development and growth of the principal types of U. S. financial institutions (commercial banks and thrifts, securities firms, insurance companies, hedge funds, etc.), the historical development of U.S. and foreign regulation of these institutions, comparisons with the thrift crisis and the Long Term Capital Management debacles of the 1990's, the importance of addressing global systemic risk more comprehensively and effectively, and the current proposals and prospects for doing so. The course will include selective readings from a number of books and articles on the subject. We anticipate inviting a number of current and former private and public sector participants in the current crisis, as well as commentators on possible changes in the system. The course is intended to help interested students understand more about the development of the U. S. financial system and the significance of the current crisis to jobs and the economy. The format will be lecture and discussion. Evaluation will be based on active class participation and debate, including class presentation and defense of short written papers on various aspects of the subject. There will be no written tests or final examination.
There are no prerequisites.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

WILLIAM BOWDEN '66 (Instructor)
S. SHEPPARD (Sponsor)

William Bowden '66 is recently retired senior lawyer with a number of major financial institutions and the U.S. Treasury Department who has had extensive experience with the subject matter and has been a frequent speaker before various industry groups and a guest lecturer at Harvard's Kennedy School.

ECON 17 Understanding Current Economic Issues

The goal of this course is to leave the students with an understanding of how the economy works and how it interacts with financial markets. We will examine some of the critical issues facing the economy today, in light of historical events and the instructor's extensive experience as a Wall Street economist. The class will explore the dynamic relationship between the financial markets and the economy beginning with a real-time forecast of U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP).
The course will build upon principles of both macro and microeconomics, but welcomes students from other disciplines. It will provide an introduction to the work done by business economists and will examine topics chosen by the students. We will look at relationships between key economic variables, movements in interest rates, the behavior of the dollar, oil prices and inflation. There will be class discussions of business cycles, credit cycles, long waves and past stock- market bubbles. We will also have several invited guests from the Wall Street investment world speaking on various aspects of the stock market.
The class will meet 3-4 times per week in the morning. Each student should expect to spend a reasonable amount of time on homework, to participate in short presentations as well as in class discussions. There will be a formal presentation to Williams faculty and others during the last week, supported by a short written report designed for today's business audience.
An economic database, chart-generating software and a proprietary, statistical analysis program will be available to each student on the Jesup computers. Use will be made of Excel spreadsheets, charts and PowerPoint.
Requirements: 3- to 5-page paper and presentation.
Prerequisites: Economics 110 or another semester course in Economics is strongly recommended. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: about $20 for text and other materials.
Meeting time: mornings. Because essential concepts and tools are covered during the first week, all students are required to attend the first class.

THOMAS SYNNOTT '58 (Instructor)
S. SHEPPARD (Sponsor)

Thomas Synnott, Williams Class of '58, is Chief Economist, Emeritus, U.S. Trust Company of New York.

ECON 18 Discover Modern Chinese Economy through the Lens of Data

China is today a transitional economy; that is, it is an economy in transition from planned socialism to capitalism. The unique combination of the two traditionally opposite economic forms empowers China's continuous, rapid and stable growth over the past two decades. This course will provide an overview of diverse backgrounds of Chinese economy and guide students to explore, understand and analyze the dynamic transformation of Chinese economy and society. Major topics of the course include: economic reform and development, poverty reduction and income disparity, education and gender discrimination, rural-urban disparity in well-being, population growth and one child policy, migrant workers and urban development. As a group, we will explore data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey in order to analyze some of these topics.
Evaluation will be based on the effort, content and presentation of the group project. Attendance and participation will also be taken into account. We will meet twice a week for three-hour sessions in computer lab. Each session will involve discussion of topics and data along with short background films.
Prerequisites: Economics 110 and/or 120 are preferred, but not required. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference will be given to Economics majors and Asian Studies majors.
Cost to student: $25-50 for reference book.
Meeting time: afternoons.

MENG KONISHI (Instructor)
SHEPPARD (Sponsor)

Meng Konishi is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Applied Economics at the University of Minnesota. Her research focuses on economic development, health and education in China. She has taught economics at the University of Minnesota and worked as a consultant for the World Bank.

ECON 19 LaTeX for the Rest of Us

Do you want to impress your professors and fellow students with beautifully formatted papers, theses and books? Then you should learn LaTeX, an elegant and free software suite for typesetting and document preparation. It is especially good at formatting math, hence its popularity among mathematicians and those in the natural sciences. But the LaTeX suite also includes a number of compelling features for "the rest of us" who use relatively little or even no math in our writing: features that include powerful tools for managing references, formatting tables and figures, the creation of presentation slides, and built-in PDF file generation. This "how-to" course is geared towards students in any field; those in the social sciences, such as economics, should find it especially useful. You don't have to be a computer expert to learn LaTeX, and no programming experience is required-the only two prerequisites are a modest degree of computer literacy, and an appreciation for the beauty of the printed page. Evaluation will be based on a final project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit 10. Preference to Economics majors.
Cost to student: $50 for reference book.
Meeting time: mornings.

KUTTNER

ECON 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (Same as Political Economy 22)

(See under POEC 22 for full description.)

ECON 23 Introduction to the Economics, Geography and Appreciation of Wine

This course provides an introduction to the economics, geography and appreciation of wine. We will be studying the economics and geography of wine production, and will also learn to identify, understand and appreciate the major wine types of the world. The course will involve lectures, outside readings, and in-class wine tastings. We will focus primarily on Old World wine styles, namely the world class wine regions of France, Germany, Italy, Austria, Hungry, and Portugal, but will occasionally make comparisons to analogous New World style wines.
Evaluation will be based on short quizzes, including blind tastings, and either an oral presentation or 10-page paper at the conclusion of the course.
Enrollment limit: 10. Since the course will include wine tastings, it will also be restricted to those who are of legal age for wine consumption by the date of the first class meeting. In the event that demand exceeds the maximum limit for the course, students will be selected primarily on the basis of their academic record, with some consideration given to creating a balanced mix of backgrounds and interests among participants. Although this course is fun and interesting, it is also a serious course in which students are expected to learn the materials and skills presented in the lectures and wine tastings.
Cost to student: $200.
Meeting time: Tuesdays and Thursdays 7-10pm.

PEDRONI

ECON 30 Honors Project

The "Specialization Route" to the degree with Honors in Economics requires that each candidate take an Honors Winter Study Project in January of their senior year. Students who wish to begin their honors work in January should submit a detailed proposal. Decisions on admission to the Honors WSP will be made in the fall. Information on the procedures will be mailed to senior majors in economics early in the fall semester.
Seniors who wish to apply for admission to the Honors WSP and thereby to the Honors Program should register for this WSP as their first choice.
Some seniors will have begun honors work in the fall and wish to complete it in the WSP. They will be admitted to the WSP if they have made satisfactory progress. They should register for this WSP as their first choice.

ECON 31 Honors Thesis

To be taken by students participating in year-long thesis research (ECON 493-W31-494).

ECON 51 The Practice of Monetary Policy

This course will cover four practical aspects of modern monetary policy, with a focus on issues relevant to emerging market economies. We will begin with a discussion of the objectives of monetary policy-inflation, output, and financial stability-and the implications of conflicts between these objectives. We will move next to the topic of monetary policy transmission: how the central bank's policy instrument affects the financial markets and the broader economy. The third topic ecompasses central bank independence, and the interaction between monetary and fiscal policy. We will conclude with a consideration of alternative policy frameworks, with particular attention to inflation targeting.
Requirements and evaluation: three short papers and a case study.

KUTTNER

ECON 52 Research in Development Economics

This course introduces students to the craft of posing a good research question in development economics. The instructor will direct students to a topic based both on the instructor's research pursuits (which include microfinance, liberalization and reform, black markets and agricultural trade) and the student's intellectual interests. The student will then independently conduct library research, literature surveys (and in some cases, empirical research) on the topic. Students will be required to make weekly in-class presentations and write a substantial research paper.
Evaluation: 15-20 page final paper.
Prerequisites: Economics 251. Interested students must consult with the faculty instructor before electing this course. Enrollment limit: 6 (if the course is overenrolled, the instructor will decide on whom to admit based on research interests and background of students).
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

RAI

ECON 53 Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Modeling: Construction and Analysis

A common tool for applied policy work is the Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model. These models are used extensively by various NGO's when deciding aid and policy recommendations. Advanced undergraduates or masters students can attain a basic understanding of these models in a relatively short time frame. The great advantage of these models is that they capture the general equilibrium feedback effects of policy proposals on various sectors of the economy. This is of great importance in applied work, as this allows the identification of the winners and losers from potential policies. The class will begin with a general overview of CGE models, followed by a detailed construction of a simple model for the US. During the latter part of the course, students will create a CGE model for a country of their choice (preferably their home country). This exercise will provide them with a basic model to examine the possible effects of various changes in national policy. Interested students could continue this project as a potential thesis topic.
Evaluation: Students will be evaluated using problem sets and a paper based on their country-specific model. Prerequisites: Economics 251 or instructor consent. Enrollment limit: 20. Course intended for CDE fellows, undergraduate enrollment limited and only with instructor permission.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting times: daily afternoons.

ROLLEIGH

ECON 57 Tools for Time Series Econometrics
This winter study course is designed to provide students with an introduction to some of the tools they will need to master in order to learn and implement modern time series techniques, which form the basis for empirical work in macroeconomics and related fields. Specifically, the course will introduce students to a useful computer programming language for time series econometrics known as RATS.
The course will also review important mathematical tools such as matrix algebra and difference equations, and introduce students to some basic conceptual building blocks for time series analysis, such as moving average process and autoregressive processes.
Students planning to enroll in Econ464/514 "Empirical Methods for Macroeconomics" during the spring semester are strongly encouraged to enroll in this winter study course.
Enrollment limit: 12 (expected: 15). Preference to CDE students but open to undergraduates.
Cost to students: none.

MAMADOU D. BARRY and PETER PEDRONI

ENGLISH

ENGL 10 Silent Film Comedy CANCELLED!

This course examines the early days of motion picture production, specifically focusing on silent film comedy from its origins in Mack Sennett's Keystone Cops through the full flowering of the genre with the work of Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd, and Buster Keaton. Readings will include selections from Kevin Brownlow's The Parade's Gone By, Frank Capra's The Name Above The Title, and Jean Renoir's My Life and My Films.
Requirements: active participation in class discussion, regular brief, written responses to the films, and a 10-page paper focusing on a film of the student's choosing.
Prerequisites: prior film study or comedy experience. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons. In addition to that, class will meet once a week in the evening for film screenings prior to class discussion.

WILLIAM TEITLER (Instructor)
J. SHEPARD (Sponsor)

William Teitler is a producer of theatrical feature films and television whose credits include Jumanji, Empire Falls, Hurricane, and Tales From The Crypt.

ENGL 11 The Pictures of Dorian Gray
“If only it were the picture that grew old and I were to stay young forever.”  While the eponymous hero of Wilde’s novel is granted his wish only until the book’s final page, The Picture of Dorian Gray seems to have enjoyed the kind of run—forever young, relevant, alluring to both popular culture and scholarly interest—that Dorian Gray would (and did) kill for.  This course will read Wilde’s notorious 1890 novel and then trace out its cultural afterlife in the 20th and 21st centuries, thinking in particular about how this book and its avatars engage with the relations among art, technology, economics, and violence over the past 200 years.  Texts we’ll spend time with include a 1945 film adaptation of Wilde’s novel, for which Angel Lansbury (!) was nominated for an Academy Award, a 2002 novel by Will Self called Dorian, an Imitation and, if we can get hold of it, a new film adaptation starring Colin Firth due in 2009.  We’ll also read what I take to be a kind of adaptation by the left hand of Wilde’s book, Bret Easton Ellis’s novel of 1980s finance capital and serial killing, American Psycho—a book that some have found hard to put down, but is even more difficult to pick up.  We’ll also watch Mary Harron’s 2000 film version of American Psycho, which has had its own surprising force and staying power.  For all of The Picture of Dorian Gray’s vibrant afterlife, we may be surprised to see how much the radicalism of Wilde’s book—its style, its limning of male desire, its alliance of middle-brow Victorian gothic with satire and cultural critique—still feels radical, at times too radical even for the adaptations of our supposedly more politically and socially freewheeling (at least than the Victorians) modern era.
Format:  seminar.  Requirements:  attendance of all class meetings and reading or viewing all assigned texts.  Lively, thoughtful contributions to in-class discussion is a must.  There will be frequent short writing assignments and a final paper, around 10 pages of writing in all.  You should be committed to reading and engaging seriously with a set of works that might seem by turns sleight, fraudulent, or offensive.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to English majors.
Cost to student: about $35 for books.
Meeting time: mornings.

MCWEENY

ENGL 12 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography (Same as ArtH 12 and Special 27)

This course explores the evolution of modern documentary photography. We will start with Robert Frank's The Americans, and how Frank's singular vision deeply shaped the next generation of photographers working the American streets and landscape. Diane Arbus, Bruce Davidson, Lee Freidlander, William Klein, Danny Lyon, Gary Winogrand are some of the photographers whose work we will get to know well. Discussions will include the new wave of independent and Magnum photojournalists (Phillip Jones Griffiths, Josef Koudleka, Susan Meiselas, Gilles Peress, James Nachtwey, Alex Webb, Ron Haviv and Tyler Hicks) and the wars from Vietnam to Bosnia to Iraq they cover as well as the personal visions they explore. Insight into the diverse currents of documentary photography will be covered through the work of Bill Burke, Larry Clark, Larry Fink, Nan Goldin, Emmet Gowin, Sally Mann, Mary Ellen Mark, Nicholas Nixon , Richard Misrach, Joel Sternfeld, Edward Burtynsky, Laura Letinsky and Simon Norfolk.
The class will meet three mornings a week for two hours. Slide presentations will occupy half of the first meetings and give way to discussion of isssues in documentary photography. Students will be encouraged to work on individual projects of their own choice. Each student will be required to make a brief presentation to the class on a documentary topic of their choice. A final paper expanding on this documentary topic will be due at the end of the course. Students will be evaluated on their classroom presentation, general participation and their written work. A field trip to New York will let us see first hand works from the collections at the Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American Art and the International Center of Photography.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference given to upperclass students.
Cost to student: $50.
Meeting time: mornings.

KEVIN BUBRISKI (Instructor)
MURPHY (Sponsor)

Kevin Bubriski has received photography fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. His photographs are in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. His books include Portrait of Nepal (Chronicle Books 1993) and Pilgrimage: Looking at Ground Zero (powerHouse 2002).

ENGL 13 Obsession

In this class, we'll explore the phenomenon of obsession-mad, fixated desires: what prompts obsession, why it takes the forms it does, and what it can it tell us about our relation to the things of the world. We'll start with some psychoanalytic material, particularly Freud and Lacan. Then we'll turn to literature, film, and art. Works may include the paintings of Hieronymous Bosch, Poe's "Berenice," Balzac's "Eugenie Grandet," Dostoevski's "Notes from Underground," Thomas Bernhard's "The Old Masters," Frears' "Dangerous Liaisons," Scorsesi's "Taxi Driver," Herzog's "Fitzcarraldo" -students will be encouraged to come up with their own examples.
Evaluation will be based on participation in discussions, brief written reports, and a final critical project. (Ten pages of writing in all.)
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. If overenrolled, students will be selected for gender balance, balance of graduating years.
Cost to student: $25 for books.
Meeting time: mornings.

PYE

ENGL 14 Teaching High School English
Are you interested in teaching English at the secondary school level? If so, this course is designed for you. We will cover three topics any aspiring teacher should be familiar with: (1) how to design new courses and construct effective syllabi; (2) how to lead engaging classroom discussions about challenging works of literature; and (3) how to grade and constructively comment on student writing. This course will emphasize practice over theory, and throughout the winter term, we will jump in and try our hands at all three of these fundamental teaching skills: each student will dream up and design the syllabi for two elective courses meant to appeal to high school students; lead one 30-minute mock classroom discussion on a poem or short story of his or her own choosing (with the other students "acting" as 10th or 11th graders); and practice commenting on and grading various samples of student writing. Near the end of the course, we will also touch upon some of the nuts and bolts of landing your first teaching position, including how to prepare a strong job application and how to ready yourself for an interview and on campus visit. There will be no single final paper, but much writing and work will be required throughout: sample course descriptions and syllabi; written and mental preparation to lead a 30-minute classroom discussion; written comments on a number of sample student papers; and finally, various short written reflections on teaching which will be assigned throughout the course. Evaluation will be holistic, based on written work, discussion-leading performance, and overall effort and engagement.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

RHIE

ENGL 15 Black Independent Cinema (Same as Africana Studies 15 and American Studies 17)

Trick question: Is black independent cinema (a) a marketing strategy, (b) a political project, or (c) an aesthetic tradition? In this course, we'll watch movies that are celebrated or obscure, crowd-pleasing or aesthetically demanding, militant or reassuring, or sometimes all of the above. But "all of the above" is a lousy, lazy answer to a trick question-the kind of thing you might say on the way out of the theater if you want to sound smart but don't really have an opinion of your own. The films we watch are not designed for a passive, silent viewer, so one of our tasks will be to try to understand how we might constitute ourselves as the audience these films call for. Filmmakers may include Charles Burnett, Julie Dash, Oscar Micheaux, Spike Lee, and others; requirements will include readings, written responses (to be shared with your classmates), and class presentations.
Requirements: regular short writing and class presentations.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

SCHLEITWILER

ENGL 16 Journalism

Acquaintance with the fundamentals of journalism is useful in dealing with the daily avalanche of news and information. An understanding of how news is gathered and presented in print improves the health of skepticism, aids communication skills and sharpens the ability to think critically.
Assignments in this introductory course will include writing "basic" news stories, features, obituaries, editorials, op-ed pieces and reviews. Students also will explore interviewing techniques, the cultivation and evaluation of sources and other aspects of a newspaper reporter's job. In addition to current daily newspapers, magazines and on-line news sources, students will read and discuss examples of the journalistic forms under study.
Evaluation will rely on class attendance and participation and timely completion of all assignments.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 14. Preference is given to first-year students.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

DUDLEY BAHLMAN (Instructor)
MURPHY (Sponsor)

Dudley Bahlman is a freelance writer and a columnist for The Berkshire Eagle. He was a news reporter for 28 years before retiring in 2005.

ENGL 17 Virtual Realities

Your eyes scan the Winter Study course descriptions for 2010. You are reading them now. You stop at this one: "Virtual Realities....Students will read a series of short stories on VR themes (artificial reality, metafiction, etc.) by authors like Philip K. Dick, Stanislaw Lem, Kelly Link, and Aramaki Yoshio, and then construct their own simulacra or copies of the stories as a mode of commentary or criticism. In the first half of the course, these simulacra will be written texts: parodies, meta-fictional criticism, or essays that reproduce the devices of the stories themselves. During these first two weeks we will also be learning to build simulations in the massively multi-user online world called Second Life, and in the latter part of the course, the class will enter this world and construct a virtual playground for a new kind criticism and a new kind of storytelling...." Oh God, you think, a virtual WSP. And yet critical analysis is already a type of virtual reality, a superimposed landscape of interpretation. And here you are, a virtual adult leading an artificial life in a fairy tale college-how much simulation can one person stand? Unless, unless, these competing distortions can compound or negate each other, and leave you grounded in a hyper-reality that is realer than real. No books, no mechanical essays, no nothing (but still a significant amount of interesting, challenging work). By the end, maybe you won't even have to show up, except as fake avatars in Second Life.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, preparation, 2-3 writing assignments, and a project in Second Life.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to students with a demonstrated interest in the material.
Cost to student: $40.

Meeting time: mornings, three times a week for 2-hour sessions (including some virtual meetings in Second Life itself), with additional reading, writing, and Second Life lab work totaling 20 more hours each week.
WSP committee: Please note that the course is team-taught: both instructors will participate fully in the course.

PAUL PARK (Co-instructor) and CHRISTOPHER BOLTON (Co-instructor)

Christopher Bolton and Paul Park are co-teaching this course. Paul Park is the author of numerous science fiction novels and short stories. He regularly teaches courses in the English department.

ENGL 18 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel

Each class will begin with a lecture-demonstration, followed by practice on the potter's wheel. Each student will have the use of a potter's wheel for each class. We will work with stoneware and porcelain clays on mugs, bowls, pitchers, plates, jars, lids, vases, and bottles, and will finish these shapes as required by trimming and adding handles, lugs, lids, spouts, and knobs. We will also work on several different handbuilding projects. After the tenth class session, all class work will be biscuit-fired. The eleventh class will be devoted to glazing the biscuited pieces. Glazing techniques will include pouring, dipping, layering, brushing, and stamping, and using wax resist and other masking techniques to develop pattern and design. The completed work will then be glaze-fired. The last meeting will be devoted to a "final project" gallery show of your best work. Woven into lecture-demonstrations will be presentations on various topics relating to the science and history of pottery making.
Requirements: attendance at all class sessions and enthusiasm for learning the craft of pottery making.
No prerequisites or potterymaking experience necessary. Enrollment limit: 9. Preference will be given to English and Art majors.
Cost to student: $250 lab fee, plus makeup class fees ($42.00 per class) if applicable.
Meeting time: mornings.

RAY BUB (Instructor)
MURPHY (Sponsor)

Ray Bub is a ceramic artist and teacher at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery in Pownal, Vermont, 10 minutes north of the Williams College campus. All classes except the final project exhibition take place at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery.

ENGL 19 Words and Music by Bob Dylan (Same as Music 11)

This course will offer students an opportunity for intensive study of the songs of Bob Dylan as we investigate in detail Dylan's lyrics and their musical setting and performance. Albums receiving particular attention will include The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan, The Times They Are A-Changin', Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited, Blonde on Blonde, Blood on the Tracks, and "Love and Theft". Our primary focus will be on the songs themselves-on how they were put together and on how we hear them-yet we will also consider the impact of social and artistic context on their creation. By studying these particular songs, we will develop and refine our abilities to read and hear all forms of words and music. In addition to training our analytic and interpretive skills on Dylan's work, we will also briefly consider figures who influenced Dylan and artists he inspired.
Evaluation: active participation in class discussions and one 12-page paper. Students are also required to complete reading/listening assignments before each class meeting.
Prerequisites: none, although prior experience in literary and musical studies will enable students to engage more fully in the course's interpretive and analytical work. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to English and Music majors or to applicants with demonstrated successful experience in related courses.
Cost to student: approximately $60 for books and photocopies.
Meeting time: 10 a.m. to noon on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday.

BELL and SHEPPARD

 

ENGL 20 The Art of Ingmar Bergman (Same as Philosophy 14 and Theatre 14)

(See under PHIL 14 for full description.)

ENGL 25 Morocco (Same as International Studies 25 and Philosophy 25)

(See under PHIL 25 for full description.)

ENGL 27 Printmaking on Paper Clay (Same as ArtS 27)

This course introduces the technical and creative possibilities of printmaking on ceramic paperclay without the use of a press. Students will learn how to make their own paperclay and will explore monoprinting, relief printing, and offset printing. Historical examples of printmaking on clay will be introduced and explored through lectures, examples and assignments. Students will receive feedback on their work through supervised group critiques and open studio sessions. They will be evaluated based on completion of assignments with attention to content, detail, and development of their work. Attendance and participation are required along with an exhibition of final work on the last day of Winter Study.
The goal of this course is to experiment with different printing methods on ceramic surfaces. You will learn about the history of printmaking on ceramics and use that knowledge as a stepping stone for your individual projects. This course will cover basic handbuilding with clay, concentrating on surface design through printmaking. Each of you will be expected to develop your own visual vocabulary and create objects in 2 and 3D formats. The exchange of ideas among classmates of different skill levels will be highly encouraged in the studio, as will the importance of exploring the work of contemporary artists. We will also draw from various texts and web sites for historical and contemporary examples for discussion. You will learn about kiln firing and will complete projects by the end of the course for exhibition.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8.
Cost to student: $35 for book (Image Transfer on Clay by Paul Andrew Wandless) plus $40 lab fee to cover cost of materials.
Meeting time: 10:00-12:00 Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday. Class will meet three times a week for three hour sessions the first two weeks, twice a week the last two weeks with extra open studio time available. A field trip trip to the Instructor's studio is planned.

DIANE SULLIVAN (Instructor)
BARRETT (Sponsor)

Diane Sullivan is a professional artist who lives and works at The Eclipse Mill in North Adams. She exhibits her work nationaly and abroad.

ENGL 29 Peer Writing Tutor Workshop (Same as INTR 29)

The purpose of this course is to train peer writing tutors and assistants to be more effective reviewers and editors of student work. Format: workshop/discussion. Students will read and discuss literature on the teaching of writing; they will also do analytical writing assignments, which they will then bring into the workshop.
Evaluation will be based on analytic writing assignments and course participation. Students who complete this training will be eligible for assignment as Writing Workshop tutors and/or as Writing Assistants for selected Williams classes.
Prerequisites: admission to Williams Writing Writing Pilot or by permission of the instructor. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: under $50.
Meeting time: MWF 2-4 p.m.

DEBORAH SCHNEER, Writing Coordinator at Williams

ENGL 30 Honors Project: Specialization Route

Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the specialization route.

ENGL 31 Honors Project: Thesis

Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the thesis route.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

ENVI 10 Geology of the National Parks (Same as Geosciences 14)

(See under GEOS 14 for full description.)

ENVI 11 Island at the Center of the World: Early and Contemporary Views of New York City Using Google Earth (Same as American Studies 12, Economics 12 and History 12)

(See under ECON 12 for full description.)

ENVI 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Geosciences 12)

(See under GEOS 12 for full description.)

ENVI 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Roots, Its Uncertain Future (Same as Legal Studies 13)

(See under LGST 13 for full description.)

ENVI 14 Sustainable Agriculture: On The Farm

Understanding and getting involved in our food production chain is of growing interest to those with concerns about their own ecological footprint, maintaining personal physical health, the humane treatment of animals, sustainable local economies, social justice or other issues. Sustainable agriculture comes in many forms, reflective of the given ecological/economic/cultural/historic/personal context of a farm. To truly understand this most important issue, just like all matters of ecology, we must go deeper than the overarching theories and find out what the relationships are on the ground.
Through class visits to local farms, reading and a reflective journal, students will gain hands-on experience exploring the day-to-day operations and guiding principles of some local sustainable agricultural enterprises. While January is generally thought of as a time of reflection and planning on the farm, there is still work to be done both outside and inside. Find out what goes on in a dairy enterprise, a mixed vegetable operation, a sugar bush, a woodlot, a pastured and foraging mixed animal farm or an orchard during the "off-season". Meet the farmers, ask the questions, learn skills and lend your help to the task at hand. Because January is the time of reflection and planning, we will join the farmers in a little reading and reflection of our own. Members of the class will engage in a brief survey of agriculturally relevant literature including popular non-fiction, journals, newsletters and informational publications as suggested by the instructor and the farmers visited. Students will respond to our experiences, discussions and readings in a reflective journal.
As per the field nature of this course, students will be responsible for dressing appropriately for January weather on a farm. Appropriate attire might include boots, hat, gloves, coat, etc, that you're not afraid to get dirty.
Class will begin each day in the van on our way to the field. We'll meet twice a week for three hours.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Meeting times: afternoons.

BRIAN MCGINNESS (Instructor)
CASSIDAY (Sponsor)

Brian McGinness co-operates a small sustainable farm in Pownal, Vermont.

ENVI 15 Williams' Sustainability and Student Engagement CANCELLED!

Through readings and case studies, students will learn how models for creating change (politics and power, rules and organizational structure, and prosocial norms and social marketing) can be applied to addressing the challenges of climate change. These models will be used to examine the role of student engagement in the success of Williams College's sustainability initiatives. Students will learn about sustainability initiatives on campus and learn how they can be an effective agent of change. Students will engage with one of three sustainability projects outlined by the course instructors. The projects will address one of three topics: food and sustainability, energy and the built environment, and sustainable living.
Evaluation will be based on final project and presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: $50 for books/materials.
Meeting time: 10 a.m.-1 p.m., two times a week.

STEPHANIE BOYD, WENDY PENNER and LORI VAN HANDEL

Stephanie Boyd is Director of the Zilkha Center for Environmental Initiatives. Wendy Penner is a member of the Williamstown COOL (CO2 Lowering) committee and a Ph.D. organizational psychologist. Lori Van Handel is the manager of the sustainable food program at the Zilkha Center.

ENVI 25 Sustainable Tourism: Ecological Development in a Small Island Nation

The Island School (IS) and affiliated Cape Eleuthera Institute (CEI) are an ecologically-sound school and research center that integrate sustainability into every part of their operations. New and innovative systems are continually being developed to allow the campus to grow with minimal impact on the surrounding environment, and with a positive environmental impact on the surrounding communities. Systems such as biodiesel production, solar and wind energy, composting, farming, water collection, green building design, alternative septic systems, aquaponics and offshore aquaculture make the institution a model of sustainable development in the Bahamas. The natural limits of the island environment provide a unique set of challenges and opportunities for the campus to achieve carbon neutrality and zero-waste, and for the island as a whole to achieve the goal of Freedom 2030, an initiative of the Bahamas National Government for Eleuthera to become energy independent and fossil-fuel free by 2030.
The location in the Bahamas offers students a unique opportunity to learn about the tropical terrestrial and marine environments as well. Understanding the local environment is instructive as students explore the myriad ways that the campus seeks to integrate with the biologic community. In this course students will use the campus and the island as a laboratory for the study of sustainable systems, including food, energy, water, materials, waste, and transportation. Students will become intimately aware of where resources come from and will be challenged to investigate solutions to some of the ongoing resource issues at the school and on the island.
Students will spend two weeks on Eleuthera and the third week at Williams. The first week will be an intensive course on the basics of sustainable systems (listed above), through a mix of lectures, readings, classroom discussions, hands on investigation of campus systems, and site visits. In the second week the students will apply what they have learned to a project on the island. The Bahamas government has decided that Eleuthera should be developed for ecotourism: currently, much of the Island's coast is pristine and there is minimal tourism, coupled with a weak economy and high unemployment. Working in conjunction with the Ministry of Tourism, and with the staff of the CEI, the students and I will work with an existing or planned resort to identify ways that is can operate in an environmentally sustainable way. This will include measuring the planned or existing resource consumption, ecological impact, energy use, water use, imports, impact on the land and coast line, food needs, waste production, and sewage. We will work as a research team; the project will result in a plan, a final report, and a public presentation for the resort and the Ministry of Tourism. The third week of class will be spent back at Williams doing more research and data analysis, finishing the report, and finalizing the public presentation, to be given on campus.
The CEI and the IS are the only research institutions on Eleuthera and their role as experts in renewable energy, sustainable systems, and resource management have earned them high praise as advisors to government and business. Further, the CEI has close ties with the Ministry of Tourism and has previously worked collaboratively. As the instructor, I will be assisted by two CEI researchers who will each give one lectures, as well as campus tours and explanations of the campus systems, and who will serve as on-site advisors to the class. This arrangement is confirmed and incurs no additional costs to the class.
Students will be evaluated on their class work, work on the group projects, and participation in all research and project activities on Eleuthera. They will also prepare and present a group presentation to the Williams community scheduled for Log Lunch in February 2010.
Budget
Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to student: $2264.

SARAH GARDNER, Associate Director of the Center for Environmental Studies and
Lecturer in Environmental Studies

ENVI 26 Vermont's Northeast Kingdom: the 19th Century Meets the 21st Century

Less than four hours drive from Williamstown, the Northeast Kingdom is as different as a foreign country. The course will examine the geography, politics, culture and environmental assets of Vermont's most remote region. For generations this sparsely populated area was home to a static, impoverished, self-reliant Yankee rural culture based on farming and timber. At the end of the 1960's, the completion of the Interstate highway system brought the region into much closer proximity to more developed areas namely Massachusetts. Today the region is changing rapidly generating a clash of cultures between the native Yankees and the "flatlanders" and other people from "away". The course will examine competing visions for the future of the region as the old Yankee kerosene culture meets the present day digital culture. It is envisioned that for many students from urban upbringings, this will be their first in-depth look at rural America.
The first week of the course will be spent on campus familiarizing students with this unique region thru reading novels of Howard Frank Moser-Northern Borders, Where the Rivers Flow North, Disappearances, and Stranger in the Kingdom. Students will get a flavor of the culture thru reading websites such as the Caledonian Record (the most prominent newspaper), Vermont Association of Snow Travelers (VAST-the statewide snowmobiling association), the Unorganized Towns and Gores (UTG-the most remote towns without any town government), the Twelve Tribes of Island Pond, and the Vermont Traditions Coalition (a "traditional use" anti-environmental group of hunters, fisherman, loggers, etc). The boom and bust history of the timber industry will be examined by reading Tall Trees, Tough Men, the story of the cutting of the virgin timber, the lumber camps and log drives on the Connecticut River. The modern version of unsustainable logging by Champion International during the 1980's will be investigated with special emphasis on the outcome of the sale of 2 million acres of their timberland to conservation organizations.
In the second week the class will travel into the teeth of winter to stay at the Clyde River Hotel in Island Pond in the heart of the Kingdom. While there we will meet with State Senator Vince Illizzi of Newport aka the King of the Kingdom; Jennifer Hanlon, supervisor of the Unorganized Towns and Gores; Mark Smith, publisher of the Caledonian Record; Howard Frank Moser of Irasburg, novelist; Peter Schuman of Glover, founder and director of the Bread and Puppet Theater; Jay Craven, filmmaker, founder and director of Kingdom County Productions; Plum Creek Timber Company, new owners of the Champion timberlands; the Northeast Vermont Development Association which serves as the regional planning commission and
economic development authority; Steve McLeod of Bolton from the Vermont Traditions Coalition; representatives of UPC Wind, wind energy developers who have been granted a permit to erect 14 large wind turbines on Hardscrabble Mountain; Walter Medwid, director of the Northwoods Stewardship Center in East Charleston; representatives from Kingdom Trails in East Burke, a nationally recognized mountain biking and cross country skiing trail system; and the Twelve Tribes of Island Pond.
The third week will involve a stay at Toad Hall, a legendary backcountry camp in East Haven built and owned by this instructor. Students will arrive on skis or snowshoes with all their gear and food in backpacks. They will be involved in getting the camp systems up and running-heating the building with a wood stove, chopping the ice out of the stream and hauling drinking water, melting snow for wash water. While in camp we will explore the backcountry on skis, learn about wildlife track and tree identification, search for moose and examine other issues of winter ecology. The isolation and slow pace of life in camp will allow for continued discussions of people and places we have visited. Students will be able to work on their final paper during this time. I will arrange a visit by a group of thirty something young people to talk about growing up and living in the Kingdom. And of course camp life wouldn't be complete without the telling of tall tales (of which I have many).
Students will be evaluated on attendance, class participation, the quality of journals kept and final project (ten page paper or other as approved by instructor). Should the course be oversubscribed, preference will be given to students not from northern New England especially those from urban areas.
Enrollment limit: 8. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: $400.

CHRISTOPHER WILLAMS, Assistant Director for Architectural Services

ENVI 31 Senior Research and Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Environmental Studies 493-494.

GEOSCIENCES

GEOS 10 The Digital Darkroom

The camera is an imperfect tool. Film and digital sensors record only a fraction of the range of tones and colours the human eye can perceive, and today's monitors and printers can display only a small portion of the information present in a well-exposed photograph. Digital processing is about optimizing the basic image for electronic display or print.
The digital darkroom allows the photographer complete control over his or her images. This course will demystify its principles and practices by teaching the basics of digital image manipulation and optimization.
Students will learn what makes a digital image, and how the tools they use affect the image data itself. They will learn about digital file formats and how to use their camera's histogram to ensure that they capture the maximum amount of information from the scene in their viewfinder. They will also learn how to scan 35 mm slides and negatives for digital post-processing.
Using Photoshop, students will learn how to bring out the best in their images. This can range from simple tone and colour adjustments to complex layering and masking to bring out hidden detail or to maximize the aesthetic nature of the print. They will learn how to remove dust and blemishes from their images. The basics of digital printing and colour management will also be taught.
The students will produce a series of image pairs-processed images and their raw photo counterparts-which will be mounted on a class web page. Each student will keep a journal recording the processes they applied and the results achieved.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation and journal quality and completeness.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to students: $30 for books. A digital camera (with RAW capture mode) is suggested, but students may use a 35-mm film camera, and bring prints or negatives for digital processing, if they do not have a digital camera.
Meeting time: mornings for two hours, four times a week.

PETER COX (Instructor)
COX (Sponsor)

Peter Cox is a professional landscape photographer in Ireland. He makes fine art prints from digital images, and runs regular workshops on digital photography.

GEOS 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Environmental Studies 12)

This class will broaden students' appreciation for the appearance and history of the landscape and teach the skills of making a successful photograph. Williamstown, situated in a valley between the Green and Taconic Mountains and bisected by the Green and Hoosic Rivers, is a place of great natural beauty. The local landscape is a subject that inspires both professional and amateur photographers alike. While Williamstown will be the subject of most of our work, we will use it to learn principles of universal application. Students will discover the importance of light in making a photograph. They will also learn camera skills and the mechanics of photography to make slides, which will be reviewed at biweekly class meetings.
In addition to photographing and critiquing images, the class will visit collections at the Clark Art Institute and WCMA to see original work and examine and discuss books on reserve at Sawyer Library. An overview of the history of landscape photography will be provided with an emphasis on American workers such as Carlton Watkins, Eadweard Muybridge, Alfred Stieglitz, Eliot Porter and Ansel Adams. We will also demonstrate examples of different cameras such as medium format, view cameras, and panorama cameras.
Students will produce a body of successful photographs/slides, which will be displayed at http://drm.williams.edu/projects/. Students will submit short written explanations with each of their photographic assignments.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, the student's photography and their presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Priority given to first and second-year students.
Students will need a digital single lens reflex camera (DSLR).
Cost to student: approximately $50.
Meeting time: mornings.

NICHOLAS WHITMAN (Instructor)
DETHIER (Sponsor)

Nicholas Whitman is a professional photographer and the former Curator of Photography at the New Bedford Whaling Museum. A 1977 graduate of the Rochester Institute of Technology, he has honed his craft to make landscape and photographs of power and depth. See more at www.nwphoto.com

GEOS 14 Geology of the National Parks (Same as Environmental Studies 10)

A vicarious trip through selected national parks of the U.S. and Canada with emphasis on the geological basis for their unique scenery. Areas to be studied will be chosen in order to portray a wide variety of landscapes and geologic processes (volcanism, glaciations, etc.). Readings will include a paperback text (Plates and Parks) as well as short publications of the U.S. Geological Survey and of various natural history associations. The second part of the month will involve independent study of topics chosen by the students in preparation for half-hour oral presentations during the last week. The oral reports will be comprehensive, well illustrated explanations of the geology of a particular national park or monument of the student's choice, using maps, slides, and reference materials available within the department and on the internet. A detailed outline and an accompanying bibliography will be submitted at the time of the oral presentation.
Evaluation based on attendance and participation and on the quality of the final report.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference will be given to first-year students and others with no prior college-level study of physical geology.
Cost to student: approximately $60.
Meeting time: mornings.

WOBUS

GEOS 25 Monitoring a Coral Reef Complex

Participants will spend two weeks camping and conducting field work on St. John in the US Virgin Islands, preceded by preparatory time at Williams, and followed by further time back at Williams carrying out data reduction and analysis. The aim of the course is to make a detailed map of the Mary Creek fringing reef complex in the Virgin Islands National Park, and to track and interpret on-going changes in its ecology and sedimentology. In 1998 a group of Williams students mapped the Mary Creek Reef Complex and discovered that large-scale transformation had occurred since previous mapping in 1968. A second group mapped the reef in 2004, and showed that some ecological recovery was in progress. We will return in 2010 to continue this reef-monitoring project. Detailed surveying and analysis of modifications that have occurred since 2004 will allow us to better understand this reef complex, and to put constraints on models for its recent evolution in the context of tourism-based environmental pressure.
Evaluation will be based on participation in field mapping and on field notebooks.
Prerequisite: GEOS 253T in Fall 2009. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference to sophomores.
Cost to student: transportation, accommodation, and food will be covered by the College. Students must bring their own snorkel and mask.

COX

GEOS 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Geology 493-494.

GERMAN

GERM S.P. Sustaining Program for German 101-102

Something new and different for students enrolled in German 101-102. Practice in the use of German for everyday purposes; creation and performance of short dramatic sketches through group collaboration; games; songs; storytelling; reading. No homework.
Requirements: active participation and regular attendance earn a "Pass" grade.
Prerequisites: German 101 or equivalent. Limited to German 101-102 students.
Cost to student: approximately $5 for photocopied materials.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week 9-9:50 a.m.

GERM 25 Changing Vienna

For centuries, Vienna functioned as the center of a huge empire, stretching from today's Poland in the northeast to today's Spain in the southwest. Today, Vienna has been called the capital of nowhere; Austria's somewhat bizarre and troubling trajectory preceding, during, and after the second World War has ultimately led to its current status as a tiny, politically insignificant central European nation embedded in a rejuvenating Europe. But Vienna remains a fascinating place, laden, but also energized, by its own history, and struggling to understand how that history informs its inevitable march into the future of a multicultural Europe. The course will involve introductory readings and discussions in Williamstown, ten days in Vienna, and a follow-up in Williamstown that will include public presentations of projects for which materials were gathered in Vienna. While in Vienna, students will visit the museum of the city of Vienna, the Jewish Museum, the Archive of the Austrian Resistance, and various memorials around the city, as well as meeting with individuals and organizations associated with migration to Austria from Eastern Europe, Turkey, and Africa, and relations to its remaining Jewish citizens.
Requirements: A journal kept during the trip, a five-page paper, and a public presentation.
Prerequisites: German 104 or equivalent proficiency. Enrollment limit: 8.
Costs to student: $1500.

NEWMAN

GERM 30 Honors Project

To be taken by honors candidates following other than the normal thesis route.

GERM 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for German 493-494.

HISTORY

HIST 10 "The Fatherland in Cleats": Soccer and Identities in the Americas

This course will examine the historical and cultural meanings of futebol/fútbol/soccer in inter-American contexts. Across the Americas people have used this sport to define themselves, their regions, and even their national civilizations. Looking at both the darker tendencies (especially violence) and the aesthetically pleasing products (such as Brazilian "football-art" or "the beautiful game") of soccer, we will discuss the boundaries involved in such definitions-between Latin American countries and the United States, between men and women, between macho and non-macho men, between racial and ethnic groups. Among the questions we will address are: Why do nations develop allegedly distinct styles of play? Why has futebol achieved wide popular while soccer languishes in relative obscurity? Will the rise of women's teams challenge futebol machismo?
Evaluation will be based on class participation, a presentation, and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference will be given to history majors and students with strong backgrounds in soccer.
Cost to student: about $50 for book and course packet.
Meeting time: mornings, twice per week, three hours per session.

KITTLESON

HIST 11 Waste

Waste, and what can be wasted, comes in many forms-some tangible (household, hazardous, human, industrial, nuclear) and some less so (time, money, effort, opportunity, talent, words, lives). This course explores how understandings of waste and wastefulness have changed from the mid-1800s to the present, in the contexts of developments in public health and hygiene, mass consumerism, and environmentalism. We will ask how waste and wastefulness have been conceived, how these conceptions have shifted over time, and how they have been taken up not only in the scholarly literature but also in fiction. Assigned materials will include theoretical works on waste; case studies about waste in various countries including France, England, the U.S., and Japan; and Don DeLillo's novel Underworld.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and short response papers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15 (decision based on discretion of instructor).
Cost to student: about $40 for books and course packet.
Meeting time: mornings; 2-3 sessions per week.

SINIAWER

HIST 12 Island at the Center of the World: Early and Contemporary Views of New York City Using Google Earth (Same as American Studies 12, Economics 12 and Environmental Studies 11)

(See under ECON 12 for full description.)

HIST 16 Genealogy

In this course, students will become familiar with the basic methodology of genealogical research and use this information to create a family history. Students will conduct research using primary and secondary sources, including vital records (birth, marriage and death certificates), federal and state census records, immigration records, military service and pension records, naturalization records, probate and court records, newspapers, city directories, and published genealogies. Students will index vital records in a community in Southern Bennington County Vermont to learn what information is included in the records and become familiar with computerized databases. The course will include field trips to local libraries, local town clerks offices and the National Archives and Records Administration in Pittsfield. Students will complete a family history using both secondary and primary sources. They will become familiar with the process of historical research including formulating theories, finding evidence through various media (including oral interviews, records, ephemera, and published sources), and drawing conclusions based on that research.
Evaluation: students will complete a family history from 1850 to present.
No prerequisites (although students should have some basic family knowledge, such as names and locations of grandparents in 1930). Enrollment limit: 18.
Cost to student: approximately $15.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week.

ALAN DOYLE HORBAL (Instructor)
WATERS (Sponsor)

Alan Doyle Horbal has worked as a volunteer at the National Archive and Record Center in Pittsfield, Massachusetts since 2001 and has previously offered this WSP several times at Williams..

HIST 17 The Fight for Free Speech in America

There is nothing free about free speech. Amendment to the Constitution guarantees freedom of speech and freedom of the press, these rights exist only to the extent that people are willing to fight for them. The war on terrorism and the USA Patriot Act pose the greatest threat to free speech since the Red Scare of the 1950s. But the censors are active in many other areas of American life: they challenge books in the public schools and seek to restrict the content of radio, television and the Internet. This course will examine the battles that are currently being fought over sex and violence in the media, hate speech, the First Amendment rights of students, and national security.
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance, class participation, and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25 (chosen by seniority).
Cost to student: $50 for books and duplicating.
Meeting time: mornings, twice a week for three hours.

CHRISTOPHER FINAN (Instructor)
WATERS (Sponsor)

Christopher Finan is president of the American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression, and is the author of several books, including From the Palmer Raids to the PATRIOT Act: A History of the Fight for Free Speech in America.

HIST 18 The Guitar in American Culture

This course will trace the history of the guitar, both acoustic and electric, in American culture. We will examine how the guitar developed in conjunction with the history of American music as well as the music we imported from other cultures. The required readings and videos used in class will place the guitar in the social and cultural contexts of various periods in American history and how guitars have changed with the development of sonic technology. In addition, we will visit a local luthier to observe the process of how guitars are built.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper and a final presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30 (first come, first serve basis until enrollment limit is met).
Cost to student: $25 maximum for books.
Meeting time: afternoons, twice a week for 3 hours, 1:00-4:00.

WONG

HIST 19 The Vietnam War in Literature and Film

This course explores how filmmakers and writers have depicted America's Vietnam War. Students will view and discuss classic films like The Quiet American and Platoon, as well as lesser known but important contributions like The Anderson Platoon and Go Tell the Spartans. Novels and memoirs like Wallace Terry's Bloods and Tim O'Brien's The Things they Carried will complement the course films and round out students' inquiries into the American experience in Vietnam. Class will meet for 6-9 hours/week for film viewing and discussion. Students will be assigned approximately 200-300 pages/week of reading.
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance, class participation, and a final, 10-page oral history paper based on an interview or series of interviews with an individual who was somehow involved with the war in Vietnam.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20 (chosen by relevant coursework and GPA).
Cost to student: approximately $100.
Meeting time: afternoons.

CHAPMAN

HIST 20 1972-73

Roe v. Wade, the fall of Saigon, the Watergate hearings, and the Arab oil embargo, each of these occurred in 1973, and each one separately marked a major shift in American politics and culture. Together these events also point to a period of cultural schizophrenia: the culmination of liberalism and the beginning of neoconservatism. The course will use documentary methodology-photographs, films, music, fiction, essays, and television-to identify and explore a series of themes and issues that created the dissonance of the era.
Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation and a final project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost to student: approximately $75 for books and reading packet.
Meeting times: afternoons.

L. BROWN

HIST 23 Investigative Tips for the Incurably Curious

Whether you are an enterprising journalist, suspicious partner or nosy neighbor, you'll love this introduction to the many tools used by investigative reporters. Willy Stern, '83, a veteran investigative journalist, will show you that no matter what your lawyer, teacher or mother told you, no document is off limits, and no secret secure from a journalist who knows how to dig up the dirt-and all in an ethical fashion. We'll use case studies, movies, and scavenger hunts on campus.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 24-hour take-home group investigative project/scavenger hunt.
Prerequisites: curious mind. Enrollment limit: 30 (chosen by seniority).
No cost to student.
Meeting times: mornings (Tuedays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays).

WILLY STERN (Instructor)
CHRIS WATERS (Sponsor)

Veteran investigative reporter, Willy Stern, '83, has reported from six continents. Over the years, he has been variously harassed, sued, arrested, detained without trial and even tossed out of a country.

HIST 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all senior honors students who are registered for HIST 493 (Fall) and HIST 494 (Spring), HIST 31 allows thesis writers to complete their research and prepare a draft chapter, due at the end of WSP.

WATERS

INTERDEPARTMENTAL PROGRAM FOR EXPERIMENTAL AND CROSS-DISCIPLINARY STUDIES

INTR 29 Peer Writing Tutor Workshop (Same as English 29)

(See under ENGL 29 for full description.)

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

INST 25 Morocco (Same as English 25 and Philosophy 25)

(See under PHIL 25 for full description.)

INST 30 Senior Honors Project

To be taken by candidates for honors in International Studies.

LATINA/O STUDIES

LATS 10 What Does It Really Mean to “Want Your MTV”?: Reading Race, Gender, and Sexuality in U.S. Music Video (Same as American Studies 10 and Women's and Gender Studies 10)

Since MTV's inaugural broadcast in 1981, the music video format has irrevocably altered the ways in which audiences experience, interpret, and consume popular music in the United States. Despite its continued success, the music video genre has long been the subject of critiques from across the political spectrum due to its frequently problematic representations of women, people of color, and/or queer individuals. Departing from a brief historical overview of the birth of US music video, MTV’s impacts, and its aesthetic/thematic conventions, this interdisciplinary course will focus on the multiple, and often conflicting, readings that emerge regarding issues of race, gender, and sexuality across a broad range of visual and sonic texts.
Requirements: two 5-page papers; 1additional short discussion assignment.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference based on seniority.
Cost to students: $30-45.
Meeting time: mornings.

CEPEDA

LATS 12 Waking the Dead: Funeral Homes and Funerals as Sites of Identity and CommunityFunerals are an embodiment and symbol of honor, of the power of memory, and of individual and collective identity. In paying tribute to the departed, stories are told about lives of success and lives of failure, and, hence, the experience of the community itself. In this course, we will explore the politics of mourning and waking practices of working-class communities of color, particularly Puerto Rican communities in the island and the diaspora. In doing so, will also address questions of race, gender, and belonging in struggles over space and place. Course materials include, but are not limited to, Pedro Pietri’s Puerto Rican Obituary, Edgardo Rodríguez Julía’s Cortijo’s Wake, and Karla Holloway’s Passed On: African American Mourning Stories.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, a presentation, and short response papers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to Latina/o Studies concentrators and American Studies majors.
Cost to student: about $80 for books and course packet.
Meeting time: afternoons, twice per week, three hours per session.

RÚA

LEADERSHIP STUDIES

LEAD 10 Institutional Leadership and Social Responsibility

This course will examine a wide variety of issues related to leadership and responsibility, in both public- and private-sector settings. We will explore these issues through the experiences of men and women who have held leadership roles in these contexts. We will examine the changing role of lawyers in advising and guiding their clients. We will look at environmental issues from the perspective of both private institutions and government regulators. We will discuss issues facing leaders in higher education. We will look at questions of responsibility facing political leaders at the state level in our federal system. And we will examine some of the most difficult leadership issues involving national security in the post-9/11 environment, particularly the use of torture in interrogation of detainees. The majority of class sessions will be led by guest speakers, most, though not all, of whom are distinguished alumni of the college. Students will be expected to take an active role in introducing and helping to lead discussions involving the guest speakers. Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation in class discussions, and a final 10-page paper. No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to Leadership Studies concentrators. Meeting time: mornings. Cost to student: approximately $30 for reading materials.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost to student: approximately $30 for reading materials.

EARL C. DUDLEY and FRED HITZ (Instructors)
MCALLISTER (Sponsor)

Earl C. Dudley and Fred Hitz teach at the University of Virginia Law School.

LEAD 12 Making Sense of the CIA (Same as Political Science 12)

(See under PSCI 12 for full description.)

LEAD 13 Epidemiology, Public Health, and Leadership in the Health Professions (Same as ANSO 13 and Chemistry 17)

(See under ANSO 13 for full description.)

LEAD 18 Wilderness Leadership

This Winter Study project is for students who would like to participate in an off-campus experiential education opportunity. Students will be required to research an appropriate accredited program i.e. National Outdoor Leadership School, Outward Bound etc., that will provide a suitable learning environment and be at least 22 days in length. The Director of the Williams Outing Club will assist students in their search if necessary. Upon choosing a program and being accepted, students will meet with the Director in a pre-program meeting in December to create a framework for observing group dynamics and studying a variety of leadership styles. A required 10-page paper based on their journals will be required immediately after their return to campus for the start of third quarter. There will also be a follow up class to debrief the experience in the first week of February. All programs must meet with the approval of the Outing Club Director.
In addition to off-campus opportunities, there will be a Wilderness First Responder Emergency Care course that will take place on campus. Contact Scott Lewis for details.
Requirements: course approval by WOC Director, daily journal writing with focus on leadership and group dynamics, 10-page paper and 2 class meetings pre and post trip. Student assessment will be based on ten page paper and class discussions.
No prerequisites. Off-campus opportunities are not open to first-year students. Interested students must consult with WOC Director before registration. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student will vary depending on the program selected-range is generally from $1,500-3,000.

SCOTT LEWIS, Director of the Outing Club

LEGAL STUDIES

LGST 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Roots, Its Uncertain Future (Same as Environmental Studies 13)

Taught from the perspective of an experienced trial attorney, this course will examine the role environmental law plays in the United States today in light of how that role has developed during the nearly forty years since the modern era of environmental law began. As a preface, we will consider the significantly more limited influence of environmental law in our national affairs before 1970 and some of the historical and political reasons for that situation. We will examine the reasons why the law's early application in the first half of the 20th century almost exclusively to the conservation and preservation of natural resources took on in the second half a markedly different approach, one emphasizing pollution control and all but ignoring resource conservation.
This course will begin by tracing the development of an American consciousness towards the environment through an examination of our law and our literature. The term "law" includes state and federal judicial decisions and legislation, particularly during the presidency of Theodore Roosevelt and during the decades which followed the year 1970 when much of the legal basis for the American environmental protection movement was established. The term "literature" includes not just the written word (the first book we look at is "The Lorax" by your favorite childhood author, Dr. Seuss) but also painting, sculpture, and music. Nothing too heavy! We will examine the historical and legal choices we as Americans have made which have put our environment on trial. What has occurred in our development as a people that explains this quintessentially American phenomenon? Our journey begins with the Puritans of New England and the planters of Virginia and their predecessors in the New World and then moves swiftly to the beginning of the modern era in environmental law and to its now uncertain future.
In light of this historical situation students will examine state and federal legislative and judicial attempts to address environmental problems and then try to reach informed, rational conclusions as to whether those attempts were successful. What were the political, social and economic issues involved and, ultimately, how did their context affect the legal solutions imposed. Cases decided at the appellate level will be introduced and examined through their trial court memoranda opinions in order to observe how the legal system actually works and how frequently the reasoning behind the trial judge's decision changes as the case works its way through the appellate process.
This course will be presented from a litigator's point of view, that is to say, both the practical and the theoretical, emphasizing what is possible to achieve in the litigator's real world as informed by what the academician would present from the security of the classroom. Evaluation will be based on attendance and classroom participation. Students will prepare several short papers, including single page "clerk's notes," which will present one or more sides of an issue and form the basis for classroom discussion. They will be asked to defend or reject the conclusions reached or approaches taken by our courts and legislatures and by our literature, as broadly defined, on environmental issues.
No prerequisites. This course is appropriate for students eager to explore the material presented and prepared to argue assigned positions on important legal, literary and historical issues. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: approximately $60 for books and materials.
Meeting time: mornings. 3 two-hour sessions a week.

PHILIP R. MCKNIGHT '65 (Instructor)
KAPLAN (Sponsor)

Philip R. McKnight '65 is a trial and appellate attorney. At Williams he completed the honors program for both American History and Literature and European History. He earned his law degree from The University of Chicago Law School and then practiced in the state and federal courts of New York and Connecticut, as well as in Europe.

LINGUISTICS

LING 10 Linguistic Typology and the Science of Constructed Languages

Saluton! Qapla'! Suilad! Coi! From Esperanto to Klingon, from Quenya to Lojban, linguaphiles have long been driven to duplicate and manipulate the properties of natural languages to construct new languages for use in works of fiction, for facilitating international communication, or for the pure fun of intellectual stimulation. In this course, students will develop their own constructed languages, guided by study of the cross-linguistic typology of patterns in phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and language change to help make their invented languages more realistic-or if appropriate, more realistically unrealistic! Students will also apply their knowledge of linguistic typology to critcially assess the design of existing constructed languages such as Esperanto and Klingon.
Evaluation will be based upon class participation, performance on regular homework assignments, presentation of selected readings, and the quality and thoroughness of the final project, which will be a formal description and typological evaluation of grammar of the student's constructed language.
Prerequisites: Linguistics 100, Linguistics 210, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference will be given based on demonstrated interest in the course material and in linguistics generally. Interested students should contact the instructor in the fall with a brief expression of intent.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

SANDERS

MATHEMATICS and STATISTICS

MATH 10 LQWURGXFWLRQ WR FUBSWRJUDSKB

The ability to encode information so that only certain recipients can read it (or, conversely, to read information you are not supposed to have!) contains some of the most exciting applications of pure and applied mathematics. Since at least the time of Julius Ceasar (the title to this course is encoded with the cipher he made famous), codes and ciphers have been used to protect important information. We'll discuss various cryptosystems used over the years. The course will be a mix of history and theory.
Evaluation: combination of paper/presentation and some challenge problems.
Prerequisites: Math 102 or its equivalent. Enrollment limit: 25.
Cost to student: $10 for supplies
Course homepage: http://web.williams.edu/go/math/sjmiller/public_html/crypto/index.htm
Meeting time: afternoons.

MILLER

MATH 11 Teaching Mathematics at BArT (Same as Special 17)

Do you have an interest in inspiring others to enjoy the intellectual triumphs of mathematical ideas? Is education one of your passions? Do you want to learn the finer points of teaching while working with your own group of middle or high school students? This winter study course will offer you insights into the art of teaching and will provide practical teaching experience in which you will be able to find your own voice in the classroom. In this experiential course, you will be assigned to a group of middle school students from Berkshire Arts & Technology Charter Public School in Adams, Massachusetts (BArT) with whom you will teach during January. You will meet with your students several times a week and will teach both the curriculum at hand as well as offer mathematical enrichment and craft original activities. If you are drawn to the opportunity to teach real students and are willing to commit to this serious responsibility, this is the winter study for you. Teaching is truly "the toughest job you'll ever love."
In addition to regular class meetings here on campus, Williams students will be responsible for meeting BArT students on their assigned days and times. Transportation to and from Adams, MA will be provided. In addition to their teaching, Williams students will keep a Teaching Journal and produce a Teaching Portfolio.
Prerequisites: This course is open to all Williams students having a solid knowledge of calculus. Enrollment limit: 8-10.
Cost to student: $25.

BURGER

MATH 12 Contemporary Movie Criticism

Are there some movies that you love? Are there any movies that you despise? If so, can you make it clear why you feel so strongly about a film? In this course, students will watch the films of contemporary directors that have a very distinctive style-styles which they will either love or hate. The students will then study how various critics have reacted to these directors, and then write their own responses. Directors that will be focused on include David Gordon Green, Larry Clark, Terry Zwigoff, Kore-eda Hirokazu, P.T. Anderson, Errol Morris, and Todd Solondz. Students will be required to turn in and present several critical essays throughout the term.
Evaluation will be based on a 2-page critical essay due every other class meeting.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings, Monday-Friday, with two meetings at least two hours to show movies.

BOTTS

MATH 13 Atheism (Same as Religion 13)

In this course, we will read some of the recent authors arguing against a belief in God, including Richard Dawkins, Sam Harris and Christopher Hitchens, in addition to some earlier writers. We will also read attempts to refute them. Discussion topics will include what role science has to play in determining spiritual beliefs and potential foundations for morality when it is not dictated by fear of divine retribution. We will also debate the danger in having religious beliefs drive political decision-making in a nuclear age. The validity of any and all religious beliefs and disbeliefs will be considered. Students who might take offense at having their religious beliefs questioned should not take this course.
Evaluation will be based on participation in class discussion, leading class discussion and a 10-page paper. There will be a substantial amount of reading.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $100 for books.
Meeting time: mornings, 6 hours per week, and a few evening sessions.

ADAMS

MATH 14 The Art and Science of Baking

This course will provide an introduction to baking, including cakes, meringues, cookies, pastry, quick breads, and chocolate. We will study the science behind the baking in addition to techniques of baking. Students will also contribute to a food blog, where they will write about and display their creations.
Evaluation will be based on class participation (in the Williams College bakeshop in Paresky), homework, and a final project that will include both a baking and writing component.
No prerequisites; the course is aimed at those without extensive baking experience, though some knowledge would be helpful. Enrollment limit: 10. Selection will be based on responses to a questionnaire.
Cost to student: approximately $150 for textbook, ingredients, and supplies.
Meeting time: 2-5 pm (not Friday's), an average of three days per week.

PACELLI

MATH 15 Mathematics of the Rubik's Cube

The Rubik's cube, one of the greatest toys ever invented, hides deep and subtle mathematical concepts. In this course the students will learn how to solve the Rubik's cube and will investigate the solution using abstract mathematics and geometric intuition. The mathematical model associated with the cube is the Rubik's Group, an algebraic structure with more than 43 quintillion elements. We will study the basics of Group Theory, an area of algebra used in the study of symmetry in two- and three-dimensional geometric figures. The mathematical theory will help us understand the beauty and some of the complexity of the Rubik's cube. We will also briefly investigate the other Rubik's cubes: the 2x2x2 Mini Cube, the 4x4x4 Rubik's Revenge and the 5x5x5 Professor's Cube.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and homework.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 104 or its equivalent. Enrollment limit: 25.
Cost to student: $15 for Rubik's cube
Meeting time: mornings.

STOICIU

MATH 23 Gaudino Winter Study Fellows Program

The Gaudino Winter Study Fellow designation is available to up to fifteen students who create their own independent projects that involve critical, reflective, and experiential learning during Winter Study. Each student works independently under the direction of a faculty sponsor, who will help shape and monitor the project. The project must receive approval from the Winter Study Committee, as well as from the Gaudino Scholar and Gaudino Board of Trustees. The Gaudino Board is looking for projects that address specific intellectual problems through direct experience, undertaken preferably in a social milieu that is previously unfamiliar or even uncomfortable to the applicant. Projects must be academically rigorous and worked out carefully with faculty sponsors. Projects should also entail systematic self-reflection on how the experiences affect students personally, and students may be asked to discuss their project with the Gaudino Board after it is completed. The Gaudino Scholar will meet with students as a group before and after Winter Study. All students whose projects are approved will receive the Gaudino Fellow designation. In addition, students on Financial Aid will receive Gaudino funding from a minimum of 50% to a maximum of 90% of the budget for the project up to $2,500, as determined by the Financial Aid office. No additional funding for students' projects will be provided by the College. Students selecting this course will register for MATH 23. More information about the Gaudino Fellows Winter Study Program and guidelines for applying can be found at: http://web.williams.edu/resources/gaudino/overview.php.

BURGER

 

MATH 25 Graduate School Blog

Students will help in the launching of a blog for students enrolled in or considering graduate school. The first prototype <http://mathgradblog.williams.edu/>http://mathgradblog.williams.edu/ is one for mathematics, from which others may follow. The students will write columns, publicize the blog, and recruit others for involvement.
In the travel portion of this Winter Study, students will attend the annual mathematics meetings in San Francisco January 13-16; write associated stories for blog posting; and meet, recruit, and work with other students and mathematicians.
Enrollment limit: 4. Not open to first-year students.
Cost: $1500 for airfare, registration, food, and lodging, much of which can probably be covered by the College and other sources.

MORGAN

MATH 26 Resettling Refugees in Maine (Same as Special 26)

(See under SPEC 26 for full description.)

MATH 30 Senior Project

To be taken by candidates for honors in Mathematics other than by thesis route.

MATH 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Mathematics 493-494.

MUSIC

MUS 10 Symphonic Winds

Students enrolled in Symphonic Winds will rehearse and prepare music in preparation for a February2010 concert performance. Students will participate in a variety of performance settings from full ensemble to various chamber ensemble settings (both conducted and unconducted). Students will be responsible for preparing their individual parts (including both instrumental practice and required listening/reading), attending all rehearsals and composer
lectures to which they are assigned by the instructor, and leading occasional sectionals. A specific, detailed schedule will be constructed once the repertoire is determined; however, rehearsals/lectures will most likely be scheduled on Monday-Thursday afternoons and Sunday evenings. Students should be expected to be in rehearsal for approximately 5-10 hours a week; for every hour of rehearsal time, students will be expected to have prepared for approximately 14 hours per rehearsal, as necessary.
Evaluation will be based on individual performance and preparation, and, as necessary, written assignments. Repertoire will be selected based on enrollment. Repertoire to be studied during Winter Study will include music of Louis Andriessen (De Materie, La Passione, and others), and possibly music by composers including John Adams, Cornelis de Bondt, Susan Botti, John Corigliano, Michael Gordon, Judd Greenstein, David Maslanka, and Ileana Perez-Velazquez. Symphonic Winds is open to students of all musical abilities, including wind, brass, and percussion players, as well as vocalists, string players, and pianists. Instructor permission is necessary to enroll in this winter study course.
Preference is given to students who have performed in Symphonic Winds previously.
Enrollment limit: 30
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

S. BODNER

MUS 11 Words and Music by Bob Dylan (Same as English 19)

This course will offer students an opportunity for intensive study of the songs of Bob Dylan as we investigate in detail Dylan's lyrics and their musical setting and performance. Albums receiving particular attention will include The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan, The Times They Are A-Changin', Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited, Blonde on Blonde, Blood on the Tracks, and "Love and Theft". Our primary focus will be on the songs themselves-on how they were put together and on how we hear them-yet we will also consider the impact of social and artistic context on their creation. By studying these particular songs, we will develop and refine our abilities to read and hear all forms of words and music. In addition to training our analytic and interpretive skills on Dylan's work, we will also briefly consider figures who influenced Dylan and artists he inspired.
Evaluation: active participation in class discussions and one 12-page paper. Students are also required to complete reading/listening assignments before each class meeting.
Prerequisites: none, although prior experience in literary and musical studies will enable students to engage more fully in the course's interpretive and analytical work. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to English and Music majors or to applicants with demonstrated successful experience in related courses.
Cost to student: approximately $60 for books and photocopies.
Meeting time: 10 a.m. to noon on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday.

BELL and SHEPPARD

MUS 12 "Wherefore Art Thou?": Musical Explorations of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

The story of star-crossed lovers is surely the Shakespearean story best established in popular culture. Besides the romance and tragedy which it first brings to mind, the play Romeo and Juliet mixes low comedy, combat, songs, clowns, intrigue, and social commentary. Such a popular play has invited numerous and diverse musical treatments for over two centuries, with composers seizing on various facets of the play according to their times and temperament. We will begin with a reading of the play itself, and then examine diverse treatments of the narrative including the dramatic symphony by Berlioz; selected scenes from romantic operas by Bellini, Gounod, and Delius; the orchestral overture by Tchaikovsky, the ballet by Prokofiev, incidental music by Duke Ellington, and the Broadway musical West Side Story by Leonard Bernstein. We will also consider film adapations of the story, including the 1936 version directed by George Cukor and the 1996 film directed by Baz Luhrmann, with special attention to the cinematic use of music.
Evaluation will be based on class attendance and participation; and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference to first-years and sophomores.
Cost to student: $20 reading packet.
Meeting time: three two-hour morning meetings per week.

J. BLOXAM

MUS 13 Microtonal Eartraining, Performance and Composition

Instrumentalists, vocalists and composers are invited to explore the still new and growing field of microtonal music. The course begins with basic ear training- hearing, singing and playing microintervals as small as 1/12 of a tone (n-note equal temperament), which will be of great value to all who perform and listen to any kind of music. We continue with the creation of short compositional and improvisational exercises as presented in our textbook "Preliminary Studies in the Virtual Pitch Continuum." Playing and discussing these exercises in class will provide an opportunity as a group to understand the esthetic and stylistic implications of using these strange new sonorities-a topic that often leads to more fundamental questions about what we expect from music. Students will be perfoming their own or their classmates' short works by the end of the course. To put these pursuits in context, we will take a look at explorations with microtonality from the turn of the twentieth century to the present-the music of Carrillo, Ives, Wyschnegradsky, Haba, Partch, Johnston, Boulez, Bancquart, Stahnke, Maneri and others. By listening to recordings and studying scores, we will try to answer the basic question "Why microtones?"
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons.

JAMES BERGIN (Instructor)
KECHLEY (Sponsor)

James Bergin is the executive director of the Boston Microtonal Society; conductor of its permanent chamber ensemble NotaRiotous; composer; violist and teacher. His microtonal compositions have been performed by NotaRiotous; he plays viola in the Berkshire Symphony and maintains a private teaching studio.

MUS 14 Soul of Jazz

"Jazz is the Teacher, Funk is the Preacher"-James "Blood" Ulmer.
Exploring the music from the roots of the blues and gospel tradition we will take examples from various time periods and see how blues and expressive playing has been interpreted since the earlier days of jazz through the present. Starting in New Orleans, up through Kansas City and Chicago and finally around the world we will play, listen and analyze examples of the evolution of style and expression through jazz. Louis Armstrong, Louis Jordan, Les McCann, Horace Silver, Charles Mingus, Lee Morgan, Cannonball Adderley, Eddie Harris, Herbie Hancock, The Crusaders, David Sanborn and beyond will be explored. Please note, this class is for musicians. This will be an ensemble workshop playing experience. A performance will conclude the study session.
Enrollment limit: 8.
Cost to student: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons.

ERIK LAWRENCE (Instructor)
KECHLEY (Sponsor)

Saxophonist/flutist with Erik Lawrence has spent his career playing with and studying the music of the soul, expressed by the masters of jazz, blues and funk. The common thread that rings in music from the earliest recorded jazz through the most modern music is represented in Erik's current band, Hipmotism.

MUS 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Music 493, 494.

MUS 35 Singing School: Sacred Choral Traditions in the Berkshires and Beyond (Same as American Studies 35 and Special 35)

(See under SPEC 35 for full description.)

NEUROSCIENCE

NSCI 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Neuroscience 493-494.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 10 The Philosophy of Chess

This is a rare opportunity to study chess with a Grandmaster. We will study the whole game, from the opening to the endgame. Students can expect to greatly improve their chess playing skills, and to learn about the history, aesthetics and philosophical significance of chess.
Evaluation will be based on written analysis of games.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference based on chess level and chess interest.
Cost to student: $60-80.
Meeting time: mornings.

GERRARD and HAR-ZVI

Har-Zvi is a chess Grandmaster, was the World Champion under 16, the author of numerous chess articles, and is a commentator on the world's most popular internet chess site. Grandmaster Har-Zvi was also the victor in what has been called "The Immortal Bullet Chess Game (see http://blogs.williams.edu/wccc/). Gerrard is a professor of philosophy, an enthusiastic chess amateur, and was three times junior chess champion of West Virginia.

PHIL 11 Two Great Board Games: Chess and Go

Students will hone their skills in playing-after, if necessary (beginners welcome!), learning to play-arguably the greatest Western and Eastern board games, i.e., respectively, chess and go. The chief philosophical subject matter for the course will be the differences between the two games. One such difference: whereas chess pieces (chessmen!) are named for people having different occupations, and winning the game requires killing (or, at the bare minimum, being in a position to kill) the opponent's pieces, go pieces are named what they are-stones-and although games generally involve removing some stones from the board, it is possible to win without removing any of the opponent's stones. Outside-of-class may include some reading, but will include playing both games, with others on campus and/or on computers, then either with others or against programs.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper arguing either that one of the two games is superior to the other, or that they cannot be ranked with respect to which is the better game (it is easily argued, for example, that both games are far better than tic-tac-toe; making that argument requires beginning to identify criteria for ranking games in general.)
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference based on essay explaining interest in the course.
Cost to student: no more than $75, depending on whether or not student has chess or go equipment.
Meeting time: mornings.

WHITE

PHIL 12 Ethics Bowl: Case-based Reasoning in Ethics

Ethics Bowl is a nationwide intercollegiate debate competition in which teams comprising three to five undergraduate students cooperatively develop, present, and respond to analyses of fifteen morally complex case scenarios. In the national program, all teams receive the case descriptions in advance of the competition, but they are not provided with any questions about them which they'll be asked to address during the tournament. Thus, teams must work through all facets of the scenarios in order to be prepared for whatever the moderator and judges may ask. The competition proceeds, tournament style, as a series of matches in which two teams square off in debating a question concerning the moral features of a given case. However, it is a debate with a difference: because teams do not know in advance what will be asked, they are not obliged to take a position opposing that of their competitors. They may disagree or concur, but must provide an assessment of their opponents' arguments and justification for their own conclusions. The emphasis in presentations is on substantive argumentation, not on rhetoric or presentation style, and the positions presented typically represent a consensus among all the team members who have contributed to the preparations and analysis.
This winter study course will be modeled on the Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl format. It will begin with a brief introduction to reasoning in practical (as opposed to theoretical) ethics and case analysis. Thereafter, students dive into this year's Ethics Bowl cases, some taken from the regional Ethics Bowl competition held in the Fall and some from the upcoming national competition. The scenarios present ethical problems in one of a number of personal, professional, or public policy domains (e.g., medical, legal, journalistic, and environmental ethics; issues of academic integrity, personal relationships, etc.) Students in the course will collaborate in analyzing all of the cases in-depth, but will take primary responsibility for at least one and up to three cases. The discussion sessions will be intensive, but very much student-driven, with the instructor acting as a coach rather than as a teacher.
The course will include at least one or two public "scrimmages" which may include teams from area schools (e.g., Dartmouth, Union). It is open both to members and to nonmembers of the Williams College Ethics Bowl team. If the Williams College Ethics Bowl team qualifies to participate in the national IEB competition-as it has for all 5 of its years of existence to date-PHIL 12 students may be invited to join the "nationals" team. More information about Ethics Bowl, including sample cases from previous competitions are available at http://ethics.iit.edu/eb/index.html.
Requirements: final paper (7-10 pp) based on an Ethics Bowl case of the student's choice.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15 (expected 5-10), priority to current Ethics Bowl team members and to juniors and seniors (any major).
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: flexible; generally, early afternoons.

J. PEDRONI

PHIL 13 God in Philosophy

Philosophers have been interested in God as long as there had been philosophy (and perhaps before). In this winter study, we will look at a broad selection of what philosophers have had to say about God. We will look at ancient Greek attempts to characterize the nature of the divine. We will look at ingenious arguments for God's existence as devised by Augustine, Anselm, Scotus, Aquinas and other medieval thinkers. We will consider the Fool's reply, Pascal's Wager, miracles, and the problem of evil. Throughout the course we will be particularly interested to understand and analyze arguments concerning God. To enrich our discussions, we will screen a selection of films such as Crimes and Misdemeanors, Religulous, and Faustina.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation, and short written assignments totaling to no more than 10 pages.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Meeting times: 3 meetings a week and film screenings.

MCKEEN

Catherine McKeen is a visiting scholar at Williams College. McKeen holds a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Rutgers University and has taught at Clark University, Williams College, and SUNY College at Brockport.

PHIL 14 The Art of Ingmar Bergman (Same as English 20 and Theatre 14)

Ingmar Bergman (1918-2007) was one of the greatest artists of the 20th century. His films could be seen as a realization of Wagner's ambition to create a "total work of art": they are brilliantly written, superbly acted and directed, with stunning photography and camera work, and all deeply indebted to Bergman's lifelong preoccupation with classical music. In telling stories of varied complexity, Bergman expresses and explores-with considerable psychological sophistication and sometimes with humor-human emotions, relationships and solitude, the meaning of life and the role of art in it.
We will analyze and discuss Bergman's evolving filmmaking technique, his aesthetics, and his philosophical preoccupations. We will read his screenplays,his memoir The Magic Lantern, and select critical responses to his work-including Bergman's own mature self-evaluation.
The focus of the course will be on a necessarily small selection of Bergman's films. Time permitting, we will see Smiles of a Summer Night, Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries, Through a Glass Darkly, Persona, Cries and Whispers, Face to Face, Scenes from a Marriage, and Sarabande. The last week will be devoted to viewing and discussing of Bergman's masterpiece, Fanny and Alexander.
Format: seminar
Requirements: class attendance and participation; weekly short papers (about 1000 words each); and a final paper, about 5 pages long.
No prerequisites. Enrollment: limit: 20. In case of overenrollment, preference will be given to students who demonstrate a strong interest in the course.
Cost to student: $20-40 for the reading packet and/or books.
Class meetings will be in the afternoons, 3-4 times a week; film screenings, followed by discussions, will be in the evenings, 4 times a week, typically 7-10 pm.; only students willing to devote evening time to the class should apply.

MLADENOVIC

PHIL 25 Morocco (Same as English 25 and International Studies 25)

Students in this course will spend winter study in Morocco. Morocco presents a compelling blend of historical influences and modern world currents. Threads of Islam, Arab traditions, and the heritage of the native Berber people are woven into a distinctive cultural tapestry, while traces of French colonialism can still be seen in the political and social structure. Morocco is at the intersection of the West, the Middle East, and Africa. Travel there is therefore a powerful way to introduce intellectual themes that require and reward a subtle blending of insight from history, political science, religion, and philosophy.
We will take the first steps in engaging some of these challenging topics in order to enable independent study facilitated by serious and multifaceted exposure to the country. For the first two weeks, students will study at the Center for Cross Cultural Learning (CCCL) in Rabat, taking Arabic lessons (classical or Moroccan dialect) each morning and then gathering for lectures by local university faculty in the afternoon. During this span students will live with Moroccan families in the Rabat medina. In the third week of the course students will travel in the interior of Morocco, exploring Fez and Marrakech, riding camels in the desert, and hiking through Berber villages in the Atlas Mountains.
Students will be expected to attend all seminars, lead a group presentation, and complete a substantial research paper (10-15 pages). The presentation and research paper will be occasions to explore a special topic in depth including, for instance, justice and gender, art, literature, colonial studies, or Islam.
No prerequisites. Arabic is the official spoken language of Morocco, and French is spoken very widely. While desirable, neither is required. Enrollment limit: 12. Not open to first-year students. Preference: Student interest is more important than class year or academic major. Final participants will be chosen on the basis of interviews regarding student goals and intellectual interests.
Estimated cost: $3500.

KNOPP (English Dept.) and BARRY (Philosophy Dept.)

PHIL 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Philosophy 493-494.

PHYSICS

PHYS 10 Light and Holography

This course will examine the art and science of holography. It will introduce modern optics at a level appropriate for a non-science major, giving the necessary theoretical background in lectures and discussion. Demonstrations will be presented and students will make several kinds of holograms in the lab. Thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation, we have 7 well-equipped holography darkrooms available for student use.
Students will be evaluated on the basis of regular attendance, completion of 4 laboratory exercises, and a holography laboratory project or a 10-page paper. Attendance at all classes and labs is required for a passing grade.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference will be given to students with no previous college course in physics more advanced than Physics 109.
Cost to student: about $50 for holographic film, chemicals, and photocopies.
Meeting time: At the beginning of WSP, the class will meet for lecture and discussion three mornings a week and for lab 2 afternoons a week. Later classes will be mainly laboratory.

K. JONES

PHYS 12 Meet the Right Side of Your Brain: Drawing as a Learnable Skill

Representational drawing is not merely a gift of birth or a magical ability, but a learnable skill. If you ever wanted to draw, but doubted you had the ability or believed you could not learn, then this course is for you. This intensive course utilizes discoveries in brain research to teach representational drawing. By using simple techniques and extensive exercises you will discover and develop the perceptual shift from your symbol based left hemisphere to your visually based right hemisphere. This cognitive shift enables you to accurately see and realistically represent the physical world. You will learn to draw a convincing portrait, self-portrait, and still life. This course is designed to develop your powers of observation and enhance your innate creative problem solving abilities, which are applicable in any field. Students need no previous artistic experience, just the willingness and desire to learn a new skill. Students will be expected to attend and participate in all sessions. They will also be required to keep a sketchbook recording their progress and complete a final project.
Evaluation will be based on participation, effort, and development. There will be an exhibition of coursework on the final day of Winter Study.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to juniors and seniors.
Cost to student: cost of text and approximately $15 for drawing materials.
Meeting time: mornings, two times per week with substantial additional independent student work.

STELLA EHRICH (Instructor)
S. BOLTON (Sponsor)

Stella Ehrich holds an M.F.A. in painting from Bennington College. She teaches drawing at Bennington and other local colleges. She has had solo exhibits from Rutland, VT to Dallas, Texas to Mobile, Alabama.

PHYS 13 Scientific Computing and Visualization

Students in this course will learn a number of computational tools and techniques to model and visualize scientific processes. Each student will carry out a series of computational exercises using Mathematica, matlab, Python, C, Fortran, and/or a computer language of the student's choice (no previous programming experience is required). These exercises will be drawn from mathematics, chemistry, biology, and physics. In addition, students will be introduced to the typesetting program LaTeX, allowing for the preparation of professional scientific documents incorporating high-quality images. An effort will be made to allow each student to work on problems appropriate to his or her interests and background.
Students will be evaluated on the basis of regular attendance, completion of the exercises, and a final project or Cost to student: approximately $50.
The class will meet three times a week (two hours each), including a short lecture and group programming exercises; the final project will be planned and completed outside of class (estimated 20 hours each week).

F. STRAUCH

PHYS 22 Research Participation

Several members of the department will have student projects available dealing with their own research or that of current senior thesis students. Approximately 35 hours per week of study and actual research participation will be expected from each student.
Students will be required to keep a notebook and write a five-page paper summarizing their work. Those interested should consult with members of the department as early as possible in the registration period or before to determine details of projects then expected to be available.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 1 or 2 per project.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: to be arranged with instructor.

S. BOLTON and members of the department

PHYS 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Physics 493, 494.

POLITICAL ECONOMY

POEC 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as Political Science 21)

(See under PSCI 21 for full description.)

POEC 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (Same as Economics 22)

Students learn about tax policy toward low-income families in the United States through training and work as IRS certified volunteer income tax preparers in North Adams. This course has three objectives: 1) to help students understand the shift of redistributive policy in the United States from income support through the transfer system (Aid to Families with Dependent Children/Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) towards support of working individuals through the tax system (primarily the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC); 2) for students to understand the challenges that low-income individuals have "making ends meet" and the role the EITC has played in increasing the standard of living of the "working poor"; and 3) To enable students to understand the tax code well enough to prepare simple income tax returns including those filers claiming the EITC. Students will be trained by the IRS.
Evaluation is based on the results of the IRS certification test and the students' work as tax preparers. In exceptional cases, students will be able to write a 10-page paper in lieu of these requirements.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. If overenrolled, students selected via a written statement of interest.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: TWR 10-12; Williams provides access to desktop computers via OIT and the Office of Experiential Education, as well as vans to the site in North Adams for tax preparation sessions. Sessions are usually Thursday evenings and Saturday mornings.

PAULA CONSOLINI, Coordinator of Experiential Education at Williams and
IRS-designated Northern Berkshire Site Coordinator for this program

POEC 23 Institutional Investment

This course is an internship with the Williams College Investment Office in Boston. It is part of a structured program designed to give students an overview of endowment and investment management. Students will gain a better understanding of investments as well as sharpen professional skills that could be applied in the investment or financial sector, either in the for-profit or non-profit realm. Topics include portfolio construction, endowment investment management, and relations with College administration. The instructors are employees in the Williams College Investment Office in Boston.
The work will be based in Boston and will run for four weeks (January 4 – January 28). Students are expected to work at the office for a minimum of 32 hours a week (four days), complete a set of relevant readings, keep a journal, and write an analytic essay.
No prerequisites are required. Relevant knowledge is an advantage to selection.
To apply for enrollment, please select this course (WS POEC 23) as your first choice when registering for Winter Study. Additionally, please send an email with your resume and a cover letter discussing why you are interested in this course and what you hope to gain from it to: investmentoffice@williams.edu by 11:59PM ET on Sunday, October 25, 2009.  Enrollment limit: 2. If oversubscribed, students will be selected via interviews.
Students are responsible for the cost of housing, food, and incidentals.  The Investment Office will provide help in locating low-cost / no-cost housing in the Boston area if needed.

COLLETTE CHILTON, Chief Investment Office (Co-instructor)
JENNIFER LEE, Investment Analyst (Co-instructor)
THOMAS MUCHA, Investment Analyst (Co-instructor)

POEC 25 Eye Care and Culture on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua

Continuing the model of recent eye care winter studies in Nicaragua, the trip will follow a similar protocol. In cooperation with Ray Hooker, President of FADCANIC (The Foundation for the Autonomy and Development of the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua) who has assisted us in all of our previous courses and certain professors of the New England College of Optometry (specifically Dr. Bruce Moore, Dr. Nicole Quinn and Dr. Elise Harb) who have previously trained our students in the prescription of reading and distance glasses and have accompanied our trips, we are proposing a follow up course continuing our work of prescribing glasses and also the training of local medical personnel to prescribe and distribute glasses as a sustaining project. In preparation for this proposed trip, at the conclusion of our 2007 trips, we left approximately 500 pairs of glasses and other materials and supplies in Pearl Lagoon for future work. After a partial week of classes on campus on the culture and politics of Nicaragua and a weekend of training in the prescribing of glasses we would travel to Managua for a day of cultural visits (national museum, Masaya Volcano, Huembes market). Following our cultural visits we would travel to Rama by bus and conduct clinics at this important river port for a couple of days and then travel by boat to Pearl Lagoon. While conducting clinics in Pearl Lagoon we would send out small groups to several communities on the rim of the Lagoon. While in Pearl Lagoon we will evaluate the work of the nurses we trained during the last two years and continue to upgrade, expand and support this effort toward sustainability. After our efforts in the Pearl Lagoon we will travel to Bluefields by boat and conduct clinics at the Normal School, the University and possibly the Cuban Clinic, where we have been invited to use their excellent space for exams. After our work on the Coast we will fly to Managua and then to the U.S. The course will conclude at Williams with the turning in of our journals as well as discussions and evaluations of our insights about the developing world and our personal reactions to the experience.
Enrollment limit: 12. Not open to first-year students. Contact: robert.r.peck@williams.edu.
Cost to student: $2500.

ROBERT PECK (Instructor)
MAHON (Sponsor)

Dr. Robert Peck, retired Director of Athletics at Williams (1971-2000), is a 24-year visitor and observer of Nicaraguan politics and culture.

POEC 31 Honors Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Political Economy 493.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

PSCI 10 War in American Cinema

War is one of the most puzzling and enduring of collective human activities. It is also one of the most represented: stories of war have been told throughout human history and can be found in poetry, song, literature, and more recently, on film. Not only has war been portrayed in multiple mediums, narratives of violence have also evoked varied themes including glory and tragedy, sacrifice and suffering, heroism and recklessness. This course examines the aesthetics of violence by examining portrayals of war in American cinema. How has Hollywood imagined war? What themes do American films emphasize and how have these themes changed over time? How have war movies dealt with contentious social issues such as race, gender and class? We will explore these themes by comparing and contrasting historical descriptions of war with their cinematic counterparts. The class will meet for two-hour sessions, three times a week for discussion and in-class screenings (note: some films will run slightly over the allotted time).
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page critical analysis of a film of the student's choosing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference to Political Science majors.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for books and reader.
Meeting time: afternoons.

P. MACDONALD

PSCI 12 Making Sense of the CIA (Same as Leadership Studies 12)

This course examines the history of the Central Intelligence Agency. We will examine some of the crucial cases of success and failure that mark the history of the agency. While we will certainly look at questions of organizational structure and larger political context, our primary focus will be to examine the CIA through the personal experiences of those who served in the agency.
Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation in class discussions, a short paper and a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference to Political Science majors and Leadership Studies concentrators.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for reading materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

MCALLISTER and DONALD GREGG

Donald Gregg served as U.S. Ambassador to Korea from 1989-1993. He is currently chairman of the board of the Korea Society.

PSCI 13 The Third World City

In 2007, the world became majority urban. But most of these urbanites live not in places like New York or Tokyo but rather in places like Lagos or Mumbai, dwelling in shantytowns and working in petty commerce. Their cities' path of urbanization diverges from the "normal" one accompanying industrialization in the West and East Asia. Toward this phenomenon, arguably the most important social fact in today's world, writers have adopted wildly divergent stances, from the optimistic to the apocalyptic. We read a few of these, including Mike Davis, Rem Koolhaas, Sukhetu Mehta, Hernando De Soto, and Robert Neuwirth, and watch some films and videos on the subject.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference to Political Science majors.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

MAHON

PSCI 14 The Federal Bench

As a branch of the national government, the federal courts are an important component of the constitutional political system in the United States, and they play a central role in today's political debates. The past decades have been complex and fascinating ones for anyone interested in the federal courts. The class will examine the allocation of authority among the branches of the federal government and the relationships among state, federal, and tribal governments within the United States. Questions of the meaning of national and of state "sovereignty" lace the materials. Beneath the sometimes dry discussions of jurisdictional rules and doctrines of comity lie conflicts about such issues as race, religion, the beginning and end of life, abortion, Indian tribal rights, and gender equality. In additional to considering the political and historical context of the doctrinal developments, the class will examine the institutional structures that have evolved in the federal courts; questions about the size and shape of the federal courts, the allocation of work among state, tribal, and federal courts and among the different kinds of federal judges now in the federal system; and the effects of social and demographic categories on the processes of federal adjudication. The class will also have weekly discussion with members of the federal bench: Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, Federal Circuit Judges and Federal District Judges in a roundtable seminar discussion or lecturers.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation and a 10-paper final paper with presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference to Political Science majors.
Cost to student: price of books.
Meeting time: mornings.

TBA

PSCI 15 Catholic Political Economy (Same as Religion 15)

The Catholic Church has from her beginning thought and taught on social, political and economic relations (e.g. St. Paul's Epistle to Philemon). Over the last century or so, however, she has devoted particular attention to the problems of modern economies-inequality, class conflict, private property, the profit motive, the welfare state, consumerism, and human freedom to name just a few-and wrestled with many foundational questions of modern economic life: What is the proper relationship between the social classes? What are the merits and flaws of socialism? Of capitalism? Is love a relevant concept in political and economic analysis? What is an economy for?
This course involves a thoughtful engagement with one small portion of the larger body of thought known as 'Catholic social teaching,' namely that emphasizing the themes of political economy. Our primary texts will be the papal encyclicals Rerum novarum (1891), Quadragesimo anno (1931), Mater et magistra (1961), Laborem exercens (1981) and Centesimus annus (1991), as well as commentaries on the documents themselves and their social impact.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation and a final paper.
No prerequisites, although a basic familiarity with general Christian history and doctrine is recommended. Enrollment limit: 15 Preference to Political Science majors.
Cost to student: price of books.
Meeting time: mornings.

PAUL

PSCI 16 Education for Liberation: An Introduction to Social Justice Education (Same as American Studies 16 and Women's and Gender Studies 16)

This course is an invitation to engage in Social Justice Education, an interdisciplinary field of study that seeks to understand the power dynamics of the United States in order to more fully work towards the ideals of equality and opportunity for all. We will spend time learning about oppression and liberation theories and studying different manifestations of oppressions, including racism, sexism, gender identity, classism, ableism, heterosexism, and anti-Semitism. Investigations into these topics will include academic scholarship, experiential activities, dialogue, personal reflection, independent research, and a final project. Students must be open to a personal, dyanmic, and engaged educational experience.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, response papers, and a final project.
Prerequisites: American Studies 201, Women's and Gender Studies 101, or permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 16.
Cost to student: $40 for book.
Meeting time: mornings.

DIANE WILLIAMS '02 (Instructor)
C. JOHNSON (Sponsor)

Diane Williams '02, received her Master's in Social Justice Education from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and has faciliated workshops on self- awareness and social justice issues in high school, college, and community settings.

PSCI 18 Douglass, Davis, Obama: Fugitive Democratic Theory (Same as Africana Studies 18)

(See under AFR 18 for full description.)

PSCI 19 In Treatment: Exploring the Path Back from Debt Addiction and Financial Stress

The current international economic crisis is challenging national governments in ways not seen since the Great Depression. Today's headlines chronicle the impact of financial stress on daily life as governments which loaded up on debt struggle to build confidence and dig out from past excesses. Other countries with more conservative policies were still sideswiped by the global financial crisis and must now react to actions taken by the large economic powers. How should governments respond? Are we sowing the seeds for a reversal of globalization? This class will tackle these questions in a roundtable format using a case study approach. We will invite private sector guests from the international financial and legal communities and monitor current developments through the media. In the first half, we will explore the origins of the crisis and the experiences of countries dramatically affected by the credit boom. Next, students will form teams to select countries from a short list for in-depth analysis, develop a recommended policy to respond to the crisis and present their findings in person to a panel of experts in New York for a reality test. Members of the panel will include specialists in the international financial and legal communities, multilateral agencies, non-governmental organizations and credit rating agencies. Site visits to relevant companies and organizations are planned during the trip.
Evaluation will be based on class attendance, participation in group project teams and the quality of the final presentation.
We will meet for two three hour sessions two days a week for the first half followed by group project work in the second half. The final presentation will take place at the end of the course during an overnight trip to New York City.

DAVID BARTSCH '74 (Instructor)
C. JOHNSON (Sponsor)

David Bartsch'74 graduated with a degree in Political Economy; he manages a global portfolio of investments in the sovereign and financial sectors for a large New York based insurance group.

 

PSCI 20 Pictures and Words: Documentary Storytelling (Same as ArtS 20 and American Studies 20)

This course will explore the documentary form as a way to investigate and communicate compelling stories about social, economic and political life in the US. Students will learn about the history of the documentary form through lectures, slide shows and screenings and they will complete their own documentary projects in class. The class will survey a range of projects that document the human condition by photographers, writers, and radio and film producers, including James Agee and Walker Evans' WPA project Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, Jim Goldberg's Rich and Poor, David Isay's The Sunshine Hotel, Milton Rogovin' Lower West Side, Mary Ellen Mark's Streetwise, as well as the current journalistic audio and slide show projects regularly featured in The New York Times. Students will learn how to research and scout interesting stories, how to conduct and record interviews, how to capture a narrative with the camera, and how to edit their work into a cohesive final project. Students will be encouraged to explore topics that are locally relevant, such as the effects of deindustrialization on the social and economic life of a community.
Students are required to bring their own camera to class-all formats are acceptable from inexpensive disposable to a digital or analogue. Students are also encouraged to bring their own video camera or audio recorders if they have them in order to record interviews but audio recording equipment will be provided as needed.
Evaluation will be based on the completion of documentary assignments and class presentation, with attention to content, effort, and development of the work. Active participation in class sessions will also count toward the final assessment. Presentation of final projects on the last day of Winter Study is required. Supervised meetings to mentor individual projects will be arranged. In addition to the work conducted on their own, the class will meet together three times per week for two and a half hour sessions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16. If overenrolled, instructor will conduct short interviews with interested students.
Cost to student: $25-60 for development of film and purchase of any additional materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

EVE MORGENSTERN (Instructor)
C. JOHNSON (Sponsor)

Eve Morgenstern is a documentary filmmaker and photographer from Brooklyn, NY who has produced award-winning projects for PBS. Her film, "Cheshire, Ohio", received grants from the New York State Council on the Arts and The Anthony Radziwill Documentary Fund. Her documentary photographs have been published in The New York Times and Le Monde and exhibited in Brooklyn, NY and San Francisco, CA.

PSCI 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as Political Economy 21)

This course is a participant-observation experience in which students work full-time for a governmental agency, nongovernmental (including voluntary, activist, and grassroots) organization, or for a political campaign. Students may find placements in government and nonprofit organizations in which their work involves significant involvement with public issues. Examples include: town government offices; state or federal administrative offices (e.g., environmental agencies, housing authorities); interest groups that lobby government (e.g., ACLU, NRA); nonprofit organizations such as service providers or think tanks (e.g., Habitat for Humanity; Cato Institute); and grassroots, activist or community development organizations (e.g., Greenpeace or neighborhood association). In 2009, students are especially encouraged to train and become certified IRS Volunteer Income Tax Preparers through a special section of the course. The instructors will work with each student to arrange a placement; such arrangements must be made in advance of the Winter Term. Students should first make their own contacts with an institution or agency. The instructors and members of the Political Science department are available to help students find placements, if necessary. Each student's fieldwork mentor shall send a confirmation letter to the instructors verifying the placement and describing the nature of the work to be performed by the student. Students will read a few short articles distributed at the beginning of Winter Term and must agree to keep a journal, maintain weekly contact with the instructors, and write a final paper summarizing and reflecting upon the experience. A group meeting of all students will occur after winter study to discuss the experiences.
Requirements: 90 hours of fieldwork; satisfactory evaluation from the institutional sponsor; 10-page final paper or equivalent; participation in final meeting.
At the time of registration, interested students should send a resume and letter of interest to Paula Consolini.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost to student: approximately $15 for readings, student covers transportation costs to and from internship site.

NICOLE MELLOW and PAULA CONSOLINI (Instructors)

Paula Consolini, Ph.D, (UC Berkeley, 1992) is the Coordinator of Experiential Education at Williams and supervisor of the North Berkshire Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program.

PSCI 23 Great Writing, Great Teaching (Same as Special 23)

CANCELLED!

PSCI 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 493-494.

PSCI 32 Individual Project

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 495 or 496.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 10 Immortality Bites: Meaning and Metaphor in Vampire Mythology

This class will examine the representations of vampires in terms of both symbolism and socio-cultural context. How do portrayals of vampires reflect the hopes and fears of their time and place? How are themes such as living a meaningful life, balancing our animal instincts with our moral values, and constraining or releasing our sexuality played out in books, movies, and television shows about vampires? This class will focus on novels such as Interview with a Vampire and Twilight, movies such as Nosferatu and The Lost Boys, and TV shows such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer and True Blood.
Evaluation will be based on final presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons.

CROSBY and GREER

PSYC 11 Community Screening for Alzheimer's Disease

This course will consider memory screening as a strategy to address the increasing prevalence and importance of early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in Williamstown and surrounding communities. Through readings and class presentations/discussions, students will become familiar with research on the epidemiology and underdiagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, neuropsychological screening instruments for Alzheimer's disease, and the design and analysis of screening instruments. Students will learn how to administer and interpret neuropsychological instruments used to screen for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The class will then design and conduct a community screening day for AD. This will include selecting appropriate screening instruments, selecting an appropriate venue, raising community awareness of memory problems, and working with local community agencies to encourage individuals to participate in memory screening. Following the screening day, each student will analyze the data collected on the screening day and submit a report.
Evaluation will be based upon class discussions and presentations, engagement in the design of the screening day, proficiency in learning to administer screening instruments, and the written report of the results of the screening day.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16.
Cost to student: $50.
Meeting time: the class will meet approximately 6 hours per week. Meeting will typically be in the morning. Some of these meetings will be as a class and other meetings will be in smaller groups. Students will be expected to visit The Memory Clinic in Bennington, Vermont (20 minute drive) to observe the administration of screening tests and to become familiar with individuals experiencing memory problems.

P. SOLOMON and CYNTHIA A. MURPHY

Dr. Cynthia Murphy is Executive Director of the Memory Clinic in Bennington VT. She holds an MBA from Columbia University and a doctorate in clinical psychology. She has conducted numerous memory screening days and is co-author of a widely used screening instrument for Alzheimer's disease.

PSYC 12 Alternative Birth Choices (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 12)

This course will consider the range of women's experiences surrounding pregnancy and childbirth. Among the topics we will cover are: alternative birthing choices (midwifery, homebirth, water-birth), the medicalization of childbirth, and attitudes regarding breastfeeding. We will view documentaries about pregnancy and childbirth, including films of labor and delivery; hear from a number of local professionals, such as a midwife, a doula, a childbirth educator, and a lactation consultant, and take a tour of a birthing center.
Evaluation will be based on class presentation and participation in class discussions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference based on seniority.
Cost to student: $30 for photocopying expenses.
Meeting time: mornings.

KRISTEN SAVITSKY(Instructor)
HEATHERINGTON (Sponsor)

Kristen Savitsky holds a Bachelor's of Science degree in nursing and has worked as a labor and delivery nurse.

PSYC 13 Animal Personality: Theory and Research

Over the past decade researchers have begun to make the controversial case that the same personality trait profiles which diffentiate between humans are also present in apes, monkeys, dolphins, dogs, parrots, octopuses, hyenas, and other non-human animals. If correct, this raises many other fascinating questions: What are animal personality traits "for"? Does environment shape animal personalities? Do animals have personalities in a more limited sense than do humans? We will briefly review human personality theory and research before exploring the animal personality literature and its critics. In class we will interact with animals, interview animal caretakers, and explore our assumptions about animal behavior. Animals will be present at class meetings and there will be field trips to a local farm, veterinary clinic, and/or animal shelter during the scheduled class hour. Weekly time commitment will include six hours of class meetings per week, approximately 5 hours of reading and self-scheduled film viewing, and five more hours divided among interviewing pet owners, writing brief reaction papers, and developing a term paper.
Evaluation will be based on 1-page reaction papers twice per week, participation during class, and a 10-page minimum term paper on an approved topic related to the course.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost to student: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons.

ARI SOLOMON (Instructor)
HEATHERINGTON (Sponsor)

Dr. Solomon is a psychology department research associate who studies personality, depression and anxiety. He has been a visiting scholar at Stanford University, a faculty member in Williams' psychology department, and the willing handservant to a panicky Belgian tervuren, and infantile shih tsu, a painfully intelligent border collie, a brother-sister pair of introverted and extroverted cockapoos, and a strangely irascible cat.

PSYC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as Chemistry 14 and Special 14)

(See under CHEM 14 for full description.)

PSYC 15 Ephquilts: An Introduction to Traditional Quilting

This studio course will lead the student through various piecing, appliqué and quilting styles and techniques, with some non-traditional methods included. Samples will be made of techniques learned, culminating in the completion of a sizeable project of the student's choosing (wall quilt or lap-size quilt). There will be an exhibit of all work (ephquilts), at the end of winter study. "Woven" into the classes will be discussions of the history of quilting, the controversy of "art" quilts vs. "traditional" quilts, machine vs. hand-quilting and the growing quilting market. Reading list: Pieces of the Past by Nancy J. Martin; Stitching Memories: African- American Story Quilts by Eva Ungar Grudin; Sunshine and Shadow: The Amish and Their Quilts by Phyllis Haders; A People and Their Quilts by John Rice Irwin; Treasury of American Quilts by Cyril Nelson and Carter Houck; The Quilt: New Directions for an American Tradition, Nancy Roe, Editor. Requirements: attendance of all classes (two field trips inc), a love of fabric, design and color, an enthusiasm for handwork, participation in exhibit. Extensive time will be spent outside of class working on assigned projects.
Evaluation will be based on 2 projects: a techniques sampler quilt and a quilt of student's choosing (to be approved by instructor) and participation in exhibit.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $200 for materials and supplies.
Meeting time: 2-4 p.m., three days each week.

DEBRA ROGERS-GILLIG (Instructor)
HEATHERINGTON (Sponsor)

Debra Rogers-Gillig, one of the top quilters in New England, has been quilting for 30 years, and teaching classes and coordinating shows and exhibits for 25 years. She has received numerous prizes and awards from quilt shows in New York and New England and been published in quilt magazines.

PSYC 19 Psychology in Action

This course gives students two opportunities do to a full-time placement during winter study either in a hospital, mental health or social service agency, legal firm, industry, consulting, or research setting in which work of a psychological nature is done, or in a classroom at Mt. Greylock Regional High School or at Williamstown Elementary School. For the former, during the fall semester, students are responsible for locating their own potential placements and consulting with the course instructor about the suitability of the placement before the winter study registration period. Students should provide the course instructor with a brief description of the proposed placement, noting its relevance to psychology, and the name of the agency supervisor. Before Thanksgiving break, the student must provide a letter from the agency supervisor which describes the agency, and the student's role and responsibilities during winter study. For the latter (school placements), those accepted will work under the supervision of a regular member of the teaching staff and submit a report on their work at the end of the Winter Study Period. This project involves a four-week commitment to full-time affiliation with the school. Before winter study registration, interested students should consult with Professor Savitsky, Bronfman 389. He will assist in arranging placements and monitor students' progress during the four-week period.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page minimum final paper summarizing the student's experiences and reflections as drawn from a daily journal, and the supervisor's evaluation.
Prerequisite: Approval of Professor Savitsky is required. Enrollment limit: number of places available at the two participating schools up to a total of 20 in both placements.
Cost to student: travel expenses in some cases.

SAVITSKY

PSYC 22 Introduction to Research in Psychology

This course provides a research opportunity for students who want to understand how psychologists ask compelling questions and find answers about behavior in the laboratory. Several faculty members, whose subfields include behavioral neuroscience, cognitive psychology, social psychology, clinical psychology, developmental psychology, and the psychology of education, will have student projects available. Since projects involve faculty research, interested students must consult with members of the Psychology Department before electing this course.
Evaluation will be based on the quality of research participation, student's lab journal and either an oral presentation or a written 10 page report of the research project.
Required activities: A minimum of 20 hours per week of research participation will be expected of each student.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: space available in faculty research labs.
Student selection criteria: Decision will be based on evaluation of departmental application and number of faculty available as mentors.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

ZIMMERBERG

PSYC 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Psychology 493-494.

KAVANAUGH

RELIGION

REL 10 Meditation-Based Stress Reduction: Adopting a Mindfulness Practice (Same as ANSO 10)

(See under ANSO 10 for full description.)

REL 11 Kierkegaard and Religion

The 19th century Danish thinker Soren Kierkegaard has provided much fodder for ethical, existential and religious debates during the past two centuries; and even now, his thoughts spark similar, if not more heightened, controversies.
Evaluation will be based on a final paper (2500 words) and active participation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost to student: $100.
Meeting time: TBA.

SHUCK

REL 12 Create Your Life with Yoga

This class explores the multifarious yoga tradition to lay out resources and techniques you can use to create your life. By integrating textual studies and personal practice, you take your place as a creative innovator employing the resources of yoga. Analysis of classic yoga texts from India provides a historical, cultural, and philosophical background. Class discussions consider key yogic concepts and how they relate to contemporary life, and yoga practice sessions explore how these themes play out, both on and off the yoga mat. Based on the powerful technology of Anusara Yoga, you learn how to create your own effective home practice. As you gain familiarity with the basics of human anatomy and receive individualized attention on how to work with your particular body, your practice becomes even more effective. Creatively interacting with the yoga tradition can facilitate greater physical accomplishment and ease, prompt explorations of ethical dilemmas and philosophical questions, and reveal ways to reduce stress and optimize your energy. This class aims to provide an overview of the traditional and contemporary dimensions of yoga, and to empower each participant to draw upon this tradition to manifest a fulfilling, life-enhancing personal yoga practice.
Required Texts: The Yoga Sutras, The Bhagavad Gita, Hatha Yoga Illustrated, and related articles.
Evaluation is based on attendance and participation in all classes and sessions, as well as a personal practice journal, a research bibliography and oral presentation, and a final paper reflecting on the course.
Prerequisites: Apply by email explaining your experience and interest in the class to Natasha.Judson@gmail.com.
Cost to student: approximately $70. For your health, please bring your own yoga mat.
Meeting time: afternoons, three two-hour sessions/week.

NATASHA JUDSON (Instructor)
BUELL (Sponsor)

Natasha Judson, M.Ed., RYT, Certified Anusara Yoga Instructor has been teaching yoga in Williamstown since 1999. She first practiced yoga as a teen in Pittsburgh, and took it up again when she became a high school teacher in Vermont. She has practiced Ashtanga and Iyengar Yoga, completing a two-year teacher training with Patricia Walden. She completed an internship in Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction at UMASS Medical School and helps facilitate the annual Teen Retreat at Insight Meditation Society. Currently she studies several times each year with John Friend, the founder of Anusara Yoga.

REL 13 Atheism (Same as Mathematics 13)

(See under MATH 13 for full description.)

REL 15 Catholic Political Economy (Same as Political Science 15)

(See under PSCI 15 for full description.)

REL 25 Explorations in Solidarity: a Meeting of Minds and Hearts in Nicaragua

This course will explore the lived realities of the hemisphere's second most impoverished nation, and the relevance of faith and religious community to the continuing struggle for social justice. Students will reflect on these realities in the company of subsistence farmers, urban factory laborers, and leaders of grassroots organizations working for progressive social change. The effects of free trade policies (CAFTA and FTAA) in an increasingly globalized economy, natural disasters, and the changeable attentions of the developed world will be explored, along with other influences-Christian, Marxist and neo-Liberal-on the material and spiritual well-being of Nicaraguan people. In particular, the course will explore ways in which the paradigms of liberation theology and the base Christian community movement have shaped some Nicaraguans' views of the economic system and the natural environment in which they live, and some of their traditional folkloric and contemporary artistic responses to it.
Nicaragua offers a unique lens through which to view the culture and influence of the U.S., as well as the daily struggles, the dignity, and the hope of some of the hemisphere's most marginalized citizens. The experience of the course will include approximately ten days of living (with minimal amenities) with families in a subsistence farming community. Students will also attend a number of Christian religious services, and take part in dialogues with communities in which liberation theology shapes perspectives and daily choices. (The course is open to students of any religious background or no affiliation.) And for a portion of the course we may be joined by Nicaraguan peers who are involved in youth empowerment movements or in the midst of university education. Travels in Nicaragua will be organized by the staff of the Escuela Asociación Kairos para la Formación, an NGO that facilitates educational programs and fosters faith-based partnerships for communities in North America and Nicaragua. Throughout, students will be invited to accompany our Nicaraguan hosts as they live their daily lives, and to reflect on their own identities and assumptions as North Americans. The goal is to explore the relevance of religious community to the possibilities for restorative justice, and to discover what it would mean to shape a relationship with the people of Nicaragua according to a paradigm of solidarity-in contrast to the more familiar paradigms of charity and national self-interest.
The course will begin in Williamstown with several days of background reading (Nicaraguan history, liberation theology and current political and economic reporting), writing, and orientation. Once in Nicaragua there will be daily reflection sessions, in preparation for which students will keep a detailed personal journal. Other requirements include attendance at two orientation sessions during the latter weeks of the fall semester; participation in a group oral presentation to the Williams community upon return; and a final 10-page paper. As in years past, in order to get the maximum benefit from the opportunity to live among the Nicaraguans, the course will continue into the first 2 or 3 days of "Dead Week"; students will return to Williamstown on Monday, February 1.
Conversational knowledge of Spanish is, of course, helpful; but we will be accompanied by several translators who will help to to make the experience accessible to non-Spanish speakers as well. Willingness to live in physically demanding situations is essential. By present estimates, the cost of the trip to each student (including all food, lodging, round-trip travel between Williamstown and Managua, all in-country transportation and fees) will be approximately $3,200. Students are individually responsible for the cost of travel to Williamstown at the beginning of WSP.
Enrollment limit: 10. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: $3200.

Rev. Richard Spalding, Chaplain to the College (Instructor)
DARROW (Sponsor)

REL 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Religion 493 or 494.

ROMANCE LANGUAGES

FRENCH

RLFR S.P. Sustaining Program for French 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study period. There are three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

LIBERT and RENOUARD (Teaching Associates)

RLFR 13 Masterpieces of French Cinema (Same as ArtH 13)

(See under ArtS XX for full description.)

RLFR 30 Honors Essay

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLFR 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for French 493-494.

ITALIAN

RLIT S.P. Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

NICASTRO

SPANISH

RLSP S.P. Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

TEACHING ASSOCIATES

RLSP 30 Honors Essay

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLSP 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Spanish 493-494.

RUSSIAN

RUSS S.P. Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102

Required of all students enrolled in Russian 101-102. Three meetings per week, 50 minutes per session. Practice in speaking and comprehension based on material already covered as well as some new vocabulary and constructions. Designed to maintain and enhance what was acquired during fall semester, using new approaches in a relaxed atmosphere. No homework.
Regular attendance and active participation required to earn a "Pass." Open to all.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

INYASHKIN

RUSS 12T Nikolai Gogol's Petersburg Tales (Same as Comparative Literature 12)

This tutorial takes seriously Fyodor Dostoevsky's famous yet apocryphal statement, "We all came from under Gogol's `Overcoat,'" by investigating the cycle of short stories in which Nikolai Gogol's world-famous tale "The Overcoat" first appeared. Initially published in the 1830s and1840s, the five stories that comprise Gogol's Petersburg Tales-"Nevskii Prospect," "The Overcoat," "The Nose," "The Portrait," and "Diary of a Madman"-are considered among the most influential works of short fiction ever written and have provoked as many interpretations as there are critics in the almost two centuries since they first appeared. While critics in Gogol's own day praised them for their heightened realism and biting social critique, later scholars have viewed the Petersburg Tales as precursors of the grotesque, absurd, and postmodern in twentieth-century literature. For each tutorial meeting, students will read a single Petersburg Tale, as well as a selection of criticism from Gogol's own time to the present day. Our final tutorial meeting will be devoted to synthesizing the myriad meanings of the Petersburg Tales and developing our own interpretation of what and how Gogol's stories mean in the early twenty-first century. Students will work in pairs, with one student writing a 5-page paper for each tutorial meeting and the other critiquing her partner's work. Students with advanced proficiency in the Russian language (RUSS 251 or higher, or the equivalent) will read the Petersburg Tales in the original Russian, while those who do not know Russian will complete all readings in English translation. Students will be evaluated on the basis of the papers they write and their critiques of their partner's work.
Prerequisites: at least one literature course. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to Russian majors, Comparative Literature majors, and Literary Studies majors.
Cost to student: no more than $20 for reading materials.
Meeting times: tutorial meetings will take place twice a week, to be arranged according to students' and the professor's schedules.

CASSIDAY

RUSS 13 Humane Medicine and the Medical Humanities

There is a growing awareness that the sciences and social sciences are only part of the necessary preparation for medical school and the life of a physician. Although the humanities teach about the human condition, too often physicians and scientists fail to appreciate these disciplines. In the film The Dead Poets Society, John Keating describes this well: "We don't read and write poetry because it is cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. Medicine, law, business, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for." In this course, students will be introduced to the medical humanities and will develop a personalized template for life-long enrichment. We will start with Mark Edmundson's short book, Why Read. Then we will read poetry by Keats, Blake, Shakespeare, Dylan Thomas, Emily Dickinson, and physician-poets William Carlos Williams and George Bascom; fiction by George Eliot, Victor Hugo, Chekhov, Bulgakov and Updike; illness narratives by Arthur Frank, Elyn Saks, J-D Bauby; and medical student essays, such as "The Soul of a Doctor." We will also watch several films, such as Wit and A Walk to Beautiful.
The course will meet for two three-hour sessions per week. In addition, we will have two evening film sessions to introduce the field of "CineMedicine."
Method of evaluation: Students will create a personal canon that will be hosted on a course blog.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference will be given to students interested in pursuing a career in medicine.
Cost to student: approximately $50 for books.
Meeting times: Monday and Thursday, 1:00-4:00 pm. Students who need to be at team practices during sessions should not apply.

DAVID J. ELPERN (Instructor)
GOLDSTEIN (Sponsor)

David J. Elpern, a local physician, has a long-standing interest in the relationship between medicine and the humanities. He has published articles and hosted conferences on the medical humanities for over twenty years and currently maintains websites and blogs that address philosophy, pathographies, and medical films.

RUSS 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Special 25)

Williams has a unique program in the Republic of Georgia, which offers students the opportunity to engage in three-week-long internships in any field. Our students have worked in the Georgian Parliament, helped in humanitarian relief organizations like Save the Children, interned in journalism at The Georgian Times, taught unemployed women computer skills at The Rustavi Project, documented wildlife, studied with a Georgian sculptor, did rounds at the Institute of Cardiology, and learned about transitional economies at the Georgian National Bank. In addition to working in their chosen fields, students experience Georgian culture through museum visits, concerts, lectures, meetings with Georgian students, and excursions. Visit the sacred eleventh-century Cathedral of Sveti-tskhoveli and the twentieth-century Stalin Museum, take the ancient Georgian Military Highway to ski in the Caucasus Range, see the birthplace of the wine grape in Kakheti and the region where Jason sought the Golden Fleece. Participants are housed in pairs with English-speaking families in Tbilisi, Georgia's capital city. At the end of the course students will write a 10-page paper assessing their internship experience.
Knowledge of Russian or Georgian is not required.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: approximately $2000.

GOLDSTEIN

RUSS 30 Honors Project

May be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RUSS 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Russian 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY-See under ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

THEATRE

THEA 10 Theatrical Lighting Design

This course presents an intensive study of the art and techniques of lighting design for the theatre. We will examine the controllable properties of light, including angle, intensity, texture, color, and movement, and explore the process of building a lighting environment onstage that supports a specific, personal point of view about a play. This artistic exploration will be coupled with a thorough study of the technical aspects of lighting for the stage, including the physics of light and color; standard equipment in a basic stage lighting system; how to develop a set of abstract lighting ideas into a full light plot; and how to focus the light plot, program lighting cues, and bring design concepts to fruition on the stage.
The class will meet as a group three times per week in the afternoons, with additional individual sessions scheduled to provide one-on-one training specific to each student's particular interests. There will be at least one required field trip to see a performance or performances and meet the designers to discuss their work.
Evaluation will be based on thoughful and thorough class participation and successful completion of class projects.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference to sophomores and juniors.
Cost to student: approximately $150.

JULIE SEITEL (Instructor)
BAKER-WHITE (Sponsor)

Julie Seitel is a member of United Scenic Artists and has been a professional lighting designer for 13 years.

THEA 11 Verbatim: Adventures in Ethnographic Theater (Same as Sociology 11)

(See under SOC 11 for full description.)

THEA 14 The Art of Ingmar Bergman (Same as English 20 and Philosophy 14)

(See under PHIL 14 for full description.)

THEA 32 Senior Honors Thesis

See description of Degree with Honors in Theatre.

WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES

WGST 10 What Does It Really Mean to “Want Your MTV”?: Reading Race, Gender, and Sexuality in U.S. Music Video (Same as American Studies 10 and Latina/o Studies 10)

(See under LATS 10 for full description.)

WGST 12 Alternative Birth Choices (Same as Psychology 12)

(See under PSYC 12 for full description.)

WGST 16 Education for Liberation: An Introduction to Social Justice Education (Same as American Studies 16 and Political Science 16)

(See under PSCI 16 for full description.)

WGST 30 Honors Project

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

SPECIALS

SPEC 10 Quest for College: Early Awareness in Berkshire County Schools

Today's extremely competitive higher education market places significant pressure on students nationwide to start planning for college at an increasingly early age while simultaneously demanding ever-higher standards of excellence for admission to top schools. "Early Awareness" initiatives aim to educate middle school students as to what lies ahead on the college horizon, empowering them to make sound academic and extracurricular choices that will keep open a maximum of options. The first week of this course will be spent in the classroom, exploring and discussing problems and issues germane to the national trends towards greater (and earlier) college-related pressures.
Students will respond to a series of readings dealing with such issues as tracking, paid test preparation and untimed testing, early decision, parental and peer pressures, special interests, misrepresentation of information, independent counseling, and others. Class time will also be devoted to familiarizing students with both the nuances of the college admission process, visiting other higher educational institutions in Berkshire County, and learning how to facilitate the early awareness game, Quest for College. Students will spend the next two weeks visiting 10-12 Berkshire County middle classes, administering the game. If student and community interest is sufficient, the course may culminate in a public presentation and open forum regarding early college awareness initiatives.
Evaluation will be based on completion of field work (school visits), organization and a final paper (approximately 10 pages) reflecting on a course-related issue of the student's choosing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Preference given to a) students with prior experience working with middle school aged youth, b) students who can be approved to operate college vehicles c) juniors and seniors. Interested students must consult with the instructor prior to registration.
Cost to student: reading packet and meals while off campus.
Meeting time: mornings.

GINA COLEMAN `90 (Instructor)
WSP COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Gina Coleman `90 is Associate Dean of Students and Head Women's Rugby Coach. Coleman, who holds a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership and Policy from the University of Nebraska, designed the early college awareness board game used in the course, Quest for College.

SPEC 11 Science for Kids (Same as Chemistry 11)

(See under CHEM 11 for full description.)

SPEC 12 Art and Disability (Same as ArtS 19)

This course explores the importance of art in the lives of individuals with disabilities. Do individuals with disabilities experience greater benefit from experiences in the arts than the general population and, if so, why? What is the benefit to the larger community when individuals with disabilities have opportunities to create and exhibit their art? Is art by individuals with disabilities viewed through a different lens and if so, what is that consequence of that perception? Students will study specific artists and artist movements that include individuals with disabilities and a range of program models. Students will read first-hand accounts by artists with disabilities and texts from both art and education scholars that look at these issues. Students will also view documentaries and performance events. The second half of this course will include a required fieldwork component, with students attending workshops offered through Community Access to the Arts, a local nonprofit that runs visual and performing arts workshops for individuals with disabilities. Students will attend workshops, assist participants, and create art alongside artists with disabilities. This class will meet three times a week for two-hour sessions, with extra time scheduled for fieldwork. The course will culminate with a ten-page final paper and presentation that documents the individual student's fieldwork experience within the framework of the questions and issues raised in the course readings and class discussions.

REBECCA TUCKER-SMITH (Instructor)
Dean of the Faculty (Sponsor)

Rebecca Tucker-Smith was a studio art major at Amherst College, holds a Masters Degree from the University of Oregon in Special Education, taught high school special education, worked at a field interviewer for the Department of Mental Retardation, and currently works as a program director for Community Access to the Arts.

SPEC 13 Literary Journalism in Practice

What are the best ways to use long-form journalism to get at a subject? In this course, we'll explore ways to tell a story in depth, by using tactics and techniques borrowed from fiction, academic disciplines, and the arts. Classwork will include a number of brief assignments to focus on specific elements-ways to physically describe something, overhearing and transcribing dialogue, conducting interviews, and finding the right tone of voice. During our meetings, we'll read and critique each other's work to assess what works and what doesn't. We'll include regular readings from masters of nonfiction-ranging from early and overlooked pioneers like Mark Twain and Jack London, through popular writers like Tom Wolfe, Hunter S. Thompson, Ron Rosenbaum, and David Foster Wallace. Evaluation: The final piece will be a minimun 10-page profile of a person or institution around campus that will go through several revisions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference to students with a demonstrated interest in a career in journalism or a related field. Estimated cost to student: $75.

CHRISTOPHER MARCISZ (Instructor)
Dean of the Faculty (Sponsor)

Christopher Marcisz is a freelance writer based in Williamstown whose recent work has appeared in The Boston Globe, The International Herald Tribune, and the Moscow News. For many years he was a reporter for the Berkshire Eagle, where he wrote arts and cultural features and editorials, and later worked as an editor. He is a graduate of University of Pennsylvania and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

SPEC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as Chemistry 14 and Psychology 14)

(See under CHEM 14 for full description.)

SPEC 15 Contemporary American Songwriter (Same as American Studies 15)

This course will focus on learning how to write and perform songs in a contemporary style. Topics addressed will include song structure, how to create a lyric that communicates, vocal and instrument presentation, recording and performing techniques, publicity for events, and today's music industry. This class will culminate in a public performance of material written during the course. To successfully pass this course, students are required to create, edit, perform, and possibly record two original songs. These songs must be conceived during the course period (previously written material in not usable). Students will be guided to create both music and lyrics. They may also be required to participate in a co-write session. One of these songs will be presented during the final performance, preferably by the student. Attendance at classes, feedback sessions, and final presentation is mandatory. Please note: this class meets every day. A short writing assignment will be passed in on the last day of class.
No prerequisites. Students with a musical background and the ability to play an instrument may be given preference, but anyone interested is encouraged to register. (Bernice.Lewis@wililams.edu). Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: books plus $50 lab fee for recording and xeroxing costs.
Meeting time: M-F 10 a.m.-noon.

BERNICE LEWIS (Instructor)
Dean of the Faculty (Sponsor)

Bernice Lewis is an accomplished singer, songwriter, producer and educator. She has been a national touring artist for over twenty years and has performed at the Kerrville Folk Festival, PBS's Mountain Stage, and the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. She was recently chosen by the National Park Service to be an Artist in Residence. She has released six recordings of original material.

SPEC 16 Peer Support/Counseling Skills Training

Are you the person your friends seek out for support? Good listening and communication skills are of benefit to anyone and for students interested in the helping professions, in particular. This course will prepare you to be an active listener, to help others feel more comfortable with social, academic, and personal relationships, to assist others in making decisions without giving advice, and to assess risk. You will learn how to communicate about sensitive issues and develop identity in the helping role. Emphasis will be given to learning one's limits within a given situation, knowing when to refer to other resources, and what resources are available to students. This course will teach you broadly applicable helping skills that you can apply in any interpersonal role such as Peer Health, Junior Advisor, or Baxter Fellow.
We will meet twice a week for 3 hour sessions. This is an experiential training augmented by relevant readings and out of class assignments designed to deepen your understanding and practice of communication and helping skills. Evaluation is based on participation, attendance, and the option of a 10-page or final project.
Open to first-years, sophomores, and juniors. Enrollment limit: 16.
Cost to student: $25.
Meeting time: TBA.

KAREN THEILING (Instructor)
RUTH HARRISON (Sponsor)

Karen Theiling is a staff psychotherapist at Williams College Psychological Counseling Services and a licensed mental health counselor in private practice in Northampton, Massachusetts.

SPEC 17 Teaching Mathematics at BArT (Same as Mathematics 11)

(See under MATH 11 for full description.)

SPEC 18 Ernest Becker: The Denial of Death

This course introduces students to the thinking of Ernest Becker. In his Pulitzer Prize winning book, The Denial of Death, this American anthropologist synthesized various strains of 20th Century psychoanalytical thought (Freud, Kierkegaard, Rank, etc.). He noted how we all arrive on earth aware of our lonely set-apart- ness, our cosmic insignificance and the fact that one day we will die. Such pitiable, degrading circumstances generates such anxiety and fear that we deny and repress the truth of their reality and compensate therefore by vying with one another, either individually or as members of a larger group, in order to prove that we or our group are somehow special, better, more superior to others. We are obsessively engaged in trying to do something that entitles us to the admiration and respect of our peers. It is vital our self-esteem. We do so in order to maintain the pretense that we are truly "somebody" in the cosmic scheme of things.
It is hoped that students will judge or reassess their career goals in light of whether they are passionate about their goals and whether such goals involve inspiring or otherwise benefiting others or whether their choice arises from a need for self-esteem.
While we will concentrate on exploring The Denial of Death, we will read portions of other works: Tolstoy's Confession, Albom's Tuesdays With Morrie, etc.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, classroom participation and a 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference based on seniority.
Cost to student will be approximately $60 for books.
Meeting time: mornings, 2 hours 3 times a week.

VICTOR VAN VALIN '59 (Instructor)
WSP Committee (Sponsor)

SPEC 19 Medical Apprenticeship

Firsthand experience is a critical component of the decision to enter the health professions. Through this apprenticeship, students can clarify their understanding of the rewards and challenges that accompany the practice of all types of medicine. Apprenticeships are arranged in two distinct ways: some students live on campus and are matched with a local practitioner, while others make independent arrangements to shadow a distant professional. The expectation is that each student will observe some aspect of medicine for the better part of the day, five days per week. In recent years, students have shadowed physicians, veterinarians, dentists, nurses, and public health experts.
A 5-page reflective paper is required, as is attendance (for those shadowing near campus) at three Tuesday evening programs. Students will meet from 6:30-8:30 p.m. over dinner to hear from invited speakers from the medical community as a stimulus to discussion about their apprenticeship experiences.
Prerequisites: Interested students must attend an information meeting in early October.
Local enrollment is limited by the number of available practitioners. Preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the health professions.
Cost to student: local apprenticeships: required vaccinations, local transportation and possibly lunches. Distant apprenticeships: costs will vary based upon location.

TEACHING ASSOCIATES (Instructors): DAVID ARMET. P.T.; CHILDSY ART, M.D.; VICTORIA CAVALLI, M.D.; JENNIIFER DEGRENIER, M.D.; MARIANNE DEMARCO, M.D.; PAUL DONOVAN, D.O.; STUART DUBUFF, M.D.; RONALD DURNING, M.D.; DAVID ELPERN, M.D.; ROBERT FANELLI, M.D.; MICHAEL GERRITY, M.D.; WADE GEBARA, M.D.; DAVID GORSON, M.D.; EUGENE GRABOWSKI, M.D.; LAURA JONES, D.V.M.; JOSHUA KLEEDERMAN, D.M.D.; WILLIAM KOBER, M.D.; JONATHAN KRANT, M.D.; WILLIAM LEVY, M.D.; PAUL MAHER, M.D.; RONALD MENSH, M.D.; CHARLES O'NEILL, M.D.; JUDY ORTON, M.D.; FERNANDO PONCE, M.D.; DANIEL ROBBINS, M.D.; OSCAR RODRIGUEZ, M.D.; SCOTT ROGGE, M.D.; PAUL ROSENTHAL, M.D.; ANTHONY SMEGLIN, M.D.; KATHERINE WISEMAN, M.D.; JEFFREY YUCHT, M.D.; CHI ZHANG, M.D. and others.

JANE CARY
Health Professions Advisor

SPEC 20 What Was Monet Thinking?-Understanding Art, for Non-Art Majors (Same as Comparative Literature 20)

This course will introduce non-majors to the ways in which artists see and understand paintings-by painting. Following a traditional method, students will create a painting (subject matter of their choosing) using the basic elements of visual art: line, composition, color and value. Each of these elements of the painting process will be presented simply and in clearly defined steps through the use of visuals, demonstrations, and exercises. Supplementing the painting periods, the class will visit the Clark Museum to examine and discuss how the impressionist painters understood and worked with the same issues and challenges. Students will begin to see paintings as artists do.
Evaluation will be based on the completion of one painting by the student as well as a written analysis of one painting from the Clark collection. The evaluation of the student's painting will be based not on artistic merit but on the effort made and understanding gained. Because of the step-by-step methodology, class attendance will be mandatory.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to upperclass students.
Cost to student: $135.
Meeting time: TWR, 1-4.

JOHN MACDONALD (Instructor)
NEWMAN (Sponsor)

John MacDonald, a painter and freelance illustrator, holds a BFA from Washington University in St. Louis and an MA from Purdue University. A member of the Graphic Artist Guild, Illustrators Partnership of America, and the Society of Illustrators, John is also a certified creativity coach.

SPEC 21 The Psychology of the Workplace; a Field Study with Williams Alumni/Parents

Field experience is a critical component of the decision to enter a profession. Through this field study, students can clarify their understanding of the rewards and challenges that accompany the practice of many different aspects within a profession, and understand the psychology of the workplace. Field placements are arranged in two distinct ways: some students live on campus and are matched with a local professional, while others make independent arrangements to work with a distant professional. The expectation is that each student will observe some aspect of the profession for the better part of the day, five days per week. It is also expected that the teaching associate will assign a specific project to be completed within the three-and-a-half week duration of the course depending upon appropriateness.
Participation in this winter study will require the student to quickly assess the work environment, make inferences about corporate culture, performance norms and expectations, and to take initiative not only to learn from this experience, but also to contribute where and when appropriate. Understanding the dynamics within a work environment is critical to success in any organization and this hands-on experience will illuminate lessons learned in the classroom. Upon completion of the winter study, it is expected that the student write a thorough report evaluating and interpreting the experience.
Method of evaluation: It is expected that students will complete assigned readings, keep a daily journal, and write a 5-page expository review and evaluation that will become public record as a resource for other students. Finally, the student will be expected to create a 20-minute Powerpoint presentation on his/her experience due at the end of Winter Study. If possible the student will make a presentation to fellow students at some time during the spring semester.
Required activities and Meeting time: The expectation is that each student will be in the field to observe some aspect of the profession for the better part of the day, five days per week. In addition to observation there may be an opportunity to work on distinct projects generated by the instructor depending upon appropriateness.
Prerequisites: interested students must attend an information meeting in early October, and meet individually with John Noble to go over the details of their placements. Preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the profession of interest.
Enrollment is limited by the number of available teaching associates (maximum 20). Preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the profession of interest.
Meeting time: each student will be in the field to observe some aspect of the profession five days per week, at least 6 hours per day.
Cost to student: Local apprenticeships-local transportation. Distant apprenticeships-costs will vary based upon location, but are the responsibility of the student.
Teaching Associates (instructors): Williams College alumni and parents of current Williams students will be recruited to become instructors for this course. A broad range of professions will be represented as the course develops. Alumni and parents will receive a training packet and individual orientations with the course director in person or via telephone conference.

JOHN NOBLE, Director of Career Counseling

SPEC 23 Great Writing, Great Teaching (Same as Political Science 23)

CANCELLED!

SPEC 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Russian 25)

(See under RUSS 25 for full description.)

SPEC 26 Resettling Refugees in Maine (Same as Mathematics 26)

Sponsored by the Gaudino Scholar and the Gaudino Fund in 2008 and now again for 2009, this Winter Study travel course will allow a small group of students to live in Portland, Maine for the month of January, where they will explore the impact of over thirty years of refugee resettlement in the 'whitest' of the United States. Each student will live with a refugee family from one of the over two dozen countries represented by the refugee communities of Portland, and during her or his home stay will encounter first-hand the issues confronting recent immigrants to the United States from Southeast Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe or Latin America. Students will keep a daily journal to record their experiences working with their refugee family and the organizations that serve them. Students will be exposed to such issues as race, ethnicity, and national identity; the interplay of public and private values; the wide variety of educational, health, governmental, and religious agencies and providers serving refugee families; and how these services are perceived and received by family members. Students will meet weekly with the course instructor to discuss how their experiences are going; they will also have a chance to meet with a group of refugee and international students at the local community college, and with some State officials serving the multicultural communities. Students as a group will also have time in Maine at the beginning of the program for an orientation session, and at the conclusion to share experiences with each other and write a short reflection paper..
No prerequisites. If student interest exceeds the enrollment limit, preference will be given to those students who demonstrate, in a short conversation with and essay submitted to the instructor, their interest in experiential learning generally and the problems confronting recent immigrants to the United States specifically. Enrollment limit: 6. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: $550 plus travel to and from Portland, Me.

JEFF THALER '74 (Instructor)
BURGER (Sponsor)

Jeff Thaler '74 participated in Williams-at-Home with Professor Robert Gaudino in 1971-72. After Professor Gaudino's death in 1974, Jeff and some other alumni developed an initiative that eventually became the Gaudino Memorial Fund. Jeff served on the Board of the Fund for many years, including service as its Chair. Since 1974, Jeff graduated from Yale Law School in 1977, worked as a public defender in New York City from 1977-79, and has lived in Maine since 1979, where he has worked as a trial and environmental attorney. He has taught environmental law as an adjunct professor at the Maine Law School, as well as family law as an adjunct professor at Bowdoin College. Jeff directed this WSP in January 2008; has worked as a mentor for a Sudanese student attending Portland High School; and has worked as a group facilitator for the past seven years at the Center for Grieving Children in Portland.

SPEC 27 Looking at Contemporary Documentary Photography) (Same as ArtH 12 and English 12)

(See under ENGL 12 for full description.)

SPEC 28 Teaching Practica in New York City Schools

Students in this course learn about the front-line challenges of urban public education by working in one of New York City's public schools. Participants will be expected to pursue a full day's program of observing, teaching, tutoring and mentoring in their choice of more than 20 different school situations from elementary through high school. Each of the participating schools will have a resident supervisor who will meet with the January interns to arrange individual schedules and provide mentoring during the month. There will be weekly seminar meetings of all the interns who are expected to participate in group discussions, keep a journal and write a 5 page paper reflecting upon their experience. The course will conduct orientation meetings with students prior to January, matching each student's interest with appropriate teaching subject areas and a host school..
Dormitory-style housing will be provided along with some assistance with transportation and food costs-estimated at $400 for the term. Further assistance is available for financial aid students.
Evaluation will be based on a journal and a 5-page paper.
Prerequisites: Sophomore, Junior or Senior standing. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: $400.
Meeting time: off-campus fieldwork: daily 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. and weekly seminar dinners.

TRACY FINNEGAN (Instructor)
WSP COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Tracy Finnegan is a master's level teacher with training and teaching experience in a variety of approaches and settings.

SPEC 29 Applied Data Analysis

One of the main drivers of success in the 21st century economy is ones ability to understand, utilize and interpret data. This class will help you develop a comfort level around data, learn the software necessary to manipulate it, and put these skills to work on a substantive project. We will use the R programming language and associated open source tools, by far the most powerful software environment for summarizing, graphing and modeling information. You will gather data, replicate the results of a published academic paper (or similarly rigorous non-published study) and then extend those results in a non-trivial manner. Most students will work in teams but solo projects will be permitted. Projects related to Williams are especially encouraged, e.g., sustainability, admissions, housing policy and so on. Data for finance-related projects will be supplied.
Requirements: 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

DAVID KANE '88 (Instructor)
KLINGENBERG (Sponsor)

David Kane '88 has a Ph.D. in Political Economy and Government and is an Institute Fellow at IQSS at Harvard University. He is the CEO of Kane Capital Management and a former member of the Harvard faculty.

SPEC 35 Singing School: Sacred Choral Traditions in the Berkshires and Beyond (Same as American Studies 35 and Music 35)
This performance-oriented class will explore the history of popular sacred music in the United States, with a special emphasis on music that might have been sung in New England from the eighteenth to the early twentieth century. We will begin with Protestant hymns by early New England “singing masters” (Billings, Ingals, West); in this first part of the course we will also explore Shaker and gospel/revivalist Protestant music of the early nineteenth century. As we move forward in time our attention will broaden to other religious singing traditions that evolved from these and/or that came into New England with new populations of people: what we pursue will partly depend on the particular interest and expertise of members of the class. Our premise will be that this music is a valuable route to understanding the complex religious and social cultures of New England. Outside of class, we will do some reading about U.S. religious movements and music history; we will also "readi" old hymnals and listen to old recordings, in part with an eye to selecting particular pieces for interpretation and performance. Class time will be mainly devoted to singing. The class will culminate with a concert, to be held at a local site where some of these hymns were once sung.
Requirements: Students will be expected to meet 8-9 hours a week (three discussions/rehearsals); during the last week, when preparing for the concert, there may be one or two longer rehearsals. In addition to participating in classes and the performance, students will be expected to work on one or two group projects--either an oral report on some aspect of the reading, or the interpretation and teaching of one hymn to the class, or the working-up of a choral piece.
Evaluation will be based on all these activities. Prerequisites: Singers, conductors, and instrumentalists are of course very welcome; singers with interest in/knowledge of a particular sacred musical tradition or style are also very welcome; but those without much previous singing experience are very welcome too--we'll be simulating a congregation. Participants must, however, be willing to shout out! Enrollment limited to 20.
Cost to student: approximately $30.
Meetings: afternoons.
Swann

SPEC 39 "Composing a Life:" Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams

To be at Williams you have learned to be a successful student, but how do you learn to be successful in life? How will you define success in both your career and in your personal life? How will you achieve balance between the two? In short, what will constitute the "good life" for you? We borrow the concept of "composing a life" from Mary Catherine Bateson, as an apt metaphor for the ongoing process of defining success and balance in life. This course is designed: (1) To offer college students an opportunity to examine and define their beliefs, values, and assumptions about their future personal and professional lives before entering the "real" world; (2) To encourage students to gain a better understanding of how culture, ideology, and opportunity affect their life choices; (3) To provide an opportunity for students to consider different models of success and balance through "living cases" (in the form of guests from various professions and lifestyles); and (4) To aid students in contemplating their career options through individual advising and introducing various career and life planning resources. Using selected readings, cases, and guest speakers, we will explore both the public context of the workplace as well as the private context of individuals and their personal relationships in determining life choices.
Requirements: regular attendance, class participation, field interview, and a 10-page final paper. Weekly assignments include cases and readings from a variety of related fields, and some self-reflection exercises
No prerequisites. Questions about the course: please contact Michele Moeller Chandler at 458-8106 or michele.chandler2@verizon.net Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $40 lab fee for cases/reading materials.
Meeting time: mornings-two-hour classes three times a week

MICHELE MOELLER CHANDLER and CHIP CHANDLER (Instructors)
TOOMAJIAN (Sponsor)

Michele Moeller Chandler (`73) and Chip Chandler (`72) have taught this Winter Study course for the past thirteen years. They have been both personally and professionally engaged in the course topic. Michele, a former college administrator, has an M.A. from Columbia, and a Ph.D. from Northwestern. Chip, a retired McKinsey senior partner, has an M.B.A. from Harvard, and currently teaches in the Leadership Studies Program.

WILLIAMS PROGRAM IN TEACHING

Students interested in exploring one or more of the following courses related to teaching and/or working with children and adolescents should contact Susan Engel, Director of Education Programs, who will be able to help you choose one that best suits your educational goals.

ANSO 12 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

(See under ANSO 12 for full description.)

CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as Special 11)

(See under CHEM 11 for full description.)

MATH 11 Teaching Mathematics at BArT (Same as Special 17)

(See under MATH 11 for full description.)

SPEC 28 Teaching Practica in New York City Schools

(See under SPEC 28 for full description.)

WILLIAMS-MYSTIC PROGRAM IN AMERICAN MARITIME STUDIES

An interdisciplinary one-semester program co-sponsored by Williams College and Mystic Seaport which includes credit for one winter study. Classes in maritime history, literature of the sea, marine ecology, oceanography, and marine policy are supplemented by field seminars: offshore sailing, Pacific Coast and Louisiana. For details, see "Williams-Mystic Maritime Studies Program" or our website: web.williams.edu/williamsmystic.