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WINTER STUDY PROGRAM

REMINDERS ABOUT WSP REGISTRATION

All students who will be on campus during the 2010-2011 academic year must register for WSP. Registration will take place in the early part of fall semester. If you are registered for a senior thesis in the fall which must be continued through Winter Study by departmental rules, you will be registered for your Winter Study Project automatically. In every other case, you must complete registration. First-year students are required to participate in a Winter Study that will take place on campus; they are not allowed to do 99's.

If you think your time may be restricted in any way (ski meets, interviews, etc.), clear these restrictions with the instructor before signing up for his/her project.

Remember, for cross-listed projects, you should sign up for the subject you want to appear on your record.

For many beginning language courses, you are required to take the WSP Sustaining Program in addition to your regular project. You will be automatically enrolled in this Sustaining Program, so no one should list this as a choice.

The grade of honors is reserved for outstanding or exceptional work. Individual instructors may specify minimum standards for the grade, but normally, fewer than one out of ten students will qualify. A grade of pass means the student has performed satisfactorily. A grade of perfunctory pass signifies that a student's work has been significantly lacking but is just adequate to deserve a pass.

If you have any questions about a project, see the instructor before you register.

Finally, all work for WSP must be completed and submitted to the instructor no later than January 27, 2011. Only the Dean can grant an extension beyond this date.

AFR 25 Miami: Gateway to the Caribbean (Same as Latina/o Studies 25, History 25 and Religion 26)

AFR 29 Eyewitness to the Civil Rights Movement: Mississippi, 1964-1965 (Same as History 29)

AFR 30 Senior Project

AMST 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as Special 15)

AMST 30 Senior Honors Project

ANSO 11 Berkshire Farm Internship

ANSO 12 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

ANSO 13 Trajectories of Economic Practices in India

ANSO 14 Introduction to Go

ANSO 15 Sustainable Food Systems, Sourcing and the Triple Bottom Line (Same as Economics 13 and Environmental Studies 15)

ANSO 17 Learning Intervention For Troubled Teens (LIFTT) (Same as Special 17)

ANTH 31 Senior Thesis

SOC 31 Senior Thesis

ARAB S. P. Sustaining Program for Arabic 101-102

ARAB 31 Senior Thesis

ARTH 10 Selling the Cow: Viewbook Design

ARTH 31 Senior Thesis

ARTH 33 Honors Independent Study

ARTS 11 Architectural Model Making

ARTS 12 Advanced Painting CANCELLED!

ARTS 13 Introduction to 35mm Film Photography

ARTS 14 Making Art Together: Collaborative and Collective Practices

ARTS 15 The Documentation of the Hopkins Observatory (Same as Astronomy 15 and History of Science 15)

ARTS 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as Chemistry 16)

ARTS 25 Drawing and Painting in Egypt

ARTS 27 Printmaking on Paper Clay (Same as English 27)

ASST 31 Senior Thesis

CHIN S. P. Sustaining Program for Chinese 101-102

CHIN 10 Americans and Chinese: Case Studies of Cross-Cultural Communication

CHIN 31 Senior Thesis

JAPN S. P. Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102

JAPN 10 Aikido: Towards an Economy of Human Motion

JAPN 11 The Samurai in Japanese Films

JAPN 31 Senior Thesis

ASTR 12 Mars!-A Passion for the Red Planet

ASTR 15 Documentation Hopkins Observatory (Same as ArtS 15 and History of Science 15)

ASTR 31 Senior Research

ASPH 31 Senior Research

BIOL 10 Observational Drawing from the Natural World

BIOL 11 Project BioEyes: Zebrafish Genetics and Development in the K-12 Classroom

BIOL 21 Science Beyond Williams

BIOL 22 Introduction to Biological Research

BIOL 31 Senior Thesis

CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as Special 11)

CHEM 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as Psychology 14 and Special 14)

CHEM 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as ArtS 16)

CHEM 18 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry

CHEM 20 Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry

CHEM 23 Introduction to Research in Organic Chemistry

CHEM 24 Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry

CHEM 31 Senior Research and Thesis

CLAS 10 Greek Myth and the Modern Cinema

CLAS 11 Alexander the Great

CLAS 12 Plato's Symposium and Its Afterlife (Same as Comparative Literature 12) CANCELLED!

CLAS 31 Senior Thesis

COGS 31 Senior Thesis

COMP 11 Brazil (Same as Latina/o Studies 11, RLSP 11 and Special 23)

COMP 12 Plato's Symposium and Its Afterlife (Same as Classics 12) CANCELLED!

COMP 20 What Was Monet Thinking?-Understanding Art, for Non-Art Majors (Same as Special 20)

COMP 31 Senior Thesis

LIT 31 Senior Thesis

CSCI 10 Designing and Building a Desktop Computer

CSCI 11 Green Computing

CSCI 14 LEGO Robotics

CSCI 23 Introduction to Research and Development in Computing

CSCI 31 Senior Honor Thesis

CMAJ 31 Senior Thesis

ECON 10 Dollars and Sense: Healthcare Coverage Before, After and Beyond the Obama Plan

ECON 11 Public Speaking

ECON 12 So You Want to Start a Business Some Day---Understanding the Business Plan

ECON 13 Sustainable Food Systems, Sourcing and the Triple Bottom Linee (Same as ANSO 15 and Environmental Studies 15)

ECON 14 Accounting

ECON 15 Stock Market

ECON 16 Mechanisms of Arbitrage

ECON 17 Entrepreneurship

ECON 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) (Same as Political Economy 22)

ECON 23 Introduction to the Economics, Geography and Appreciation of Wine

ECON 25 Coping with Global Crisis: South Africa's Policy Responses and Their Impacts (Same as Political Economy 25 and Political Science 24)

ECON 51 Law, Finance and Development

ECON 52 Micro-Simulation Modeling for Ex Ante Policy Analysis

ECON 30 Honors Project

ECON 31 Honors Thesis

ENGL 10 Journalism

ENGL 11 Your Favorite Director

ENGL 12 Emma and Anna

ENGL 13 Writing Home CANCELLED!

ENGL 14 The Stories and Essays of Jorge Luis Borges

ENGL 15 Talking Animals

ENGL 16 Further Studies in the Undead

ENGL 17 Hamlet

ENGL 18 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel

ENGL 27 Printmaking on Paper Clay (Same as ArtS 27)

ENGL 29 Peer Writing Tutor Workshop (Same as INTR 29)

ENGL 30 Honors Project: Specialization Route

ENGL 31 Honors Project: Thesis

ENVI 10 The Winter Naturalist's Journal

ENVI 11 Winter?!

ENVI 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Geosciences 12)

ENVI 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Roots, Its Uncertain Future (Same as Legal Studies 13)

ENVI 15 Sustainable Food Systems, Sourcing and the Triple Bottom Line (Same as ANSO 15 and Economics 13)

ENVI 25 Sustainable Eleuthera: Reviving Island Agriculture

ENVI 27 Sustainable Agriculture: On The Farm (Same as Special 27)

ENVI 31 Senior Research and Thesis

GEOS 10 Ultimate Wellness: Concepts for Living a Happy Healthy Life (Same as Maritime Studies 10)

GEOS 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Environmental Studies 12)

GEOS 31 Senior Thesis

GERM S. P. Sustaining Program for German 101-102

GERM 10 Marx and Nietzsche

GERM 11 A Taste of Austria (Same as Mathematics 11)

GERM 30 Honors Project

GERM 31 Senior Thesis

HIST 10 American Autobiography

HIST 13 The Historian as Detective

HIST 16 Genealogy

HIST 17 The Abortion Debate: The Politics of Abortion in the United States, 1973-Present (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 17)

HIST 18  Williams Reads Invisible Man

HIST 23 Investigative Tips for the Incurably Curious (CANCELLED!)

HIST 25 Miami: Gateway to the Caribbean (Same as Africana Studies 25, Latina/o Studies 25, and Religion 26)

HIST 26 Tourism and Historical Memory in Vietnam

HIST 27 Opium Bonds: Linking India and China in the Early Nineteenth Century

HIST 28 Sex and the Constitution (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 28)

HIST 29 Eyewitness to the Civil Rights Movement: Mississippi, 1964-1965 (Same as Africana Studies 29)

HIST 31 Senior Thesis

INTR 25 Incarceration, Immigration and Policing: Texas as a Case Study

INTR 29 Peer Writing Tutor Workshop (Same as English 29)

HSCI 15 Documentation Hopkins Observatory (Same as ArtS 15 and Astronomy 15)

INST 30 Senior Honors Project

LATS 11 Brazil (Same as Comparative Literature 11, RLSP 11 and Special 23)

LATS 13 Beyond El Día de los Muertos: Latina/o Rituals of Mourning en el Teatro (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 13)

LATS 25 Miami: Gateway to the Caribbean (Same as Africana Studies 25, History 25, and Religion 26)

LATS 31 Latina/o Honors Thesis Seminar

LEAD 10 Institutional Leadership and Social Responsibility

LEAD 12 The Roosevelt Century

LEAD 17 How Court Decisions Impact Public Policy (Same as Political Science 17)

LEAD 18 Wilderness Leadership

LGST 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Roots, Its Uncertain Future (Same as Environmental Studies 13)

LGST 14 The Work of the Supreme Court: A Simulation

MAST 10 Ultimate Wellness: Concepts for Living a Happy Healthy Life (Same as Geosciences 10)

MATH 11 A Taste of Austria (Same as German 11)

MATH 12 Beginning Modern Dance

MATH 13 Modern Dance--Muller Technique

MATH 14 Introductory Photography: People and Places

MATH 30 Senior Project

MATH 31 Senior Thesis

STAT 10 Displaying Multivariate Data

MUS 10 Classical Chamber Orchestra

MUS 11 Contemporary Music Performance Practice

MUS 12 Classic American European Musical Theatre (Same as Theatre 12)

MUS 13 Voice Workshop

MUS 14 Masterworks of American Music

MUS 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as American Studies 15 and Special 15)

MUS 16 Cuban Popular Music and Culture

MUS 17 Vocal Jazz Ensemble/Jazz Choir

MUS 31 Senior Thesis

NSCI 31 Senior Thesis

PHIL 10 Foucault' Late Course Lectures

PHIL 12 Bioethics According to The Simpsons

PHIL 13 Philosophy and Race

PHIL 23 Gaudino Winter Study Fellows Program

PHIL 26 Resettling Refugees in Maine (Same as Special 26)

PHIL 31 Senior Thesis

PHYS 10 Light and Holography

PHYS 12 Meet the Right Side of Your Brain: Drawing as a Learnable Skill

PHYS 13 Media Immersion: Creativity Through Multimedia Animation and Video Production

PHYS 14 Electronics

PHYS 22 Research Participation

PHYS 31 Senior Thesis

POEC 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as Political Science 21)

POEC 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (Same as Economics 22)

POEC 23 Institutional Investment

POEC 25 Coping with Global Crisis: South Africa's Policy Responses and Their Impacts (Same as Economics 25 and Political Science 24)

POEC 31 Honors Thesis

PSCI 10 Political Campaign Ads as Political Rhetoric

PSCI 11 Hate Crime: Racial Hierarchy

PSCI 12 Civil Rights Law

PSCI 13 Economic and Political Thought of Keynes

PSCI 14 The West Wing

PSCI 15 Grave Breaches

PSCI 16 Political Aikido-Persuasion, Inspiration, and Strategic Dominance

PSCI 17 How Court Decisions Impact Public Policy (Same as Leadership Studies 17)

PSCI 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as Political Economy 21)

PSCI 24 Coping with Global Crisis: South Africa's Policy Responses and Their Impacts (Same as Economics 25 and Political Economy 25)

PSCI 25 Eye Care and Culture on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua

PSCI 26 US-Mexico Border Issues

PSCI 31 Senior Thesis

PSCI 32 Individual Project

PSYC 10 Introduction to Complex Skill Acquisition

PSYC 11 Rat Olympics CANCELLED!

PSYC 12 Alternative Birth Choices (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 12)

PSYC 13 Coming Down from the High: 12 Step Recovery and Counseling

PSYC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as Chemistry 14 and Special 14)

PSYC 15 Ephquilts: An Introduction to Traditional Quiltmaking

PSYC 16 Statistics in Psychological Research, Media, and Everyday Life

PSYC 19 Psychology Internships

PSYC 22 Introduction to Research in Psychology

PSYC 31 Senior Thesis

REL 12 Wellness, Yoga, and the Art of Fully Thriving

REL 25 Jerusalem: One City, Three Faiths, Many Narratives

REL 26 Miami: Gateway to the Caribbean (Same as Africana Studies 25, History 25, and Latina/o Studies 25)

REL 31 Senior Thesis

RLFR S. P. Sustaining Program for French 101-102

RLFR 10 Asterix the Gaul: French Culture through the Prism of the Comic

RLFR 30 Honors Essay

RLFR 31 Senior Thesis

RLIT S. P. Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102

RLSP S. P. Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102

RLSP 11 Brazil (Same as Comparative Literature 11, Latina/o Studies 11 and Special 23)

RLSP 12 Exploring Mexico/Contemporary Mexican

RLSP 30 Honors Essay

RLSP 31 Senior Thesis

RUSS S. P. Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102

RUSS 12 Introducing American Sign Language (Same as Special 12)

RUSS 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Special 25)

RUSS 30 Honors Project

RUSS 31 Senior Thesis

THEA 10 Staging Non-Dramatic Texts

THEA 12 Classic American European Musical Theatre (Same as Music 12)

THEA 13 Making a Career in Performance

THEA 14 Digital Sketching

THEA 15 What is Playing in America and the World

THEA 32 Senior Honors Thesis

WGST 12 Alternative Birth Choices (Same as Psychology 12)

WGST 13 Beyond El Día de los Muertos: Latina/o Rituals of Mourning en el Teatro (Same as Latina/o Studioes 13)

WGST 17 The Abortion Debate: The Politics of Abortion in the United States, 1973-Present (Same as History 17)

WGST 28 Sex and the Constitution (Same as History 28)

WGST 30 Honors Project

SPEC 10 Quest for College: Early Awareness in Berkshire County Schools

SPEC 11 Science for Kids (Same as Chemistry 11)

SPEC 12 Introducing American Sign Language (Same as Russian 12)

SPEC 13 Literary Journalism in Practice

SPEC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as Chemistry 14 and Psychology 14)

SPEC 15 Contemporary American Songwriter (Same as American Studies 15 and Music 15)

SPEC 16 Peer Support/Counseling Skills Training

SPEC 17 Learning Intervention For Troubled Teens (LIFTT) (Same as ANSO 17)

SPEC 18 Nonviolence and Noncoercion

SPEC 19 Medical Apprenticeship

SPEC 20 What Was Monet Thinking?-Understanding Art, for Non-Art Majors (Same as Comparative Literature 20)

SPEC 21 Experience the Workplace; an Internship with Williams Alumni/Parents

SPEC 23 Brazil (Same as Comparative Literature 11, Latina/o Studies 11 and RLSP 11)

SPEC 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Russian 25)

SPEC 26 Travel Course: Resettling Refugees in Maine (Same as Philosophy 26)

SPEC 27 Sustainable Agriculture Course (Same as Environmental Studies 27)

SPEC 28 Teaching Practica in New York City Schools

SPEC 39 "Composing a Life:" Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams

ANSO 12 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse

BIOL 11 Project BioEyes: Zebrafish Genetics and Development in the K-12 Classroom

CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as Special 11)

SPEC 17 Learning Intervention For Troubled Teens (LIFTT) (Same as ANSO 17)

SPEC 28 Teaching Practica in New York City Schools

SPEC 28 Teaching Practica in New York City Schools

SPEC 28 Teaching Practica in New York City Schools

WINTER STUDY 99'S

Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible to propose "99's," independent projects arranged with faculty sponsors, conducted in lieu of regular Winter Study courses. Perhaps you have encountered an interesting idea in one of your courses which you would like to study in more depth, or you may have an interest not covered in the regular curriculum. In recent years students have undertaken in-depth studies of particular literary works, interned in government offices, assisted in foreign and domestic medical clinics, conducted field work in economics in developing countries, and given performances illustrating the history of American dance. Although some 99's involve travel away from campus, there are many opportunities to pursue intellectual or artistic goals here in Williamstown.

99 forms are available online: http://web.williams.edu/Registrar/winterstudy/99direct.html

The deadline for submitting the proposals to faculty sponsors is September 30, 2010.

AFRICANA STUDIES

AFR 25 Miami: Gateway to the Caribbean (Same as Latina/o Studies 25, History 25 and Religion 26)
In this course, students will explore transnational Caribbean communities in Miami through participant observation, archival research, and experiential education. By studying the formation and internal dynamics of Cuban, Dominican, Haitian, and Puerto Rican diasporas in Miami, students will be challenged to think about what it means that these communities have built a home base within the nation-state of the United States. In particular, this course will pay attention to a range of interconnected themes, including: motivations behind migrating to Miami, immigration policies, city residential patterns, and community organizations that have both helped and hindered the development of these diverse communities in south Florida. We will also investigate the ways particular immigrant and exile populations have negotiated living in the same urban space, sometimes disagreeing over resources, while at alternate times forming tentative alliances with other Caribbean diasporas, African Americans, and North Americans. In advance of the two weeks of travel, students will be expected to read selected methodological pieces on participant observation and archival work as well as historical essays on the foundation of different communities in south Florida (for instance, Elizabeth Aranda and Mary Chamberlain in Caribbean Migration to Western Europe and the United States [Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2009]). Once in Miami, students will: Attend an introductory session on participant observation research; visit and work in the University of Miami's Special Collections Archive; tour key neighborhoods (Little Havana, Little Haiti, Black Grove); visit various major religious and historical sites that serve as diaspora community centers, such as la Ermita de la Caridad, the Freedom Tower, and Vizcaya; and volunteer with local agencies that work around issues of (im)migration, elder care, and youth engagement in the various communities. Knowledge of Creole and/or Spanish will be useful for this type of ethnographic research and volunteer work.
Students will be expected to keep a journal of their experiences and complete a 10-page research paper that combines participant observation and/or oral histories with archival research about a particular Caribbean community in Miami. Method of evaluation (e.g., 10-page paper, final project, presentation, etc.): Students will be expected to keep a journal of their experiences and complete a 10-page research paper that combines participant observation and/or oral histories with archival research about a particular Caribbean community in Miami.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Not open to first-year students. If over-enrolled, selection will be based on application essays and interviews. Preference will be given to majors and concentrators in Africana Studies, Latino/a Studies, Religion, and History. Priority will also be given to students who can speak Creole and/or Spanish.
Estimated cost per student: $2538.
Mandatory info meeting on Wednesday, September 15 at 7 p.m. in Griffin 7.

BENSON and HIDALGO

AFR 29 Eyewitness to the Civil Rights Movement: Mississippi, 1964-1965 (Same as History 29)
(See under HIST 29 for full description.)

AFR 30 Senior Project

To be taken by students registered for Africana Studies 491 who are candidates for honors.

AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as Special 15)
(See under SPEC 15 for full description.)

AMST 30 Senior Honors Project
To be taken by students registered for American Studies 491 or 492.

ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

ANSO 11 Berkshire Farm Internship
A field placement at Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth in Canaan, New York. Berkshire Farm Center is a residential treatment facility for troubled, at-risk adolescent boys who have been remanded by the Family Court for treatment and intervention. These youths come primarily from lower socio-economic strata, are very ethnically diverse, and hail from both urban and rural areas throughout New York State. The issues that bring them to placement are mainly a result of the psychological scars developed from physical, emotional, and sexual abuse. The manifested behaviors include chemical dependency, juvenile delinquency, inability to function in the school setting, inability to follow the rules at home, running away and/or mental health issues. The residential treatment model is strength based and focuses on teaching healthy decision making.
Williams students will commute to Berkshire Farm and work under supervision in various settings including school, cottage life, substance abuse program, recreation, adventure-based therapy, performing arts, animal husbandry or individual tutoring. The students are responsible to be proactive in developing their learning experience.
Requirements: students will keep a journal reflecting on their experiences, and a weekly seminar with the instructor will draw on service learning experience. Students will also be required to submit a final 10-page paper at the end of the course.
Prerequisites: YOU MUST HAVE A TELEPHONE INTERVIEW WITH THE INSTRUCTOR, who can be reached at 518-265-6218. Enrollment limit: 15. Please note: all queries about this course should be directed to the instructor.
Cost to student: $25 to cover transportation to and from Berkshire Farm Center.
Meeting times to be arranged.

DONELLE HAUSER (Instructor)
FOIAS (Sponsor)

Donelle Hauser, LMSW, is the Non-Secure Detention Program Coordinator, Burnham Youth Safe Center, Berkshire Farm Center.

ANSO 12 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse
The incidence of reported child abuse and neglect has reached epidemic proportions and shows no signs of decreasing. Preventive and prophylactic social programs, court intervention, and legislative mandates have not successfully addressed this crisis. This course allows students to observe the Massachusetts Department of Social Services attorney in courtroom proceedings related to the care and protection of children. Students will have access to Department records for purposes of analysis and will also work with social workers who will provide a clinical perspective on the legal cases under study. The class will meet regularly to discuss court proceedings, assigned readings, and the students' interactions with local human services agencies. Access to an automobile is desirable but not required; some transportation will be provided as part of the course.
Requirements: full participation, a journal, and a 10-page paper to be submitted at the end of the course.
Enrollment limit: 15. Please note: all queries about this course must be directed to the instructor, Judge Locke (phone messages may be left at 458-4833).
Cost to student: $25 for books and photocopies.
Meeting times to be arranged.

JUDITH LOCKE (Instructor)
FOIAS (Sponsor)

Judith Locke is Associate Justice of the Juvenile Court, Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

ANSO 13 Trajectories of Economic Practices in India
With much hubris, India is being hailed as an economic giant in the making. In this course, we will examine representations of Indian economic production and its spaces of consumption. This course will also examine economic themes in relation to South Asia through the lenses of economic sociology and anthropology in addition to history. The course will examine contemporary economic practices and set them against a canvas which links history, culture, and politics. Readings aim to push participants to study the workings of commonly assumed economic practices by pointing to their specificity in different parts of India and south Asia, and with an aim to interrogate popularized domains of economic activity that touch on information technology, industrial production, telephony etc. Participants will also view and discuss a selection of Indian films which serve to represent economic practices as being interwoven within everyday social routines and preoccupations.
Format: seminar. Requirements: full participation and attendance, class presentation, and an essay.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: a few selected texts and the reader.
Meeting time: afternoons.

VALIANI

ANSO 14 Introduction to Go
The game of Go (also known in China as wei qi and Korea as baduk) is one of the oldest continuously-played strategy games in the world and is played by millions in China, Korea, and Japan. Its popularity no doubt has arisen from an ideal combination of intense intellectual challenge and the meditative beauty of playing. The goal of Go is not to destroy a force (as in chess) or to run a race (as in backgammon). Instead, two players alternate in placing black and white stones on a wooden 19x19 grid with the aim of surrounding the most territory. Go is unique because its large board and minimally restrictive rules allow for complex strategy and expression of each players' personality. But Go is also more than a game. It is a cultural phenomenon with deep roots in Eastern history and an art form with intriguing implications for artificial intelligence and the nature of problem solving. In this course we will learn, study, and play a lot of Go, culminating in a class tournament. In addition, play will be supported by game analyses, novels, articles, and films. Expectations: 6 hours in class activities; 20 hours of work outside of class (reading, playing with other students and on-line, game problems, commentaries and analyses). Evaluation will be based on attendance (prompt attendance at all classes is mandatory), problem sets, game commentaries, and participation in discussions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 14. Preference to first-year students and sophomores.
Cost to student: approximately $65 for books and supplies.
Meeting time: three 2-hour morning periods each week.

JUST

ANSO 15 Sustainable Food Systems, Sourcing and the Triple Bottom Line (Same as Economics 13 and Environmental Studies 15)
(See under ENVI 15 for full description.)

ANSO 17 Learning Intervention For Troubled Teens (LIFTT) (Same as Special 17)

(See under SPEC 17 for full description.)

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Anthropology 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Sociology 493-494.

ARABIC

ARAB S.P. Sustaining Program for Arabic 101-102
Students registered for Arabic 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Arabic Sustaining Program.
Prerequisite: Arabic 101.
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation.
Meeting time: mornings, 9:00-9:50.

ARAB 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for ARAB 493-494.

ART

ART HISTORY

ARTH 10 Selling the Cow: Viewbook Design
Print may be dead, but college viewbooks are very much alive. By creating several sample spreads for a viewbook of Williams, students will explore basic design and communications concepts. We will begin by discussing purpose and audience, as well as examine past viewbook approaches by Williams and other colleges. Students will select and develop their own visual concept of what a viewbook can/should do, combining imagery (either self-generated photography, found photography, or illustration) with typography. Weekly presentation of work and verbal justification of approach will be expected. Original text content encouraged but not required. Class will meet for three hours twice a week, with extensive design exploration, research, and any photography or illustration expected to be done outside of class. Exhibition and explanation of work process on last day of class is mandatory.
Requirements: weekly presentations plus a final project consisting of several spreads.
No prerequisites, however, familiarity with digital photography and layout programs such as InDesign or Quark would be helpful. Enrollment limit: 15. If overenrolled, students will be selected by a lottery.
Estimated cost to student: $50 for color lasers.
Meeting time: mornings.

HEIDI HUMPHREY (Instructor)
LOW (Sponsor)

Heidi Humphrey, graphic and environmental designer, has a bachelor's and master's degree in graphic design from Yale. She has been designing for nonprofits for over 35 years.

ARTH 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for ArtH 493, 494.

ARTH 33 Honors Independent Study

To be taken by candidates for honors by the independent study route.

ART STUDIO

ARTS 11 Architectural Model Making
Architectural history is generally taught by slides, three-dimensional things compressed into two-dimensional projections. But describing the dynamic nature of architectural space with a flat image is like describing an ice cream flavor with a flow chart. In this course groups of four or five students will receive measured drawings of major American buildings and construct models at quarter-inch scale. Possible subjects include works by Jefferson, Richardson, Furness, Kahn and Wright. No previous architectural experience is necessary. After the initial two sessions, there will be two three-hour studio sessions each week where the instructor will critique the projects. At a final meeting, a jury will review the models.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25.
Cost to students: approximately 35$ for materials.

LEWIS

ARTS 12 Advanced Painting
CANCELLED!

GLIER

ARTS 13 Introduction to 35mm Film Photography
The digital SLR camera is a simulacrum of the 35mm film camera, with camera manufacturers charging extra for cameras which produce a frame with the same aspect ratio as the 35mm film frame. 35mm film is mid-20th century technology. In this course, students will learn to shoot and process 35mm black and white film, as well as learning the basics of black and white paper printing. A series of short assignments will guide students through the technical as well as the historical and aesthetic concerns of small format, roll film photography.
Requirements: portfolio and class participation in critiques.
No prerequisites or prior experience in art or photography are required. A willingness to go out in the cold of January to shoot and spend long hours in darkrooms with photographic chemicals, a must. Enrollment limit: 10. If overenrolled, selection will be based on a lottery.
Cost to student: not to exceed $200.
Meeting time: MW 1:00-3:50 p.m. Additional 12 hrs./wk lab time.

LALEIAN

ARTS 14 Making Art Together: Collaborative and Collective Practices
What can grow out of making art collaboratively, and where can we find a place for it in our communities? In this course we will explore the rewards and challenges particular to making art as a group. We will also look at the history of collaborative art making and artist collectives in the 20th and 21st centuries. The course will begin with a communal 'project room' that we will design and build, then use as a hub from which to work. This room will be an open space for sharing ideas, books, images, music, etc. Each week students will work together to produce a zine, a small circulation publication reproduced via photocopier, to distribute throughout the community. The bulk of the course will be spent working on a large collaborative project that may take the form of a group performance, communal meal, published book, mural or sculptural installation. Throughout this process we will question what it means to work in collaboration, and how collective art making can provide a voice to marginalized groups.
We will look at collaborative art makers from Dadaism and Surrealism to Gilbert and George, the relational aesthetics movement, and DIY artist collectives including The Royal Art Lodge, Fort Thunder, and Vox Populi. As a group we will use these models as points of departure to define our own collective working system.
We will meet for six hours per week and students will be expected to work on their project for 4-5 hours outside of class. There will be a small reading list, several screenings, and the course will culminate in an exhibition of the major collaborative project. Because this class relies so heavily on a group dynamic, attendance is mandatory.
Requirements: attendance, participation, and collaborative project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16. If overenrolled, students will be chosen to create a group that is diverse in class years, majors and interests.
Estimated cost to student: $50.
Meeting time: M,W 1-4.

REBECCA SUSS '03 and ELIZA MYRIE '03 (Instructors)
LOW (Sponsor)

Rebecca Suss has an MFA from the University of California, Berkeley and a BA from Williams College. She was a member of artist collective Space 1026 for four years. Eliza Myrie has an MFA from Northwestern University and a BA from Williams College. She currently lives and works in Chicago, and has collaborated with various New York artists on issues of race and class.

ARTS 15 The Documentation of the Hopkins Observatory (Same as Astronomy 15 and History of Science 15)
This course will focus on the documentation and analysis of the Hopkins Observatory (1838), the oldest existing astronomical observatory in the United States and one of the college's most familiar yet most obscure buildings. Students will document and analyze the building and its primary contents using both digital photography and measured CAD architectural drawings within the general guidelines of the Historic American Building Survey (HABS).
The documentary process may also include archival and historical research reflective of the unique collection of scientific instruments housed within the building. We will consider the building contextually, typologically, historically, culturally and as an aesthetic object on its own.
We will use the process of documentation as a discursive framework for the interpretation and analysis of the building, its contents and its place in the history of astronomical observatories. The project will conclude with an exhibition of drawings, photographs and interpretive texts.
This class will meet three mornings a week for two hours with field and studio work in the afternoons. Students will be encouraged to work on individual projects of their choice and to work as a group for the final presentation and exhibit.
Given the project's unique and wide-ranging issues--architecture, history, astronomy and history of science--we encourage students with a broad range of interests to participate.
Students will be evaluated on classroom and field participation and are required to submit examples of research and/or a final portfolio of photographs or drawings. All students will be expected to participate in the final exhibition.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $100-$150.
Meeting time: mornings from 10-noon, 3 days a week with afternoon Studio and field work.

SCOTT WOOD (Instructor)
LEWIS (Sponsor)

Scott Wood is a graduate of Haverford College, studied Architectural History and Historic Preservation at the University of Pennsylvania and received his Masters of Architecture degree at Yale University. He is a practicing architect and photographer in New York and Connecticut.

ARTS 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as Chemistry 16)
(See under CHEM 16 for full description.)

ARTS 25 Drawing and Painting in Egypt
This course combines art-making with art-looking in the fascinating Upper Egypt Nile valley. Students will work in drawing and pastel to explore historical, architectural, and figurative gestures in the Theban landscape. During the trip, students will have opportunities to work with Egyptian students from the Faculty of Fine Arts in Luxor. Students will explore ancient Egypt through guided tours of the East and West Bank temples and tomb paintings; they will experience contemporary Egypt through cross-cultural dialogue with the Egyptian students and other local artists. Along with completing art assignments and participating on tours, students will document their experiences visually and in writing in sketchbook form. Prior to departure, students will complete required readings, and attend an orientation session and an initial studio class. Upon return to campus, students will participate in planning and presenting an exhibit of their artwork and experience for the Williams College community.
Students will be evaluated on successful completion of their sketchbooks, art assignments, and final paintings.
Prerequisites: letter of interest to instructor and letter of recommendation from campus source. While some drawing experience is helpful, this course is open to all but first-year students. Enrollment limit: 10. If overenrolled, selection will be based on seniority and letters of interest (and interviews if needed). Please indicate art background, if any, in letter of interest.
Cost per student: approximately $3000.
If you are interested in this course, please plan to attend a REQUIRED informational meeting on Tuesday, September 14 at 7 pm in Hopkins B1964.

JULIA MORGAN-LEAMON (Instructor)
H. EDWARDS (Sponsor)

Julia Morgan-Leamon is a painter, installation artist, and media producer. She received her MFA in Visual Arts from Vermont College of Fine Arts, and her BA in Studio Art from Mount Holyoke College. In 2009, she was one of 25 international artists invited to participate in the Luxor International Painting Symposium and residency.

ARTS 27 Printmaking on Paper Clay (Same as English 27)

(See under ENGL 27 for full description.)

ASIAN STUDIES

ASST 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Asian Studies.

CHINESE

CHIN S.P. Sustaining Program for Chinese 101-102
Students registered for Chinese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Chinese Sustaining Program. Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9:00-9:50. Prerequisite: Chinese 101. Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation. Cost to student: one xerox packet.

LANGUAGE FELLOWS

CHIN 10 Americans and Chinese: Case Studies of Cross-Cultural Communication
Through film screening, role-play, skit performances, and discussions, students will learn to identify differences in the behavioral culture between Americans and Chinese. This course aims to bring students of different cultural backgrounds together and conduct cross-cultural comparison through observation, first-hand experience sharing, and critical analysis. It is designed to help Americans interact more effectively with Chinese people when visiting China or dealing with Chinese counterparts in their future careers. It will also help Chinese native speakers to better adjust to the American cultural environment. All course readings and the language of instruction will be English. All films are subtitled. Evaluation will be based on class attendance and active participation in class activities.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: approximately $20 for reading materials. Meeting time: mornings, 10-noon. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

YU

CHIN 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Chinese.

JAPANESE

JAPN S.P. Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102
Students registered for Japanese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Japanese Sustaining Program. Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9:00-9:50. Prerequisite: Japanese 101. Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation. Cost to student: one xerox packet.

YAGI

JAPN 10 Aikido: Towards an Economy of Human Motion
Aikido is a 20th Century martial art invented by Morihei Ueshiba, (1883-1969) and practiced in one form or another by millions of people around the world. In the words of Ueshiba's son Kisshomaru (1921-99) it is a "...refinement of traditional martial techniques, combined with an exalted philosophy of the spirit."
This course will take a kinesthetic approach to training in fundamental techniques of aikido. In particular, we will begin by considering issues of the body in motion, including inter-dynamics of structure & posture, planes & axes of motion; and particular body landmarks of bones, joints and muscle groups. This broad-ranging practical and experiential kinesthetic inquiry will form a context for training in the fundamentals--including sitting and standing techniques, throws, and pins--of aikido. In other words, we will attempt to use the experiential physical practice as a means towards approaching the spiritual and other dynamics of the art. Particular attention will be given to the notion of ukemi, which refers not only to the ability to fall safely in any direction, but more specifically the ability to receive and blend with an attack.
The course will meet between 10-12 hours per week, and good-spirited daily participation is a must! It will be essential to cultivate a safe, cooperative and non-competitive view towards training with partners of different sizes and varying levels of physical strength. Other course requirements will include readings on topics including kinesiology and Japanese martial arts. Written work will include regular journal entries and brief abstracts in response to reading assignments. A final paper will take the form of an autoethnography, culling together your own experiential findings in the course while drawing from the readings and other source materials. Altogether, it is expected that students will spend approximately 15 hours of work outside class, in addition to the in-class training.
Method of evaluation: The instructor will make an assessment based on 1) consistency and dedication to in-class participation, 2) accuracy of technique, and 3) the timeliness and quality of written assignments.
Prerequisites: good physical health and well-being; prior martial arts training is NOT necessary. Enrollment limit: 12. If overenrolled, selection will be by lottery.
Cost to student: $100 or less (for course packet and practice attire).
Monday-Friday, 1-3 p.m. (with occassional days off).

THOMAS O'CONNOR (Instructor)
CHANG (Sponsor)

Thomas O'Connor holds a shodan (first degree black belt) from the Aikido Hombu Dojo in Tokyo. He is also an actor and physical theatre practitioner, who for the last ten years has taken a kinesthetic approach to teaching stage movement and physical theatre techniques in conservatory and other settings.

JAPN 11 The Samurai in Japanese Films
Some of the finest films ever crafted and celebrated in cinematic history have projected the lives and legends of the samurai. Like the gunfighter and cowboy of the American West, the samurai is an extraordinarily iconic figure, if not, an enduring expression of a distinct Japanese ethos. This course will examine the samurai genre, the formulation of the samurai character, the code of Bushido he lived by, and the multiple roles he has assumed in Japanese filmmaking. Whether as a warrior or loyal retainer to his lord, a symbol of purity of purpose or tragic sacrifice, the samurai has usually been apotheosized as a noble, revered hero. Why? Notwithstanding this image, the films in this course will trace the rise and fall of the samurai class, the tangled legacies of its demise, and ultimate disappearance at the end of the Shogunate era, when Samurai cut their top knots before the turn of the twentieth century, and put up their swords for good. The focus of this class will be on the films of Kurasawa, Gosha, Kobayashi, Okamoto and Inagaki.
Students will write a 2- to 3-page evaluation after the completion of each film. Readings will be drawn from the Hagakure, a key document written in the 17th century that provided a guide for samurai behavior.
No prerequisites but class attendance and participation is required. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost to the student: $30.
Meeting time: MWF, 10-12, with additional film screenings to be announced.

FRANK STEWART (Instructor)
YMAMOTO (Sponsor)

JAPN 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Japanese.

ASTRONOMY

ASTR 12 Mars!-A Passion for the Red Planet
This course, meant for non-majors, will deal with scientific, historical, and literary aspects of the planet Mars. It will be based on the content of the instructor's book A Passion for Mars: Intrepid Explorers of the Red Planet (2008). Dreamers and space scientists, engineers and biologists, backyard astronomers and artists have devoted their lives-sometimes at the expense of their careers-to the quest for Mars. Over half a century, they have transformed the Red Planet from a projection of our wildest fantasies into an even more amazing real place of spectacular landscapes, beguiling mysteries, and fantastic possibilities-as an abode for life, and even as a second home for humanity. In A Passion for Mars, Andrew Chaikin, who covered Mars exploration as a science journalist and took part in the first Mars landing, chronicled this epic quest and the enduring dream of going there. Based on first-person interviews and animated by the author's own passion, this Winter Study Course will deal with the story of Earthbound explorers and their robotic surrogates caught in the irresistible pull of the Red Planet. The humans include astronomer Carl Sagan, fierce champion of the search for life; rocket scientist Wernher von Braun, who envisioned human Mars expeditions years before the space age; and science-fiction titan Ray Bradbury, standard-bearer for Mars as human destiny. The course will discuss four decades of photographs and other observations sent back by robotic explorers as well as visionary artwork that renders our Martian future.
Meeting time: two 2.5-hour classes per week one additional 2-hour session per week for Mars-related videos.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. If overenrolled, selection will be on the basis of emailed student description of experience or interest in the topic.

ANDREW CHAIKIN (Instructor)
PASACHOFF (Sponsor)

Andrew Chaikin is the author of numerous books and articles on space exploration. His book A Man on the Moon: The Voyages of the Apollo Astronauts (1994) has been called the definitive account of the Apollo missions. Chaikin is a commentator for National Public Radio's Morning Edition, and is an advisor to NASA on space policy and public communications. While studying geology at Brown University, he participated in the Viking 1 Mars landing. A former editor of Sky and Telescope magazine, he has written about astronomy and space exploration for three decades.

ASTR 15 Documentation Hopkins Observatory (Same as ArtS 15 and History of Science 15)
(See under ARTS 15 for full description.)

ASTR 31 Senior Research
To be taken by students registered for Astronomy 493, 494.

ASTROPHYSICS

ASPH 31 Senior Research
To be taken by students registered for Astrophysics 493, 494.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 10 Observational Drawing from the Natural World
This is a drawing course for science students and others who are interested in developing their skills in drawing from nature. Much of the class work will deal directly with drawing from plant forms and the animal world. Beyond the subject matter at hand, assignments will also address and analyze the more formal aspects of drawing and two-dimensional design. One class meeting will be held at the Berkshire Museum to observe and draw from their collection.
Evaluation will be based on completion of in-class work and outside drawing assignments with a focus on the depiction of content, effort, and development of the work. Evidence of technical and skill development as well as attendance and participation will also be taken into consideration. Exhibition and review of work at the final class meeting is required.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. If overenrolled, selection will be based on seniority.
Cost to student: $75.
Meeting time: 3 hours, twice a week.

JOHN RECCO (Instructor)
DEWITT (Sponsor)

John Recco lives and works in Hoosick, NY and holds an MFA from Columbia University. He has taught at a variety of institutions including Bennington College and Williams. He is the recipient of numerous awards including a Fulbright, fellowships at Yaddo, The Millay Colony, The European Cultural Centre of Delphi, Greece and a NYSCA Individual Artist Grant.

BIOL 11 Project BioEyes: Zebrafish Genetics and Development in the K-12 Classroom
Project BioEyes brings tropical fish to 4th grade classrooms in Williamstown, in a one week science teaching workshop. Elementary school students will breed fish in the classroom, then study their development and pigmentation during the week. Williams students will write lesson plans that adapt the project to the science curriculum for the grades we visit, work with classroom teachers to introduce concepts in genetics and development, help the 4th grade students in the classroom, and assess student learning. A final eight-page paper describing the goals and outcomes for each grade level is required. No zebrafish experience is necessary; no genetics background is necessary; during the first week students will learn to set up fish matings, and learn about embryonic development and the genetics of fish pigmentation, as well as about supporting the K-12 curriculum with hands-on experiments using living animals. In the subsequent two weeks we will work at the schools, and in the final week, students will write up the assessment data.
Requirements: 8-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Preference to seniors.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: TBA, depending on needs of schools and on laboratory requirements
JENNIFER SWOAP (Instructor)
DEWITT (Sponsor)

Jennifer Swoap, an elementary school teacher, currently coordinates Williams Elementary Outreach, where Williams students teach hands-on science lessons at area elementary schools.

BIOL 21 Science Beyond Williams
Are you interested in hands-on experience in a science-related field beyond the Purple Valley? Are you curious to explore science in a university or medical school research lab, a government agency, or a not-for-profit organization? This course is designed to help students take part in scientific work or research going on outside of Williams in order to provide them with a broader sense of what it is like to work in a professional scientific setting. Any field of science or technology can be explored via this course.
In consultation with the course instructor, students will use resources such as the Office of Career Counseling, science faculty members, and Williams alumni/ae to locate a mentor in the student's area of interest at a work site in the United States. Once the course instructor approves the arrangement for a mentored, hands-on experience for three weeks of Winter Study, the student will prepare for the internship by reading literature related to the project, and discuss the readings with a faculty sponsor here at Williams in November/December. Once on site, students must remain in contact with their Williams faculty sponsor by having a weekly phone conference. Participating students would not have to be on campus during WSP prior to beginning their fieldwork. Strong interest, enthusiasm and willingness to plan and prepare for the internship are required for this course.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper and post-WSP public presentation to a relevant department or program on the goals and accomplishments of the project.
Prerequisites: two semesters of relevant course work in science and/or mathematics. Enrollment limit: 10.

DEWITT

BIOL 22 Introduction to Biological Research
An experimental research project will be carried out under the supervision of Biology Department faculty. It is expected that the student will spend 20 hours per week in the lab at a minimum, and a 10-page written report is required. This experience is intended for, but not limited to, first-year students and sophomores. Interested students must submit an application form available on the Biology Department webpage: http://biology.williams.edu/biol-022-winter-study-application.
Prerequisites: Biology 101. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

DEWITT

BIOL 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Biology 493, 494.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as Special 11)
Are you interested in teaching? Do you enjoy working with kids? Do you like to experiment with new things? Here is a chance for you to do all three! The aim of this Winter Study Project is to design a series of hands-on science workshops for elementary school children and their parents. Working in teams of 2-4, students spend the first two and a half weeks of Winter Study planning the workshops. This involves deciding on a focus for each workshop (based on the interests of the students involved) followed by choosing and designing experiments and presentations that will be suitable for fourth-grade children. On the third weekend of Winter Study (January 22, 23) we bring elementary school kids with their parents to Williams to participate in the workshops. You get a chance to see what goes into planning classroom demonstrations as well as a sense of what it's like to actually give a presentation. You find that kids at this age are great fun to work with because they are interested in just about everything and their enthusiasm is infectious. You also give the kids and their parents a chance to actually do some fun hands-on science experiments that they may not have seen before, and you are able to explain simple scientific concepts to them in a manner that won't be intimidating. It is a rewarding experience for all involved.
Evaluation is based on participation in planning and running the workshops. Each group is expected to prepare a handout with descriptions of the experiments for the kids, parents, and teachers.
No prerequisites. You need not be a science major; all that is needed is enthusiasm. Enrollment limit: 25. If overenrolled, priority will be given to seniors, juniors, and then sophomores.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings. Classes meet three times a week for approximately three hours each session. The workshop is run on the third weekend of Winter Study (January 22, 23) and attendance from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. is mandatory that weekend. There are also one or two brief meetings held in the fall term for preliminary planning.

JENNIFER MACINTIRE and BINGEMANN (Instructors)

Jenna Macintire is a lecturer for both the Biology and Chemistry Departments at Williams.

CHEM 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as Psychology 14 and Special 14)
Looking back on past loves and crushes, have you ever wondered "What on earth was I thinking?!" or "Why do I keep picking the wrong guys/girls for me?" While intense sexual attraction or urges may first call the shots, people who take the time to carefully choose and build caring, mutual relationships tend to be happier, healthier and more successful in their lives than those who don't. So how do we get there from here and make sense of all this? Well, no matter where you are on the dating spectrum, this course is for you if you are ready to learn how to follow your heart AND your mind to co-create a fulfilling relationship within the vortex of the "hook up" culture. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and "How to Avoid Falling In Love with A Jerk," "Keeping the Love You Find" and PAIRS curricula will guide this interactive relationship mastery course through meaningful discussions and exercises that explore the common issues, dirty fighting tactics, hidden expectations and emotional allergies that often sabotage relationships. Experiential exercises, personal experiences and journaling will also give you the opportunity to practice effective communication and conflict resolution skills that honor the constructive use of differences and promote intimacy. Evaluation is based on attendance, class participation, inventory completion, assigned readings, journaling, assignments, 1:1 consultations, and final 10-page reflective paper. Email your statement of interest to ssmith@williams.edu if you are ready and willing to take your relationships to the next level.
Prerequisites: statement of interest. Enrollment limit: 16. If overenrolled, selection will be based on statement of interest.
Estimated cost to student: $100.
Meeting time: TBA 6-8 hours per week.

SHERIE RACHELLE SMITH (Instructor)
RICHARDSON (Sponsor)

Rachelle Smith, MSW, is a holistic, strengths-based Clinical Social Worker, Consultant, Educator & Mentor bridging Relationships, Wellness, Childbirth, and Energy Psychology.

CHEM 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as ArtS 16)
This course provides an introduction to both a theoretical consideration of the glassy state of matter and the practical manipulation of glass. We do flameworking with hand torches for at least 12 hours per week. While no previous experience is required, students with patience, good hand-eye coordination, and creative imagination will find the course most rewarding. The class is open to both artistically and scientifically oriented students.
Evaluation is based on class participation, exhibition of glass projects, a 10-page paper, and a presentation to the class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference is given to juniors, sophomores, and those who express the most and earliest interest and enthusiasm.
Cost to student: $75 for supplies.
Meeting time: 9:00 a.m. - noon, M-F.

THOMAN

CHEM 18 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry
An independent experimental project in biochemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in biochemistry. Biochemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the molecular details of living systems including the interaction of biologically important molecules. In the Chemistry Department, studies are underway to investigate the structure/function relationship of proteins, the interaction between proteins and RNA and DNA, and the molecular basis of bacterial gene regulation.
Requirements: a 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

GEHRING

CHEM 20 Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry
An independent experimental project in inorganic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in inorganic chemistry. Representative projects include a) the study of complexes of transition metals as catalysts for polymerization and oxidations, with applied and industrial significance and b) studies of self-assembling systems, focusing primarily on the design, synthesis, and characterization of new materials for use in organic solar cells and the testing of photovoltaic efficiencies. Students working in these areas gain expertise in the synthesis of a diverse range of compounds, including organic molecules, metal containing complexes, and polymers and their characterization by modern spectroscopic techniques.
Requirements: a 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

C. GOH and L. PARK

CHEM 23 Introduction to Research in Organic Chemistry
An independent experimental project in organic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in organic chemistry. Representative projects include: (a) The synthesis and evaluation of amphiphilic polymers as delivery vehicles. These self-assembled materials are loaded with protein or small molecule drugs for anti-cancer therapies. Depending upon the project, students use techniques in organic synthesis, materials characterization, biochemical assays, and cell culture. (b) Synthesis and evaluation of novel carbohydrate-terminated dendrimers. Projects include modifying carbohydrate structures with linkers, synthesizing and characterizing dendrimeric structures, and production and biological evaluation of a malaria parasite protein implicated in severe malaria. The goal is to probe the activity of the carbohydrate dendrimers as potential inhibitors of the parasite protein. Classical organic synthesis and biochemical techniques are used in these projects.
Requirements: a 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

S. GOH and OYELARAN

CHEM 24 Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry
An independent experimental project in physical chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in physical chemistry. Current research projects in the Department include computer modeling of non-linear, chaotic chemical and biochemical systems, molecular modeling of water clusters, laser spectroscopy of chlorofluorocarbon substitutes, and experimental studies of the oxidation of sulfur dioxide on atmospheric aerosols.
Requirements: a 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

PEACOCK-LOPEZ

CHEM 31 Senior Research and Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Chemistry 493, 494.

CLASSICS

CLAS 10 Greek Myth and the Modern Cinema
This course will examine the mythic narratives that formed the basis of ancient Greek religion and culture, especially those concerning cosmological and human origins, epic heroes, and trickster figures, for example, Hesiod's Theogony, Homer's Odyssey, and the Homeric Hymn to Hermes. We will explore these narratives by using a variety of theoretical approaches, including psychoanalytic and structural analysis, and by comparing them to other ancient texts like The Epic of Gilgamesh and the Book of Genesis. In tandem with this project, we will view and discuss several Hollywood films, such as Star Wars: Episode IV and The Dark Knight, in order gain to insight into the important similarities and differences between Greek myths and myths of contemporary American society.
Method of evaluation: class participation, several short writing assignments, and a final 10-page paper or a final project accompanied by a shorter paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. If over-enrolled, preference will be given to majors or prospective majors in Classics, Comparative Literature, English or another literature, and Religion.
Meeting time: three afternoons a week.
Cost to student: approximately $50-$60.

RUBIN

CLAS 11 Alexander the Great
In this course we will be exploring the many different Alexanders that have existed over the centuries, and we will try to gain insight into his hold on our imaginations for over two millenia. In different places and ages he has been the ideal warrior-king; the pious leader whose exploits serve God; the brilliant but vulnerable boy-king corrupted by sudden wealth and power; the philosopher-king who debated the sages of India or lived a life of Stoic virtues; the isolated, out-of-touch mad leader; the liberator of the oppressed; the lonely romantic seeker; the tyrannical despot. Ancient accounts of his life evolved into mythologies for the new world he had created with his conquests. These tales circulated throughout Greece, North Africa, the Near East and India, and later by way of Rome throughout the western world, growing into separate and distinct traditions as each culture made Alexander its own.
Readings include the ancient accounts of Alexander that are our primary sources for his life; selections from the Bible and Qur'an, from the medieval English Alexander tradition, and from the medieval Ethiopic, Armenian and Persian romances of Alexander; later works such as Racine's Alexandre le Grande and Kipling's "The Man Who Would Be King"; and selected works of modern scholarship, some of which has been surprisingly impassioned and argumentative. We will also examine visual representations of Alexander in ancient sculpture and coinage, Indian and Persian manuscripts, and European paintings of the Renaissance. We will encounter the musical Alexander in works from Handel to Iron Maiden, and films including Oliver Stone's idiosyncratic Alexander.
Method of evaluation: Two 3-page analyses of selected course materials and a final 5-page paper; occasional quizzes; preparation for and participation in class meetings.
No prerequisites other than a serious interest in Alexander and his multiform legacy. Enrollment limited to 15. If the course is oversubscribed, preference will be given to majors in Classics, Comparative Literature, and Art History.
Cost to student: approximately $50.
Meeting time: afternoons, three days per week.

CHRISTENSEN

CLAS 12 Plato's Symposium and Its Afterlife (Same as Comparative Literature 12)
CANCELLED!

CLAS 31 Senior Thesis
May be taken by students registered for Classics 493, 494.

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

COGS 31 Senior Thesis
May be taken by students registered for Cognitive Science 494.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

COMP 11 Brazil (Same as Latina/o Studies 11, RLSP 11 and Special 23)
Brazil will host the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympics. This will bring the world's attention to all things Brazilian. Brazil is a dynamic society of contrasts sure to touch all who get to know it. This course will introduce students to significant ideas and issues in Brazilian culture with which they might be familiar: Carnaval, slavery, capoeira, samba, soccer, favelas/violence and super-models. They will also be exposed to concepts within Brazilian culture that might be less familiar such as saudade (akin to melancholy and/or nostalgia) and antropofagia (often translated as cannibalism). Through the analysis of literary texts, film and music deeper appreciation of this multicultural society will be attained.
Requirements: one 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to students: $40 for books.
Meeting time: TBA.

VARGAS

COMP 12 Plato's Symposium and Its Afterlife (Same as Classics 12)
CANCELLED!

COMP 20 What Was Monet Thinking?-Understanding Art, for Non-Art Majors (Same as Special 20)
This course will introduce non-art majors to the ways in which artists see and understand painting, both the meaning of the work (the art) and painting techniques (the craft). Following a traditional method, students will create two paintings (subject matter of their choosing) using the basic elements of visual art: line, composition, color, and value. Each of these elements of the painting process will be presented simply and in clearly defined steps through the use of visuals, demonstrations, and exercises. Supplementing the painting periods, the class will visit WCMA to examine and discuss how artists, from the Old Masters to contemporary artists, have approached the art and craft of painting. Students will begin to see paintings as artists do.
Evaluation will be based on the completion of two paintings by the student as well as a written analysis of one painting from the WCMA collection. The evaluation of the student's painting will be based not on artistic merit but on the effort made and understanding gained. There will also be outside reading requirements. Because of the step-by-step methodology, class attendance will be mandatory.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. If overenrolled, selection will be based on seniority.
Estimated cost to student: $135 for supplies.
Meeting time: T,W,Th 1-4.

JOHN MACDONALD (Instructor)
NEWMAN (Sponsor)

John MacDonald, a painter and freelance illustrator, holds a BFA from Washington University in St. Louis and an MA from Purdue University. A member of the Graphic Artist Guild, Illustrators Partnership of America, and the Society of Illustrators, John is also a certified creativity coach.

COMP 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Comparative Literature 493, 494.

LIT 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Literary Studies 493, 494.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CSCI 10 Designing and Building a Desktop Computer
This course introduces the study of computer hardware and the methods used to construct a fully working system with an emphasis on the interconnection between the components and the operating system. There will be in-depth study of the purpose of each part and of the different options available when purchasing. Research will include finding suppliers to acquire the parts online and will require deciphering and explaining the jargon used. The students will have the choice of purchasing their own parts and ending up with their own computer which they can take home, or using existing spare parts from the OIT basement to end up with a computer suitable for donation off campus or to use as a campus email station. The class will be in a lab equipped with the hardware, spare parts and tools for assembly. Students will research and discuss Operating System considerations such as networking, firewalls, anti-virus and software productivity packages for Windows, Mac and Linux. A final step will be the installation of an operating system and finding or downloading appropriate drivers for the hardware.
Evaluation will be based on research papers, quizzes, and the completion of a working system and presentation system.
There are no prerequisites as the class is aimed at the hardware novice, although familiarity with a screwdriver is recommended. Enrollment limit: 15. If overenrolled, seniors will be give preference.
Cost to student: none, unless the student chooses to build their own computer.

SETH ROGERS (Instructor)
MURTAGH (Sponsor)

Seth Rogers is the Director of Desktop Systems at the Office for Information Technology. He oversees the computer hardware and software support for personal computers at Williams.

CSCI 11 Green Computing
Computers consume energy...lots of energy. Recent estimates equate the carbon dioxide produced by two Google searches from a desktop computer to be roughly the same amount produced by boiling a kettle of water for a cup of tea. Google services over 300 million queries per day! As another example, using a character in Second Life for a year requires roughly 1750 kilowatt-hours of electricity, or the same amount used by an average Brazilian in a year. Studies have shown that computing infrastructure annually consumes over 1% of the United States total energy supply, and number is growing. Green computing studies the design of carbon-efficient hardware and software. This seminar will survey problems with the energy consumption of computing infrastructure, and discuss new techniques for mitigating those problems. We will also discuss how computers can be leveraged to improve energy-efficiency by automatically monitoring and adjusting energy usage in buildings, homes, etc.
Students will write 2-page summaries of the assigned readings before each class, and will take turns leading discussions. Class attendance and participation will be mandatory to receive a passing grade.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference to computer science majors prioritized by seniority; the non-majors by seniority.
Cost to student: $25 for books.
Meeting time: TBA.

DAVID IRWIN (Instructor)
MURTAGH (Sponsor)

David Irwin is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Computer Science Department at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, working in conjunction with the Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) on the software architectures for geographically-dispersed sensor networks. He received his B.S. in Mathematics and Computer Science from Vanderbilt University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Science from Duke University, where his dissertation research focused on novel system structures and policies for sharing networked resources in clusters and data centers.

CSCI 14 LEGO Robotics
In this course, students will explore the theory and practice behind the construction of autonomous robots. Working in small teams, students will construct robots from battery powered microprocessor control boards, assorted sensors and motors, and LEGO components, and will then program them. Control programs will be written in a subset of the C programming language. The majority of class time will be spent in the laboratory. Students will be expected to complete appropriate structured exercises to develop basic skills in robot construction and programming. By the conclusion of the course, each team will be required to construct a robot designed to perform a pre-determined task such as obstacle avoidance, maze navigation, etc. Each team's project goals will be selected with both the interests and prior backgrounds of the team members in mind. Each team will be required to give a brief presentation describing their final project (including a demonstration of their robot's performance) and to submit a written report summarizing the design process.
Prerequisites: previous experience with programming is helpful but not required. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference will be based on class year (favoring upperclass students) and the desire to form working groups with appropriate levels of background knowledge.
Cost to student: $25 (reading packet).
Meeting time: mornings.

DANYLUK and MURTAGH

CSCI 23 Introduction to Research and Development in Computing
An independent project is completed in collaboration with a member of the Computer Science Department. The projects undertaken will either involve the exploration of a research topic related to the faculty member's work or the implementation of a software system that will extend the students design and implementation skills. It is expected that the student will spend 20 hours per week working on the project. At the completion of the project, each student will submit a 10-page written report or the software developed together with appropriate documentation of its behavior and design. In addition, students will be expected to give a short presentation or demonstration of their work. Students should consult with instructor as early as possible to determine details of projects that might be undertaken.
Requirements: final paper and presentation/demonstration.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to sophomores and juniors.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: TBA.

FREUND

CSCI 31 Senior Honor Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Computer Science 493-494.

CONTRACT MAJOR

CMAJ 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Contract Major 493, 494.

ECONOMICS

ECON 10 Dollars and Sense: Healthcare Coverage Before, After and Beyond the Obama Plan
The delivery of the historic Obama healthcare legislation was a touch and go process resulting in a plan that is likely to encounter significant growing pains as it matures over the next decade. This course will look at where we've been and where we are headed when it comes to how healthcare services in this country are reimbursed. The class is designed to help pre-med students think about the financial realities of their careers, and to encourage economics and public policy students to think critically about this aspect of the country's economic future. Students should finish this winter study offering with basic background, vocabulary and insight that will enable them to think about and discuss the concept of universal healthcare coverage from an informed and creative perspective. To that end we will:

1) Ask students to analyze their own health coverage.

2) Discuss the pros and cons, myths and facts about how other Western countries-specifically Canada and the U.K.-- have achieved universal coverage.

3) Probe various key concepts in what is likely to be an ongoing debate, including (but not limited to) "open access" and "managed care;" the role of physician training and specialization; the notion of supply determining demand; the myth that more medicine is necessarily better medicine; and "monopoly medicine."

4) Discuss what might be essential elements of any U.S. plan that aspires to economic longevity.

Requirements: regular attendance, class participation, a field interviews and either a 10-page paper or a team project/presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to pre-med, economics and political economy students.
Cost to student: approximately $40 for reading materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

KAREN ENGBERG (MD) and DOUG JACKSON (MD) (Instructors)
S. SHEPPARD (Sponsor)

Doug Jackson, MD is Board Certified in Family Medicine and has been active on the boards of several IPAs. He has practiced in ER, solo, small group and large group healthcare settings in Los Angeles and Santa Barbara, and is currently the Medical Director of a small primary care group. Karen Engberg, MD is retired from the active practice of primary care medicine and is currently an administrative physician and the CEO of Jackson Medical Group, Inc.

ECON 11 Public Speaking
This course will help students become effective and organized public speakers, whether public speaking means giving a class presentation, participating in a debate, or giving a formal speech before a large audience. We will primarily use extemporaneous and prepared class presentations as a means of learning this skill, but we will also study the great American speeches and presidential debates of the twentieth century for further insights into persuasive public speaking techniques. The class will provide a supportive environment to help each student create his or her own public speaking style that is comfortable, confident, and conversational. We will also focus on organizational techniques, handling visual aids effectively, eye contact and body language. Finally, receiving feedback and providing constructive criticism to other students in the class will be an important part of the course.
Requirements: 5-6 oral presentations to the class, most of which will be videotaped and critiqued. Evaluation will be based on in-class presentations, class participation, and a 10page written critique of the student's own videotaped presentations.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to juniors and seniors.
Cost to student: approximately $25 for materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

BRADBURD, LOVE, and SHORE-SHEPPARD

ECON 12 So You Want to Start a Business Some Day---Understanding the Business Plan
The course will meet three days a week for four hours. Classes will be spent reviewing the fundamentals of writing a business plan. Participants will receive workbooks and handouts as background which they will be expected to read. They will also be expected to do worksheets. Working in teams, the participants will be expected to research a business idea and write a draft of a business plan. They will also present the business plan to the class.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, presentations, and the business plan.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. If overenrolled, preference will be based on whether or not the student has a business idea he/she would like to analyze and develop.
Cost to student: less than $30.
Meeting time: noon-4 Tuesday-Thursday.

STEVEN FOGEL (Instructor)
S. SHEPPARD (Sponsor)

Steve Fogel is the Program Director of Berkshire Enterprises Entrepreneurial Training Program and has helped hundreds of people develop business plans and start businesses.

ECON 13 Sustainable Food Systems, Sourcing and the Triple Bottom Line (Same as ANSO 15 and Environmental Studies 15)
(See under ENVI 15 for full description.)

ECON 14 Accounting
The project will examine the theoretical and practical aspects of financial accounting. Although the beginning of the course will explore the mechanics of the information gathering and dissemination process, the course will be oriented mainly towards users, rather than preparers, of accounting information. The project will include discussion of the principles involved in accounting for current assets, plant assets, leases, intangible assets, current liabilities, stockholders' equity, the income statement and the statement of cash flows. Students will be expected to interpret and analyze actual financial statements. The nature of, and career opportunities in, the field of accounting will also be discussed. The project is a "mini course." It will present a substantial body of material and will require a considerable commitment of time by the student, including regular attendance and participation in discussion and homework cases and problems.
The course is a web-based course. The course website will include required readings from various linked web sites, additional downloadable reading material, required homework problems as well as self study material. The course grade will be determined on the basis of several quizzes and a written group report presenting an analysis of a company's annual report.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost to student: possible cost of downloading about 200 pages of material from the course website.
Meeting time: the course will meet for two hours on each Monday, Tuesday and Thursday of every week of Winter Study except the last week when classes will meet on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.

LEO MCMENIMEN (Instructor)
S. SHEPPARD (Sponsor)

Leo McMenimen has taught in the Winter Study Program at Williams College since 1980. He retired as a professor emeritus from the School of Business, Montclair State University.

ECON 15 Stock Market
Elementary description and analysis of the stock market. Emphasis will be on the roles of the market in our economy, including evaluation of business firms and the success of particular capital investments, allocating savings to different types of investment, and providing liquid and marketable financial investments for individual savers.
The course will focus on the description of mechanics of trading on various exchanges and other markets, stock market indexes or "averages" (Dow-Jones, S&P, 500, etc.), how to read the financial news, historical rates of return on stocks and portfolios, role of mutual funds, beta coefficients, and "random walk" theory. The course will also involve a brief introduction to financial reports of firms and analysis of financial ratios.
The course is a web-based course. The course website will include required readings from various linked web sites and required homework problems.
Each student will participate in discussions, do some homework assignments and, as part of a team, give two presentations and write a 10-page report analyzing the wisdom or folly of having chosen a particular investment portfolio. The course grade will be determined on the basis of performance on several quizzes and a written group investment portfolio report.
No prerequisites; not intended for students who already know much about the stock market; students who have had Economics 317 not admitted. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost to student: possible cost of downloading about 100 pages of material from the course website.
Meeting time: the course will meet for two hours on each Monday, Tuesday and Thursday of every week of Winter Study except last week when classes will meet Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.

LEO MCMENIMEN (Instructor)
S. SHEPPARD (Sponsor)

Leo McMenimen has taught in the Winter Study Program at Williams College since 1980. He retired as a professor emeritus from the School of Business, Montclair State University.

ECON 16 Mechanisms of Arbitrage
Arbitrage is a central concept of economics. This course is an introduction to mechanisms in markets which cause arbitrage to occur in various markets, as well as those which limit arbitrage, particularly when a mechanism counteracts others. The emphasis will be on markets in public securities and the firms which may issue them as well as markets which overlap with those in public securities. Emphasis will be on distortions caused by agency issues, regulations, venues and intellectual "bucketing". The processes by which these issues are at least partially resolved in current markets will be emphasized, although there will be historical readings and backgrounds in market mechanisms.
There will be an average of 100 pages of reading per class provided by the instructor and there will be an expectation of 10-12 pages of papers, typically as 1- to 2-page papers for class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25. Priority in inverse order of years remaining to graduation.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

PAUL ISAAC '72 (Instructor)
S. SHEPPARD (Sponsor)

Paul Isaac, Williams Class of '72 and a former Watson fellow, has 35 years of buy side investment experience in a broad range of securities and markets. He is currently Chief Investment Officer of an $3 billion fund of hedge funds as well as an active portfolio manager. He served as Chair of the Security Industry Association's Capital Rules Committee.

ECON 17 Entrepreneurship
Designed for students interested in starting a company, this course will focus on the interface between entrepreneurs and venture capital investors with the aim of giving students an immersive, hands-on experience. Student teams will develop new company proposals based on seed concepts provided by local experts. The teams will then present ("pitch") their proposals to venture capitalists for critique and feedback. We will learn from case studies of both successful and failed early-stage companies. We will explore technical aspects of creating venture-backed start-ups, including capitalization, equity, intellectual property considerations, and returns on investment. Each team's final project shall comprise a mock prospectus (written) for its virtual company accompanied by a final presentation to potential investors. Student evaluations will be based upon their team's success in developing its seed concept, their team's final project and upon classroom participation. Most class meetings will include guest experts; attendance is required. The course will include a required two-day trip to Boston for meetings with venture professionals.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference to upperclass students.
Cost to student: approximately $200 for Boston trip.
Meeting time: mornings MWF.

JEFFREY THOMAS (Instructor)
S. SHEPPARD (Sponsor)

Jeffrey Thomas holds and M.D. and Ph.D. from Indiana University. He helped start two Cambridge, MA - based biotechnology companies, Millennium Pharmaceuticals and Genstruct.

ECON 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) (Same as Political Economy 22)
This course examines tax policy towards low-income families in the United States, and has the following three objectives: 1) For students to understand the shift of redistributive policy in the United States from income support through the transfer system (Aid to Families with Dependent Children/Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) towards support of working individuals through the tax system (primarily the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC)); 2) For students to understand the challenges that low income individuals have "making ends meet" and to understand the role that the EITC has played in increasing the standard of living of the working poor; and 3) To enable students to understand the tax code well enough to prepare simple income tax returns, including those for filers claiming the EITC. Students will be trained by the IRS to prepare income tax returns for low-income individuals and families. At the end of the term, students will use their newly acquired expertise to help individuals and families in Berkshire County prepare and file their returns. Class meetings will involve a mixture of discussion of assigned readings, and exercises that help develop tax preparation skills and understanding of poverty. Assignments outside of class include: a variety of short readings on tax policy, the challenges of living in poverty in the U.S., and public policies that address these challenges; completion of an online course in IRS VITA training; and staffing approximately six hours of tax preparation assistance during the final week of winter term.
Evaluation is based on the results of the IRS certification test, students' work as tax preparers, and a ten-page analytical and reflective essay.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 14. If overenrolled, students selected via a VII How will students be selected if oversubscribed? written statement of interest.
Cost to student: $100 for texts and coursepack.
Meeting time: mornings, with the possibility of occasional afternoon meetings to accommodate guest speakers.

PAULA CONSOLINI and BAKIJA

Paula Consolini is Coordinator of Experiential Education at Williams and IRS-designated Northern Berkshire Site Coordinator for this program.

ECON 23 Introduction to the Economics, Geography and Appreciation of Wine
This course provides an introduction to the economics, geography and appreciation of wine. We will be studying the economics and geography of wine production, and will also learn to identify, understand and appreciate the major wine types of the world. The course will involve lectures, outside readings, and in-class wine tastings. We will focus primarily on the Old World wine styles and regions of France, Italy, Germany, Austria, Spain and Portugal. However, this year, for the first time, the course has been expanded to also cover some New World wine regions, including California, Oregon, Chile, Argentina, South Africa, New Zealand and Australia. Evaluations will be based on short quizzes, including blind tastings, and either an oral presentation or 10 page paper at the conclusion of the course.
Requirements: short quizzes, including blind tastings, and either an oral presentation or 10-page paper. While this will be a fun and interesting course, it is also a serious course in which students are
expected to learn the materials and skills presented in the lectures and wine tastings.
Enrollment limit: 10. Since the course will include wine tastings, it will also be restricted to those who are of legal age for wine consumption by the date of the first class meeting. In the event that demand exceeds the maximum limit for the course, students will be selected on the basis of a mix of academic record and diversity of backgrounds and interests.
Cost to student: approximately $225 in the form of a course fee, to be used for the cost of wine purchases for the course.
Meeting time: evenings.

P. PEDRONI

ECON 25 Coping with Global Crisis: South Africa's Policy Responses and Their Impacts (Same as Political Economy 25 and Political Science 24)
The recent global financial crisis and economic downturn have affected South Africa more than many other African countries. South Africa's policy choices after its first democratic elections in 1994 liberalized the financial system and opened the economy to the rest of the world. As a result, South Africa has been increasingly buffeted by global shocks. In response, South Africa has built one of the developing world's most effective social safety nets, employing social protection systems to not only achieve short term poverty reduction objectives but also to promote long term investments in education and other forms of human capital development. This course will provide students with an overview of South Africa's social, political and economic responses to the global downturn, and an opportunity to explore first hand the dilemmas policy-makers face. Through meetings with Parliamentarians and bureaucrats, businesspeople and social activists, teachers and students, labor leaders and health care workers, the participants in this travel WSP will learn about the challenges, successes and failures of South Africa's socio-economic responses and the political implications. South Africa is a country of contrasts: international polls rank Cape Town as one of the world's three most pleasant cities, yet minutes from the central business district smolder expanses of abject urban poverty. This course will investigate how such a skewed distribution of resources has evolved and increased vulnerability to global shocks, and what options a government has available in coping with this type of crisis. A major part of the course will focus on understanding the problem--visiting poor townships created as socially and economically vulnerable entities, investigating inequities in the provision of education and health care, and comprehending the predicament of the rural poor. The unifying theme of this course applies to South Africa as well as many other developing countries: responding to crisis with developmental social protection tackles not only the impact of the short term shocks but also contributes to long term human and national development. Using socio-economic data, first-hand observation and meetings with key stakeholders, students will better understand the options available to developing countries for tackling the perils of an increasingly globalized world, and building a foundation for pro-poor and inclusive economic growth and development.
Requirements: 10-page paper, presentations and seminar discussions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. If overenrolled, selection will be based on an essay of motivation. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: approximately $3485.

SAMSON and KENNETH MAC QUENE

The trip will be led by Michael Samson and Kenneth Mac Quene, Executive Director of the Economic Policy Research Institute in Cape Town, who has co-led four prior travel WSPs to South Africa.

ECON 51 Law, Finance and Development
Capital investment plays an important role in economic development. But how should firms and governments decide about which investments to undertake? How can and should domestic and multinational firms finance these investments? What government policies-such as legal institutions, policies towards corporate governance, financial regulations, and tax rules-affect investment and financing decisions in emerging market countries? The goal of this course is to examine public policies that facilitate investment in emerging markets. The course will primarily take a microeconomic (or firm-level) perspective on these issues. The course will introduce many basic principles of finance, including diversification, hedging, option values, the cost of capital, and asymmetric information in contracting. We will also discuss legal issues for corporate governance and investor protection. More importantly, we will examine the challenges of applying these principles in the context of developing and transition economies. The course will combine economic theory with a series of business case studies.
The course will meet roughly 8 hours per week. Outside reading and preparation for case discussions will take at least 20 hours per week.
Students will be evaluated on a series of case write-ups, problem sets, class participation, case presentations, and a five-page research paper.
Prerequisites: prior economics course (Economics 110 or 503), and one statistical methods class (Economics 253, 255, 510, 511 or Statistics 201). Enrollment limit: 15. Preference will be given to CDE Fellows. Undergraduates interested in the course should discuss their plans with the instructor.
Cost to student: approximately $100 for reading packets and books.
Meeting time: mornings.

GENTRY

ECON 52 Micro-Simulation Modeling for Ex Ante Policy Analysis
Micro-simulation modeling provides one of the most powerful tools for ex ante evidence-based analysis of economic and social policy interventions. Rooted in representative household surveys of a country's population, the models provide a picture of poverty, employment, consumption and income levels throughout the country. A micro-simulation model enables researchers to investigate the impact of existing economic and social policy interventions (such as tax and public benefit interventions) on income levels, poverty, inequality and other outcomes. In addition, researchers are able to simulate the impact and estimate the cost of new policy interventions.
During this course, students will learn to apply these methods to analyze public policies and interpret the findings. The course examines measurement issues, analytical tools and their application to household survey data for a range of developing countries. The course also links the outcomes of the analysis with the challenges of policy implementation, exploring how the political environment and/or institutional setting may result in the implementation of second-best options. This is a hands-on modeling course, and Fellows will build a micro-simulation model for a country of their choice and use this model in completing the course requirements. The course will employ Excel, Stata and advanced micro-simulation packages.
Requirements: micro-simulation model and reports.
No prerequisites: Enrollment limit: 15. Preference to CDE students and essay of motivation.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: WRF 2-4 p.m.

SAMSON

ECON 30 Honors Project
The "Specialization Route" to the degree with Honors in Economics requires that each candidate take an Honors Winter Study Project in January of their senior year. Students who wish to begin their honors work in January should submit a detailed proposal. Decisions on admission to the Honors WSP will be made in the fall. Information on the procedures will be mailed to senior majors in economics early in the fall semester.
Seniors who wish to apply for admission to the Honors WSP and thereby to the Honors Program should register for this WSP as their first choice.
Some seniors will have begun honors work in the fall and wish to complete it in the WSP. They will be admitted to the WSP if they have made satisfactory progress. They should register for this WSP as their first choice.

ECON 31 Honors Thesis
To be taken by students participating in year-long thesis research (ECON 493-W31-494).

ENGLISH

ENGL 10 Journalism
Acquaintance with the fundamentals of journalism is useful in dealing with the daily avalanche of news and information. An understanding of how news is gathered and presented in print promotes healthy skepticism, improves written communication skills and enhances the ability to think critically. Assignments will include writing news stories, features, obituaries, editorials, op-ed pieces and reviews. Students will explore interviewing techniques, the cultivation and evaluation of sources and other aspects of a newspaper reporter's job. They also will survey the current state of print journalism and examine the ways in which "traditional" journalistic techniques and practices are evolving to maintain their relevance in the digital age. In addition to current daily newspapers, magazines and on-line news sources, students will read and discuss examples of the journalistic forms under study. Several classes will focus on allied disciplines such as photo journalism, sports writing and criticism.
Evaluation will rely on class attendance and participation and timely completion of all assignments.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 14. Preference is given to first-year students.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

DUDLEY BAHLMAN (Instructor)
MURPHY (Sponsor)

Dudley Bahlman is a freelance writer and a columnist for The Berkshire Eagle. He was a news reporter for 28 years before retiring in 2005.

ENGL 11 Your Favorite Director
This course gives students an opportunity to do research on their favorite film directors and in an oral presentation share what they have learned. The first half of the course will be devoted to developing a filmography and an annotated bibliography of 10 items (e.g., reviews, articles, books or chapters) on the director each student chooses. We will be working with a librarian to facilitate this part of the course. One reading about each director or one of his/her films will be recommended for reading by the whole class (this should be approximately 10-15 pages long). During this time, we will also screen one film by each director for the whole class to view. There will be oral presentations during the second half of the course, and students should also turn in their filmographies, bibliographies, and an outline of their oral presentation at the end of Winter Study. Students may choose to augment their oral presentations with video clips from the directors' films.
Requirements: annotated bibliography, filmography, oral presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Preference given to English majors.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

BUNDTZEN

ENGL 12 Emma and Anna
Sit before the fire reading long novels about miserable women. We will read two books that changed the course of world literature: Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary, and Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina; we will listen to recordings of the novels; we will watch film adaptations of the novels; we will read a choice sampling of critical writing about the novels; we will discuss the novels; we will respond to our reading of the novels in nontraditional, multimedia forms.
Requirements: shoebox dioramas, graphic novels, short movies, illustrated journals, anything but a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to English majors.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

CLEGHORN

ENGL 13 Writing Home
What is a home? Nineteenth-century Americans spun visions of what a home looks like, what a family is, and why the spaces in which persons live are culturally meaningful which have had a lasting impact on American culture. For Emily Dickinson, the home is often a spare private room in which the artist's mind can roam freely, while for Harriet Beecher Stowe, home is a place to raise a family and foster an ideology of maternal power in counterpoint to capitalism and slavery. For Harriet Jacobs, home is first a place of enslavement and imprisonment-for very different reasons, Herman Melville also found domestic spaces imprisoning, and he writes of alternative homes found in the masculine world of the office or a whaling ship. For Henry David Thoreau, who actually lived much of his life in his parents' attic, home is in a real sense found not indoors but outdoors, in a nature filled with familiar spaces and sights. In addition to exploring how these authors shaped visions of home, we will consider how the spaces from which they wrote resonate with their writing. To that end, we will take field trips to local museums of Dickinson, Stowe, and Melville's homes, and discuss how the museums both preserve and refigure the meaning of home for each author. Students will write two short papers on topics of their choice.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to English majors.
Cost to student: $60 (for transportation and museum admission).
Meeting time: mornings.

DAVIS

ENGL 14 The Stories and Essays of Jorge Luis Borges
In this course, we will read almost all of the fiction, and a large number of the creative essays, of the Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges, one of the most influential writers of the twentieth century. All readings will be in translation.
Evaluation will be based on contributions to the four weekly meetings, each one an hour and a half, and on a final paper of 10 pages.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference is given to English majors.
Cost to students: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

LIMON

ENGL 15 Talking Animals
This course will explore models for understanding communication between humans and animals, ranging from Descartes' theory of mind to Alex, the talking parrot. We'll concentrate especially on relations between humans and dogs, asking what it means, biologically and philosophically, to domesticate a species, to bring it into the home. If humans and dogs are, in Meg Wolfert's words, literally made for each other, what can we learn about ourselves and presuppositions, from looking in that furry mirror?
Course texts may include Vicki Hearne's Adam's Task; Irene Pepperberg's Alex & Me: Temple Grandin's Animals In Translation; Cheney & Seyfarth's Baboon Metaphysics: The Evolution of a Social Mind; recent experimental work in bird behavior; and exemplary films and novels assaying the nature of animal minds.
Students will be required to present final presentations to the class, and to complete a 10-page paper on a topic that grows out of our coursework.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Students with pets; with farm experience; or with training in neuroscience will be selected first for this course.
Cost to student: $90.
Meeting time: MWR 1-3 p.m.

ROSENHEIM

ENGL 16 Further Studies in the Undead
Vampires are back. Gone, mostly, are the zombies of the last decade-the dilatory, the dawdling, the pointlessly milling dead. Pop culture once again prefers its ghouls to have purpose and penetrating stares. We'll watch a dozen or so vampire movies, some eighty years worth, the better to anatomize this newest breed, including the sparkly and crepuscular. Questions: What's the difference between vampires and other genera of the undead? When we find ourselves briefly creeped out by vampires, these nonexistent things, what are we scared of really? And why have they suddenly become datable? Movies: Dracula, The Last Man on Earth, Blade, Twilight, a few episodes of True Blood, Let the Right One In, &c.
Requirements include a film journal and a high tolerance for vulgar Nietzscheanism; regular attendance and a film journal.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference given to English majors and first-year students.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

THORNE

ENGL 17 Hamlet
This course is an opportunity to immerse yourself in one of the most innovative and celebrated literary works, Shakespeare's Hamlet. We will read and reread the text, practice reading speeches aloud, and watch and discuss film versions and adaptations. Students who wish may also rehearse and perform scenes from the play.
Requirements: regular attendance at class and scheduled screenings plus a 10-page paper.
No prior literary or theatrical experience is required. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to English and Theatre majors.
Cost to student: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons.

I. BELL

ENGL 18 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel
Each class will begin with a lecture-demonstration, followed by practice on the potter's wheel. Each student will have the use of a potter's wheel for each class. We will work with stoneware and porcelain clays on mugs, bowls, pitchers, plates, jars, lids, vases, and bottles, and will finish these shapes as required by trimming and adding handles, lugs, lids, spouts, and knobs. We will also work on several different handbuilding projects. After the tenth class session, all class work will be biscuit-fired. The eleventh class will be devoted to glazing the biscuited pieces. Glazing techniques will include pouring, dipping, layering, brushing, and stamping, and using wax resist and other masking techniques to develop pattern and design. The completed work will then be glaze-fired. The last meeting will be devoted to a "final project" gallery show of your best work. Woven into lecture-demonstrations will be presentations on various topics relating to the science and history of pottery making.
Requirements: attendance at all class sessions and enthusiasm for learning the craft of pottery making.
No prerequisites or potterymaking experience necessary. Enrollment limit: 9. Preference will be given to English and Art majors.
Cost to student: $275 lab fee, plus makeup class fees ($42.00 per class) if applicable.
Meeting time: mornings.

RAY BUB (Instructor)
MURPHY (Sponsor)

Ray Bub is a ceramic artist and teacher at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery in Pownal, Vermont, 10 minutes north of the Williams College campus. All classes except the final project exhibition take place at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery.

ENGL 27 Printmaking on Paper Clay (Same as ArtS 27)

This course introduces the technical and creative possibilities of print making on ceramic paper clay without the use of a press. Students will learn how to make their own paper clay, and will explore monoprinting, relief printing, and offset printing. Historical examples will be introduced through field trips, Lectures and assignments. Students will receive feedback on their work through group critiques and open studio sessions. They will be evaluated based on completion of assignments with attention to detail, content, and development of their work. Attendance and participation are required along with a group exhibition on the last day of Winter Study.
The goal of this course is to experiment with different printing methods on ceramic surfaces. You will learn about the history of printmaking on ceramics and use that knowledge as a stepping stone for your individual projects. This course will cover basic handbuilding with clay, concentrating on surface design through printmaking. Each of you will be expected to develop your own visual vocabulary and create objects in 2 and 3D formats. The exchange of ideas among classmates of different skill levels will be highly encouraged in the studio, as will the importance of exploring the work of contemporary artists. We will also draw from various texts and web sites for historical and contemporary examples for discussion. You will learn about kiln firing and will complete projects by the end of the course for exhibition.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8.
Cost to student: $100 lab fee.
Meeting time: mornings.

DIANE SULLIVAN (Instructor)
BARRETT (Sponsor)

Diane Sullivan is a professional artist who lives and works at The Eclipse Mill in North Adams. She exhibits her work nationaly and abroad.

ENGL 29 Peer Writing Tutor Workshop (Same as INTR 29)
The purpose of this course is to train peer writing tutors and assistants to be more effective reviewers and editors of student work. Format: workshop/discussion. Students will read and discuss literature on the teaching of writing; they will also do analytical writing assignments, which they will then bring into the workshop.
Evaluation will be based on analytic writing assignments and course participation. Students who complete this training will be eligible for assignment as Writing Workshop tutors and/or as Writing Assistants for selected Williams classes.
Prerequisites: admission to Williams Writing Writing Pilot or by permission of the instructor. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: under $50.
Meeting time: MWF 2-4.

TBA, Writing Coordinator at Williams

ENGL 30 Honors Project: Specialization Route
Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the specialization route.

ENGL 31 Honors Project: Thesis
Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the thesis route.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

ENVI 10 The Winter Naturalist's Journal
This course will explore the tools for studying the natural world through various uses of writing, literature, and drawing. Students will spend time outdoors learning the ecosystem of the Williamstown area and time indoors doing observational drawing, reflective writing, and reading and discussions of nature literature. The writing component of the journal will be the equivalent of a 10-page paper. The drawing part will consist of ongoing entries contained in a nature journal, to be displayed and discussed as part of the final project. Designed for students with interests in environmental studies, natural history writing, and drawing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. If overenrolled, students will be chosen based on seniority and the need to create a group that is diverse in majors and interests.
Cost to student: $50 for books and art supplies.
Meeting time: mornings.

CHRISTIAN MCEWEN and BARBARA BASH (Instructors)
FRENCH (Sponsor)

Christian McEwen is the editor of "Jo's Girls: Tomboy Tales of High Adventure," True Grit & Real Life", and co-editor of "The Alphabet of the Trees: A Guide to Nature Writing". She has recently completed a non-fiction book, "Ordinary Joy: the Necessary Art of Slowing Down". Barbara Bash is an illustrated journal keeper and calligrapher. She has written and illustrated a number of children's books on natural history for Sierra Club. Her most recent book for adults is "True Nature: An Illustrated Journal of Four Seasons in Solitude". She lives in the Hudson Valley of New York.

ENVI 11 Winter?!
This course will investigate the winter season, in all its various facets, using readings, discussions, media and field trips. We will consider this extreme season in the context of global climate change: what will be the future of winter in New England and how will its denizens be affected? The course explores topics such as the factors that determine our climate and winter weather; how these factors have affected the landscape; the different strategies used by various plants and animals to cope with the extremes of winter; and how humans in northern climates have adapted to life in the cold-from their lifestyles to architecture to civic planning. The class will spend significant time outdoors observing winter up close: Winter botany, tracking and viewing wildlife, and looking at how winter has shaped the natural and human environment. Accordingly, students should be prepared to spend hours coping with the elements. The class will take an overnight field trip outside of our local area that requires students to be away beyond normal Winter Study class hours.
Each student will undertake an independent project on some aspect of Winter, and will produce the equivalent of a 10-page paper and give a class presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to first-year students.
Cost to student: $100.
Meeting time: mornings MWF and one weekend trip.

DREW JONES and ART

Drew Jones has been the Manager of Hopkins Memorial Forest for ten years. He has a Masters Degree in Forestry and has worked as a Wildlife Biologist and Naturalist from the Southern Appalachians to the North Woods.

ENVI 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Geosciences 12)
(See under GEOS 12 for full description.)

ENVI 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Roots, Its Uncertain Future (Same as Legal Studies 13)
(See under LGST 13 for full description.)

ENVI 15 Sustainable Food Systems, Sourcing and the Triple Bottom Line (Same as ANSO 15 and Economics 13)
Around the world, a growing number of forward-thinking institutions and businesses are reviewing their purchasing habits and incorporating environmental concerns into all stages of their procurements. These pioneering organizations are minimizing their planetary environmental footprints, in many cases improving their bottom lines, and serving as successful models for other institutions. In the face of the current, interrelated economic and environmental threats, business leaders are "greening" supply chains and utilizing the 'power of purchase' towards the achievement of a range of sustainable development goals, including a sustainable food system. Although not a panacea, consciously directing purchasing power may be one of the most powerful tools that business can employ to shift patterns of food production and consumption in a more sustainable direction.
Students in this course will both taste and think in new ways about their 'daily bread'. This course will act as a comparative overview to the principles and models of both large-scale industrial food systems and their smaller-scale counterparts. Students will examine how food supply chain reform is a critical mechanism for "triple bottom line" returns-sustainable economic, ecological and social development-and how food can bridge these sectors. They will look at the challenges and opportunities involved in several contemporary business models of sustainable sourcing and explore what models may be applicable at an institution such as Williams. They will discover the pivotal leadership role of civic institutions within the working rural landscape, and they will develop a theoretical approach for applying principles of food sustainability to their future business ventures.
As a final research project, students will start with an ingredient of a lunch, from the Williams cafeteria, and take an excursion from their taste buds back through the production, distribution and policy behind an 'ordinary' meal. They will trace each single ingredient to its source and critique it through cross-disciplinary lenses, as appropriate.
Method of evaluation: 10 page investigative research paper. Students will also present their findings to the class.
Required activities: "Sustainable Sourcing" will meet for two three-hour sessions per week. In addition, we will have three half-day field trips to community farms and/or businesses that work with sustainable food models.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: 12:30-3:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays.

KATHARINE MILLONZI (Instructor)
GOLDSTEIN (Sponsor)

Katharine Millonzi is an eco-gastronome who has worked in sustainable supply chain development with a range of businesses and organizations worldwide. She was a Fulbright Fellow to Italy, where she conducted research on traditional agriculture and regional food production, and studied with the University of Gastronomic Sciences, founded by Slow Food International. She is currently the Sustainable Food Program Manager at Williams College.

ENVI 25 Sustainable Eleuthera: Reviving Island Agriculture
The students in this class will learn about food, farmers, and farming in Eleuthera, a small, outer Bahama Island. Historically, islanders were subsistence farmers and the island produced fruits and vegetables for export. In recent decades, farming and home gardening has significantly decreased and although there is abundant land, it is mostly fallow. Farming skills are being lost and generational knowledge is not being passed down. Most families rely on canned and boxed food. There are some new farming initiatives on the island and growing interest in locally grown food. This class will research four food and farming issues on Eleuthera: 1) the decline of subsistence and truck (market) farming, 2) the reliance on expensive, low quality food imports, 3) food policy issues, including import and export policies, and 4) the poor nutrition and high incidence of diabetes and other diet related diseases.
The class is structured as an experiential group project and the students and professor will work as a research team. We will immerse ourselves in farming and in the community. Our days will include hands-on gardening in the campus orchard and vegetable garden, touring farms and interviewing farmers, talking with residents, researching past and present food production on the island, attending farmers markets, and conducting the first steps of a food security assessment for the island. A community food assessment includes a profile of general community characteristics and community food resources, household food security, food availability and affordability, food production resources, and the agricultural capacity of the island. Students will learn a variety of skills, including survey design, interview technique, field research, data analysis, report writing and some film editing.
Two island organizations are concerned about these issues and the class will work in conjunction with them: The Cape Eleuthera Institute and the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation. On the last day on the island, the class will give a presentation of research findings to members of these organizations. Back on campus the following week, we will finalize the written report and presentation for submittal to the island organizations. The class will give a presentation on campus in February.
Requirements: active and involved participation in group research project, including conducting interviews, farm tours, group discussions, taking photos and film footage, conducting primary research, data analysis, writing group report, and preparing and delivering two public presentations. Last week of winter study class meets on campus finalizing written report and power point presentation and/or film.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Selection will be based on relevant coursework or extracurricular involvement in environmental, sustainability or agriculture projects. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: approximately $2200 (airfare, room and board, course packet).
Class will meet full-time during the trip; class will have two to three 2-hour meetings during the last week on campus. Travel: 1/5-1/19; on-campus, 1/20-1/27.

GARDNER

ENVI 27 Sustainable Agriculture: On The Farm (Same as Special 27)
(See under SPEC 27 for full description.)

ENVI 31 Senior Research and Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Environmental Studies 493-494.

GEOSCIENCES

GEOS 10 Ultimate Wellness: Concepts for Living a Happy Healthy Life (Same as Maritime Studies 10)
(See under MAST 10 for full description.)

GEOS 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Environmental Studies 12)
This class will broaden students' appreciation for the appearance and history of the landscape and teach the skills of making a successful photograph. Williamstown, situated in a valley between the Green and Taconic Mountains and bisected by the Green and Hoosic Rivers, is a place of great natural beauty. The local landscape is a subject that inspires both professional and amateur photographers alike. While Williamstown will be the subject of most of our work, we will use it to learn principles of universal application. Students will discover the importance of light in making a photograph. They will also learn camera skills and the mechanics of digital photography, which will be reviewed at biweekly class meetings. In addition to photographing and critiquing images, the class will visit collections at the Clark Art Institute and WCMA to see original work and examine and discuss books on reserve at Sawyer Library. An overview of the history of landscape photography will be provided with an emphasis on American workers such as Carlton Watkins, Eadweard Muybridge, Alfred Stieglitz, Eliot Porter and Ansel Adams. We will also demonstrate examples of different cameras such as medium format, view cameras, and panorama cameras. Students will produce a body of successful photographs that will be projected at the Winter Study presentation day and on display at http://drm.williams.edu/projects/. Students will submit short written explanations with each of their photographic assignments.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, the student's photography, and their presentation.
Prerequisites: students will need a digital single lens reflex camera (DSLR). See http://digital-photography-school.com/blog/how-to-buy-a-dslr-camera/. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to first-year students and sophomores.
Cost to student: $50.
Meeting time: mornings.

NICHOLAS WHITMAN (Instructor)
DETHIER (Sponsor)

Nicholas Whitman is a professional photographer and the former Curator of Photography at the New Bedford Whaling Museum. A 1977 graduate of the Rochester Institute of Technology, he has honed his craft to make landscape photographs of power and depth. See more at www.nwphoto.com.

GEOS 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Geology 493-494.

GERMAN

GERM S.P. Sustaining Program for German 101-102
Something new and different for students enrolled in German 101-102. Practice in the use of German for everyday purposes; creation and performance of short dramatic sketches through group collaboration; games; songs; storytelling; reading. No homework.
Requirements: active participation and regular attendance earn a "Pass" grade.
Prerequisites: German 101 or equivalent. Limited to German 101-102 students.
Cost to student: approximately $5 for photocopied materials.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week 9-9:50 a.m.

GERM 10 Marx and Nietzsche
Though radically opposed in their basic world views, Karl Marx (1818-83) and Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) exhibited striking similarities in their critiques of modern bourgeois society as it emerged in the nineteenth century. Their analyses of the religious, economic, political, sexual and linguistic predilections of the rising middle-class continue to exert enormous influence, even as the middle class reigns triumphant. We will compare and contrast their ideas in the context of German society from the final defeat of Napoleon (1815) to the start of the First World War (1914). We will also consider whether their relevance today can extend beyond the academic bubble. Among works to be read: by Marx, Early Writings, The Communist Manifesto, Capital (selections), and by Nietzsche, On the Use and Abuse of History, Beyond Good and Evil (selections), and The Anti-Christ.
Evaluation will be based on participation and two 5-page papers. We will meet three times a week for ninety-minute sessions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $30 for books.
Meeting time: 10:30-noon, MWR.

B. KIEFFER

GERM 11 A Taste of Austria (Same as Mathematics 11)
(See under MATH 11 for full description.)

GERM 30 Honors Project
To be taken by honors candidates following other than the normal thesis route.

GERM 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for German 493-494.

HISTORY

HIST 10 American Autobiography
Autobiography is an ancient and honorable form of literary expression. It is also an exceptionally revealing one, giving us, as it does, insights both into individual lives and how people living in different eras and circumstances attempted to understand and interpret their experiences. Autobiographies, too, are unusually plentiful in American literature. Over the period of Winter Study we will read three American autobiographies, including Benjamin Franklin's Autobiography, Barack Obama's Dreams from My Father, and a third example chosen from a list of other possibilities. Broadly speaking, we will consider how these autobiographies differ from one another, what they may have in common, and finally what, if anything, identifies them as particularly American.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a final writing assignment - the preparation of a chapter of your own autobiography.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference given to juniors and seniors.
Cost to students: about $30-40 for books and course packet.
Meeting time: afternoons.

DALZELL

HIST 13 The Historian as Detective
This course will bring students into close physical and intellectual contact with the papers of notable eighteenth and nineteenth-century Americans: Presidents, literary figures, and leading social reformers. Students will have a rare opportunity to work with original manuscripts of people like Governor Thomas Hutchinson, Thomas Jefferson, John Qunicy Adams, Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, William Cullen Bryant, John Brown, and Dorothea Dix, to cite a few representative examples. We will also use letters and documents of little known people, be they slaves, war widows, soldiers, homemakers, or working men, whose manuscript relics provide interesting lights on significant topics. All documents are part of the Chapin Library's manuscript holdings, and all work for this course will be done in Williamstown. Research into any historical topic requires some knowledge of what historical editors do and frequently calls for editing on the part of the researcher. It is detective work that begins with the simple existence of a document but then turns it over, analyzes it, relates it, evaluates it, and finally draws conclusions. In this course students will learn to transcribe a document accurately and to make sense of it as well. In the first week daily classes will introduce past and present editorial practices and rationales and allow work on more easily read Presidential letters. In sessions during each of the second and third weeks, additional points of historical editing will be discussed, while work is done on somewhat more challenging letters in Presidential, Civil War, and literary collections, and in the remarkable "reformer files" of the Julia Ward and Samuel Gridley Howe papers. Class sessions will be held at the end of the fourth week in which students will present and discuss an important historical or literary document or letter series each has earlier selected for editing.
Evaluation: students will be expected to attend all class meetings and present a medium-length paper on the document or letter series each student selects as his or her special editing project. The instructors also expect everyone who registers for this course to commit themselves to the hard work and high research standards required in serious historical editing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8.
Cost to students: less than $50 for books and photocopied materials.
Meeting time: every morning for the first five days, and thereafter every other morning; the final day we will meet both morning and afternoon for a total of five hours for a unified presentation of the student-edited manuscripts. Classes and daily afternoon consultation time with the original documents and discussions with Mr. Volz and Prof. Dew will be in the temporary quarters of the Chapin Library at 96 School Street (on the corner with Southworth Street, located just down a block from Dodd House).

CHARLES DEW and ROBERT VOLZ (Instructors)

HIST 16 Genealogy
In this course, students will become familiar with the basic methodology of genealogical research and use this information to create a family history. Students will conduct research using primary and secondary sources, including vital records (birth, marriage and death certificates), federal and state census records, immigration records, military service and pension records, naturalization records, probate and court records, newspapers, city directories, and published genealogies. Students will index vital records in a community in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, to learn what information is included in the records and become familiar with computerized databases. The course will include field trips to local libraries, local town clerks offices and the National Archives and Records Administration in Pittsfield. Students will complete a family history using both secondary and primary sources. They will become familiar with the process of historical research including formulating theories, finding evidence through various media (including oral interviews, records, ephemera, and published sources), and drawing conclusions based on that research.
Evaluation: students will complete a family history from 1850 to present.
No prerequisites (although students should have some basic family knowledge, such as names and locations of grandparents in 1930). Enrollment limit: 11. If overenrolled, preference will be given to History majors and to students by seniority.
Cost to student: approximately $50.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week.

ALAN DOYLE HORBAL (Instructor)
WATERS (Sponsor)

Alan Doyle Horbal has worked as a volunteer at the National Archive and Record Center in Pittsfield, Massachusetts since 2001 and has previously offered this WSP several times at Williams.

HIST 17 The Abortion Debate: The Politics of Abortion in the United States, 1973-Present (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 17)
This course will examine the history of abortion law and politics in recent U.S. History. Students will read historical scholarship on the history of pregnancy, abortion, and reproductive rights before Roe v. Wade, but the course will focus on the ways that abortion law and politics have intersected with and influenced American political culture for the past forty years. We will ask how race, sexuality, class, religion, and gender have shaped abortion politics; consider debates about fetal rights, disability rights, and new reproductive technologies; and examine how the abortion debate has intersected with party politics, and influenced issues ranging from health care reform to foreign policy.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a final, 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. If oversubscribed, preference will be given to seniors and then juniors.
Cost to students: approximately $75.00 for books and course packet.
Meeting time: afternoons, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1-3:50 p.m.

DUBOW

HIST 18  Williams Reads Invisible Man
“I am an invisible man,” so begins Ralph Ellison’s treatise on black life in the United States in the mid-twentieth century.  Since Ellison’s book Invisible Man appeared in 1952, winning the National Book Award, it has remained a recommended text on reading lists of all types.  Often studied for its literary crafting and for the ways that it evokes the work of classic American writers, Invisible Man is also an historical text, a primary source document that reflects the time period within which it was written (mid-twentieth century America) and it is history text, full of references to the African American past and its influence on the novel’s protagonist.  Ellison’s Invisible Man has been selected as the Williams Reads book for January 2011, and I am the chair of the Williams Reads Program Committee.
This course will focus on Ralph Ellison’s novel Invisible Man as a history of African Americans in the United States since emancipation.  The class will explore the novel’s cultural symbols, including its historical images and personalities, its attention to language and music, and its approaches to politics and protest.  In addition to reading the novel, course participants will examine other work relevant to the novel’s themes, including material related to racial segregation and race relations; the Great Migration and urbanization; black sociology, anthropology, political science, and history; and black vernacular culture and social protest.  Students will attend and participate in Williams Reads programming including public readings and discussions, faculty and guest panels, films at Images Cinema, jazz concerts, dance performances, and other projects that will seek to engage the college community in the themes of the book.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, written critiques of materials, and a final ten-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.  If oversubscribed, preference will be given to seniors, and juniors.
Cost to students: $25.00 for one book.  The text Invisible Man will be provided to students gratis by the Williams Reads committee. All programming also will be free of charge.
Meeting times: afternoon, two session per week.

L. BROWN

HIST 23 Investigative Tips for the Incurably Curious
CANCELLED!

HIST 25 Miami: Gateway to the Caribbean (Same as Africana Studies 25, Latina/o Studies 25, and Religion 26)
In this course, students will explore transnational Caribbean communities in Miami through participant observation, archival research, and experiential education. By studying the formation and internal dynamics of Cuban, Dominican, Haitian, and Puerto Rican diasporas in Miami, students will be challenged to think about what it means that these communities have built a home base within the nation-state of the United States. In particular, this course will pay attention to a range of interconnected themes, including: motivations behind migrating to Miami, immigration policies, city residential patterns, and community organizations that have both helped and hindered the development of these diverse communities in south Florida. We will also investigate the ways particular immigrant and exile populations have negotiated living in the same urban space, sometimes disagreeing over resources, while at alternate times forming tentative alliances with other Caribbean diasporas, African Americans, and North Americans. In advance of the two weeks of travel, students will be expected to read selected methodological pieces on participant observation and archival work as well as historical essays on the foundation of different communities in south Florida (for instance, Elizabeth Aranda and Mary Chamberlain in Caribbean Migration to Western Europe and the United States [Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2009]). Once in Miami, students will: Attend an introductory session on participant observation research; visit and work in the University of Miami's Special Collections Archive; tour key neighborhoods (Little Havana, Little Haiti, Black Grove); visit various major religious and historical sites that serve as diaspora community centers, such as la Ermita de la Caridad, the Freedom Tower, and Vizcaya; and volunteer with local agencies that work around issues of (im)migration, elder care, and youth engagement in the various communities. Knowledge of Creole and/or Spanish will be useful for this type of ethnographic research and volunteer work.
Students will be expected to keep a journal of their experiences and complete a 10-page research paper that combines participant observation and/or oral histories with archival research about a particular Caribbean community in Miami. Method of evaluation (e.g., 10-page paper, final project, presentation, etc.): Students will be expected to keep a journal of their experiences and complete a 10-page research paper that combines participant observation and/or oral histories with archival research about a particular Caribbean community in Miami.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Not open to first-year students. If over-enrolled, selection will be based on application essays and interviews. Preference will be given to majors and concentrators in Africana Studies, Latino/a Studies, Religion, and History. Priority will also be given to students who can speak Creole and/or Spanish.
Estimated cost per student: $2538.


Mandatory info meeting on Wednesday, September 15 at 7 p.m. in Griffin 7.

BENSON and HIDALGO

HIST 26 Tourism and Historical Memory in Vietnam
This travel course to Vietnam will focus on how the Vietnamese state has developed its tourist industry and made efforts to influence foreign visitors' historical memories of several prominent aspects of the country's heritage, including its long resistance to Chinese domination, its wars for independence, its central role in the Cold War, its ethnic heritage, and more. Prior to embarking upon the trip, students will be required will be required to read Scott Laderman's Tours of Vietnam: War, Travel Guides, and Memory and a brief selection of other recent works on tourism and historical memory in Vietnam. We will travel from south to north, stopping at several key locations along the way to explore this theme. Students will be expected to arrive in Ho Chi Minh City on January 2 and will return to the US on January 21.
Evaluation: students will be expected to undertake the initial readings for the course, participate fully in the planned activities in Vietnam, and write a ten-page paper at the end of the course.
No prerequisites, however, you will be REQUIRED to attend an informational meeting on September 15th at 7 p.m. in Hollander Hall 340 in order to be eligible for this class (watch for details in the daily message); you must have a valid passport in order to be accepted into the course; you should bring copies of the infomation pages of your passport to the meeting. (Students on leave fall semester who are interested in the class should contact the instructor BEFORE September 15th.) Enrollment limit: 10 students from Williams. (This winter study travel course will be conducted in tandem with another historian of Vietnam, Professor Matthew Masur of St. Anselm College, with a maximum of ten spaces for St. Anselm students and ten for Williams students.) The course is open to all except first-year students, but should it be oversubscribed interviews of interested students will be undertaken and preference will be given to students who have taken a course at Williams on the Vietnam War.
Cost to students: approximately $2,810 (including airfare and all accommodation) and an additional $200 for incidentals.

CHAPMAN and MATHEW MASUR (Instructors)

HIST 27 Opium Bonds: Linking India and China in the Early Nineteenth Century
At the turn of the nineteenth century opium grown in India and sold in China was the most valuable commercial crop in the world. This course examines not only the trade in this drug (organized under the British East India Company), but the economic, social, and cultural linkages it established between these two broad regions. Readings will include historical works on both countries' involvement in the opium trade, selected primary sources, and Amitav Ghosh's recent novel Sea of Poppies.
Evaluation will based on participation in discussion, short response papers, and a final project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20 (decision based on discretion of the instructor).
Cost to students: approx. $40 for books and course packet.
Meeting time: 2-3 afternoon meetings per week.

A. REINHARDT

HIST 28 Sex and the Constitution (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 28)
This course will introduce students to the history and current law regarding First Amendment protections for sexual expression. Historical background, including the suppression of sexuality education and the Hays Code regulating sexual content in films, will be reviewed. Students will learn the legal distinction between obscenity and pornography, and current legal approaches to child pornography, virtual child pornography, nudity and other material that has sexual content or overtones. The course will also address the continuing legal and cultural conflict over sexual speech, as manifested in federal mandates for "abstinence-only-until-marriage" sex education, efforts to remove books like Judy Blume's novel Forever from public school libraries, and censorship of art work depicting nudity.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and several short papers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20 (chosen by seniority).
Cost to students: approximately $50.
Meeting time: Monday and Friday afternoons.

JOAN BERTIN (Instructor)
WATERS (Sponsor)

Joan Bertin is currently Executive Director of the National Coalition Against Censorship and was formerly on the national legal staff of the ACLU. She is a member of the faculty at Columbia University and held the Joanne Woodward Chair in Public Policy at Sarah Lawrence College in 1995-1997.

HIST 29 Eyewitness to the Civil Rights Movement: Mississippi, 1964-1965 (Same as Africana Studies 29)
During sixteen months in 1964-1965, I worked as a civil rights organizer in rural Mississippi with the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). I witnessed and aided in the heroic efforts by black citizens to dismantle the pervasive structure of Jim Crow that had oppressed them for generations. I met relatively uneducated people with the stature of giants. What I encountered was an apartheid America-a vicious police state reinforced by government and random violence-beyond the understanding of most Americans and certainly beyond the imagination of young people today. This course will explore this transformative moment in recent American history, largely through discussion. Topics will include nonviolence, the role of the black church, black nationalism, Malcolm X and Black Power, the role of women, the role of whites, the third party politics of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and the actions of the federal government during the civil rights era. The course will examine how these events and issues have played out over the ensuing decades, up to and including the election of Barack Obama. It is the intent of the instructor to convey the immediacy that only first person experience can invoke. Reading materials will include Coming of Age in Mississippi by Anne Moody, Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi by John Dittmer, Letters From Mississippi, edited by Elizabeth Martinez, and Freedom Summer: The Savage Season That Made Mississippi Burn and Made America a Democracy by Bruce Watson. Documentary films Eyes on the Prize and Freedom on My Mind as well as music from the time will be utilized. Other veterans of the civil rights movement will visit the class to tell their stories.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a final project in any media approved by the instructor.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30 (chosen randomly if the course is oversubscribed).
Cost to students: approximately $125.
Meeting time: afternoons, three hours three times a week.

CHRIS WILLIAMS (Instructor)
WATERS and L. BROWN (Co-sponsors)

Chris Williams is the College architect. He has recently returned from a tour of the Deep South, where the events in this course took place. He has offered Winter Study courses at Williams on previous occasions and has taught courses in architecture at the Pratt Institute and Parsons School of Design in New York City.

HIST 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by all senior honors students who are registered for HIST 493 (Fall) and HIST 494 (Spring), HIST 31 allows thesis writers to complete their research and prepare a draft chapter, due at the end of WSP.

WATERS

HISTORY OF SCIENCE

HSCI 15 Documentation Hopkins Observatory (Same as ArtS 15 and Astronomy 15)
(See under ARTS 15 for full description.)

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

INTR 25 Incarceration, Immigration and Policing: Texas as a Case Study
Prior to departure, students will be asked to read assigned materials. During their stay in Austin, they will interact with campus faculty and students in formal/informal discussion groups. They will also volunteer with local nonprofit organizations. Emphasis will be on on-line readings issued by the Texas state government or its nonprofits.
Requirements: volunteer with nonprofits; 10-page analysis/project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 4. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: approximately $1000 to be covered by the instructor.

JAMES

INTR 29 Peer Writing Tutor Workshop (Same as English 29)
(See under ENGL 29 for full description.)

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

INST 30 Senior Honors Project
To be taken by candidates for honors in International Studies.

LATINA/O STUDIES

LATS 11 Brazil (Same as Comparative Literature 11, RLSP 11 and Special 23)
(See under COMP 11 for full description.)

LATS 13 Beyond El Día de los Muertos: Latina/o Rituals of Mourning en el Teatro (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 13)
Moving away from Sigmund Freud's foundational essay "Mourning and Melancholia," students will critically question its so called universality. In doing so, students will unpack how Latina/o theatre and performance constitute an in-between cultural domain where rituals of passage and structures of feelings are contested and negotiated. Each act of mourning within the Latina/o cultural landscape is not only experienced both physically and emotionally, but also an articulation of an alternative politics of mourning. As such, this mourning is historically situated in given discursive formations and social practices. Migdalia Cruz's Miriam's Flowers highlights intimate injury and dysfunctional mourning. Cherríe Moraga's Heroes and Saints showcases the passage from grief to activist grievance. Eddie Sánchez's Unmerciful Good Fortune centerstages anticipated mourning through serial killing and euthanasia. Elaine Romero's Walking Home awakens the dead that haunts ancestral land. Evelina Fernandez's Dementia gives voice to the undead in a celebratory AIDS "going away for good party;" and Wilma Bonet's Good Grief, Lolita memorializes the premature death of her daughter. These ex-centric practices of mourning make visible the ambivalent and ambiguous condition of mourning as a process that troubles, disrupts, and subverts Freud's insistence on the resolute termination and unbelatedness of mourning.
Requirements: class discussion, presentations, and final 10-page paper.
Prerequisites: interest in Latina/o Studies and performance. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to Latina/o Studies concentrators and Women's and Gender Studies majors.
Cost to student: $30.
Meeting time: TWR, 2-4 p.m.

ALBERTO SANDOVAL-SÁNCHEZ (Instructor)
WHALEN (Sponsor)

Alberto Sandoval-Sánchez is Professor of Spanish and U.S. Latina/o literature at Mount Holyoke College since 1983. His extensive publications explore Latina/o Theater in the US, Cultural Studies, Women's and Queer Studies, and AIDS Discourse and Representation.

LATS 25 Miami: Gateway to the Caribbean (Same as Africana Studies 25, History 25, and Religion 26)
(See under AFR 25 for full description.)BENSON and HIDALGO

LATS 31 Latina/o Honors Thesis Seminar
Students must register for this course to complete an honors project begun in the fall or begin one to be finished in the spring.
Prerequisite: approval of program chair. Enrollment limited to senior honors candidates.

LEADERSHIP STUDIES

LEAD 10 Institutional Leadership and Social Responsibility
This course will examine a wide variety of issues related to leadership and responsibility, in both public- and private-sector settings. We will explore these issues through the experiences of men and women who have held leadership roles in these contexts. We will examine the changing role of lawyers in advising and guiding their clients. We will look at environmental issues from the perspective of both private institutions and government regulators. We will discuss issues facing leaders in higher education. We will look at questions of responsibility facing political leaders at the state level in our federal system. And we will examine some of the most difficult leadership issues involving national security in the post-9/11 environment, particularly the use of torture in interrogation of detainees. The majority of class sessions will be led by guest speakers, most, though not all, of whom are distinguished alumni of the college.
Students will be expected to take an active role in introducing and helping to lead discussions involving the guest speakers. Evaluation will be based on attendance and participation in class discussions, and a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to Leadership Studies concentrators.
Cost to student: approximately $30 for reading materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

EARL C. DUDLEY and FRED HITZ (Instructors)
MCALLISTER (Sponsor)

Earl C. Dudley and Fred Hitz teach at the University of Virginia Law School.

LEAD 12 The Roosevelt Century
How did three members of a wealthy New York "Knickerbocker" family rise above the narrow, elitist interests of their social class to become the great political and moral leaders of the twentieth century? In this course we will focus on the political careers and lives of Theodore Roosevelt, his niece Eleanor, and his fifth-cousin Franklin. Theodore and Franklin both graduated from Harvard to become lawyers, assistant secretaries of the Navy, governors of New York, and American presidents of unusual ability and accomplishments. Eleanor Roosevelt, a tireless advocate for the rights of working men and women of all races, led in the drafting of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The three Roosevelts were committed to an inclusive, egalitarian, and progressive democracy. Through readings, documentary films, guest lectures, and class discussions, we will explore the intertwining lives and ideas of the Roosevelts.
Requirements: there will be three class meetings a week; students will give several oral reports and write one 15-page research paper.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to students: books.
Meeting time: afternoons.

DUNN

LEAD 17 How Court Decisions Impact Public Policy (Same as Political Science 17)

(See under PSCI 17 for full description.)

LEAD 18 Wilderness Leadership
This Winter Study project is for students who would like to participate in an off-campus experiential education opportunity. Students will be required to research an appropriate accredited program i.e. National Outdoor Leadership School, Outward Bound etc., that will provide a suitable learning environment and be at least 22 days in length. The Director of the Williams Outing Club will assist students in their search if necessary. Upon choosing a program and being accepted, students will meet with the Director in a pre-program meeting in December to create a framework for observing group dynamics and studying a variety of leadership styles. A required 10-page paper based on their journals will be required immediately after their return to campus for the start of third quarter. There will also be a follow up class to debrief the experience in the first week of February. All programs must meet with the approval of the Outing Club Director. In addition to off-campus opportunities, there will be a Wilderness First Responder Emergency Care course that will take place on campus. Contact Scott Lewis for details.
Requirements: course approval by WOC Director, daily journal writing with focus on leadership and group dynamics, 10-page paper and 2 class meetings pre and post trip. Student assessment will be based on ten page paper and class discussions.
No prerequisites. Off-campus opportunities are not open to first-year students. Interested students must consult with WOC Director before registration. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student will vary depending on the program selected-range is generally from $1,500-3,000.

SCOTT LEWIS, Director of the Outing Club

LEGAL STUDIES

LGST 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Roots, Its Uncertain Future (Same as Environmental Studies 13)
Taught from the perspective of an experienced trial attorney, this course will examine the role environmental law plays in the United States today in light of how that role has developed during the nearly forty years since the modern era of environmental law began. As a preface, we will consider the significantly more limited influence of environmental law in our national affairs before 1970 and some of the historical and political reasons for that situation. We will examine the reasons why the law's early application in the first half of the 20th century almost exclusively to the conservation and preservation of natural resources took on in the second half a markedly different approach, one emphasizing pollution control and all but ignoring resource conservation.
This course will begin by tracing the development of an American consciousness towards the environment through an examination of our law and our literature. The term "law" includes state and federal judicial decisions and legislation, particularly during the presidency of Theodore Roosevelt and during the decades which followed the year 1970 when much of the legal basis for the American environmental protection movement was established. The term "literature" includes not just the written word (the first book we look at is "The Lorax" by your favorite childhood author, Dr. Seuss) but also painting, sculpture, and music. Nothing too heavy! We will examine the historical and legal choices we as Americans have made which have put our environment on trial. What has occurred in our development as a people that explains this quintessentially American phenomenon? Our journey begins with the Puritans of New England and the planters of Virginia and their predecessors in the New World and then moves swiftly to the beginning of the modern era in environmental law and to its now uncertain future.
In light of this historical situation students will examine state and federal legislative and judicial attempts to address environmental problems and then try to reach informed, rational conclusions as to whether those attempts were successful. What were the political, social and economic issues involved and, ultimately, how did their context affect the legal solutions imposed. Cases decided at the appellate level will be introduced and examined through their trial court memoranda opinions in order to observe how the legal system actually works and how frequently the reasoning behind the trial judge's decision changes as the case works its way through the appellate process.
This course will be presented from a litigator's point of view, that is to say, both the practical and the theoretical, emphasizing what is possible to achieve in the litigator's real world as informed by what the academician would present from the security of the classroom. Evaluation will be based on attendance and classroom participation. Students will prepare several short papers, including single page "clerk's notes," which will present one or more sides of an issue and form the basis for classroom discussion. They will be asked to defend or reject the conclusions reached or approaches taken by our courts and legislatures and by our literature, as broadly defined, on environmental issues.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. This course is appropriate for students eager to explore the material presented and prepared to argue assigned positions on important legal, literary and historical issues.
Cost to students: approximately $60 for books and materials.
Meeting time: mornings, 3 two-hour sessions a week.

PHILIP R. MCKNIGHT '65 (Instructor)
KAPLAN (Sponsor)

Philip R. McKnight '65 is a trial and appellate attorney. At Williams he completed the honors program for both American History and Literature and European History. He earned his law degree from The University of Chicago Law School and then practiced in the state and federal courts of New York and Connecticut, as well as in Europe.

LGST 14 The Work of the Supreme Court: A Simulation
The aim of this course is to provide a sense of the personal, theoretical, and institutional characteristics of judicial decision making at the highest level. At the beginning of the course, all students will be furnished with a set of the briefs for an actual pending Supreme Court case. Four students (two per side) will be assigned to make oral arguments to the "Court," which will be composed of eight students, each playing a role of a sitting justice, and the instructor, who will act as chief justice for purposes of coordination. After hearing arguments, the "Court" will confer and prepare majority and other opinions and announce them in "open courts" at the conclusion of the term.
Evaluation will be based on the overall credibility in assigned role; effective argument, questions, performance in conference, drafting, etc. and a 3- to 5-page "reflective" essay in which students will be expected to identify and comment on some aspect of the work of the Court.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: less than $30.
Meeting time: afternoons.

JOHN NELSON '70 and THOMAS SWEENEY '70 (Instructors)
L. KAPLAN (Sponsor)

Tom Sweeney, Williams Class of '70, is a partner in a New York law firm and practices in both state and federal courts.
John (Jay) Nelson, Williams Class of '70, has taught a number of Winter Study courses and practices law in Houston, Texas. He is a member of the Texas and District of Columbia bars and has taught at the University of Texas Law School.

MARITIME STUDIES

MAST 10 Ultimate Wellness: Concepts for Living a Happy Healthy Life (Same as Geosciences 10)
This course provides an opportunity to drastically improve your life by introducing concepts that can start making a difference in the way you feel today. We will be approaching post-modern nutrition concepts such as: Bio-individuality, crowding out, deconstructing cravings, and primary food through discussion, reading material, and videos. Students will develop a healthy eating and feasible living approach that includes: Menu planning, food label reading, navigating the grocery store, overcoming sugar addiction, self-care, physical activity, journaling, and achieving balance.
Evaluation will be based on completion of assignments, class participation, final paper, and final presentation that demonstrates a level of personal growth.
After signing up for this course please email Nicole at nicole@zentreewellness.com with a brief statement describing your interest in the course and what you hope to get out of it. In the event of over-subscription, these statements will be used in the selection process.
No prerequisites. There will be several books, videos, grocery store field trip and simple cooking required for this class. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to student: $75-100 for books and materials.
Meeting time: mornings, twice a week for three-hour sessions.

NICOLE ANAGNOS (Instructor)
KARABINOS (Sponsor)

Nicole Anagnos is a local Health Coach and the founder and director of Zen Tree Wellness. She also holds a masters degree in education.

MATHEMATICS and STATISTICS

MATH

MATH 11 A Taste of Austria (Same as German 11)
This course introduces students to and advances their proficiency in the German language through discussions and presentations of elements of the Austrian culture around the turn of the 19th century. Students will learn about significant contributions to the arts and science from Austrians such as Gustav Mahler, Gustav Klimt, Karl Landsteiner, and Stefan Zweig. Other activities include learning how to dance the Viennese waltz composed by Johann Strauss (in case you want to attend Austria's main annual society event, the Opernball in Vienna) and how to bake Sachertorte (the delicious cake offered by the Hotel Sacher in Vienna). We will also pursue typical Austrian winter activities such as down hill or cross country skiing, sledding or ice skating. The course will be conducted in German and English to also welcome beginning German speakers.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, small weekly group presentations (on some topic of Austrian significance) followed by class discussions, reading assignments and a ten page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. If overenrolled, selection will be random.
Cost to student: $90 (lift ticket plus equipment rental for skiing; $30 if no lift ticket is purchased).
Meeting time: mornings.

SOPHIA KLINGENBERG (Instructor)
GARRITY (Sponsor)

Sophia Klingenberg was born in Graz, Austria. She graduated from the Vienna University Medical School with a doctorate degree in Medicine in 2004. Sophia worked at the University of Florida, Department of Pathobiology as a research scholar for three years. She has experience in teaching senior medical students in a child birthing class, and second year veterinary medicine students in Microbiology laboratory courses. Sophia worked in the Opera House of Graz in Austria as an extra for 10 years.

MATH 12 Beginning Modern Dance
This course is an introduction to modern dance for those who have never taken a modern dance or ballet class, but who want to give it a try. (Those with more experience might consider MATH 13 Modern Dance-Muller Technique). The technique for the course is based on a combination of styles from the companies that Dick De Veaux worked with while he toured as a professional dancer. The course includes both flexibility and strength training as well as dance instruction. We will work on the basics of movement through space and the different efforts and shapes that are used to propel us. Students with previous dance experience should enroll in Modern Dance-Muller Technique.
Requirements for the course will include participation in the class, short essays on assigned videos and readings, and participation in an end of term lecture demonstration that we will present to the public.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25. If overenrolled, selection will be based on individual statements of interest.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings, 1 1/2-2 hours a session 4 times a week, MTRF. Overall, the class will meet 6-8 hours each week.

DEVEAUX

MATH 13 Modern Dance--Muller Technique
This dance class will be based on the modern dance technique developed by Jennifer Muller, with whom I danced professionally for 5 years in New York City and in Europe. Jennifer Muller was a soloist in the dance company of José Limon before she started her own company in 1974. She has added her own style of movement to the Limon technique, creating an expansive, free-flowing dance that is wonderful to do and to watch. The class will be multi-leveled and open to both men and women alike. Previous dance experience preferred. Students with no dance experience should enroll in Beginning Modern Dance.
Students will have the opportunity to choreograph a short piece either as a soloist or in small groups. We will finish the course with a short lecture-demonstration illustrating what we have learned.
Previous dance experience preferred. Enrollment limit: 24. If overenrolled, students will be referred to MATH 12 Beginning Modern Dance.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings. 10-noon, MTRF.

SYLVIA LOGAN (Instructor)
GARRITY (Sponsor)

Sylvia Logan received her B.A. in Slavic Literature from Stanford University. She danced professionally with the Jennifer Muller Dance Company, a modern company based in New York City for five years.

MATH 14 Introductory Photography: People and Places
This is an introductory course in photography, with an emphasis on color photography and using the digital camera. The main themes will be portraiture and the landscape. No previous knowledge is assumed, but students are expected to have access to a 35 mm (or equivalent) digital camera, with manual override or aperture priority.
The topics covered will include composition, exposure, camera use, direction and properties of light, and digital imaging. Students will develop their eye through the study of the work of well-known photographers and the critical analysis of their own work. We will discuss the work of contemporary photographers such as Mary Ellen Mark, Joel Meyerowitz, Constantine Manos, and Eugene Richards.
Students will be expected to spend a considerable amount of time practicing their own photography outside of class. There will be one required local half-day field trip. Students will also be introduced to the program Photoshop, and will work on their own pictures with this program. Evaluation will be based on class participation, an in-class quiz and a final project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. If overenrolled, selection will be based on individual statements of interest.
Cost to student: $50.
Meeting time: mornings.

C. SILVA

MATH 30 Senior Project
To be taken by candidates for honors in Mathematics other than by thesis route.


MATH 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Mathematics 493-494.

STAT

STAT 10 Displaying Multivariate Data
Ever wished you could go beyond the capabilities of your current software and actually create the graph or display you had in mind for a particular data set? We are going to introduce the free statistical software program R (google "R") and a very powerful add-on called Lattice to create beautiful (and correct!) graphs, starting with simple histograms and barcharts for one-dimensional and scatterplots and time series plots for two-dimensional data. We will finish with three-dimensional surface plots or plots that show the distribution of a variable over a map (the states) of the U.S. Examples of graphs can be found at http://lmdvr.r-forge.r-project.org/figures/figures.html. In the first two weekly meetings, we will use the textbook by the author of Lattice to introduce the many ways (multivariate) data can be displayed effectively and how this is coded in R. The third meeting each week is dedicated to student presentations, where students present their "graph of the week" (and the corresponding R coding steps) based on a data set of their interest.
Requirements: weekly presentation and paper. Evaluation based on final grade will depend on performance on the weekly project and paper and on class participation.
Prerequisites: no formal prerequisites, but no fear of computer programming. Enrollment limit: 30. If overenrolled, students will be selected at random (using R).
Cost to student: $70
Meeting time: mornings, TWR.

KLINGENBERG

MUSIC

MUS 10 Classical Chamber Orchestra
A classical chamber orchestra will be formed to read and perform symphonies of Haydn and Mozart. Performing music of this period demands a high level of technical ability. Proficiency in performance practice and understanding the idiomatic style of this period and with these composers is essential. The important issues of intonation, articulation, balance, bowing, dynamics, tempo, and interpretation will be the backbone of the training. Haydn was the first composer to define the classical symphonic style. The trio of symphonies, `Le Matin', `Le Midi', and `Le Soir' (`Morning', `Noon', and `Evening'), were symphonies composed in this new contemporary style. We will be performing `Le Midi' of this triptych. Mozart continued the development of the classical symphonic style. The orchestra grew in size on Mozart's watch fueled by his need for more dramatic contrast and a richer harmonic language. We will be performing Symphony no. 35, K385. I will choose two student conductors to conduct the orchestra, one from my Fall conducting class as well as one from the Student Symphony. They will be responsible for conducting the orchestra, acting as personnel managers and librarians. They will be coached on every aspect of producing a symphonic performance. There will be a final recorded and videotaped concert at the end of Winter Study.
BSO and SS members are welcome.
Evaluation based on attendance and preparation.
Enrollment limit: Strings; 12 violins, 5 violas, 4 cellos, 2 basses, Winds; 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 trumpets, timpani.
Meeting time: MWF, 7-9 p.m.

FELDMAN

MUS 11 Contemporary Music Performance Practice
Students enrolled in Contemporary Music Performance Practice will rehearse and prepare music written by living composers in preparation for several performances in January and February 2011. Students will participate in a variety of performance settings including large wind band (Symphonic Winds), large chamber ensemble (Opus Zero Band), Percussion Ensemble, and student-led small chamber ensemble (Iota). Students will be responsible for organizing the Iota concert, preparing their individual parts (including both instrumental practice and required listening/reading), attending all rehearsals and composer lectures to which they are assigned by the instructor, and leading occasional sectionals. A specific, detailed schedule will be constructed once the repertoire is determined; however, rehearsals/lectures will most likely be scheduled on Monday-Thursday afternoons and Sunday evenings. Students should be expected to be in rehearsal for on average 5-10 hours each week; for every hour of rehearsal time, students will be expected to have prepared for approximately 1-2 additional hours, as necessary.
Evaluation will be based on individual performance and preparation, and, as necessary, written assignments. Repertoire will be selected based on enrollment. Repertoire to be studied during Winter Study may include music of by student composers and Louis Andriessen, Cornelis de Bondt, Klas Torstensson, Michel van der Aa, Paula Matthusen, Chen Yi, Susan Botti, Tania Leon, Armando Bayolo, and Ileana Perez-Velazquez.
The class is open to students of all musical abilities, including wind, brass, and percussion players, as well as composers, vocalists, string players, and pianists. Instructor permission is necessary to enroll in this winter study course. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference is given to students who have performed in Symphonic Winds and Percussion Ensemble previously.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

BODNER

MUS 12 Classic American European Musical Theatre (Same as Theatre 12)
This Winter Study will give participants an opportunity to study and perform numbers for one or more singers in great American musicals and European light operas. You have sung a solo, you have sung in chorus-now practice the exacting art of singing an ensemble on stage. Selections from Man of La Mancha will be a special focus. The course will culminate with a performance of ensembles, solos, and duets from a variety of musical theater shows. Other ensembles from European models may also be included. Singers, actors, and pianists are all welcome to participate.
The course is intended especially for singers who wish to have some stage time, and for actors who wish to work on their singing.
A student may fulfill the requirements of the course by performing, writing a 10-page discursive paper, or some
combination of the two approved by the teacher.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. The instructor will communicate with those wishing to register either in person or via email.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons, MWF.

KEITH KIBLER (Instructor)
BLOXAM (Sponsor)

Keith Kibler has performed under some of the finest directors currently working including David Alden, Peter Sellars, Galina Vishnevskaya. He sang a major role in Kurt Weill's "Die Kleine Mahagonny" under Alvin Epstein with the American Repertory Theatre. He has been a featured soloist with the Boston Pops in American theater music. Keith Kibler is an adjunct teacher of singing at Williams College. He can be reached at kibler@verizon.net

MUS 13 Voice Workshop
Singers of all levels of experience will increase their skills in vocal technique, interpretation and performance. In a combination of private voice lessons, coaching with an accompanist, and a performance/discussion workshop session, students will immerse themselves in repertoire towards the goal of performing comfortably in a concert at the end of Winter Study. Preference will be given to students currently studying voice or with some vocal or musical background. Pianists interested in accompanying singers are also welcome.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, effort, performance.
Enrollment limit: 10. Students are encouraged to email the instructor if they are particularly eager to take the course.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: M, W; lessons, coaching, separate workshop time.

KERRY RYER-PARKE (Instructor)
BLOXAM (Sponsor)

Kerry Ryer-Parke is known as an skilled and intuitive performer of many musical styles. She is a frequent soprano soloist, the Director of the Bennington Children's Chorus, and maintains a private teaching studio as well as serving as an Adjunct Instructor of Voice at Williams

MUS 14 Masterworks of American Music
This course introduces students to masterworks of American music from colonial times to the present. Composers to be studied include William Billings, Stephen Foster, Amy Beach, Charles Ives, George Gershwin, Aaron Copland, Ruth Crawford Seeger, Leonard Bernstein, John Cage, Philip Glass, John Adams, and Stephen Sondheim. Through lectures, discussion, and guided listening, students will explore a range of issues concerning music's ties to American national identity, as well as significant political, societal, technological, and artistic developments of the past 300 years.
Evaluation based on class participation and two exams.
No prerequisites. An ability to read music is not required. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to freshmen and students with a demonstrated interest in music.
Meeting time: TWF, 10-noon.

M. HIRSCH

MUS 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as American Studies 15 and Special 15)
(See under SPEC 15 for full description.)

MUS 16 Cuban Popular Music and Culture
This class will cover genres of Cuban folk and popular music and the impact that Cuban history has had on Cuban music, art, and culture in general. Topics to be discussed will include; the African influence on Cuban music between the 15th and 16th centuries, the contemporary coexistence of old African musical practices with new musical manifestations now purely Cuban that has resulted, and Spanish influence on the PuntoCubano or PuntoGuajiro that flourished at the end of the 18th century as a family-neighborhood activity. We will discuss the connection between folk music and the utilization of European techniques that gave as a result the danzon, the mambo, and the cha chacha, as well as multiple genres of the Cuban cancion (song). We will also discuss the strong bonds between Cuban music and North American music during the 20th and 21th century including afrocuban jazz and Cuban hip hop. Other topics of discussion will
include how the combination of folk music/professional music imparts a dynamic to contemporary Cuban classical music. We will talk about Cuban culture and how music is very much part of their daily life.
Evaluation based on a class presentation during the last week of classes and a ten pages long paper on the same subject of your class presentation.
No prerequisites; no need to be able to read and write music to take this class.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time:?

PEREZ VELAZQUEZ

MUS 17 Vocal Jazz Ensemble/Jazz Choir
This class will give vocalists an opportunity to rehearse and perform in a jazz choir format accompanied by a rhythm section. The rhythm section will consist of piano, bass, drums and guitar. The rhythm section players will have the valuable experience of accompanying vocalists. The class will explore the standard repertoire of jazz, including arrangements by Lambert, Hendricks & Ross, New York Voices, Take 6, Manhattan Transfer, and others. Some of the possible arrangements are Duke Ellington's Caravan and In a Mellow Tone, songs from the Count Basie band, Miles Davis' Boplicity and Freddie Freeloader, a Paul Simon composition arranged by New York Voices, music by Claire Fisher and others. Vocalists will have the opportunity to explore the vocal traditions of scat singing, vocalese, and improvisation. The focus will be on ensemble singing with four- and five-part harmony. Each vocalist will have the opportunity to explore soloing with a rhythm section. CD and DVD performances of various vocal groups will be shown and discussed.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, preparation for rehearsal, and performance
Prerequisites: students will be required to have basic reading skills. Enrollment limit: 15. If overenrolled, selection will be based on overall musicianship.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

TERI ROIGER (Instructor)
BLOXAM (Sponsor)

Teri Roiger is a professional musician (vocalist, pianist) and composer. She has over 16 years experience teaching Jazz Studies and over 13 years teaching vocal ensembles. She has recorded two CDs and performs regularly in New York and worldwide.

MUS 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Music 493, 494.

NEUROSCIENCE

NSCI 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Neuroscience 493-494.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 10 Foucault' Late Course Lectures
We will devote the seminar to reading the several of Foucault's late course lectures at the College de France: The Birth of Biopolitics, The Hermeneutics of the Subject, Government of Self and Others.
Prerequisites: some experience reading Foucault. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference will be given to Philosophy and Women's and Gender Studies majors.
Cost to student: $50.
Meeting time: 1-4, MR.

SAWICKI

PHIL 12 Bioethics According to The Simpsons
Active Euthanasia? Okely Dokely! Human cloning? Don't have a cow, man! Over the past twenty years The Simpsons has included a healthy dose of stinging and sometimes surprisingly illuminating critique of numerous bioethical issues. In this winter study course we will use clips and episodes from the classic animated series as a launch pad for investigating the deeper philosophical concepts and ethical questions involved in a variety of bioethical topics. Good comedy has a way of driving straight to the core of contested issues and painful circumstances, providing a point of entry for students in the class to more serious, academic material. Along the way, the course will also investigate what makes The Simpsons's treatment of these bioethical issues *funny*--how its satire plays on common misunderstandings, contradictions and inconsistencies in social policy and individual decisions, and how serious issues drive the comedic effect. During the first portion of the course, the instructor will present selections from The Simpsons that take up several core bioethical issues, paired with related readings from the bioethics literature and possibly from the philosophical literature on "funniness." In the second portion of the course, the students themselves will identify and present clips pertaining to bioethical issues and will be responsible for leading the discussions about them. The final project for the course will be collaborative in nature: small groups of students will be asked to develop and pitch (to the other class members) a storyline for a Simpsons episode (or portion thereof) that centers on a bioethical topic. Classes will meet two or three afternoons each week, and students will be expected to read a substantial amount of philosophical material in preparation for these meetings. In addition, students will need to spend significant amounts of time outside of class viewing videos and developing their final projects.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, one in-class presentation, and the final collaborative project. There are no prerequisites for the course. Enrollment limit: 12 Preference in enrollment will be given to students who indicate intellectual "seriousness" about philosophical bioethics.
Cost to students: $20-$30 for reading packet; students may also wish to obtain their own copies of relevant video material, although one copy of all episodes should be available on library reserve or freely available on the internet.
Meeting time: TBA.

J. PEDRONI

PHIL 13 Philosophy and Race
In the 19th century, both science and common wisdom held that the world's population was divided into several "great races". These racial groups were held to be natural groups whose existence did not depend on human classificatory practices. Contemporary science has challenged the idea that racial groups are natural kinds. But socially, we still recognize racial differences.
In this course, we will engage in a philosophical examination of race and questions raised by racial phenomena (such as "passing"). What is it to have a race? Are races real? Are races socially constructed? If race is not "real", what are the social implications?
Possible readings for this course include works by: W.E.B. DuBois, Adrian Piper, Charles Mills, Lucius Outlaw, Anthony Appiah, Naomi Zack, and Sally Haslanger.
Cost: approximately $50 to $80 for books.

CATHERINE MCKEEN (Instructor)
GERRARD (Sponsor)

Catherine McKeen is a visiting scholar at Williams College. McKeen holds a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Rutgers University and has taught at Clark University, Williams College, and SUNY College at Brockport.

PHIL 23 Gaudino Winter Study Fellows Program
The Gaudino Winter Study Fellow designation is available to up to ten students who create their own independent projects that involve critical, reflective, and experiential learning during Winter Study. Each student works independently under the direction of a faculty sponsor, who will help shape and monitor the project. The project must receive approval from the Winter Study Committee, as well as from the Gaudino Scholar and Gaudino Board of Trustees. The Gaudino Board is looking for projects that address specific intellectual problems through direct experience, undertaken preferably in a social milieu that is previously unfamiliar or even uncomfortable to the applicant. Projects must be academically rigorous and worked out carefully with faculty sponsors. Projects should also entail systematic self-reflection on how the experiences affect students personally, and students may be asked to discuss their project with the Gaudino Board after it is completed. The Gaudino Scholar will meet with students as a group before and after Winter Study. All students whose projects are approved will receive the Gaudino Fellow designation. In addition, students on Financial Aid will receive Gaudino funding from a minimum of 50% to a maximum of 90% of the budget for the project up to $2,500, as determined by the Financial Aid office. No additional funding for students' projects will be provided by the College. Students selecting this course will register for PHIL 23. More information about the Gaudino Fellows Winter Study Program and guidelines for applying can be found at: http://web.williams.edu/resources/gaudino/overview.php.

DUDLEY

PHIL 26 Resettling Refugees in Maine (Same as Special 26)
(See under SPEC 26 for full description.)

PHIL 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Philosophy 493-494.

PHYSICS

PHYS 10 Light and Holography
This course will examine the art and science of holography. It will introduce modern optics at a level appropriate for a non-science major, giving the necessary theoretical background in lectures and discussion. Demonstrations will be presented and students will make several kinds of holograms in the lab. Thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation, we have 7 well-equipped holography darkrooms available for student use. At the beginning of WSP, the class will meet for lecture and discussion three mornings a week and for lab 2 afternoons a week. Later classes will be mainly laboratory.
Students will be evaluated on the basis of regular attendance, completion of 4 laboratory exercises, and a holography laboratory project or a 10-page paper. Attendance at all classes and labs is required for a passing grade.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference will be given to students with no previous college course in physics more advanced than Physics 109.
Cost to student: about $50 for holographic film, chemicals, and photocopies.
Meeting time: lectures for all students will be in the morning. Labs (2 sections) will be in the afternoon.

WOOTTERS

PHYS 12 Meet the Right Side of Your Brain: Drawing as a Learnable Skill
Representational drawing is not merely a gift of birth or a magical ability, but a learnable skill. If you ever wanted to draw, but doubted you had the ability or believed you could not learn, then this course is for you. This intensive course utilizes discoveries in brain research along with traditional drawing exercises to teach representational drawing. By using simple techniques and extensive exercises you will discover and develop the perceptual shift from your symbol based left hemisphere to your visually based right hemisphere. This cognitive shift enables you to accurately see and realistically represent the physical world. You will learn to draw a convincing portrait, self-portrait, and still life. This course is designed to develop your powers of observation and enhance your innate creative problem solving abilities, which are applicable in any field. Students need no previous artistic experience, just the willingness and desire to learn a new skill. Students will be expected to attend and participate in all sessions. They will also be required to keep a sketchbook recording their progress and complete a final project. Evaluations will be based on participation, effort, and development.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 18. If overenrolled, selection will be based on seniority.
Cost to student: textbook and $5 for materials.
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons; the class will meet two times per week with substantial additional independent student work. There will be an exhibition of coursework on the final day of Winter Study.

STELLA EHRICH (Instructor)
JONES (Sponsor)

Stella Ehrich lived in Italy for sixteen years, where she spent seven years studying figurative realism in the atelier of Nerina Simi in Florence. She holds an MFA in painting from Bennington College. Stella is a professional painter whose work includes portraits, landscapes and still life subjects.

PHYS 13 Media Immersion: Creativity Through Multimedia Animation and Video Production
This course is designed to introduce concepts and workflows associated with multiple formats of video production, ranging from still image and 2D animation to live footage mixed with 3D modeling. Class time will consist of lecture mixed with hands-on instruction/participation in concepts of project management, scriptwriting, storyboarding, copyright and fair use considerations, content research and creation, multimedia editing and digital publishing. We will frontload the course with critical analysis and deconstruction of examples of the various media formats we will be producing and allow students to explore the technical workflow, equipment and software required to produce each format. Midway, we will form groups to undertake production of a five-minute piece in the format of their choosing. Weekly assignments will be completed during (and outside of, as needed) three 2-hour lab sessions each week. Software introduced includes: iMovie, Final Cut Pro, Motion, Flash, Soundtrack, Photoshop.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. If overenrolled, selection will be done by lottery.
Cost to student: $25 for blank media.
Meeting time: 3, two-hour sessions each week (lecture and workshop) with an additional required lab/production time (minimum of 6 hours/week, additional during final project weeks).

TAMRA HJERMSTAD and TREVOR MURPHY (Instructors)
K. JONES (Sponsor)

Trevor Murphy has been an Instructional Technology Specialist at Williams College for 9 years. He has taught two winter study courses in the past that
focused on video and animation.

Tamra Hjermstad has been an Instructional Technologist and media production consultant for more than 14 years at both Williams and Mount Holyoke colleges. She has created and delivered course integrated workshops and multi-part learning modules on digital media production.

PHYS 14 Electronics
Electronic instruments are an indispensable part of modern laboratory work throughout the sciences. This course will cover the basics of analog electronic circuits, including transistors and operational amplifiers, and will briefly introduce digital circuits. Students will build and test a variety of circuits chosen to illustrate the kinds of electronic devices and design problems a scientist is apt to encounter.
Evaluation will be based on participation, completion of both laboratory work and occasional homework,. and the quality of the final project or paper.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 or equivalent calculus. No prior experience with electronics is required. Enrollment limit: 16. If overenrolled, selection will be based on seniority.
Cost to student: $50 for course packet and electronic parts.
Meeting time: afternoons, for a mixture of lab, lecture, and discussion, providing ample opportunity for hands-on experience. In the last week, students will design and build a final project, or will write a 10-page paper.

STRAIT

PHYS 22 Research Participation
Several members of the department will have student projects available dealing with their own research or that of current senior thesis students. Approximately 35 hours per week of study and actual research participation will be expected from each student.
Students will be required to keep a notebook and write a five-page paper summarizing their work. Those interested should consult with members of the department as early as possible in the registration period or before to determine details of projects then expected to be available.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 1 or 2 per project.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: to be arranged with instructor.

K. JONES and members of the department

PHYS 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Physics 493, 494.

POLITICAL ECONOMY

POEC 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as Political Science 21)
This course is a participant-observation experience in which students work full-time for a governmental agency, nongovernmental (including voluntary, activist, and grassroots) organization, or for a political campaign. Students may find placements in government and nonprofit organizations in which their work involves significant involvement with public issues. Examples include: town government offices; state or federal administrative offices (e.g., environmental agencies, housing authorities); interest groups that lobby government (e.g., ACLU, NRA); nonprofit organizations such as service providers or think tanks (e.g., Habitat for Humanity; Cato Institute); and grassroots, activist or community development organizations (e.g., Greenpeace or neighborhood association). In 2009, students are especially encouraged to train and become certified IRS Volunteer Income Tax Preparers through a special section of the course. The instructors will work with each student to arrange a placement; such arrangements must be made in advance of the Winter Term. Students should first make their own contacts with an institution or agency. The instructors and members of the Political Science department are available to help students find placements, if necessary. Each student's fieldwork mentor shall send a confirmation letter to the instructors verifying the placement and describing the nature of the work to be performed by the student. Students will read a few short articles distributed at the beginning of Winter Term and must agree to keep a journal, maintain weekly contact with the instructors, and write a final paper summarizing and reflecting upon the experience. A group meeting of all students will occur after winter study to discuss the experiences.
Requirements: 90 hours of fieldwork; satisfactory evaluation from the institutional sponsor; 10-page final paper or equivalent; participation in final meeting.
At the time of registration, interested students should send a resume and letter of interest to Paula Consolini.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost to student: approximately $15 for readings, student covers transportation costs to and from internship site.

PAULA CONSOLINI (Instructor)
PAUL (Sponsor)

Paula Consolini, Ph.D, (UC Berkeley, 1992) is the Coordinator of Experiential Education at Williams and supervisor of the North Berkshire Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program.

POEC 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (Same as Economics 22)
(See under ECON 22 for full description.)

POEC 23 Institutional Investment
This course is an internship with the Williams College Investment Office in Boston. It is part of a structured program designed to give students an overview of endowment and investment management. Students will gain a better understanding of investments as well as sharpen professional skills that could be applied in the investment or financial sector, either in the for-profit or non-profit realm. Topics include portfolio construction, endowment investment management, and relations with College administration. The instructors are employees in the Williams College Investment Office in Boston.
The work will be based in Boston and will run for four weeks (January 3 - January 27). Students are expected to work at the office for a minimum of 32 hours a week (four days), complete a set of relevant readings, keep a journal, and write an analytic essay.
No prerequisites are required. Relevant knowledge is an advantage to selection.
To apply for enrollment, please send an email with your resume and a cover letter discussing why you are interested in this course and what you hope to gain from it to: investmentoffice@williams.edu by 11:59PM ET on Wednesday, October 13, 2010. The enrollment limit for this course is 2. If oversubscribed, students will be selected via interviews and notified of selection decisions in time to select another course as their first choice if not selected for this course.
Students are responsible for the cost of housing, food, and incidentals. The Investment Office will provide help in locating low- cost / no-cost housing in the Boston area if needed.

COLLETTE CHILTON, Chief Investment Office (Co-instructor)
ABIGAIL WATTLEY, Associate (Co-instructor)
THOMAS MUCHA, Investment Analyst (Co-instructor)

POEC 25 Coping with Global Crisis: South Africa's Policy Responses and Their Impacts (Same as Economics 25 and Political Science 24)
(See under ECON 25 for full description.) SAMSON and KENNETH MAC QUENE

POEC 31 Honors Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Political Economy 493.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

PSCI 10 Political Campaign Ads as Political Rhetoric
The focus of this winter study course is on campaign television ads. Some ads have, it is often claimed, determined the outcome of elections. Lyndon Johnson's famous 1964 campaign ad showing a young girl plucking flower petals while a narrator counts down to a nuclear explosion, shown only once, or the George H. W. Bush's campaign ad of Willie Horton in 1988, are two such examples. The course will examine campaign ads, and current research on when, how, and why, they work (or don't). One of the charges often leveled against democracy is that people are too easily seduced by clever and devious leaders, by the power of rhetoric and especially emotional images to mislead. But, what does it mean to delude or mislead? What can an effective campaign ad accomplish? Do campaign ads delude or do they educate, or both? Each student will write a paper analyzing a selected series of campaign ad of their choosing. Joining us for some of our meetings will be Prof. Ted Brader (Michigan), author of Campaigning for Hearts and Minds: How Emotions make Political Ads Work.
Evaluation will be based on a paper, class attendance and participation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Selection Criteria: Political Science Majors and then thereafter first come first served.
Costs to students: texts for course (under $100).
Meeting times: four times a week, 10 AM to 11:30 AM, Monday to Thursday.

MARCUS

PSCI 11 Hate Crime: Racial Hierarchy
This course probes the nature and functions of hate speech and hate crime in the U.S. by examining the laws, enforcement practices and social policies in response thereto. We explore the interrelationships among the occurrences of hate crime and speech incidents to determine which are so harmful as to require proscription and which are protected communication. We consider which kinds of hateful expressions contribute to the maintenance of racial hierarchy, which religious, ethnic, racial, sexual orientation groups have been victimized because of their identities and what remedies are available for their protection. The course explores basic concepts of criminal and constitutional law to determine what kinds of such communication and conduct is deserving of criminal punishment and with what kind of sanctions. We analyze excerpts from state and federal statutes, judicial opinions, journal articles and scholarly studies of the subject to assess the social policy implications of the enforcement of hate crime laws. Class will meet 6 hours per week and as much time as necessary to address individual and group student questions about the required writing. It is estimated that up to 2 hours per class hour will be required for preparation for in-class discussion. Outside-of-class work will include viewing recorded hate crime conference film, commercial films and assigned readings in scholarly books, articles and excerpts from the unpublished manuscript, "Patterns of Hatred" written by the instructor.
Each student will be required to write a 3- to 5-page paper on a suggested topic, make an in-class presentation on the topic and submit a final paper of 10 to 15 pages for completion of the course.
Prerequisites: a basic social science course (e.g., sociology, psychology, political science). Enrollment limit: 30. If overenrolled, selection will be at the discretion of the instructor.
Cost to student: $25 for Reader.
Meeting time: TBA.

CHARLES JONES (Instructor)
MAHON (Sponsor)

Charles Jones taught courses in Criminal Law, Constitutional Law, Race Law Theory and seminars on Hate Crimes and the First Amendment at Rutgers Law School, a course on Racially Motivated Violence and the Law at Harvard Law School and was a litigator of civil rights cases with the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund.

PSCI 12 Civil Rights Law
This course will examine contemporary civil rights law including application of constitutional and statutory law to modern civil liberties issues. The course will examine the role of the judiciary in adjudicating civil rights disputes. The course will address discrimination, employment, privacy, sexual harassment, ethnic profiling and police conduct issues. The course will emphasize analysis of cases, statutes and related legal materials. Most of the class time will be devoted to discussion of the cases and statutes. A model civil rights case will be analyzed to demonstrate application of the law to a civil rights dispute.
The class will begin with an introduction to legal research principles including traditional and electronic legal research. Students will analyze appellate court decisions and related materials, primarily U.S. Supreme Court decisions and select federal statutes including the Americans With Disabilities Act and the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
Reading assignments will mostly involve analysis of appellate cases and statutes.
Requirements: a research paper addressing a civil rights topic to be decided by student and instructor. Evaluation will be based on the analysis of a student paper and class participation. There are no prerequisites, although an interest in civil rights issues is recommended.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. If overenrolled, selection will be based on seniority.
Cost to student: $90 for books.
Meeting time: three mornings per week.

J. MICHAEL MCGUINNESS (Instructor)
MAHON (Sponsor)

J. Michael McGuinness has litigated civil rights cases for over twenty years including before the United States Supreme Court. He has taught civil rights law at the college and law school levels. jmichael@mcguinnesslaw.com Mr. McGuinness has offered this course in three prior winter terms.

PSCI 13 Economic and Political Thought of Keynes
The recent financial crisis and the general recession have revived interest in the thought of John Maynard Keynes. He influences debates about economic stimulus programs, financial regulation, and the operation of financial markets. Ironically, Keynes is invoked more frequently than he is read. To correct that, this course will read what Keynes actually wrote in two of his main works -- The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money and Essays in Persuasion. The course will address both his economic thought and the politics that is associated with it.
Requirements: 10-page paper.
No prerequisites: Enrollment limit: 15. If overenrolled, selection will be at the discretion of the instructor.
Cost to student: $50.
Meeting time: mornings.

M. MACDONALD

PSCI 14 The West Wing
Critically acclaimed and wildly popular, Aaron Sorkin's Emmy-winning presidential drama The West Wing (1999-2006) was more than merely imagery and rhetoric. Indeed, perhaps unique among television programs, it was also a creative mode of political science education and a remarkably successful attempt by Hollywood to make sense of Washington. Proceeding from that foundation, this course focuses on The West Wing as a unique tool for teaching and learning about the principles, structures, and dynamics of the American political system. Among the subjects we might consider are the scope and limits of presidential authority (including the veto and the "bully pulpit"), the relationship between the president and Congress over lawmaking, the politics of Supreme Court nominations, the role of public opinion polling and political consulting, the challenges and strategy of presidential campaigns, the internal organization of the White House, America's role in the world, and public policy issues ranging from taxes to abortion. For each, we will cull out the didactic potential of the show by pairing episodes with associated political science scholarship. Along the way, we will also read interviews with cast and crew as well as assorted assessments of the show more broadly, seeking to uncover the ways in which The West Wing not only explained politics but also shaped public conceptions of and discourse about it.
Requirements: class participation and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. If overenrolled, preference to Political Science majors.
Cost to student: $30 for readings.
Meeting time: mornings.

CROWE

PSCI 15 Grave Breaches
Customary and contemporary international law limit what states-people acting on behalf of states-may do to people during war or peace. We will read the core documents outlining these limits, prominently the Nuremberg statutes, Geneva, Genocide and Torture Conventions, and International Criminal Court statute, and try to make something of them.
Requirements: two six-page papers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. If overenrolled, preference to 1st and 2nd year students.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

SHANKS

PSCI 16 Political Aikido-Persuasion, Inspiration, and Strategic Dominance
The most effective strategy for victory is that which leaves the least opposition in its wake while using the minimum of resources. This is true for political conflict as well as armed combat. While the Powell Doctrine may correctly call for the use of overwhelming force in war as a way to minimize opposition and prevent lingering struggle, the political equivalent is rarely available in a multi-party democracy. Long-term success in politics--both international and domestic--is much more likely with persuasion than coercion. and when the rhetoric and tactics used emphasize shared values rather than divisive stances.
Aikido is a Japanese martial tradition that combines the samurai arts of sword and grappling with the philosophical desire to manifest harmony in the face of conflict. As such, it addresses situations of conflict that manifest themselves physically, but also offers insight into how to prevent or redirect the energies--social, political, or psychological--that might otherwise become conflict in one or another aspect of our lives. As a martial art, Aikido teaches more than simply how to survive; it also teaches us how to physically express our noblest intentions--our compassion--in movements that protect not only ourselves but the attacker as well. Put another way, Aikido is ethical persuasion made physical.
This course will have both physical and academic components. The physical training (two hours daily on mats in Currier Ballroom) will improve each student's strength, balance, posture, and flexibility. Everyone will also learn how to throw their friends across the room. About 25% of training time will be devoted to sword, staff, and dagger techniques. Some of the mat time each week will be shared with students of the other WS Aikido course taught by Thomas O'Connor Sensei, and some will be on our own.
The academic component of the course will engage with how the physical training resonates with the tactical practices of Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King, and will review the martial arts-influenced literature on Politics (Sun Tsu's Art of War, Miyamoto Musashi's Book of Five Rings) as well as Gene Sharp's The Politics of Nonviolent Action. Discussion sessions over lunch will provide students the chance to articulate what their bodies are learning in a way that does not interfere with the primacy of the uncognitized physicality of the training sessions themselves. Particular emphasis will be placed on Aikido's contribution to the virtues of calmness, centeredness, and creativity which allow a practitioner, or a politician, to catalyze significant change with what seems like minimal effort.
Additional relevant experiences, such as meditation practice, misogi, Samurai films, and a chance for the bold to try live-steel tameshigiri will be an integral part of the course.
Students will be evaluated on the quality of their participation in both physical and intellectual course components, and a final project equivalent in scope to a 10-page paper. Students interested in the course should visit http://www.aikidokids.com/williamsaikido.htm before registration begins.
Prerequisites: same physician's approval on file as the school requires to participate on sports teams. Students do not have to be especially athletic, and in Aikido women train as equals with men. Enrollment limit: 25.
Cost to student: approximately $100 for uniform and wooden training weapons. $35 for books.
Meeting time: Aikido sessions 2 hrs/day (10-12), Monday-Friday. Discussion groups will meet at least two hours each week with the instructor, typically over lunch.

ROBERT KENT '84 (Instructor)
MAHON (Sponsor)

Robert Kent '84 spent 3 years in Kyoto, Japan earning his Sho Dan (first degree black belt), directly after majoring in both Philosophy and Religion at Williams. He currently holds a Yon Dan rank (Fourth degree black belt), having studied since 1991 at Aikido West in Redwood City under Frank Doran Shihan, where he helped run the youth program for 18 years. He is currently President of Aiki Extensions, Inc, a nonprofit that supports programs that bring the strategic insights and practical wisdom of Aikido into non-traditional settings. He is founding coordinator for The PeaceCamp Initiative (a scholarship program that seeks to use Aikido principles to heal the Israeli/Palestinian conflict a few kids at a time, for which he won Ben & Jerry's 2008 Peace Pioneer Prize). He earned a Masters degree in Philosophy at Claremont Graduate School in 1993, writing his thesis on the Ethics of Authenticity. This will be the fifth time he has offered an Aikido-based Winter Study course.

PSCI 17 How Court Decisions Impact Public Policy (Same as Leadership Studies 17)

This course will examine how courts in the United States formulate important social policies. The course will explore several contemporary examples of social policies formulated by courts, such as affirmative action, use of electronic surveillance, women's right of choice and reproductive decisions, marriage equality, death penalty and health care legislation to which constitutional challenges are pending. These decisions result from litigation which is commenced in the courts and the course will discuss how litigation shapes the courts' decisions. The course will meet in Williamstown for two 3-hour classes in the first and third weeks of Winter Study, and in Boston for 4 days in the second week. The students will be assigned to the Office of the Attorney General during the days in Boston and there will be opportunities to watch court proceedings and meet with judges. Students will be responsible for arranging for housing, meals and travel expenses during the four days in Boston.
Evaluation will be based on a 5-page paper and oral argument.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. If overenrolled, selection will be based on seniority.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

MARTHA COAKLEY '75 and MICHAEL KEATING '62 (Instructors)
MAHON (Sponsor)

Martha Coakley '75 is the Attorney General of Massachusetts; Michael Keating '62 is a Senior Partner in a Boston law firm.

 

PSCI 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as Political Economy 21)
(See under POEC 21 for full description.)

PSCI 24 Coping with Global Crisis: South Africa's Policy Responses and Their Impacts (Same as Economics 25 and Political Economy 25)
(See under ECON 25 for full description.) SAMSON and KENNETH MAC QUENE

PSCI 25 Eye Care and Culture on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua
Continuing the model of recent eye care winter studies in Nicaragua, the trip will follow a similar protocol. In cooperation with Ray Hooker, President of FADCANIC (The Foundation for the Autonomy and Development of the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua) who has assisted us in all of our previous courses as well as professors of the New England College of Optometry who have previously trained our students in the prescription of reading and distance glasses and have accompanied our trips. We are proposing a follow up course continuing our work of prescribing glasses and also the training of local medical personnel to prescribe and distribute glasses as a sustaining project. At the conclusion of our 2010 trip, we left a small amount of glasses and other materials and supplies in Pearl Lagoon and Bluefields for future work.
After a partial week of classes on campus on the culture and politics of Nicaragua and a weekend of training in the prescribing of glasses we would travel to Managua for a day of cultural visits (national museum, Masaya Volcano, Huembes market). Following our cultural visits we would travel by bus to the city of Rama, where we visited last year and were overwhelmed by the needs of this important river head community. We will conduct clinics for two days and then take the "Bluefield Express" (a large river boat) to Bluefields. We will conduct clinics in Bluefields for 2.5 days and then travel by ponga (fiberglass boat) to Pearl Lagoon, Haulover, Kukra Hill and possibly Wawashan where there is an experimental project and school educating local teenagers in basic high school subjects as well as how to tend and manage Coco farms, an important cash crop for the region. We will visit some off shore islands for a day of recreational and cultural activities before return to Managua and back to the U.S. The course will conclude at Williams with the turning in of our journals as well as discussions and evaluations of our insights about the developing world and our personal reactions to the experience.
Enrollment limit: 12. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: $2500.
If you are interested in this course, please plan to attend a REQUIRED informational meeting on Wednesday, September 29 at 7 pm in Hopkins B1964.

ROBERT PECK (Instructor)
MAHON (Sponsor)

Dr. Robert Peck, retired Director of Athletics at Williams (1971-2000), is a 24-year visitor and observer of Nicaraguan politics and culture.

PSCI 26 US-Mexico Border Issues
This course takes a close look at life and issues along the US -Mexico border, specifically the border with Arizona. The first week (on campus) will be devoted to investigating the political-economy of global immigration, cultural flows and identities, social transformations and domestic political coalitions, security concerns in the wake of 9/11, and US immigration policy and practice, all with specific reference to US-Mexican immigration. The objective is to provide students with background and references in preparation of their experiential learning in Arizona and Mexico.
The two-week travel portion of the course will be organized through the Borderlinks program, a non-profit that specializes in academic programs on the Arizona/Mexico borderlands (www.borderlinks/org/). Students will extend their understanding of the immigration issues on-site with the Borderlinks delegation and then profit from a service-learning component where they volunteer in Arizona and/or Mexico with non-profit groups involved in border issues. Upon their return to campus, students will meet with the instructors to evaluate their experience in light of the reading they did before departing.
Each
student will complete a 10-page paper on some facet of US-Mexico immigration and the borderlands.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: approximately $2345.

JANE CANOVA and SAM CRANE (Instructors)

PSCI 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Political Science 493-494.

PSCI 32 Individual Project
To be taken by students registered for Political Science 495 or 496.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 10 Introduction to Complex Skill Acquisition
Come learn how to juggle. Beginners welcome. Learning to juggle is fun, but it is also a highly complex procedural learning task. We will talk about factors that affect skill learning and design experiments, which we will conduct on ourselves, to learn more about what makes skill acquisition effective. There might also be unicycle access.
Students will be evaluated based on a) attendance, b) skill development, and c) a paper on the research we conduct. The paper will require an introduction that provides background and motivation for the question we're asking, a method section, and a results/discussion section describing our findings.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16. Preference will be given to non-jugglers.
Cost to student: approximately $15 for bean bags.
Meeting Time: 9:00-10:30 am, Monday-Thursday.

KORNELL

PSYC 11 Rat Olympics
CANCELLED!

N. SANDSTROM

PSYC 12 Alternative Birth Choices (Same as Women's and Gender Studies 12)
This course will consider the range of women's experiences surrounding pregnancy and childbirth. Among the topics we will cover are: alternative birthing choices (midwifery, homebirth, water-birth), the medicalization of childbirth, and attitudes regarding breastfeeding. We will view documentaries about pregnancy and childbirth, including films of labor and delivery; hear from a number of local professionals, such as a midwife, a doula, a childbirth educator, and a lactation consultant; and take a tour of a birthing center.
Requirements: class presentation and participation in class discussions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. If overenrolled, selection will be based on seniority.
Cost to student: $30 for photocopying expenses.
Meeting time: mornings.

KRISTEN SAVITSKY(Instructor)
ZIMMERBERG (Sponsor)

Kristen Savitsky holds a Bachelor's of Science degree in nursing and has worked as a labor and delivery nurse.

PSYC 13 Coming Down from the High: 12 Step Recovery and Counseling
This course will explore the history and culture of the 12 Step Recovery Movement as well as diagnosis rubrics and methods of counseling/interventions that are commonly used at clinics and Employee Assistance Programs throughout the world. Students will read the text Slaying the Dragon, a variety of texts published by different 12 Step groups and watch movies such as Days of Wine and Roses, My Name is Bill, Clean and Sober, and When Love is not Enough: The Lois Wilson Story. Students will be expected to attend and report on their impressions on two different 12 Step meetings that they attend per week. This class is designed to help familiarize students with the disease model of addiction and help act proactively and with understanding with addicts, be it personally, socially, or professionally.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25.
Cost to students: approximately $50.00 for books and course packet.
Meeting time: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, 2:30-3:50 p.m..

RICK BERGER (Instructor)
DEAN OF FACULTY (Sponsor)

Rick Berger earned his M.A. in 2009 from Hazelden Graduate School of Addiction Studies.

PSYC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as Chemistry 14 and Special 14)
(See under CHEM 14 for full description.)

PSYC 15 Ephquilts: An Introduction to Traditional Quiltmaking
This studio course will lead the student through various piecing, appliqué and quilting styles and techniques, with some non-traditional methods included. Samples will be made of techniques learned, culminating in the completion of a sizeable project of the student's choosing (wall quilt or lap-size quilt). There will be an exhibit of all work (ephquilts), at the end of winter study. "Woven" into the classes will be discussions of the history of quilting, the controversy of "art" quilts vs. "traditional" quilts, machine vs. hand-quilting and the growing quilting market. Reading list: Pieces of the Past by Nancy J. Martin; Stitching Memories: African-American Story Quilts by Eva Ungar Grudin; Sunshine and Shadow: The Amish and Their Quilts by Phyllis Haders; A People and Their Quilts by John Rice Irwin; Treasury of American Quilts by Cyril Nelson and Carter Houck; The Quilt: New Directions for an American Tradition, Nancy Roe, Editor.
Requirements: attendance of all classes (two field trips inc), a love of fabric, design and color, an enthusiasm for handwork, participation in exhibit. Extensive time will be spent outside of class working on assigned projects.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: $200 for materials and supplies.
Meeting time: 1-3 p.m., MWF.

DEBRA ROGERS-GILLIG (Instructor)
ZIMMERBERG (Sponsor)

Debra Rogers-Gillig, one of the top quilters in New England, has been quilting for 32 years, and teaching classes and coordinating shows and exhibits for 27 years. She has received numerous prizes and awards from quilt shows in New York and New England and been published in quilt magazines.

PSYC 16 Statistics in Psychological Research, Media, and Everyday Life
This is a course about data. We will consider data from psychological research that is reported in journal articles, data reported in the mass media, and even some data generated by a study of our own design. Along the way, we will think about the principles of research in psychology-the logic and methodology of experimentation, and the concepts and techniques of statistical inference. We will cover a variety of statistical methods, emphasizing both how to conduct your own analyses and how to interpret the analyses conducted/reported by others. In other words, this is partly a course on how to do statistics and partly a course on how to think about statistics. No math background is assumed. This course is appropriate for students with no previous coursework in statistics or for students who have taken a course in statistics, managed to forget nearly everything they learned, and are seeking a refresher.
Evaluation will be based on readings, active class participation and attendance, 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. If overenrolled, priority will be based on seniority.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.

KENNETH SAVITSKY

PSYC 19 Psychology Internships
Would you like to explore applications of psychology in the "real world?" This course gives students an opportunity to work full time during winter study in a mental health, business, education, law or other setting in which psychological theories and methods are applied to solve problems. Students are responsible for locating their own potential internships whether in the local area, their hometowns, or elsewhere, and are welcome to contact the course instructor for suggestions on how to do this. In any case, all students considering this course must consult with the instructor about the suitability of the internship being considered before the winter study registration period. Please prepare a brief description of the proposed placement, noting its relevance to psychology, and the name and contact information of the agency supervisor. Before Thanksgiving break, the student will provide a letter from the agency supervisor which describes the agency, and the student's role and responsibilities during Winter Study. Enrolled students will meet the instructor before Winter Study to discuss matters relating to ethics and their goals for the course, and after Winter Study to discuss their experiences and reflections.
Requirements: 10-page minimum final paper summarizing the student's experiences and reflections, a journal kept throughout the experience, and the supervisor's evaluation.
Prerequisite: approval of Professor Heatherington is required. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: travel expenses in some cases.

HEATHERINGTON

PSYC 22 Introduction to Research in Psychology
This course provides a research opportunity for students who want to understand how psychologists ask compelling questions and find answers about behavior. Several faculty members, whose subfields include behavioral neuroscience, cognitive psychology, social psychology clinical psychology, developmental psychology, and the psychology of education, will have student projects available. Since projects involve faculty research, interested students must consult with members of the Psychology Department before electing this course.
Evaluation will be based on the quality of research participation, student's lab journal and either an oral presentation or a written 10-page report of the research project.
Requirements: a minimum of 20 hours per week of research participation will be expected of each student.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: space available in faculty research labs. Student selection will be based on evaluation of departmental application and number of faculty available as mentors.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

HANE

PSYC 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Psychology 493-494.

M. SANDSTROM

RELIGION

REL 12 Wellness, Yoga, and the Art of Fully Thriving
The art and science of yoga invites us into an ongoing conversation of what we do, who we are, and how we manage our energy. Inquire into the rich fabric of your life as you explore the power of healthy food and conscious nutrition, the stress reductive effects of breath, meditation and yoga, and practical tools to align what you think, feel, say and do to live the life you have always wanted. This course includes weekly yoga classes (no prior experience needed), meditation, breath work, a field trip to Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health, film viewing, final project/presentation, and two mandatory reading books (Nourishing Wisdom by Marc David and Nourishing the Teacher: Inquiries, Contemplations, & Insights on the Path of Yoga by Danny Arguetty).
Evaluation will be based on the final project/presentation and a 5- to 10-page research paper on a topic related to the course.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. If overenrolled, students will be selected based on an essay explaining why they want to take the course.
Cost to student: $50 plus yoga mat and blanket.
Meeting time: mornings, three times per week for three hours.

DANNY ARGUETTY (Instructor)
BUELL (Sponsor)

Danny Arguetty, M.A. is a yoga teacher, nutrition & health counselor, and philosophy lecturer at Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health in Stockbridge MA. Danny has been studying the art and science of yoga for over ten years, attended the institute for integrative nutrition in New York City, and works privately with clients on nutrition and health. He is passionate about supporting people on their path of greater awareness and potent vitality.

REL 25 Jerusalem: One City, Three Faiths, Many Narratives
Jerusalem excites the imagination, the emotions, and the spiritual aspirations for many people. An ancient city that was the locus of holiness and conflict for one hundred generations still retains that description today. Through the first half of Winter Study, we will engage readings, (Innocents Abroad by Mark Twain, Karen Armstrong's JERUSALEM), class discussions, and additional study, to prepare for travel to Jerusalem. We will leave Williamstown on January 16, taking up residence in Jerusalem on Monday morning, the 17th, through Thursday the 27th. Our study in Jerusalem will feature many walking tours to various neighborhoods and historic sites, and will bring Christian, Jewish, and Muslim teachers to present the complicated series of narratives that describe the mosaic of Jerusalem's three thousand year history. We'll even learn from a naturalist about the importance of Jerusalem as a flyway for millions of birds! Our educational program in Jerusalem will be led by Ophir Yarden, education director for the Interreligious Coordinating Council of Israel. When this course was offered in 2007 and 2009, many students agreed that it was "the most amazing experience of my life!" Students will submit a 10- to 12-page reflection paper discussing the meaning of Jerusalem. In mid- to late February, there will be a "reunion gathering" for the students to revisit the papers they wrote immediately after the trip, as an opportunity to revisit and further reflect on their January experience.
Enrollment limit: 10. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to students: approximately $3000.

Cantor BOB SCHERR, Jewish Chaplain for the College

REL 26 Miami: Gateway to the Caribbean (Same as Africana Studies 25, History 25, and Latina/o Studies 25)
(See under AFR 25 for full description.) BENSON and HIDALGO

REL 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Religion 493 or 494.

ROMANCE LANGUAGES

FRENCH

RLFR S.P. Sustaining Program for French 101-102
Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study period. There are three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

TBA (Teaching Associates)

RLFR 10 Astérix the Gaul: French Culture through the Prism of the Comic
The longevity and popularity of the Astérix comic strip series over successive generations of an international readership can be explained, in part, by its subtle and penetrating rendering of Europeanism through caricature. This course will examine some of the most enduring texts in the Astérix saga as interpretations, first, of French culture and the way the French view themselves with respect to the rest of Europe and, second, of the way they view Europe in dialogue with French cultural norms. Such issues as "la Patrie" (homeland), linguistic characteristics, the idea of France, French provincial distinctiveness, France's view of a homogeneous national character seen through its own cultural diversity, and the relationship of France to other specific regional cultures will be studied as a way not only of defining the nation's historic legacy, but of coming to terms with the way it sees its place within the vision of the European Union. Among the texts to be studied will be Astérix the Gaul, Astérix and the Normans, Astérix and the Mansions of the Gods, Astérix in Corsica, Astérix in Britain, Astérix in Switzerland, Astérix and the Goths, and Astérix in Belgium. Analysis of the primary texts will be complemented by secondary cultural readings, especially those of Fernand Braudel and other prominent interpreters of French culture. Readings will be in English, but those students who wish to read the texts in the original French should make arrangements in advance with the instructor. Conducted in English
Requirements: class participation and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to student: books and reading packet only.
Meeting time: mornings, 3 two-hour sessions per week.

NORTON

RLFR 30 Honors Essay
To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.


RLFR 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for French 493-494.

ITALIAN

RLIT S.P. Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102
Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

NICASTRO

SPANISH

RLSP S.P. Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102
Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

TEACHING ASSOCIATES

RLSP 11 Brazil (Same as Comparative Literature 11, Latina/o Studies 11 and Special 23)
(See under COMP 11 for full description.)

RLSP 12 Exploring Mexico/Contemporary Mexican
This course will provide students with the opportunity to view a variety of contemporary films and documentaries directed in Mexico by prominent contemporary Mexican filmmakers. These films and documentaries will be used a spring-board to explore and discuss how these filmmakers use this media to portray Mexico's culture, values, as well as the country's handling of social issues such as migration, colonialism, resistance, gender and education, among others. This class will be taught in Spanish. The theoretical and background reading will be provided both in English and Spanish, however most of the films and documentaries to be screened are in Spanish.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a final 8- to 10-page paper that will be due at the end of the course.
No prerequisites but students must have a basic proficiency in language. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: TR.

PAULINA SALAS-SCHOOFIELD (Instructor)
ROUHI (Sponsor)

Paulina Salas-Schoofield is resident of Oaxaca, Mexico. During the past 14 years she has taught courses on Mexican Culture and Spanish Language at the Language Center of the Benito Juarez University, the Canadian International College and the Instituto Cultural Oaxaca. Paulina Salas-Schoofield studied art history at the Instituto de Cultura Superior in Mexico City, and film studies at Edinburgh University.

RLSP 30 Honors Essay
To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLSP 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Spanish 493-494.

RUSSIAN

RUSS S.P. Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102
Required of all students enrolled in Russian 101-102. Three meetings per week, 50 minutes per session. Practice in speaking and comprehension based on material already covered as well as some new vocabulary and constructions. Designed to maintain and enhance what was acquired during fall semester, using new approaches in a relaxed atmosphere. No homework.
Regular attendance and active participation required to earn a "Pass." Open to all.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

INYASHKIN

RUSS 12 Introducing American Sign Language (Same as Special 12)
This course introduces students to basic knowledge about American Sign Language and deaf people. Emphasis in this preliminary introduction to ASL is on developing rudimentary receptive, expressive, and interactive skills through an intensive immersion in ASL. Students will also be introduced to deaf history, culture, and politics. This course is designed to help nonsigners develop rudimentary skills, to introduce them to the complexity of ASL, and to cultivate interest in further study of the language.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation, quizzes, and student projects or student produced videotapes of their own expressive skills. Students will also be expected to spend an hour outside of class each week viewing videos of native ASL signers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to students: $50.
Meeting time: 3 two-hour meetings per week in the afternoon.

LAURIE BENJAMIN (Instructor)
CASSIDAY (Sponsor)

Laurie Benjamin is a nationally certified ASL interpreter with training and extensive experience in legal and mental health interpreting as well as video-relay interpreting. She has taught in deaf schools. She has also taught winter study at Williams on and off since the early 1990s.

RUSS 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Special 25)
Williams has a unique program in the Republic of Georgia, which offers students the opportunity to engage in three-week-long internships in any field. Our students have worked in the Georgian Parliament, helped in humanitarian relief organizations like Save the Children, interned in journalism at The Georgian Times, taught unemployed women computer skills at The Rustavi Project, documented wildlife, studied with a Georgian sculptor, done rounds at the Institute of Cardiology, and learned about transitional economies at the Georgian National Bank. In addition to working in their chosen fields, students experience Georgian culture through museum visits, concerts, lectures, meetings with Georgian students, and excursions. Visit the sacred eleventh-century Cathedral of Sveti-tskhoveli and the twentieth-century Stalin Museum, take the ancient Georgian Military Highway to ski in the Caucasus Range, see the birthplace of the wine grape in Kakheti and the region where Jason sought the Golden Fleece. Participants are housed in pairs with English-speaking families in Tbilisi, Georgia's capital city.
At the end of the course students will write a 10-page paper assessing their internship experience.
Knowledge of Russian or Georgian is not required.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Not open to first-year students.
Cost to student: approximately $2000.

GOLDSTEIN

RUSS 30 Honors Project
May be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RUSS 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Russian 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY-See under ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

THEATRE

THEA 10 Staging Non-Dramatic Texts
This studio course will examine aspects of the staging and performance of "texts" not initially meant for production. Inspiration for these pieces may come, for example, from literature (poetry, stories, aphorisms), the visual arts, or music. In performance, lab students will develop and experiment with their pieces while attempting to embody the "meaning" of the original into palpable stage form. The focus will be clearly on process rather than product, but if modest performance of the pieces is warranted, there will be a showing at the end of the WSP.
Students will be asked to perform in one another's pieces as they develop, so that the official class meetings (6 hours/week in the Studio) will have to be supported by a substantial commitment to collaborative work and rehearsal.
Enrollment limit: 12. Preference to students who have taken at least one Theatre course.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: 10-noon, MWF.

BUCKY

THEA 12 Classic American European Musical Theatre (Same as Music 12)
(See under MUS 12 for full description.)

THEA 13 Making a Career in Performance
In this course, students will learn practical steps in making a career in theatre. How do you introduce your talent to the professional world? How do you find an agent, auditions, director and inspiring collaborators? How do you deal with anxiety and stay active creatively? What should be done or avoided? These and other questions will be addressed through research, discussion, exploration exercises and meeting professional theatre artists.
Evaluation: discussion and final research presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: TW 1-4 p.m.

SANGARE

THEA 14 Digital Sketching
Photoshop, 3D modeling software, CAD drafting and other digital tools are increasingly used as supplements to (or in lieu of) the traditional, pencil-and-paper, methods of rendering visual ideas. But digital media is often regarded as finishing or presentational tools, rather than a medium to be worked in organically throughout the entire creative process. Digital media can just as easily be a supplement to the battered sketchbook traditionally carried around by an artist or designer-but now a "sketchbook" that can be emailed, uploaded, and printed with ease! This class will focus on the use of Photoshop and SketchUp as creative development tools in imagining three dimensional space, media for both the hasty sketching out of ideas, and revising, refining, and finalizing those initial impulses-all from your laptop.
We will meet twice a week for three-hour sessions, with additional supervised lab times as needed. Most research, sketching, and rendering work will take place outside of class time (estimated 20 hours per week.) No previous experience with the software is required.
Evaluation will be based upon the effort put into, and the development process of, several digital design projects. Attendance and participation in critiques will also be seriously considered. Final project (a digital design of an imagined architectural space) will be the majority of the grade, with earlier assignments and participation taken into account.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. If overenrolled, selection will be random
Cost to student: $25.
Meeting time: MW or TR 1-4 p.m.

MORRIS

THEA 15 What is Playing in America and the World
This course will look at what plays are being performed in theatres across the United States and in several other countries as well. We will identify several of America's top regional theatres, and try to establish a pattern in the decisions taken by artistic directors and producers. We will speculate on the conditions which play a part in the process of deciding on a season of plays. Students will be expected to read some of the plays that are being performed.
Evaluation: presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Students will be selected based on Theatre experience.
Cost to students: none.
Meeting time: Monday/Thursday 1-4 p.m.

EPPEL

THEA 32 Senior Honors Thesis
See description of Degree with Honors in Theatre.

WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES

WGST 12 Alternative Birth Choices (Same as Psychology 12)
(See under PSYC 12 for full description.)

WGST 13 Beyond El Día de los Muertos: Latina/o Rituals of Mourning en el Teatro (Same as Latina/o Studioes 13)
(See under LATS 13 for full description.)

WGST 17 The Abortion Debate: The Politics of Abortion in the United States, 1973-Present (Same as History 17)
(See under HIST 17 for full description.)

WGST 28 Sex and the Constitution (Same as History 28)
(See under HIST 28 for full description.)

WGST 30 Honors Project
To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

SPECIALS

SPEC 10 Quest for College: Early Awareness in Berkshire County Schools
Today's extremely competitive higher education market places significant pressure on students nationwide to start planning for college at an increasingly early age while simultaneously demanding ever-higher standards of excellence for admission to top schools. "Early Awareness" initiatives aim to educate middle school students as to what lies ahead on the college horizon, empowering them to make sound academic and extracurricular choices that will keep open a maximum of options. The first week of this course will be spent in the classroom, exploring and discussing problems and issues germane to the national trends towards greater (and earlier) college-related pressures. Students will respond to a series of readings dealing with such issues as tracking, paid test preparation and untimed testing, early decision, parental and peer pressures, special interests, misrepresentation of information, independent counseling, and others. Class time will also be devoted to familiarizing students with both the nuances of the college admission process, visiting other higher educational institutions in Berkshire County, and learning how to facilitate the early awareness game, Quest for College. Students will spend the next two weeks visiting 10-12 Berkshire County middle classes, administering the game. If student and community interest is sufficient, the course may culminate in a public presentation and open forum regarding early college awareness initiatives.
Evaluation will be based on completion of field work (school visits), organization and a final paper (approximately 10 pages) reflecting on a course-related issue of the student's choosing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Preference given to a) students with prior experience working with middle school aged youth, b) students who can be approved to operate college vehicles c) juniors and seniors. Interested students must consult with the instructor prior to registration.
Cost to student: reading packet and meals while off campus.
Meeting time: mornings.

GINA COLEMAN `90 (Instructor)
WSP COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Gina Coleman `90 is Associate Dean of Students and Head Women's Rugby Coach. Coleman, who holds a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership and Policy from the University of Nebraska, designed the early college awareness board game used in the course, Quest for College.

SPEC 11 Science for Kids (Same as Chemistry 11)
(See under CHEM 11 for full description.)

SPEC 12 Introducing American Sign Language (Same as Russian 12)
(See under RUSS 12 for full description.)

SPEC 13 Literary Journalism in Practice
What are the best ways to use long-form journalism to get at a subject? In this course, we'll explore ways to tell a story in depth, by using tactics and techniques borrowed from fiction, academic disciplines, and the arts. Classwork will include a number of brief assignments to focus on specific elements--ways to physically describe something, overhearing and transcribing dialogue, conducting interviews, and finding the right tone of voice. During our meetings, we'll read and critique each other's work to assess what works and what doesn't. We'll include regular readings from masters of nonfiction--ranging from early and overlooked pioneers like Mark Twain and Jack London, through popular writers like Tom Wolfe, Hunter S. Thompson, Ron Rosenbaum, and David Foster Wallace.
The final piece will be a minimum 10-page profile of a person or institution around campus that will go through several revisions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference for students with a demonstrated interest in a career in journalism.
Cost to student: $75.
Meeting time: afternoons.

CHRISTOPHER MARCISZ (Instructor)
DEAN OF FACULTY (Sponsor)

Christopher Marcisz is a freelance writer based in Williamstown whose recent work has appeared in The Boston Globe, The International Herald Tribune, and the Moscow News. For many years he was a reporter for the Berkshire Eagle, where he wrote arts and cultural features and editorials, and later worked as an editor. He is a graduate of University of Pennsylvania and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

SPEC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as Chemistry 14 and Psychology 14)
(See under CHEM 14 for full description.)

SPEC 15 Contemporary American Songwriter (Same as American Studies 15 and Music 15)
This course will focus on learning how to write and perform songs in a contemporary style. Topics addressed will include song structure, how to create a lyric that communicates, vocal and instrument presentation, recording and performing techniques, publicity for events, and today's music industry. This class will culminate in a public performance of material written during the course. To successfully pass this course, students are required to create, edit, perform, and possibly record two original songs. These songs must be conceived during the course period (previously written material in not usable). Students will be guided to create both music and lyrics. They may also be required to participate in a co-write session. One of these songs will be presented during the final performance, preferably by the student. Attendance at classes, feedback sessions, and final presentation is mandatory. Please note: this class meets every day. A short writing assignment will be passed in on the last day of class.
No prerequisites. Students with a musical background and the ability to play an instrument may be given preference, but anyone interested is encouraged to register. (Bernice.Lewis@wililams.edu). Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to student: books plus $35 lab fee for recording and xeroxing costs.
Meeting time: M, Tu, W, Th, F 10 a.m.-noon.

BERNICE LEWIS (Instructor)
DEAN OF FACULTY (Sponsor)

Bernice Lewis is an accomplished singer, songwriter, producer and educator. She has been a national touring artist for over twenty years and has performed at the Kerrville Folk Festival, PBS's Mountain Stage, and the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. She was recently chosen by the National Park Service to be an Artist in Residence. She has released six recordings of original material.

SPEC 16 Peer Support/Counseling Skills Training
Are you the person your friends seek out for support?  Learn to be an active listener, to help others feel more comfortable with social, academic, and personal relationships, to assist others in making decisions without giving advice, and to assess risk.  Deepen your ability to communicate about sensitive issues and your identity in the helping role.  Emphasis will also be given to understanding our own limits within a given situation, knowing when and where to refer, and what resources are available to students.  These skills are indispensable for the many campus roles involving peer support or peer advising, among them Junior Advisors and Baxter Fellows.
We will meet twice a week for 3 hour sessions.  This is an experiential training augmented by relevant readings and out of class assignments designed to deepen your understanding and practice of communication and helping skills. 
Evaluation will be based on participation, attendance, and submission of a 10 page paper consisting of journal entries and reflections of your experience and growth throughout the course.
No prerequisites; open to first years, sophomores and juniors. Enrollment limit: 18.
Cost to students: $25.
Meeting time: TBA.

KAREN THEILING (Instructor)
HARRISON (Sponsor)

Karen Theiling is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor with 10 years experience as a psychotherapist. I have taught and facilitated in a number of different types of groups, including those designed to improve communication skills. I led one such group twice a year for UMass Amherst's Every Women's Center for 3 years. This will be the third time I have offered the course at Williams for Winter Study

SPEC 17 Learning Intervention For Troubled Teens (LIFTT) (Same as ANSO 17)
The objective of this program and winter study course is to provide an alternative sentence for adolescents involved in the Juvenile Court system in Berkshire County. Many of these children cut school, are disruptive in the classroom, and do not find learning stimulating. The goal of this program is to teach these children, through experience, that learning can be fun, providing them with the motivation to succeed in school. These students, under the guidance of Williams College undergraduates, will select a topic of interest and learn how to research and present this topic to their peers in the program, with access to Williams College facilities. Williams undergraduate students will gain experience in teaching and motivating troubled teenagers and will also present a topic of their choosing to the students in the program, modeling a classroom setting. Furthermore, Williams students will be exposed to the Juvenile Court system, gaining insight into the causes of and solutions to the incidence of juvenile crime. Williams students will be expected to read relevant training materials and meet with their teenagers three times a week, as well as keep a journal detailing the meetings.
Evaluation will be based on the quality of the log, the Williams students own topic presentations, and a final paper about the experience, with a focus on how to improve the program, the juvenile sentencing system, and what they learned about the social and psychological repercussions of adolescent crime.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Preference to sophomores, juniors and seniors.
Meeting time: TBA.

MICHAEL WYNN '93 (Instructor)
ENGEL (Sponsor)

Mr. Wynn was a police officer for 15 years, and taught at as adjunct instructor in management and leadership at Roger Williams University. He's a Williams alum, class of 1993.

SPEC 18 Nonviolence and Noncoercion
When is violence or the threat of violence morally acceptable? Do violent means lead to peaceful ends? In this course we will examine the relationship between nonviolence and noncoercion in moral and political contexts. Principled nonviolence, or ahimsa in Gandhi's writings, implies among other things that one must not harm others, even one's violent oppressors, as a means of affecting social or political change. In contrast, the noncoercion principle is a moral position that one must not initiate the use of force against another person. Although nonviolence and noncoercion are related, for historical reasons their philosophical literatures have remained almost entirely separate. We will survey both literatures, including selections from Ballou, Gandhi, King, Nozick, Rothbard, Ruwart, Thoreau, and Tolstoy, and use class discussion to bring out their similarities and differences.
Evaluation will be based on class attendance and participation, and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. If overenrolled, selection will be based on seniority.
Meeting time: afternoons, two hours three times per week.
Cost to student: less than $50 for books.

KIRBY

SPEC 19 Medical Apprenticeship
Firsthand experience is a critical component of the decision to enter the health professions. Through this apprenticeship, students can clarify their understanding of the rewards and challenges that accompany the practice of all types of medicine. Apprenticeships are arranged in two distinct ways: some students live on campus and are matched with a local practitioner, while others make independent arrangements to shadow a distant professional. The expectation is that each student will observe some aspect of medicine for the better part of the day, five days per week. In recent years, students have shadowed physicians, veterinarians, dentists, nurses, and public health experts.
A 5-page reflective paper is required, as is attendance (for those shadowing near campus) at three Tuesday evening programs. Students will meet from 6:30-8:30 p.m. over dinner to hear from invited speakers from the medical community as a stimulus to discussion about their apprenticeship experiences.
Prerequisites: Interested students must attend an information meeting in early October. Local enrollment is limited by the number of available practitioners. Preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the health professions.
Cost to student: local apprenticeships: required vaccinations, local transportation and possibly lunches. Distant apprenticeships: costs will vary based upon location.
TEACHING ASSOCIATES (Instructors): STEVEN ANISMAN, M.D.; DAVID ARMET. P.T.; CHILDSY ART, M.D.; DEBORAH AUGUST, M.D.; VICTORIA CAVALLI, M.D.; JONATHAN CLUETT, M.D.; LEE DELANEY, D.V.M.; MARIANNE DEMARCO, M.D.; MICHAEL DISIENA. D.O..; PAUL DONOVAN, D.O.; SIMON DREW, M.D.; STUART DUBUFF, M.D.; WILLIAM DUKE, M.D.; ROBERT FANELLI, M.D.; WADE GEBERA, M.D.; DAVID GORSON, M.D.; ALISON HASTINGS, D.O..; DEBORAH HENLEY, M.D.; ERIC HOLMGREN, D..D.S./M.D.; JUDITH HOLMGREN, M.D.; ORION HOWARD, M.D.; LAURA JONES, D.V.M.; JOSHUA KLEEDERMAN, D.M.D.; WILLIAM KOBER, M.D.; JONATHAN KRANT, M.D.; WILLIAM LEVY, M.D.; REBECCA MATTSON, D.V.M.; MARK MCDERMOTT, M.D.; RONALD MENSH, M.D.; GRAHAM MOORE, M.D.; BORIS MURILLO, M.D.; CHARLES O'NEILL, M.D.; JUDY ORTON, M.D.; DANIEL PERREGAUX, M.D.; FERNANDO PONCE, M.D.; RICHARD PROVENZANO, M.D.; DANIEL ROBBINS, M.D.; OSCAR RODRIGUEZ, M.D.; SCOTT ROGGE, M.D.; PAUL ROSENTHAL, M.D.; ROBERT SILLS, M.D.; THEMARGE SMALL, M.D.; ANTHONY SMEGLIN, M.D.; ANNE MARIE SWANN, M.D.; ELIZABETH TOOMAJIAN, N.P.; SPYRIDON TRIANTOS, M.D.; ELIZABETH WARNER, M.D.; ELIZABETH WHATLEY, M.D.; JAMES WHITTUM, M.D.; KATIE WOLFGANG, D.V.M.; NICHOLAS WRIGHT, M.D.; JEFFREY YUCHT, M.D.; MARK ZIMPFER, M.D.; and others.

JANE CARY Health Professions Advisor

SPEC 20 What Was Monet Thinking?-Understanding Art, for Non-Art Majors (Same as Comparative Literature 20)
(See under COMP 20 for full description.)

SPEC 21 Experience the Workplace; an Internship with Williams Alumni/Parents
Field experience is a critical element in the decision to enter a profession. Through this internship, students can clarify their understanding of the rewards and challenges that accompany the practice of many different aspects within a profession, and understand the psychology of the workplace. Internship placements are arranged in two distinct ways: some students live on campus and are matched with local professionals, while others make independent arrangements to work with a distant professional. The expectation is that each student will observe some aspect of the profession for the better part of the day, five days per week. It is also expected that the teaching associate will assign a specific project to be completed within the three-to-four week duration of the course depending upon appropriateness. Participation in this winter study will require the student to quickly assess the work environment, make inferences about corporate culture, performance norms and expectations, and to take initiative not only to learn from this experience, but also to contribute where and when appropriate. Understanding the dynamics within a work environment is critical to success in any organization and this hands-on experience will illuminate lessons learned in the classroom. Upon completion of the winter study, it is expected that the student write a thorough report evaluating and interpreting the experience.
Requirements: it is expected that students will complete assigned readings, keep a daily journal, and write a 5-10 page expository review and evaluation that will become public record as a resource for other students.
Prerequisites: interested students must attend an information meeting in early October, and meet individually with John Noble to go over the details of their placements. Preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the profession of interest.
Enrollment is limited by the number of available teaching associates (instructors). Student selection criteria: Preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the profession of interest.
Cost to students: local apprenticeships-local transportation. Distant apprenticeships-costs will vary based upon location, but are the responsibility of the student.
Williams College alumni and parents of current Williams students will be recruited to become instructors for this course. A broad range of professions will be represented as the course develops. Alumni and parents will receive a training packet and individual orientations with the course director in person or via telephone conference.
Meeting time: the expectation is that each student will be in the field to observe some aspect of the profession for the better part of the day, five days per week. In addition to observation there may be an opportunity to work on distinct projects generated by the instructor depending upon appropriateness.

JOHN NOBLE (Sponsor) Director of the Office of Career Counseling

SPEC 23 Brazil (Same as Comparative Literature 11, Latina/o Studies 11 and RLSP 11)
(See under COMP 11 for full description.)

SPEC 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Russian 25)
(See under RUSS 25 for full description.)

SPEC 26 Travel Course: Resettling Refugees in Maine (Same as Philosophy 26)
Sponsored by the Gaudino Scholar and the Gaudino Fund in 2008, 2009, and 2010, this Winter Study travel course will allow a small group of students to live in Portland, Maine for the month of January 2011, where they will experience and explore the impact of over thirty years of refugee resettlement in the 'whitest' of the United States. Each student will live with a refugee family from one of the dozens of countries represented by the refugee communities of Portland, and during her or his home stay will encounter first-hand the issues confronting recent immigrants to the United States from Southeast Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe or Latin America. While only 4 hours from Williams, Portland students speak almost 60 languages in the school system. WSP students will keep a daily journal to record their experiences with their refugee family and working weekdays the schools or nonprofit organizations that serve them. Students will be exposed to such issues as race, ethnicity, and national identity; the interplay of public and private values; and the wide variety of educational, health, governmental, and religious agencies and providers serving refugee families Students meet weekly with the course instructor to discuss how their experiences are going; they will also attend arranged community meetings or events. Students as a group will also have time in Maine at the beginning of the program for an orientation session, and at the conclusion to share experiences with each other and write a short reflection paper.
No prerequisites. If student interest exceeds the enrollment limit, preference will be given to those students who demonstrate, in a short conversation with and essay submitted to the instructor, their interest in experiential learning generally and the problems confronting recent immigrants to the United States specifically. Enrollment limit: 6; not open to first year students.
Cost to students: There will be a small per diem paid to each host family for room and board. For financial aid students, costs for this WSP travel course will be paid by the Gaudino Fund.

JEFF THALER '74 (Instructor)
DUDLEY (Sponsor)

Jeff Thaler '74 participated in Williams-at-Home with Professor Robert Gaudino in 1971-72. After Professor Gaudino's death in 1974, Jeff and some other alumni developed an initiative that eventually became the Gaudino Memorial Fund. Jeff served on the Board of the Fund for many years, including service as its Chair; in 2010 he was elected to come back onto the Board. Since 1974, Jeff graduated from Yale Law School in 1977, worked as a public defender in New York City from 1977-79, and has lived in Maine since 1979, where he has works as a trial and environmental attorney. He has taught a course on refugee issues as an adjunct professor at the University of Southern Maine, as well as courses at Maine Law School and Bowdoin College. Jeff directed this WSP in January 2008, 2009 and 2010; has volunteered with many refugee groups in Portland; was elected in 2009 to the Williams College Tyng Scholarship Committee; and has worked as a group facilitator for the past nine years at the Center for Grieving Children.

SPEC 27 Sustainable Agriculture Course (Same as Environmental Studies 27)
Understanding and getting involved in our food production chain is of growing interest to those with concerns about their own ecological footprint, maintaining personal physical health, the humane treatment of animals, sustainable local economies, social justice or other issues. Sustainable agriculture comes in many forms, reflective of the given ecological/economic/cultural/historic/
personal context of a farm. To truly understand this most important issue, just like all matters of ecology, we must go deeper than the overarching theories and find out what the relationships are on the ground. Through class visits to local farms, reading and a reflective journal, students will gain hands-on experience exploring the day-to-day operations and guiding principles of some local sustainable agricultural enterprises. While January is generally thought of as a time of reflection and planning on the farm, there is still work to be done both outside and inside. Find out what goes on in a dairy enterprise, a mixed vegetable operation, a sugar bush, a highly diversified family farm, a pastured and foraging mixed animal farm or an orchard during the "off-season". Meet the farmers, ask the questions, learn skills and lend your help to the task at hand. Because January is the time of reflection and planning, we will join the farmers in a little reading and reflection of our own. Members of the class will engage in a brief survey of agriculturally relevant literature including popular non-fiction, journals, newsletters and informational publications as suggested by the instructor and the farmers visited.
Students will respond to our experiences, discussions and readings in a reflective journal. Students will also write short essays, and have a final project of either a paper or presentation. Reading will be handed out weekly to gain a broader understanding of sustainability.
The field trips will be four hours on Monday. We will visit two different farms in that time. We will then hold a lecture on Wednesday to further discuss agricultural practices and the farms we visited. As per the field nature of this course, students will be responsible for dressing appropriately for January weather on a farm. Appropriate attire might include boots, hat, gloves, coat, etc, that you're not afraid to get dirty.

CHUCK CURRIE and LISA MACDOUGALL (Instructors)
WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Chuck Currie and Lisa MacDougall will be the teachers for the course. They own and operate Mighty Food Farm, an organic vegetable and chicken egg farm in Pownal, VT. They have degrees in Plant, Soil, and Insect Science from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and have been running Mighty Food Farm for four years.

SPEC 28 Teaching Practica in New York City Schools
Students in this course learn about the front-line challenges of urban public education by working in one of New York City's public schools. Participants will be expected to pursue a full day's program of observing, teaching, tutoring and mentoring in their choice of more than 20 different school situations from elementary through high school. Each of the participating schools will have a resident supervisor who will meet with the January interns to arrange individual schedules and provide mentoring during the month. There will be weekly seminar meetings of all the interns who are expected to participate in group discussions, keep a journal and write a 5 page paper reflecting upon their experience. The course will conduct orientation meetings with students prior to January, matching each student's interest with appropriate teaching subject areas and a host school. Dormitory-style housing will be provided along with some assistance with transportation and food costs-estimated at $400 for the term. Further assistance is available for financial aid students.
Evaluation will be based on a journal and a 5-page paper.
Prerequisites: sophomore, junior or senior standing. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost to student: $400.
Meeting time: off-campus fieldwork: daily 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. and weekly seminar dinners.

TRACY FINNEGAN (Instructor)
WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Tracy Finnegan is a master's level teacher with training and teaching experience in a variety of approaches and settings.

SPEC 39 "Composing a Life:" Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams
To be at Williams you have learned to be a successful student, but how do you learn to be successful in life? How will you define success in both your career and in your personal life? How will you achieve balance between the two? In short, what will constitute the "good life" for you? We borrow the concept of "composing a life" from Mary Catherine Bateson, as an apt metaphor for the ongoing process of defining success and balance in life. This course is designed: (1) To offer college students an opportunity to examine and define their beliefs, values, and assumptions about their future personal and professional lives before entering the "real" world; (2) To encourage students to gain a better understanding of how culture, ideology, and opportunity affect their life choices; (3) To provide an opportunity for students to consider different models of success and balance through "living cases" (in the form of guests from various professions and lifestyles); and (4) To aid students in contemplating their career options through individual advising and introducing various career and life planning resources. Using selected readings, cases, and guest speakers, we will explore both the public context of the workplace as well as the private context of individuals and their personal relationships in determining life choices.
Requirements: regular attendance, class participation, field interview, and a 10-page final paper. Weekly assignments include cases and readings from a variety of related fields, and some self-reflection exercises.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Questions about the course: please contact Michele Moeller Chandler at (413) 458-8106 or michele.chandler2@verizon.net
Cost to student: approximately $35 for cases/reading materials.
Meeting time: mornings, two-hour classes three times a week.

MICHELE MOELLER CHANDLER and CHIP CHANDLER (Instructors)
TOOMAJIAN (Sponsor)

Michele Moeller Chandler ('73) and Chip Chandler ('72) have taught this Winter Study course for the past fourteen years. They have been both personally and professionally engaged in the course topic. Michele, a former college administrator, has an M.A. from Columbia, and a Ph.D. from Northwestern. Chip, a retired McKinsey senior partner, has an M.B.A. from Harvard, and currently teaches in the Leadership Studies Program.

WILLIAMS PROGRAM IN TEACHING

Students interested in exploring one or more of the following courses related to teaching and/or working with children and adolescents should contact Susan Engel, Director of Education Programs, who will be able to help you choose one that best suits your educational goals.

ANSO 12 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse
(See under ANSO 12 for full description.)

BIOL 11 Project BioEyes: Zebrafish Genetics and Development in the K-12 Classroom
(See under BIOL 11 for full description.)

CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as Special 11)
(See under CHEM 11 for full description.)

SPEC 17 Learning Intervention For Troubled Teens (LIFTT) (Same as ANSO 17)
(See under SPEC 17 for full description.)

SPEC 28 Teaching Practica in New York City Schools
(See under SPEC 28 for full description.)

WILLIAMS-MYSTIC PROGRAM IN AMERICAN MARITIME STUDIES

An interdisciplinary one-semester program co-sponsored by Williams College and Mystic Seaport which includes credit for one winter study. Classes in maritime history, literature of the sea, marine ecology, oceanography, and marine policy are supplemented by field seminars: offshore sailing, Pacific Coast and Louisiana. For details, see "Williams-Mystic Maritime Studies Program" or our website: web.williams.edu/williamsmystic.


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