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WINTER STUDY PROGRAM 2012

REMINDERS ABOUT WSP REGISTRATION

All students who will be on campus during the 2011-2012 academic year must register for WSP. Registration will take place in the early part of fall semester. If you are registered for a senior thesis in the fall which must be continued through Winter Study by departmental rules, you will be registered for your Winter Study Project automatically. In every other case, you must complete registration. First-year students are required to participate in a Winter Study that will take place on campus; they are not allowed to do 99's.

If you think your time may be restricted in any way (ski meets, interviews, etc.), clear these restrictions with the instructor before signing up for his/her project.

Remember, for cross-listed projects, you should sign up for the subject you want to appear on your record.

For many beginning language courses, you are required to take the WSP Sustaining Program in addition to your regular project. You will be automatically enrolled in this Sustaining Program, so no one should list this as a choice.

The grade of honors is reserved for outstanding or exceptional work. Individual instructors may specify minimum standards for the grade, but normally, fewer than one out of ten students will qualify. A grade of pass means the student has performed satisfactorily. A grade of perfunctory pass signifies that a student's work has been significantly lacking but is just adequate to deserve a pass.

If you have any questions about a project, see the instructor before you register.

Finally, all work for WSP must be completed and submitted to the instructor no later than January 26, 2012. Only the Dean can grant an extension beyond this date.

WINTER STUDY 99'S

Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible to propose "99's," independent projects arranged with faculty sponsors, conducted in lieu of regular Winter Study courses. Perhaps you have encountered an interesting idea in one of your courses which you would like to study in more depth, or you may have an interest not covered in the regular curriculum. In recent years students have undertaken in-depth studies of particular literary works, interned in government offices, assisted in foreign and domestic medical clinics, conducted field work in economics in developing countries, and given performances illustrating the history of American dance. Although some 99's involve travel away from campus, there are many opportunities to pursue intellectual or artistic goals here in Williamstown.

99 forms are available online: http://web.williams.edu/Registrar/winterstudy/99direct.html

The deadline for submitting the proposals to faculty sponsors is September 29, 2011.

AFR 10 Black Gospel Music, History and Performance Ensemble (Same as Music 10) CANCELLED!
AFR 13 Understanding Similarities, Bridging Differences (Same as Latina/o Studies 13 and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies 13)
AFR 24 Politics and History in Cuba (Same as History 24 and Political Science 24)

AFR 29 Eyewitness to the Civil Rights Movement: Mississippi, 1964-1965 (Same as History 29)
AFR 30 Senior Project
AMST 10 Experimenting with Poems
AMST 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as Special 15)
AMST 30 Senior Honors Project
ANSO 11 Berkshire Farm Internship
ANSO 12 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse
ANSO 13 Epidemiology, Public Health, and Leadership in the Health Professions (Same as Leadership Studies 13)
ANSO 17 Learning Intervention For Troubled Teens (LIFTT) (Same as Legal Studies 17 and Special 17)
ANTH 15 Afghanistan in Photos and Film
ANTH 31 Senior Thesis
SOC 10 Trajectories of Economic Practices in India CANCELLED!
SOC 31 Senior Thesis
ARAB S.P. Sustaining Program for Arabic 101-102
ARAB 31 Senior Thesis
ARTH 10 Art and Exhibition (Same as Latina/o Studies 10)
ARTH 11 Editorial Cartooning and the Art of Propaganda (Same as Political Science 11)
ARTH 31 Senior Thesis
ARTH 33 Honors Independent Study
ARTS 12 Figure Modeling
ARTS 13 Design Garage
ARTS 25 Art of Experience in Egypt: Visual Documentation of Journey and Encounter
ASST 11 Lessons in Go (Same as Mathematics 11) CANCELLED!
ASST 31 Senior Thesis
CHIN S.P. Sustaining Program for Chinese 101-102
CHIN 10 Theory and Practice of Chinese Cooking
CHIN 31 Senior Thesis
JAPN S.P. Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102
JAPN 10 Looking into Nihongo and Its Culture CANCELLED!
JAPN 11 The Samurai in Japanese Film
JAPN 13 Japanese Animation (Same as Comparative Literature 13)
JAPN 31 Senior Thesis
ASTR 11 The Amber Room and Hidden Treasures: Impressionist Art Held Hostage? (Same as History 11 and Special 12)
ASTR 12 Transits: Venus's Atmosphere, the Size of the Solar System, and Planets Around other Stars
ASTR 31 Senior Research
ASPH 31 Senior Research
BIOL 10 Observational Drawing from the Natural World
BIOL 11 Project BioEyes: Zebrafish Genetics and Development in the K-12 classroom
BIOL 13 Ferment, Leaven and Curdle: Pickle, Bake, Cheese-Make!
BIOL 21 Science Beyond Williams
BIOL 22 Introduction to Biological Research
BIOL 31 Senior Thesis
CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as SPEC 11)
CHEM 12 Spanish for the Health Sciences
CHEM 13 The Principles and Practice of Peptide Chemistry
CHEM 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as Psychology 14 and Special 14)
CHEM 18 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry
CHEM 24 Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry
CHEM 31 Senior Research and Thesis
CLAS 11 The History of Words (Same as Comparative Literature 11)
CLAS 12 Introduction to Old Irish (Same as Comparative Literature 12)
CLAS 14 Plato's Symposium and Its Afterlife (Same as Comparative Literature 14, Philosophy 14, and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies 14)
CLAS 31 Senior Thesis
COGS 31 Senior Thesis
COMP 10 The Grand Hotel in Modern Fiction and Film
COMP 11 The History of Words (Same as Classics 11)
COMP 12 Introduction to Old Irish (Same as Classics 12)
COMP 13 Japanese Animation (Same as Japanese 13)
COMP 14 Plato's Symposium and Its Afterlife (Same as Classics 14, Philosophy 14, and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies 14)
COMP 16 Chekhov, An Unlikely Revolutionary (Same as Philosophy 16, Russian 16 and Theatre 16)
COMP 31 Senior Thesis
LIT 31 Senior Thesis
CSCI 11 Mixology
CSCI 14 Introduction to Ruby on Rails CANCELLED!
CSCI 15 Physical Computing: Playing with Technology (Same as Special 13)
CSCI 23 Introduction to Research and Development in Computing
CSCI 31 Senior Honor Thesis
CMAJ 31 Senior Thesis
ECON 10 Dollars, Sense and Healthcare in the U.S.
ECON 11 Public Speaking
ECON 12 How to Write a Business Plan
ECON 13 Real Estate and the Dream of Prosperity
ECON 14 Accounting
ECON 15 Stock Market
ECON 16 Mechanisms of Arbitrage
ECON 17 Entrepreneurship
ECON 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) (Same as Political Economy 22)
ECON 23 Introduction to the Economics, Geography and Appreciation of Wine
ECON 30 Honors Project
ECON 31 Honors Thesis
ECON 51 The Practice and Empirics of Monetary Policy in Emerging and Developing Economies
ECON 52 Micro-Simulation Modeling for Ex Ante Policy Analysis
ECON 53 Practical Quantitative Tools for Development
ENGL 10 Fictions of Domesticity (Same as French 10)
ENGL 11 The Changing Landscape of Journalism Today (Same as Leadership Studies 11)
ENGL 12 Making Jewelry: Design and Techniques
ENGL 13 Hipster Reading
ENGL 14 Writing Nonfiction
ENGL 15 Teaching High School English
ENGL 16 Henry James, The Golden Bowl
ENGL 17 Anarchism and Form: Conrad
ENGL 18 Stories and Pictures
ENGL 19 Humor Writing (Same as Mathematics 19) CANCELLED
ENGL 20 Tavern of Crossed Destinies: The Video (Same as Philosophy 20)
ENGL 25 Morocco (Same as International Studies 25 and Philosophy 25)
ENGL 27 Printmaking on Paper Clay
ENGL 29 Peer Writing Tutor Workshop (Same as INTR 29)
ENGL 30 Honors Project: Specialization Route
ENGL 31 Honors Project: Thesis
ENVI 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Geosciences 12)
ENVI 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Past, Its Uncertain Future (Same as Legal Studies 13)
ENVI 14 Environmental Education--What, Why, and How
ENVI 25 Sustainable Eleuthera: Farming, Subsistence, and Food Security
ENVI 31 Senior Research and Thesis
GEOS 10 Ultimate Wellness: Concepts for Living a Happy Healthy Life (Same as Maritime Studies 10)
GEOS 11 Mapping Data-a Spatial Approach to Research
GEOS 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Environmental Studies 12)
GEOS 31 Senior Thesis
GERM S.P. Sustaining Program for German 101-102
GERM 30 Honors Project
GERM 31 Senior Thesis
HIST 10 Soccer Fandom: Race, Violence, and Hooligans
HIST 11 The Amber Room and Hidden Treasures: Impressionist Art Held Hostage? (Same as Astronomy 11 and Special 12)
HIST 12 Reading Childhood
HIST 14 "I Will Bear Witness Until the Bitter End": The Experience of a German Jew in the Third Reich, 1933-1945 (Same as Jewish Studies 14)
HIST 15 CAMP IT UP! The Politics of Queer Performance (Same as Theatre 15 and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies 15)
HIST 22 Realities and Representations of Native Americans
HIST 23 Gaudino Winter Study Fellows Program
HIST 24 Politics and History in Cuba (Same as Africana Studies 24 and Political Science 24)
HIST 26 Travel Course: Resettling Refugees in Maine (Same as Special 26)
HIST 28 Sex and the First Amendment (Same as Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies 28)CANCELLED!
HIST 29 Eyewitness to the Civil Rights Movement: Mississippi, 1964-1965 (Same as Africana Studies 29)
HIST 31 Senior Thesis
INST 25 Morocco (Same as English 25 and Philosophy 25)
INST 30 Senior Honors Project
INTR 29 Peer Writing Tutor Workshop (Same as English 29)
JWST 10 Diary Writing, Children, and Experiences of Genocide
JWST 14 "I Will Bear Witness Until the Bitter End": The Experience of a German Jew in the Third Reich, 1933-1945 (Same as History 14)
LATS 10 Art and Exhibition (Same as ArtH 10)
LATS 11 Race 2.0: Race and New Media Representations CANCELLED!
LATS 13 Understanding Similarities, Bridging Differences (Same as Africana Studies 13 and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies 13)

LATS 31 Latina/o Honors Thesis Seminar
LEAD 10 Institutional Leadership and Social Responsibility
LEAD 11 The Changing Landscape of Journalism Today (Same as English 11)
LEAD 13 Epidemiology, Public Health, and Leadership in the Health Professions (Same as ANSO 13)
LEAD 14 Making Sense of the CIA (Same as Political Science 14)
LEAD 18 Wilderness Leadership
LGST 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Past, Its Uncertain Future (Same as Environmental Studies 13)
LGST 14 Mock Trial: Simulation of a Civil Trial
LGST 17 Learning Intervention for Troubled Teens (LIFTT) (Same as ANSO 17 and Special 17)
MAST 10 Ultimate Wellness: Concepts for Living a Happy Healthy Life (Same as Geosciences 10)
MATH 10 Contemporary Movie Criticism CANCELLED!
MATH 11 Lessons in Go (Same as Asian Studies 11) CANCELLED!
MATH 12 Modern Dance-Muller Technique
MATH 13 Visualization
MATH 14 The Art and Science of Baking
MATH 15 Mathematics of the Rubik's Cube
MATH 16 A Critical Study of the Coen Brothers
MATH 19 Humor Writing (Same as English 19) CANCELLED
MATH 30 Senior Project
MATH 31 Senior Thesis
MUS 10 Black Gospel Music, History and Performance Ensemble (Same as Africana Studies 10) CANCELLED!
MUS 11 Tuning and Temperament
MUS 12 African Marimba Music
MUS 13 I/O Fest '12
MUS 14 Classic American and European Musical Theatre
MUS 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as American Studies 15 and Special 15)
MUS 25 Choral Singing and South Africa
MUS 31 Senior Thesis
NSCI 31 Senior Thesis
PHIL 10 Above Us Only Sky: Atheist Understandings of Reason, Morality and the Meaning of Life
PHIL 12 Bioethics According to The Simpsons
PHIL 14 Plato's Symposium and Its Afterlife (Same as Classics 14, Comparative Literature 14, and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies 14)
PHIL 15 Film and/as Philosophy (Same as English 15) CANCELLED!
PHIL 16 Chekhov, An Unlikely Revolutionary (Same as Comparative Literature 16, Russian 16, and Theatre 16)
PHIL 20 Tavern of Crossed Destinies: The Video (Same as English 20)
PHIL 25 Morocco (Same as English 25 and International Studies 25)
PHIL 31 Senior Thesis
PHYS 10 Light and Holography
PHYS 12 Drawing as a Learnable Skill
PHYS 13 Media Immersion: Creativity through multimedia animation and video production
PHYS 22 Research Participation
PHYS 31 Senior Thesis
POEC 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as Political Science 21)
POEC 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (Same as Economics 22)
POEC 23 Institutional Investment
POEC 31 Honors Thesis
PSCI 10 Opening Up the Corporate World: Research on Corporate Ethics
PSCI 11 Editorial Cartooning and the Art of Propaganda (Same as ArtH 11)
PSCI 13 States, Foreigners and Famine in Africa
PSCI 14 Making Sense of the CIA (Same as Leadership Studies 14)
PSCI 16 Political Aikido, Embodied Leadership, and the State of the Union
PSCI 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as Political Economy 21)
PSCI 24 Politics and History in Cuba (Same as Africana Studies 24 and History 24)
PSCI 25 Eye Care and Culture on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua
PSCI 26 Catholic Social Teaching and Practice in Jamaica
PSCI 31 Senior Thesis
PSCI 32 Individual Project
PSYC 10 Group Dynamics and Leadership
PSYC 12 Alternative Birth Choices (Same as Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies)
PSYC 13 Coming Down from the High: 12 Step Recovery and Counseling
PSYC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as Chemistry 14 and Special 14)
PSYC 15 Ephquilts: An Introduction to Traditional Quiltmaking
PSYC 19 Psychology Internships
PSYC 18 Residential Treatment Internship in the Berkshires
PSYC 22 Introduction to Research in Psychology

PSYC 31 Senior Thesis
REL 10 Kierkegaard and Religion
REL 12 Wellness, Yoga, and the Art of Fully Thriving
REL 13 Write a Novel
REL 14 Yoga as Integration of Knowledge and Practice
REL 25 Jerusalem
REL 26 Explorations in Solidarity: A Meeting of Minds and Hearts in Nicaragua
REL 31 Senior Thesis
RLFR S.P. Sustaining Program for French 101-102
RLFR 10 Fictions of Domesticity (Same as English 10)
RLFR 16 Contemporary Queer Cinema in France (Same as Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies 16)
RLFR 30 Honors Essay
RLFR 31 Senior Thesis
RLIT S.P. Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102
RLSP S.P. Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102
RLSP 25 US-Mexico Border Issues (Same as Latina/o Studies 25)
RLSP 30 Honors Essay
RLSP 31 Senior Thesis
RUSS S.P. Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102
RUSS 16 Chekhov, An Unlikely Revolutionary (Same as Comparative Literature 16, Philosophy 16, and Theatre 16)
RUSS 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Special 25)
RUSS 30 Honors Project
RUSS 31 Senior Thesis
THEA 10 Playwriting Studio: Art of the Everyday
THEA 15 CAMP IT UP! The Politics of Queer Performance (Same as History 15 and Theatre 15)
THEA 16 Chekhov, An Unlikely Revolutionary (Same as Comparative Literature 16, Philosophy 16, and Russian 16)
THEA 17 Cabaret: Creation and Performance
THEA 32 Senior Honors Thesis
WGSS 12 Alternative Birth Choices (Same as Psychology 12)
WGSS 13 Understanding Similarities, Bridging Differences (Same as Africana Studies 13 and Latina/o Studies 13)
WGSS 14 Plato's Symposium and Its Afterlife (Same as Classics 14, Comparative Literature 14, and Philosophy 14)
WGSS 15 CAMP IT UP! The Politics of Queer Performance (Same as History 15 and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies 15)
WGSS 16 Contemporary Queer Cinema in France (Same as French 16)
WGSS 28 Sex and the First Amendment (Same as History 28) CANCELLED!
WGSS 30 Honors Project
SPEC 10 Quest for College: Early Awareness in Berkshire County Schools CANCELLED!
SPEC 11 Science for Kids (Same as Chemistry 11)
SPEC 12 The Amber Room and Hidden Treasures: Impressionist Art Held Hostage? (Same as Astronomy 11 and History 11)
SPEC 13 Physical Computing: Playing with Technology (Same as Computer Science 15)
SPEC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as Chemistry 14 and Psychology 14)
SPEC 15 Contemporary American Songwriter (Same as American Studies 15 and Music 15)
SPEC 16 Peer Support Training
SPEC 17 Learning Intervention For Troubled Teens (LIFTT) (Same as ANSO 17 and Legal Studies 17)
SPEC 19 Medical Apprenticeship
SPEC 21 Experience the Workplace: an Internship with Williams Alumni/Parents
SPEC 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Russian 25)
SPEC 26 Travel Course: Resettling Refugees in Maine (Same as History 26)
SPEC 28 Teaching Practica in New York City Schools
SPEC 35 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel
SPEC 39 "Composing a Life:" Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams

AFRICANA STUDIES

AFR 10 Black Gospel Music, History and Performance Ensemble (Same as Music 10) CANCELLED!

AFR 13 Understanding Similarities, Bridging Differences (Same as Latina/o Studies 13 and WGSS 13)
(See under LATS 13 for full description.)

AFR 24 Politics and History in Cuba (Same as History 24 and Political Science 24)
(See under PSCI 24 for full description.) BENSON and MAHON

AFR 29 Eyewitness to the Civil Rights Movement: Mississippi, 1964-1965 (Same as History 29)
(See under HIST 29 for full description.)

AFR 30 Senior Project
To be taken by students registered for Africana Studies 491 who are candidates for honors.

AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 10 Experimenting with Poems

This is a poetry-writing class but not your typical poetry workshop. We will not be writing the sorts of first-person "expressive" lyric poems privileged in The New Yorker magazine nor will we be approaching poetry as if it began with a capital "P." Poetry should not seem intimidating or esoteric or hoity-toity--in other words, forget everything you learned in high school and in your English classes about poetry.
You will be given various short readings by poets, assigned brief exercises, and asked to write a few poems. We will experiment with various aspects of poems-from sounds and visual layout to syntax and pronouns and other things. By the end of the course, you will have completed a portfolio of four to five poems.
To take this class you do not have to have written any poetry before or taken a poetry class. Just bring your interest and curiosity!
Requirements: final portfolio of 4-5 poems, short exercizes, class participation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost: $30.
Meeting time: afternoons.

WANG

AMST 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as Special 15)
(See under SPEC 15 for full description.)

AMST 30 Senior Honors Project
To be taken by students registered for American Studies 491 or 492.

ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

ANSO 11 Berkshire Farm Internship
A field placement at Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth in Canaan, New York. Berkshire Farm Center is a residential treatment facility for troubled, at-risk adolescent boys who have been remanded by the Family Court for treatment and intervention. These youths come primarily from lower socio-economic strata, are very ethnically diverse, and hail from both urban and rural areas throughout New York State. The issues that bring them to placement are mainly a result of the psychological scars developed from physical, emotional, and sexual abuse. The manifested behaviors include chemical dependency, juvenile delinquency, inability to function in the school setting, inability to follow the rules at home, running away and/or mental health issues. The residential treatment model is strength based and focuses on teaching healthy decision making. Williams students will commute to Berkshire Farm and work under supervision in various settings including school, cottage life, substance abuse program, recreation, adventure-based therapy, performing arts, animal husbandry or individual tutoring. The students are responsible to be proactive in developing their learning experience. Requirements: students will keep a journal reflecting on their experiences, and a weekly seminar with the instructor will draw on service learning experience. Students will also be required to submit a final 10-page paper at the end of the course. Prerequisites: YOU MUST HAVE A TELEPHONE INTERVIEW WITH THE INSTRUCTOR, who can be reached at 518-265-6218. Enrollment limit: 15. Please note: all queries about this course should be directed to the instructor.
Donelle Hauser, LMSW, is the Non-Secure Detention Program Coordinator, Burnham Youth Safe Center, Berkshire Farm Center
Cost: $25 to cover transportation to and from Berkshire Farm Center. Meeting times to be arranged.

DONELLE HAUSER (Instructor)
NOLAN (Sponsor)

Donelle Hauser, LMSW, is the Non-Secure Detention Program Coordinator, Burnham Youth Safe Center, Berkshire Farm Center.

ANSO 12 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse
The incidence of reported child abuse and neglect has reached epidemic proportions and shows no signs of decreasing. Preventive and prophylactic social programs, court intervention, and legislative mandates have not successfully addressed this crisis. This course allows students to observe the Massachusetts Department of Social Services attorney in courtroom proceedings related to the care and protection of children. Students will have access to Department records for purposes of analysis and will also work with social workers who will provide a clinical perspective on the legal cases under study. The class will meet regularly to discuss court proceedings, assigned readings, and the students' interactions with local human services agencies. Access to an automobile is desirable but not required; some transportation will be provided as part of the course.
Requirements: full participation, a journal, and a 10-page paper to be submitted at the end of the course.
Enrollment limit: 15. Please note: all queries about this course must be directed to the instructor, Judge Locke (phone messages may be left at 458-4833).
Cost: $25 for books and photocopies. Meeting times to be arranged.

JUDITH LOCKE (Instructor)
NOLAN (Sponsor)

Judith Locke is Associate Justice of the Juvenile Court, Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

ANSO 13 Epidemiology, Public Health, and Leadership in the Health Professions (Same as Leadership Studies 13)
Epidemiology, the study of disease and disability in human populations, has been called the basic science of public health and preventive medicine. Epidemiology has made substantial contributions to the advancement of health and improved illness care through a deeper understanding of the natural history of disease, the multiple "causes" of disease, including the role of behavioral factors, and the control of epidemics of both infectious and (later) non-infectious disease. Epidemiological approaches, both descriptive and analytical, are used constantly to test new medicines and guide prevention and treatment strategies. They underpin the practice of evidence-driven clinical medicine.
Making use of epidemic exercises and student presentations, selected original papers from the medical and public health literature, and a basic text, this course will begin by examining and reviewing the history, logic, and approaches of epidemiology. What is a hypothesis? How does it originate? How does a possible relationship between an exposure and an outcome get studied, analyzed, and described reliably? When is an exposure a causal factor?
At almost every session we will set aside some time to discuss aspects of leadership in the health professions using biographical material and other sources. Finally, and with the help of guest lecturers/discussion leaders, we will bring the course together by examining examine the principles of epidemiology and leadership as illustrated in at least two of the following topical areas:

*Evaluation of illness care services
*International health, specifically malaria control, drug resistant tuberculosis, or HIV/AIDS, with special consideration of how best to find the balance between treatment and prevention in high prevalence countries
*Behavioral issues in prevention and treatment, perhaps with focus on obesity.
*Sports injuries, their incidence and prevention.

Active student participation will be required. After individual consultation with the instructor, students will be asked to write a paper on selected aspects of leadership in health or an epidemiologic analysis based on available original literature concerning a topic of personal interest. Grading will depend on participation, the quality of the paper, and presentation during the discussion of unknown epidemics.
Prerequisites: Curiosity, a personal interview over coffee at Tunnel City, and a paragraph stating your reasons for interest in the course and what you think you can contribute. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost: no more than $100 for books and reading materials.
Meeting time: at least 3 times a week, for approximately 6-8 hours each week; there may be evening meetings, depending on the schedules of individual instructors.

NICHOLAS H. WRIGHT '57 MD, MPH, and others (Instructor)
NOLAN (Sponsor)

Dr. Wright is a retired medical epidemiologist, and lives in Williamstown.

ANSO 17 Learning Intervention For Troubled Teens (LIFTT) (Same as Legal Studies 17 and Special 17)
(See under LGST 17 for full description.)

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 15 Afghanistan in Photos and Film
This course looks at how Afghanistan has been represented in photographs and film since the advent of photography as a royal hobby in Afghanistan in the late 19th century, through mid-twentieth century National Geographic photo layouts and Hollywood films like The Bengal Lancers, The Man Who Would be King and The Horsemen, culminating finally in contemporary Afghan and foreign photojournalism and film (feature and documentary) on the current crisis in Afghanistan. In the course, we will read articles and books on Afghan history and culture and examine the work of theorists on visual representation. Students will be expected to develop a photo or video essay for inclusion on a newly developed website dealing with media representations of Afghanistan.
Requirements: final video/photo project.
Prerequisites: some knowledge of web design and/or video editing. Enrollment limit: 12. Students will be selected based on letter explaining interest and background.
Cost: $100.
Meeting time: afternoons.

D. EDWARDS

ANTH 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Anthropology 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 10 Trajectories of Economic Practices in India CANCELLED

SOC 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Sociology 493-494.

ARABIC

ARAB S.P. Sustaining Program for Arabic 101-102
Students registered for Arabic 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Arabic Sustaining Program.
Prerequisite: Arabic 101.
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation.
Meeting time: mornings, 9:00-9:50.

ARAB 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for ARAB 493-494.

ART

ART HISTORY

ARTH 10 Art and Exhibition (Same as Latina/o Studies 10)
Asco was a collaborative group of Chicano artists active in Los Angeles from 1972-1987. During this time they produced a wide array of experimental and conceptual art works that were often ephemeral and spanned various media including performance, video, photography, muralism, and other innovative multimedia practices. A retrospective focused on this artists group is being organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Williams College Museum and will be on view at WCMA during spring semester 2012. This class will provide the opportunity to study this work closely and explore the museum installation process. We will examine techniques used by museums to organize and display works of art, consider the challenges posed by performance and conceptual-based art works, and investigate methods used for presenting such projects in other recent exhibitions. We will also explore the role of education in museum exhibitions. Course readings will be drawn from the exhibition catalogue, additional materials on the artists, and art reviews. Writing projects will be modeled on museum educational texts, including explanatory brochures, short interpretative texts (such as, wall labels and object labels), and educator's guides.
Requirements: weekly assignments, collected writing portfolio (12-15 pages), oral presentations.
Prerequisites: ARTH 102 or permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 12. Priority given to Art majors and Latina/o Studies concentrators.
Cost: $100 for books.
Meeting time: mornings.

CHAVOYA

ARTH 11 Editorial Cartooning and the Art of Propaganda (Same as Political Science 11)
This hands-on course, taught jointly by an editorial cartoonist for a major metropolitan daily newspaper and a member of the Art Department faculty, introduces students to the "Ungentlemanly Art" through discussion and an emphasis on the creation of their own work. It is not an art course so much as an exercise in disciplining the mind to distill abstract concepts and opinions into visual and verbal symbols that can be clearly, economically and persuasively communicated to the reader. In addition, elements of creativity and ways to harness its potential will be explored. Previous drawing experience is neither a prerequisite nor an advantage. In fact, non-art majors are particularly encouraged to enroll. The basics of perspective, proportion, and shading will be covered as needed to provide all students with the necessary skills to express themselves. What is much more important is that the prospective student have an inquisitive mind, a healthy interest in the current national discourse, a willingness to enter into spirited classroom discussion, and an appreciation of satire. Class assignments will be critiqued in a non-threatening atmosphere. The instructor, who will be continuously producing daily cartoons for his newspaper, will also present his own work for criticism.
Class meetings, at least two hours per meeting three days a week, will alternate between the studio experiences described above and lectures that will acquaint students with aspects of the history of caricature, cartooning and art with a propagandistic or overtly political purpose. The lectures will provide students with knowledge that they can, if they choose, use in their own work as cartoonists.
The success of this course depends on the commitment and motivation of all participants. Course requirements will include the drawing of several editorial cartoons per week, outside reading and viewing of news media (including analysis and commentary by the nation's opinion shapers), and active involvement in class discussion. There will be a field trip to the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge.
To be considered for acceptance, applicants are requested to email Chan Lowe, in advance, a short statement (max. 200 words), describing an issue currently in the national spotlight, and why it resonates with them. Email: chanlowe@bellsouth.net
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: $75 for art materials.
Meeting time: afternoons.

CHAN LOWE AND E.J. JOHNSON

CHAN LOWE, '75, is the editorial cartoonist for the South Florida Sun Sentinel and Tribune Media Services. His work is nationally syndicated and appears regularly in newspapers, magazines and online throughout the country and the world. He is also the author of an award-winning daily blog, The Lowe Down (www.sunsentinel.com/chan)

ARTH 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for ArtH 493, 494.

ARTH 33 Honors Independent Study
To be taken by candidates for honors by the independent study route.

ART STUDIO

ARTS 12 Figure Modeling
This course is designed as an introduction to the challenges of working with the figure in a sculptural context. The class will be structured as a working studio with the students sculpting in clay from a live model.
The first half of the course will emphasize learning the technical and physiological aspects of the human figure: structure, proportion, gesture, and basic anatomy. The latter half of the course will be concerned with the creative aspects of working with the figure and of developing individual interpretations of the human form.
In addition to working studio sessions, there will be two presentations on the human form in art.
Each student will be evaluated on the success of their sculpture, attendance, participation, and effort. This course requires approximately 15 hours per week of individual investigations into the human form.
Prerequisites: ARTS 100. Enrollment limit: 12. Priority given to art majors.
Cost: $105.00.
Meeting time: afternoons.

PODMORE

ARTS 13 Design Garage
This course is a hands-on deep dive into impactful design. Explicitly and implicitly, we will use design to promote, encourage, and intervene towards sustainability at Williams. By learning and applying design techniques to this real-world challenge, students will emerge with an actionable and tested concept for a new product, service, or experience.
The format of final projects will range depending on student passions in each small group team, but all will tackle inspiring questions. For example: How might we design a program that reduces water waste without decreasing pleasurable water usage? How might we design a backpack that supports reuse of materials without sacrificing style? How might we design a mobile phone application that rewards groups of friends for reducing energy use throughout their day?
Each class session will introduce new methods that are part of a user-centered design process with a lens towards sustainability. We will practice ethnographic interviewing, needfinding, rapid ideation, improvisation, brainstorming, physical, digital and experiential prototyping, in-situ testing, and idea-pitching. Class sessions will be high-energy and require hands-on participation and radical collaboration. Students should expect to spend time outside of class working with their project team. No specific skills or prior experience are necessary, and students from any and all disciplines are encouraged to apply.
Evaluation will be based on successful completion of weekly assignments, and a final, physical, project and public presentation.
No prior experience with art or design is necessary, but a willingness to get messy while learning is required.
Cost: $80.
Meeting time: mornings.

CARISSA CARTER (Instructor)
GLIER (Sponsor)

Carissa Carter is a practicing user experience and product designer. She merges her background as a geologist with a passion for purposeful and informed design to both explore and push design methods as well as create physical products. Her personal research involves combining digital crowdsourcing techniques with hand-drawn maps collected from thousands of people around the world to gather design insights. She graduated from Williams College and has a graduate degree in design from Stanford University. Carissa has worked as a designer and consultant for startups as well Google Inc, and currently works full-time as a user experience design lead for Herman Miller Inc.

ARTS 25 Art of Experience in Egypt: Visual Documentation of Journey and Encounter
This studio art course immerses students in the contemporary culture of Egypt through travel in Luxor, Aswan and Cairo. Using watercolor, graphite and pen, students learn a range of approaches for visually documenting their experiences and encounters. As traveling artists, we repeatedly return to the following questions: How porous is being; where does the self end and the `other' begin? What does it mean to be an artist traveler? Can we say that one encounter is `more authentic' than another?
Williams College students will work with art students from the Luxor College of Fine Art during the first 10 days of the trip. Through sketchbook work and assignments on larger format paper, students will undergo a "Drawing Intensive:" in the marketplaces, at cultural sites like Hassan Fathy's New Gourna Village and Karnak Temple, and on the Luxor College campus for the study of portraiture. A Luxor College faculty member and I will provide specific skill and concept- building workshops. We will then spend three days in Aswan working in landscape, and 5 days in Cairo in order to visit artist studios, museums and other cultural sites. After the trip, students will meet to prepare an art exhibition and presentation for the Williams College community. This course requires more preparation than is usual for a WSP course; it requires attendance at evening orientation meetings and a studio workshop during the Fall semester. Preliminary sketchbook work and assigned cultural, political and historical readings including a complete text by a contemporary Egyptian author must be completed by the start of Winter Study Period. The first three days of Winter Study will take place on the Williams College campus for reading discussions, presentations, and studio workshops. Only those who can attend from the first day of Winter Study are eligible for this trip.
Requirements: completed sketchbooks and assignments, and successful execution of final project. In addition, a supportive demeanor throughout the trip and group critique participation are required.
Prerequisites: prior drawing experience strongly suggested, but not required; open to all but first-year students. Enrollment limit: 10. Students will be selected on the basis of individual interviews, campus recommendations, and seniority.
Cost: approximately $3000.

JULIA MORGAN-LEAMON (Instructor)
H. EDWARDS (Sponsor)

Julia Morgan-Leamon is a painter, installation artist, and media producer. She received her MFA in Visual Arts from Vermont College of Fine Arts, and her BA in Studio Art from Mount Holyoke College. In 2009, she was one of 25 international artists invited to participate in the Luxor International Painting Symposium and residency.

ASIAN STUDIES

ASST 11 Lessons in Go (Same as Mathematics 11) CANCELLED!

ASST 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Asian Studies.

CHINESE

CHIN S.P. Sustaining Program for Chinese 101-102
Students registered for Chinese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Chinese Sustaining Program. Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9:00-9:50. Prerequisite: Chinese 101. Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation. Cost: one xerox packet.

LANGUAGE FELLOWS

CHIN 10 Theory and Practice of Chinese Cooking
Much more than in the US., in China people are always talking about food; as the Chinese saying has it, min yi shi wei tian `the people consider eating as heaven.' This hands-on course will foster an appreciation of the historical and cultural background of Chinese cooking, as well as the development of practical skills in preparing a variety of Chinese dishes. To the extent possible, we will use locally available ingredients (organic if possible) to cook authentic Chinese food, primarily Chinese home cooking. Since climate has had a huge impact on availability of ingredients, the course includes an introduction to the four primary regions, or schools, of Chinese cooking-Northern, Eastern, Western, and Southern. While we will cook most dishes together, every student will also have the opportunity to cook independently. Students will be expected to complete assigned readings, write book reviews, view films outside of class and write film reviews, dine at a Chinese restaurant, interview chefs, write food critiques, and shop at an Asian supermarket to learn about the various cooking ingredients.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. In case of over enrollment, preference will be given to seniors, and then Juniors.
Cost: $100 for materials.
Meeting time: two three-hour sessions per week from 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM.

JERLING KUBLER (Instructor)
CHANG (Sponsor)

CHIN 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Chinese.

JAPANESE

JAPN S.P. Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102
Students registered for Japanese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Japanese Sustaining Program. Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9:00-9:50. Prerequisite: Japanese 101. Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation. Cost: one xerox packet.

YAGI

JAPN 10 Looking into Nihongo and Its Culture CANCELLED!

YAMAMOTO

JAPN 11 The Samurai in Japanese Film
Some of the finest films ever crafted and celebrated in cinematic history have projected the lives and legends of the samurai. Like the gunfighter and cowboy of the American West, the samurai is an extraordinarily iconic figure, if not, an enduring expression of a distinct Japanese ethos. This course will examine the samurai genre, the formulation of the samurai character, the code of Bushido he lived by, and the multiple roles he has assumed in Japanese filmmaking. Whether as a warrior or loyal retainer to his lord, a symbol of purity of purpose or tragic sacrifice, the samurai has usually been apotheosized as a noble, revered hero. Why? Notwithstanding this image, the films in this course will trace the rise and fall of the samurai class, the tangled legacies of its demise, and ultimate disappearance at the end of the Shogunate era, when Samurai cut their top knots before the turn of the twentieth century, and put up their swords for good. The focus of this class will be on the films of Kurasawa, Gosha, Kobayashi, Okamoto and lnagaki.
Requirements: students will write a 6- to 7-page evaluation after the completion of each film.
No prerequisites, but class attendance and participation is required. Enrollment limit: 30.
Meeting time: MWF, 10-12, with additional film screenings to be announced.

FRANK STEWART (Instructor)
YAMAMOTO (Sponsor)

JAPN 13 Japanese Animation (Same as Comparative Literature 13)
(See under COMP 13 for full description.) C. BOLTON

JAPN 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Japanese.

ASTRONOMY

ASTR 11 The Amber Room and Hidden Treasures: Impressionist Art Held Hostage? (Same as History 11 and Special 12)
The course will explore the plunder of European cultural treasures during World War II, focusing on the Germans' seizure of Russia's famed amber panels ("the eighth wonder of the world") from the Catherine Palace outside of Leningrad in 1942 and the removal of priceless Impressionist art (the "Hidden Treasures") from Germany by the victorious Soviet army in 1945. Along the way we will look at Russian entrepreneurs' leadership in collecting Impressionist art prior to World War I and the political, economic, and social changes that resulted in the Hermitage's rich Impressionist holdings after that war. Not incidentally, we will also focus on the painterly goals of the Impressionists and the political and cultural environment that affected their fortunes in France. Finally, returning to the present, we will examine the calculations that have prompted the Soviet Union to hold the "Hidden Treasures" hostage pending Germany's uncertain return of the Amber Room panels to Russia. Other examples of wartime looting and recovery, including the issues surrounding return of art that involved such luminaries as Williams professor Lane Faison will provide a starting point for students to explore further whatever aspects of the saga-artistic, social or political-interest them. Interest in how history and politics affected the fate of Impressionist artists and their art lies behind the conception of this project.
On the Astronomy Department side, the current status of the Amber Room was visited in suburban St. Petersburg, while reconnoitering for the 2008 total solar eclipse that was later observed from Siberia. Williams astronomers will, in 2012, observe the transit of Venus, only the fifth to occur since M. V. Lomonosov and Chappe d'Auteroch observed the 1761 transit of Venus from St. Petersburg and Siberia, respectively. Chappe d'Auteroch's description of Siberia and of its inhabitants, and of the Russian peoples in general, was so negative that Catherine herself wrote a rebuttal. These aspects will be covered in a guest lecture by Prof. Pasachoff.
Evaluation will be based on class presentations and a 10-page research project.
No prerequisites, however, interest in art history and/or French and Russian cultural history is recommended. Enrollment limit: 30. If overenrolled, preference will be given to history and art history majors, or students interested in taking art history or cultural history courses.

Cost: $50 to cover photocopy costs and purchase of The Amber Room, by Scott-Clark and Levy, 2004 ("reads like a Cold War Thriller" and presents the saga of the amber panels search in all its frustrating complexity).
Meeting time: mornings, 10-noon, MWR.

MARGO R. BOWDEN (Instructor)
PASACHOFF (Sponsor)

Margo Bowden is a former independent school history and politics teacher in New York as well as a NYC Teaching Fellow and an adjunct professor at Queens College. She served as a docent at the Guggenheim Museum before becoming a docent at the Clark Art Institute.

ASTR 12 Transits: Venus's Atmosphere, the Size of the Solar System, and Planets Around other Stars
Transits of planets across the faces of their parent stars have been and continue to be a powerful method of astronomical discovery. The exceedingly rare transits of Venus-seen until recently only in 1639, 1761, 1769, 1874, and 1882-were, since the work of Edmond Halley, the main way foreseen of measuring the size and scale of the Solar System, leading to over 100 expeditions being sent around the world to study the 18th- and 19th-century transits. We will discuss not only the science but also the human stories involved: Le Gentil being marooned near India in 1761 and choosing to stay on until 1769; Captain Cook observing the 1769 transit from Tahiti and, as long as he was nearby, going on to explore the coasts of Australia and New Zealand; Henry Chamberlain Russell organizing and observing the 1874 transit from Australia; Jules Janssen inventing his "revolver" to take multiple photos, a precursor to movie cameras, soon after his escape from Paris in a balloon to observe a total solar eclipse. Nobody on Earth had been alive to see a transit at the time of the 2004 transit that a Williams College team observed from Greece and with space satellites. Now we are preparing to observe the 5-6 June 2012 transit of Venus with 19th-century and 21st-century telescopes, and students in the course can participate in planning and testing historic and new equipment.
The transit method is being used in the 21st century by NASA's Kepler spacecraft to detect, so far, over 1000 planets around other stars, and the number is continually rising. Another spacecraft and ground-based telescopes are similarly studying transits of such "exoplanets." We will discuss the process and the results of these discovery searches. The discovery of these planetary systems, and consideration of the implications for our role in the Universe, is one of the most exciting topics in contemporary astronomy.
Evaluation will be based on class presentations and two 5-page papers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. If overenrolled, selection will be based on a brief personal statement.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: two-hour classes twice a week, Tuesdays and Fridays.

PASACHOFF

ASTR 31 Senior Research
To be taken by students registered for Astronomy 493, 494.

ASTROPHYSICS

ASPH 31 Senior Research
To be taken by students registered for Astrophysics 493, 494.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 10 Observational Drawing from the Natural World
This is a drawing course for science students and others who are interested in developing their skills in drawing from nature. Much of the class work will deal directly with drawing from plant forms and the animal world and to this end we will be using an interesting collection of stuffed mounts and skeletons that belong to the Williams Biology department. We will also spend time in the Morley greenhouse. Beyond the subject matter at hand, assignments will also address and analyze the more formal aspects of drawing and two-dimensional design with outside assignments including independent visits to the Clark, the WCMA study collection and the Chapin Library of Rare Books.
Evaluation will be based on completion of in-class work and outside drawing assignments with a focus on the depiction of content, effort, and development of the work. Evidence of technical and skill development as well as attendance and participation will also be taken into consideration. Exhibition and review of work at the final class meeting is required.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. If overenrolled, selection will be based on seniority.
Cost: $75.
Meeting time: 3 hours, twice a week.

JOHN RECCO (Instructor)
SWOAP (Sponsor)

John Recco lives and works in Hoosick, NY and holds an MFA from Columbia University. He has taught at a variety of institutions including Bennington College and Williams. He is the recipient of numerous awards including a Fulbright, fellowships at Yaddo, The Millay Colony, The European Cultural Centre of Delphi, Greece and a NYSCA Individual Artist Grant.

BIOL 11 Project BioEyes: Zebrafish Genetics and Development in the K-12 classroom
Project BioEyes brings tropical fish to 4th and 11th grade classrooms in Williamstown and beyond, in a science teaching workshop. Elementary and high school students will breed fish in the classroom, then study their development and pigmentation during one week per school. Williams students will write lesson plans that adapt the project to the science curriculum for the grades we visit, work with classroom teachers to introduce concepts in genetics and development, help the K-12 students in the classroom, and assess student learning. A final eight-page paper describing the goals and outcomes for each grade level is required. No zebrafish experience is necessary; during the first week students will learn to set up fish matings, and learn about embryonic development and the genetics of fish pigmentation, as well as about supporting the K-12 curriculum with hands-on experiments using living animals. In the subsequent two weeks we will work at the schools, and in the final week, students will write up the assessment data.
Evaluation will be based on a final 8-page paper.
Prerequisites: Biology 101 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 8.
Cost: $0.
Meeting times: varies depending on needs of schools and on laboratory requirements.

JENNIFER SWOAP (Instructor)
SWOAP (Sponsor)

Jennifer Swoap, an elementary school teacher, currently coordinates Williams Elementary Outreach, where Williams students teach hands-on science lessons at area elementary schools.

BIOL 13 Ferment, Leaven and Curdle: Pickle, Bake, Cheese-Make!
In this class we will learn simple and effective techniques for creating fluffy focaccia, rich paneer and quick kimchee. Students will complete the course with an in-depth understanding of the importance of yeast, rennet and bacterial-mediated fermentation in food production. Theory will come to life through practical, hands-on investigation of these biological processes, as they are involved in baking, cheese making and pickling. Each class will involve a lesson, cooking practice and tasting!
Students will be expected to read short articles on the cultural history and basic biology of each featured cooking technique, as well as articles on related hot topics such as the raw-milk debate. Students will be encouraged to practice baking, pickling and cheese making at home and to bring in their questions for troubleshooting. A short writing assignment on a special technique or culinary topic of the student's choosing will be due each week. When time permits, we will discuss these findings in class. A final paper on a richly debated issue in food production will be due at the end of the course. Development of cooking skills, attendance and participation will also be evaluated.
Local milk and flour will be used!
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15 (depends on oven/kitchen space). If overenrolled, selection will be based on seniority.
Cost to student: $80.
Meeting time: 3 hours, twice a week. 6 pm-9 pm (location: Paresky Bakery).

RACHEL RUGGLES (Instructor)
SWOAP (Sponsor)

Rachel Ruggles studied anthropology at the University of Massachusetts in Boston and is a graduate of the Cambridge School of Culinary Arts. Her love of culture and cuisine is reflected in her wide repertoire of cooking techniques and recipes. She currently bakes and makes cheese professionally in Williamstown.

BIOL 21 Science Beyond Williams
Are you interested in hands-on experience in a science-related field beyond the Purple Valley? Are you curious to explore science in a university or medical school research lab, a government agency, or a not-for-profit organization? This course is designed to help students take part in scientific work or research going on outside of Williams in order to provide them with a broader sense of what it is like to work in a professional scientific setting. Any field of science or technology can be explored via this course.
In consultation with the course instructor, students will use resources such as the Office of Career Counseling, science faculty members, and Williams alumni/ae to locate a mentor in the student's area of interest at a work site in the United States. Once the course instructor approves the arrangement for a mentored, hands-on experience for three weeks of Winter Study, the student will prepare for the internship by reading literature related to the project, and discuss the readings with a faculty sponsor here at Williams in November/December. Once on site, students must remain in contact with their Williams faculty sponsor by having a weekly phone conference. Participating students would not have to be on campus during WSP prior to beginning their fieldwork. Strong interest, enthusiasm and willingness to plan and prepare for the internship are required for this course.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper and post-WSP public presentation to a relevant department or program on the goals and accomplishments of the project.
Prerequisites: two semesters of relevant course work in science and/or mathematics.
Enrollment limit: 10.

DEWITT

BIOL 22 Introduction to Biological Research
An experimental research project will be carried out under the supervision of Biology Department faculty. It is expected that the student will spend 20 hours per week in the lab at a minimum, and a 10-page written report is required. This experience is intended for, but not limited to, first-year students and sophomores. Interested students must submit an application form available on the Biology Department webpage: http://biology.williams.edu/current-students/applications/
Prerequisites: Biology 101. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: none
Meeting time: mornings

DEWITT

BIOL 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Biology 493, 494.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as SPEC 11)
Are you interested in teaching? Do you enjoy working with kids? Do you like to experiment with new things? Here is a chance for you to do all three! The aim of this Winter Study Project is to design a series of hands-on science workshops for elementary school children and their parents. Working in teams of 2-4, students spend the first two and a half weeks of Winter Study planning the workshops. This involves deciding on a focus for each workshop (based on the interests of the students involved) followed by choosing and designing experiments and presentations that will be suitable for fourth-grade children. On the third weekend of Winter Study (January 21, 22) we bring elementary school kids with their parents to Williams to participate in the workshops.
You get a chance to see what goes into planning classroom demonstrations as well as a sense of what it's like to actually give a presentation. You find that kids at this age are great fun to work with because they are interested in just about everything and their enthusiasm is infectious. You also give the kids and their parents a chance to actually do some fun hands-on science experiments that they may not have seen before, and you are able to explain simple scientific concepts to them in a manner that won't be intimidating. It is a rewarding experience for all involved.
Evaluation is based on participation in planning and running the workshops. Each group is expected to prepare a handout with descriptions of the experiments for the kids, parents, and teachers.
No prerequisites. You need not be a science major; all that is needed is enthusiasm.
Enrollment limit: 25.
Meeting time: mornings. Classes meet three times a week for approximately three hours each session. The workshop is run on the third weekend of Winter Study (January 21, 22) and attendance from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. is mandatory that weekend. There are also one or two brief meetings held in the fall term for preliminary planning.
Cost: $0.

KAPLAN and RICHARDSON

CHEM 12 Spanish for the Health Sciences
The course is intended for those students with interest in the health sciences and with some knowledge of Spanish who want to develop their vocabulary and conversational skills. The course covers essential dialogs associated with health assessment interviews as well as extensive review of physiology, biochemistry, and public health issues affecting Spanish speaking communities in the United States. The class is open to both Spanish proficient and health sciences oriented students.
Evaluation is based on class participation, final projects, a 10-page paper, and a class presentation.
Prerequisite: Intermediate to Advanced Spanish. Enrollment limit: 12. If the course is overenrolled, preference will be given to seniors, juniors, and those who express the most and earliest interest and enthusiasm by email to Professor Peacock-Lopez (epeacock@williams.edu).
Meeting time: 9:00 a.m. to noon, three days per week.
Cost: $100 for books.

PEACOCK-LOPEZ

CHEM 13 The Principles and Practice of Peptide Chemistry
The course consists of lecture/discussion and hands on laboratory work. The lecture and lab sections meet on alternate days; the lecture in the morning and laboratories in the afternoons. Some days may involve "long" lab days where the work begins in the morning, followed by a lunch period, then finishing in the afternoon.
The lecture covers the development of synthetic techniques since the time of Fisher and Curtius through current methodology in use today: methods of peptide bond formation and the problem of racemization, α-amino protecting groups, amino acid side chain protecting groups, solution and solid phase methodologies, orthogonal protection schemes with emphasis on Fmoc/t-Butyl strategies, and sequence specific problems. Students are assigned readings and reviews from the original literature to compliment the materials discussed in class.
The laboratory portion of the course involves hands-on synthesis and characterization of model peptides using Fmoc/t-Butyl strategies. Depending on enrollment, students may start with the synthesis of Fmoc-α-N-protected amino acid derivatives, or start right out with solid phase synthesis of model peptides. A number of analytical techniques are employed to characterize the products and assess their purity, including: nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry. Time permitting, students may also learn solution-based synthesis.
Evaluation is based on laboratory performance, a report detailing the synthesis and characterization of the peptidic products, class participation, and a class presentation of a relevant topic from the current chemical literature.
Prerequisite: CHEM 251. Enrollment limit: 10. If the course is overenrolled preference will be given to students with advanced organic chemistry experience (i.e. CHEM 342/CHEM 344).
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons.
Cost: $100 for books.

TONY TRURAN (Instructor)
THOMAN (Sponsor)

Dr. Truran was trained as a peptide chemist under Professor Louis Carpino. He has taught at the University of Connecticut, Storrs and Westfield State College as a Visiting Assistant Professor. He is currently a Lecturer in the Chemistry Department at Williams College.

CHEM 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as Psychology 14 and Special 14)
Looking back on past loves and crushes, have you ever wondered, "What on earth was I thinking?!" or "Why do I keep picking the wrong guys/girls for me?" While intense sexual attraction or urges may first call the shots, people who take the time to carefully choose and build caring, mutual relationships tend to be happier, healthier and more successful in their lives than those who don't. So how do we get there from here and make sense of all this? Well, no matter where you are on the dating spectrum, this self-exploration and relationship-skill-building course is for you if you are ready to learn how to follow your heart AND your mind to co-create a fulfilling relationship within the vortex of the "hook up" culture. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, "How to Avoid Falling In Love with A Jerk," and "Keeping the Love You Find" curricula will guide this introspective, interactive relationship mastery course through meaningful discussions and exercises that explore the common issues, dirty fighting tactics, subconscious directives and emotional allergies that often sabotage relationships. Experiential exercises, personal experiences and journaling will also give you the opportunity to practice effective communication and conflict resolution skills that honor the constructive use of differences and promote intimacy.
Evaluation is based on 8 hours of attendance per week, class participation, MBTI inventory completion, 20-hours per week of assigned readings, journaling, assignments, 1:1 consultations, and final 10-page reflective paper.
Email your statement of interest to SSmith@williams.edu if you are curious about relationships and are ready and willing to delve into personal growth and take your relationships to the next level.
Prerequisite: statement of interest. Enrollment limit: 16. If overenrolled, selection will be based on statement of interest.
Meeting time: 6-8 hours a week (12-3pm).
Cost: $100 for books and materials.

RACHELLE SMITH (Instructor)
THOMAN (Sponsor)

Rachelle Smith, MSW, is a holistic, strengths-based Clinical Social Worker, Consultant, Educator & Mentor bridging Relationships, Wellness, and Energy Psychology.

CHEM 18 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry
An independent experimental project in biochemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in biochemistry. Biochemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the molecular details of living systems including the interaction of biologically important molecules. In the Chemistry Department, studies are underway to investigate the structure/function relationship of proteins, the interaction between proteins and RNA and DNA, and the molecular basis of bacterial gene regulation.
A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost: $0.

GEHRING and LOVETT

CHEM 24 Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry
An independent experimental project in physical chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in physical chemistry. Current research projects in the Department include computer modeling of non-linear, chaotic chemical and biochemical systems, molecular modeling of water clusters, laser spectroscopy of chlorofluorocarbon substitutes, and observing the dynamics in glasses using single molecule spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.
A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisite: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Meeting time: mornings.
Cost: $0.

BINGEMANN, PEACOCK-LOPEZ and THOMAN

CHEM 31 Senior Research and Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Chemistry 493, 494.

CLASSICS

CLAS 11 The History of Words (Same as Comparative Literature 11)
This course will explore the fascinating history of words from a variety of linguistic and cultural perspectives. We will examine the methods and tools of etymological research and apply them to several fields of study including historical phonology and morphology, alphabets and other writing systems, dictionaries, dialectal studies, slang and jargon, personal names, geographic names, word puzzles, and more. We will also consider the role of literary, social, and political forces in shaping the development of languages and even individual lexical items. Our goal throughout will be to gain familiarity with a broad range of issues concerning the internal and external history of words.
Method of Evaluation: class participation, several short writing assignments, and one longer research project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: approximately $30.
Meeting time: afternoons

DEKEL

CLAS 12 Introduction to Old Irish (Same as Comparative Literature 12)
This class will introduce students to the form of Irish language spoken and written in the 8th and 9th centuries, known as Old Irish. The goal of the class is to work quickly so that students will be able to read an Irish folktale in the original by the end of the session. Texts will include an as-yet-unpublished Old Irish textbook by Maria Tymozcko (used with permission) and selections from David Stifter's Old Irish textbook, Sensoidelc, as well as the text of the folktale Scéla Mucce Meic Dathó (The Tale of Mac Datho's Pig) in Old Irish and the Táin Bó Cúailnge (The Cattle Raid of Cooley) in translation. We will meet 5 days a week for 2 hours a day, as befits an intense language acquisition class.

Methods of instruction and evaluation include vocabulary quizzes, grammar exercises, short translations, and a final translation exercise.
Prerequisites: prior experience with an inflected language is helpful, but not required. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: approximately $35.
Meeting time: M-F mornings, 10 a.m.-noon.

SHANNON K. FARLEY (Instructor)
HOPPIN (Sponsor)

Shannon K. Farley is an alumna of Williams College, where she majored in Classics and History. She is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Comparative Literature at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where she has been teaching since 2004. Email skfarley@complit.umass.edu to contact the instructor.

CLAS 14 Plato's Symposium and Its Afterlife (Same as Comparative Literature 14, Philosophy 14, and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies 14)
Plato's Symposium ostensibly commemorates a gathering held at the home of the tragic poet Agathon of Athens, in 416 BCE, whose participants dedicate their evening to delivering speeches in praise of love (eros). This dialogue has been among Plato's most widely read, and its influence has ranged far beyond philosophy. We will read the Symposium in translation, with close attention to is dramatic setting, its remarkable narrative structure, and the content of each character's speech, as well as the conversations that come between. Our examination of Plato's text will be interwoven with consideration of selected receptions of and reactions to the Symposium. These will include texts from later antiquity to the Renaissance to modernity (e.g., Philo, Plotinus, Ficino, Shelley, Woolf, Mann, Forster) as well as visual and cinematic takes on aspects of Plato's work, ranging from Rubens to Hedwig and the Angry Inch. We will also consider a recent appearance of the Symposium in the American courts (Romer v. Evans, 882 P. 2d 1335 Colorado Supreme Court, 1994).
Evaluation will be based on contributions to class discussion including oral reports, several short essays, final paper or project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to majors and intended majors in Classics, Comparative Literature, Philosophy, and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Cost: approximately $25 for books and coursepack.
Meeting times: Monday through Thursday, 10-11:30 a.m..

WILCOX

CLAS 31 Senior Thesis
May be taken by students registered for Classics 493, 494.

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

COGS 31 Senior Thesis
May be taken by students registered for Cognitive Science 494.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

COMP 10 The Grand Hotel in Modern Fiction and Film
In this course, we will visit actual hotel spaces in our area, read both contemporary and early twentieth-century hotel fiction, and discuss a broad range of hotel films, from drama to comedy. The grand hotel with its dual promise of luxury and estrangement was considered a theatre of social transformation in the age of travel. We will read novels, short stories, and discuss films that feature the hotel as a space that would either uphold class distinction or give rise to class conflict, allow for sexual taboo breaking, or stage gendered identity performance. Authors and filmmakers in this early period will include Edith Wharton, Thomas Mann, Franz Werfel, Vicki Baum, and F.W. Murnau. We will consider short theoretical readings by Thorstein Veblen, Georg Simmel, Siegfried Kracauer on conspicuous consumption, modernity, and metropolitan spaces. In the present, hotel dramas focus on issues of ethnic violence (Hotel Rwanda), the invisible immigrant worker (Dirty Pretty Things), cultural alienation (Lost in Translation), and the female body at work (A Single Girl). Comedies explore the fantasy of a dramatic social climb through identity confusion in a hotel setting (Maid in Manhattan); satires highlight the confidence man who profits from social pretensions (from Thomas Mann's trickster and sexual adventurer Felix Krull, to the hilarious high-school dropout/runaway posing as the scion of a wealthy executive in Thomas Brussig's Wie es leuchtet). Fantasy writing creates virtual hotel spaces (Robert Coover's The Grand Hotels of Joseph Cornell). Theoretical readings focus on private versus public spaces, social distinction, warped space, and shopping for brands by Pierre Bourdieu, Erving Goffmann, Tony Vidler and Sharon Zukin. We will also study characteristics of real-life upscale area hotels like The Equinox, The Porches and The Orchards through site visits.
Requirements: active class participation, one oral presentation on an aspect of hotel culture, and one 10- page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to Comparative Literature, Literary Studies, and English majors.
Cost: $45 for books and xerox package.
Meeting time: TWR 10 a.m.-noon, plus excursions TBA.

DRUXES

COMP 11 The History of Words (Same as Classics 11)
(See under CLAS 11 for full description.) DEKEL

COMP 12 Introduction to Old Irish (Same as Classics 12)
(See under CLAS 12 for full description.) SHANNON K. FARLEY

COMP 13 Japanese Animation (Same as Japanese 13)
Read or Die is the title of a popular Japanese animated series about secret agents in the employ of the world's great libraries. But what does it mean to "read" in an age and culture so dominated by visual media? This class is an introduction to reading and thinking about Japanese animation, or anime, with a focus on the challenges it poses to traditional ways of interpreting literature and film. We will screen several landmark anime feature films and short series by major directors like Ôtomo Katsuhiro, Miyazaki Hayao, and particularly Oshii Mamoru; we will read the work of literature and media scholars who have tried to come to terms with anime; and we will track the latest scholarship by getting an editor's inside look at the editing process for Mechademia, an annual journal for critical writing on anime and manga. We will also look at things from the creators' side by meeting with students and faculty at the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, Vermont.
Required activities: three 2-hour morning class meetings per week, two self-scheduled film screenings per week, plus weekly reading assignments in anime criticism and theory, a day-long field trip, and a final project that addresses the course material in a sophisticated and interesting way. For the project, students may choose either a 10-page paper or a visual presentation like a storyboard, comic, film, animation, theatrical design, installation, online project, etc. Evaluation will be based on attendance, preparation, and participation, as well as the project.
No prerequisites. All material is translated or subtitled in English. Enrollment limit:15. Preference given to students with a strong interest in literary and film studies.
Cost: approximately $75 for books.
Meeting time: Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 10 a.m.-noon.

C. BOLTON

COMP 14 Plato's Symposium and Its Afterlife (Same as Classics 14, Philosophy 14, and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies 14)
(See under CLAS 14 for full description.) WILCOX

COMP 16 Chekhov, An Unlikely Revolutionary (Same as Philosophy 16, Russian 16 and Theatre 16)
(See under PHIL 16 for full description.) MILOS MLADENOVIC

COMP 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Comparative Literature 493, 494.

LIT 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Literary Studies 493, 494.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CSCI 11 Mixology
This course examines the history, science, and culture of mixed drinks. Students will learn about the origin of modern cocktails, the properties and mixing qualities of bitters, syrups, and fortified wines, the role of proportion, and the classification and appreciation of alcohol. Other topics include fermentation, modern mixology, glassware, and responsible consumption. The class will meet with local mixologists and tour a local distillery.
Evaluation is based on class participation, a short in-class presentation, a 10-page paper, and a final project involving the research and creation of a new cocktail.
No prerequisites, however, students must be at 21 years old on or before 3 January, 2012. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference is given to students with an academically strong record in the sciences.
Cost: $250 for supplies, equipment, and incidental costs due to travel.
Meeting time: mornings.

HEERINGA

CSCI 14 Introduction to Ruby on Rails CANCELLED!

CSCI 15 Physical Computing: Playing with Technology (Same as Special 13)
Get away from screen only computing,  and interface digital and analogue technologies including objects, lights, motors, sensors, sound and cameras.  Reading, research, presentations, workshops, design and practical exercises, Agile style sprints and scrums. Tools used will include Arduino micro-processor control boards, Processing and Flash.  Skills learned may include soldering, simple programming, project management, and working together to articulate and solve problems.
Requirements: attend group sessions, complete labs, blog, contribute to collaborative wiki, and a final individual and/or group project presentation equivalent to a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites, though students must have a laptop.  Enrollment limit: 12.
Group attendance: 6 hours per week.  Open labs: 12-15 hours per week (this is for designing and implementing your projects and problem solving.  You are welcome to work on your own.)
Cost: approximately $75 for hardware/software, but may be reduced depending on numbers.

DAVID FURLOW ’80 (Instructor)
Winter Study Committee (Sponsor)

David Furlow ‘80 is a European-based experience designer who has worked with interactive learning, games, simulation, toys, theme park attractions, tv set-top box DVRs, micro-transaction systems, electronic discovery, and digital archives, as well as database based investigations of fraud and money laundering.  His academic interests include surveillance and curiosity management.  He has helped to facilitate several previous WSP's and summer seminars in interaction design, experience design and media technology at Williams.  He has worked on several prize winning products including IAAPA theme park game of the year, and the Mila d'Or at Cannes, and has been a resident artist at the Banff Institute, at Performing Arts Labs in the UK and at Rotterdam Film Festival.

CSCI 23 Introduction to Research and Development in Computing
An independent project is completed in collaboration with a member of the Computer Science Department. The projects undertaken will either involve the exploration of a research topic related to the faculty member's work or the implementation of a software system that will extend the students design and implementation skills. It is expected that the student will spend 20 hours per week working on the project. At the completion of the project, each student will submit a 10-page written report or the software developed together with appropriate documentation of its behavior and design. In addition, students will be expected to give a short presentation or demonstration of their work. Students should consult with the instructor before the beginning of the Winter Study registration period to determine details of projects that might be undertaken.
Evaluation will be based on a final paper and presentation/demonstration.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to sophomores and juniors.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: TBA.

BAILEY

CSCI 31 Senior Honor Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Computer Science 493-494.

CONTRACT MAJOR

CMAJ 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Contract Major 493, 494.

ECONOMICS

ECON 10 Dollars, Sense and Healthcare in the U.S.
This class will examine how we arrived at the current system of healthcare delivery and reimbursement in the U.S. and where it is headed. The issues of access, quality and cost will be focused on, as will how well reform legislation fosters or fails these essential components. An assigned textbook and reading packet comprise the course materials with reading averaging about 100-150 pages/week. Six hours of class time each week may be added to by a field trip and/or guest lectures.
Final projects may include a 10-page paper, interview, debate, original video or other demonstration of thorough command of the material and issues.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to upper-classes.
Cost: $40.
Meeting time: mornings.

KAREN ENGBERG and DOUGLAS JACKSON (Instructors)
MONTIEL (Sponsor)

Doug Jackson, MD is Board Certified in Family Medicine and has been active on the boards of several IPAs. He has practiced in ER, solo, small group and large group healthcare settings in Los Angeles and Santa Barbara, and is currently the Medical Director of a small primary care group. Karen Engberg, MD is retired from the active practice of primary care medicine and is currently an administrative physician and the CEO of Jackson Medical Group, Inc.

ECON 11 Public Speaking
This course will help students become effective and organized public speakers, whether public speaking means giving a class presentation, participating in a debate, or giving a formal speech before a large audience. We will primarily use extemporaneous and prepared class presentations as a means of learning this skill, but we will also study the great American speeches and presidential debates of the twentieth century for further insights into persuasive public speaking techniques. The class will provide a supportive environment to help each student create his or her own public speaking style that is comfortable, confident, and conversational. We will also focus on organizational techniques, handling visual aids effectively, eye contact and body language. Finally, receiving feedback and providing constructive criticism to other students in the class will be an important part of the course.
Evaluation will be based on in-class presentations, class participation, and a 10-page written critique of the student's own videotaped presentations.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference to juniors and seniors and reasons for enrolling.
Cost: $25.
Meeting time: mornings.

CAPRIO and SWAMY

ECON 12 How to Write a Business Plan
The course will meet three days a week for three hours. Classes will be spent reviewing the fundamentals of writing a business plan. Participants will receive workbooks and handouts as background which they will be expected to read. They will also be expected to do worksheets. Working in teams, the participants will be expected to research a business idea and write a draft of a business plan. They will also present the business plan to the class. There will be a number of guest speakers including a lawyer, an entrepreneur, and a venture capitalist.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, presentations, and the business plan.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Priority will be given to students who have a business plan they would like to analyze and develop.
Cost: less than $30.
Meeting time: afternoons.

STEVEN FOGEL (Instructor)
MONTIEL (Sponsor)

Steven Fogel is the Program Director of Berkshire Enterprises Entrepreneurial Training Program and has helped hundreds of people develop business plans and start businesses.

ECON 13 Real Estate and the Dream of Prosperity
In the United States, the dream of achieving prosperity has generally included home ownership as a central feature. In advertising, the popular press and in film, home ownership is presented as one of the defining characteristics of the "American Dream". In this course we will explore-through film and economics-the role that home ownership and real estate markets play in defining the economic aspirations and welfare of individuals in the United States and elsewhere. We will view and discuss six films that present and document the pathetic, comic and tragic aspects of pursuing this dream. Each film will be discussed, and students will consider and write about the economic significance of home ownership and operation of real estate markets.
Evaluation will be based on participation in class discussions and on two-page critical essays submitted after viewing each film, (a total of 12 pages of writing).
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 19. Preference given to first-years and sophomores.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: afternoons.

S. SHEPPARD

ECON 14 Accounting
The project will examine the theoretical and practical aspects of financial accounting. Although the beginning of the course will explore the mechanics of the information gathering and dissemination process, the course will be oriented mainly towards users, rather than preparers, of accounting information. The project will include discussion of the principles involved in accounting for current assets, plant assets, leases, intangible assets, current liabilities, stockholders' equity, the income statement and the statement of cash flows. Students will be expected to interpret and analyze actual financial statements. The nature of, and career opportunities in, the field of accounting will also be discussed. The project is a "mini course." It will present a substantial body of material and will require a considerable commitment of time by the student, including regular attendance and participation in discussion and homework cases and problems.
The course is a web-based course. The course website will include required readings from various linked web sites, additional downloadable reading material, required homework problems as well as self study material. The course grade will be determined on the basis of several quizzes and a written group report presenting an analysis of a company's annual report.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost: possible cost of downloading about 200 pages of material from the course website.
Meeting time: the course will meet for two hours on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday of the first week of Winter Study. Monday, Tuesday and Thursday of the second and third week of Winter Study and on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of the last week of Winter Study.

LEO MCMENIMEN (Instructor)
MONTIEL (Sponsor)

Leo McMenimen has taught in the Winter Study Program at Williams College since 1980. He retired as a professor emeritus from the School of Business, Montclair State University.

ECON 15 Stock Market
Elementary description and analysis of the stock market. Emphasis will be on the roles of the market in our economy, including evaluation of business firms and the success of particular capital investments, allocating savings to different types of investment, and providing liquid and marketable financial investments for individual savers.
The course will focus on the description of mechanics of trading on various exchanges and other markets, stock market indexes or "averages" (Dow-Jones, S&P, 500, etc.), how to read the financial news, historical rates of return on stocks and portfolios, role of mutual funds, beta coefficients, and "random walk" theory. The course will also involve a brief introduction to financial reports of firms and analysis of financial ratios.
The course is a web-based course. The course website will include required readings from various linked web sites and required homework problems.
Each student will participate in discussions, do some homework assignments and, as part of a team, give two presentations and write a 10-page report analyzing the wisdom or folly of having chosen a particular investment portfolio. The course grade will be determined on the basis of performance on several quizzes and a written group investment portfolio report.
No prerequisites; not intended for students who already know much about the stock market. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost: possible cost of downloading about 100 pages of material from the course website.
Meeting time: the course will meet for two hours on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday of the first week of Winter Study. Monday, Tuesday and Thursday of the second and third week of Winter Study and on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of the last week of Winter Study.

LEO MCMENIMEN (Instructor)
MONTIEL (Sponsor)

Leo McMenimen has taught in the Winter Study Program at Williams College since 1980. He retired as a professor emeritus from the School of Business, Montclair State University.

ECON 16 Mechanisms of Arbitrage
Economic analysis presupposes the dominance of the "law of one price": the tendency of prices of a given item to converge. His WSP will focus on how that occurs in financial and other traded markets subject to constraints of time, distance, variety of form and differentiation. This process is called "arbitrage." Its various manifestations are important elements in the functioning of financial and commodity markets.
This course will begin with instances of "true" arbitrage and then deal with instances of multiple arbitrage pressures on the same instrument, as well as "near" arbitrage where true arbitrage doesn't exist; but arbitrage pressures dominate the price relationships of different instruments. Different securities and commodities markets will be discussed sequentially. Concepts of "faux" arbitrage and instances of fraud sold as arbitrage concepts will also be discussed. The course will incorporate current topics in financial markets where applicable.
Requirements: there will be fairly extensive readings of up to 200-300 pages per week; there will be two short papers and a five page analytical paper for the final week.
Prerequisites: enrollees should have a basic familiarity with accounting concepts. These can be achieved by reading How to Read a Financial Report (provided upon request) prior to the start of the course. Enrollment limit: 25.
Cost: $0. Course materials will be provided.
Meeting time: twice per week for 3 hours per session.

PAUL ISAAC '72 (Instructor)
MONTIEL (Sponsor)

Paul Isaac '72 has been engaged in different trading and analytical functions in financial markets for 40 years. He is Chief Investment Officer of Cadogan Management, a fund of funds firm and principal of Arbiter Partners QP, an investment partnership in New York.

ECON 17 Entrepreneurship
Designed for students interested in starting a company, this course will focus on the interface between entrepreneurs and venture capital investors with the aim of givingstudents an immersive, hands-on experience. Student teams will develop business plans based on seed concepts provided by local experts. The teams will then present ("pitch") their proposals to venture capitalists for critique and feedback. We will learn from case studies of both successful and failed early-stage companies. We will explore technical aspects of creating venture-backed start-ups, including capitalization, equity, intellectual property considerations, and returns on investment. Each team's final project shall comprise a business plan (written) accompanied by a final presentation to potential investors. Student evaluations will be based upon their team's success in developing its seed concept, their team's final project and upon classroom participation. Most class meetings will include guest experts; attendance is mandatory. The course will include a required two-day trip to New York City for meetings with venture professionals.
Requirements: final project and presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference to upperclass students.
Cost: $250 (for NYC trip).
Meeting time: afternoons.

JEFFREY THOMAS (Instructor)
MONTIEL (Sponsor)

Jeffrey Thomas holds an M.D. and Ph.D. from Indiana University. He helped start two biotechnology companies, Millennium Pharmaceuticals and Genstruct, Inc.

ECON 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) (Same as Political Economy 22)
This course examines tax policy towards low-income families in the United States, and has the following three objectives: 1) For students to understand the shift of redistributive policy in the United States from income support through the transfer system (Aid to Families with Dependent Children/Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) towards support of working individuals through the tax system (primarily the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC)); 2) For students to understand the challenges that low income individuals have "making ends meet" and to understand the role that the EITC has played in increasing the standard of living of the working poor; and 3) To enable students to understand the tax code well enough to prepare simple income tax returns, including those for filers claiming the EITC. Students will be trained by the IRS to prepare income tax returns for low-income individuals and families. At the end of the term, students will use their newly acquired expertise to help individuals and families in Berkshire County prepare and file their returns. Class meetings will involve a mixture of discussion of assigned readings, and exercises that help develop tax preparation skills and understanding of poverty. Assignments outside of class include: a variety of short readings on tax policy, the challenges of living in poverty in the U.S., and public policies that address these challenges; completion of an online course in IRS VITA training; and staffing approximately six hours of tax preparation assistance during the final week of winter term.
Evaluation is based on the results of the IRS certification test, students' work as tax preparers, and a 10-page analytical and reflective essay.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 14. If overenrolled, selection will be based on written statement of interest.
Cost: $25.
Meeting time: mornings.

WATSON and PAULA CONSOLINI

ECON 23 Introduction to the Economics, Geography and Appreciation of Wine
This course provides an introduction to the economics, geography and appreciation of wine. We will be studying the economics and geography of wine production, and will also learn to identify, understand and appreciate the major wine types of the world. The course will involve lectures, outside readings, and in-class wine tastings. We will focus primarily on the Old World wine styles and regions of France, Italy, Germany, Austria, Spain and Portugal. However, this year, for the first time, the course has been expanded to also cover some New World wine regions, including California, Oregon, Chile, Argentina, South Africa, New Zealand and Australia. Evaluations will be based on short quizzes, including blind tastings, and either an oral presentation or 10 page paper at the conclusion of the course.
Requirements: short quizzes, including blind tastings, and either an oral presentation or 10-page paper. While this will be a fun and interesting course, it is also a serious course in which students are
expected to learn the materials and skills presented in the lectures and wine tastings.
Enrollment limit: 10. Since the course will include wine tastings, it will also be restricted to those who are of legal age for wine consumption by the date of the first class meeting. In the event that demand exceeds the maximum limit for the course, students will be selected on the basis of a mix of academic record and diversity of backgrounds and interests.
Cost: approximately $225 in the form of a course fee, to be used for the cost of wine purchases for the course.
Meeting time: evenings.

P. PEDRONI

ECON 30 Honors Project
The "Specialization Route" to the degree with Honors in Economics requires that each candidate take an Honors Winter Study Project in January of their senior year. Students who wish to begin their honors work in January should submit a detailed proposal. Decisions on admission to the Honors WSP will be made in the fall. Information on the procedures will be mailed to senior majors in economics early in the fall semester.
Seniors who wish to apply for admission to the Honors WSP and thereby to the Honors Program should register for this WSP as their first choice.
Some seniors will have begun honors work in the fall and wish to complete it in the WSP. They will be admitted to the WSP if they have made satisfactory progress. They should register for this WSP as their first choice.

ECON 31 Honors Thesis
To be taken by students participating in year-long thesis research (ECON 493-W31-494).

ECON 51 The Practice and Empirics of Monetary Policy in Emerging and Developing Economies
This course is an introduction to the empirical analysis of practical macroeconomic policy issues, particularly those having to do with monetary policy. One objective is to provide an exposure to a few of the relevant econometric techniques. A second is to supply the background necessary for the critical evaluation of applied macroeconomic research. Third, with a final paper as the main requirement, the course will furnish an opportunity to practice writing about economic issues.
Requirements: final 12-page paper.
Prerequisites: ECON 509. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: mornings.

KUTTNER

ECON 52 Micro-Simulation Modeling for Ex Ante Policy Analysis
Micro-simulation modeling provides one of the most powerful tools for ex ante evidence-based analysis of economic and social policy interventions. Rooted in representative household surveys of a country's population, the models provide a picture of poverty, employment, consumption and income levels throughout the country. A micro-simulation model enables researchers to investigate the impact of existing economic and social policy interventions (such as tax and public benefit interventions) on income levels, poverty, inequality and other outcomes. In addition, researchers are able to simulate the impact and estimate the cost of new policy interventions.
During this course, students will learn to apply these methods to analyze public policies and interpret the findings. The course examines measurement issues, analytical tools and their application to household survey data for a range of developing countries. The course also links the outcomes of the analysis with the challenges of policy implementation, exploring how the political environment and/or institutional setting may result in the implementation of second-best options. This is a hands-on modeling course, and students will build a micro-simulation model for a country of their choice and use this model in completing the course requirements. The course will employ Excel, Stata and advanced micro-simulation packages. The final requirement for the course is a policy paper that provides students with an opportunity to write accessible prose that communicates the methodology adopted and the key lessons of the analysis.
Requirements: exercises, presentation, policy paper.
Enrollment limit: 15. The course is intended for CDE students and undergraduate enrollment is limited and by permission of the instructor.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: afternoons.

SAMSON

ECON 53 Practical Quantitative Tools for Development

In the day-to-day work as an economist for a developing country, you often lack the time, data, or software recreate the models detailed elsewhere in the CDE curriculum. This course is designed to bridge the gap between academic research and real world answers. We will focus on using Excel to answer the types of questions that require answers within a short time frame. Some examples of topics are: creating price indices from CPI data, growth accounting with applications, IMF FPP scenarios, and cost-benefit analysis.
This course will meet daily for the entirety of winter study. Evaluation will focus on homeworks and a long paper due at the end. I expect students to work at least two hours outside of class for every hour of class. The class is expected to take a minimum of 30 hours per week.
Evaluation will be based on home works and final project.
Prerequisites for undergraduate students: ECON 110, 120. Enrollment limit: 20.
Course is intended for CDE students and undergraduate enrollment is limited and by permission of the instructor.

Meeting time: afternoons.

ROLLEIGH

ENGLISH

ENGL 10 Fictions of Domesticity (Same as French 10)
We visit an author's home in search of a connection to the origin of their writing: here's the site from which a novel or poem sprang. Museums dedicated to authors' homes feed this fantasy, that in looking at Melville's desk (complete with glasses) or at the room where Dickinson dwelt we are even closer to them than in their words. However, as we will explore in the course, far from an unmediated visit to the source of genius, museums of author's homes construct narratives of their own about authorship, art, even about the value of daily life. Moreover, the writers themselves shaped conceptions of domestic space in ways that do not always correspond to the tales told by the museums made of their homes. We will visit the homes of, and read works by, Herman Melville, Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, and Harriet Beecher Stowe.
Students will write a 5-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost: $97 (for transportation and museum admission).

DAVIS and PIEPRZAK

ENGL 11 The Changing Landscape of Journalism Today (Same as Leadership Studies 11)
The purpose of this course is to give students an in-depth, personal view of the inner workings of various facets of journalism. The course will feature distinguished Williams alumni from a broad spectrum of today's media universe, including print, broadcast, and newer media formats. Among those planning to participate in 2012 are David Shipley '85, formerly Editor of The New York Times Op-Ed page and now of the new opinion initiative at Bloomberg News; Shayla Harris '97, Peabody Award-winning producer for Dateline and now video producer for nytimes.com; Dr. Richard Besser '81, previously at the CDC and now Senior Health and Medical Editor at ABC News; and Elizabeth Rappaport '94, previously at the Dow Jones Newswires and TheStreet.com and now staff reporter for The Wall Street Journal. Each guest lecturer will discuss specific skills and experience in his or her background as well as lead a dialogue about the issues with which they deal today.
Students will be required to do weekly research assignments as well as one major project of their choosing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to juniors and seniors.
Cost: $75.
Meeting time: mornings.

KLEINER

ENGL 12 Making Jewelry: Design and Techniques
This course will teach students to design and create jewelry in a wide range of styles and materials. We'll start with basic techniques for assembling beaded jewelry and move on from there to decorative wire wrapping and twisting, creating beads and components from colored art clay, working with the new metal clays to create metal shapes, pavé, and cutting and soldering metal wire and sheets to make settings for stones. Class will be held in Prof. Case's jewelry studio in her home in North Adams, and the studio will also be open to students for work outside of class hours. We'll also travel to a glass-blowing studio for a one-day workshop on making glass beads.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Students will be selected based on an interview.
Cost: $100.
Meeting time: afternoon.

CASE

ENGL 13 Hipster Reading
What could be more hopeless than the fate of the little magazine-the ones with a taste for culture and critique that you'll likely only find in museum shops, on the racks of independent bookshops, or maybe on the side tables of the hipper inhabitants of Williamsburg, Brooklyn-in today's moment of digitization and media consolidation? Magazines, you may have noticed, or not, appear to be dropping like flies as the web supplants old-fashioned glossies. So, it's all the more interesting that one could plausibly claim we're living in a gold age of hipster periodicals, journals devoted to art, culture, and intellectual life without fustiness or even a sense of impending doom around intellectual life: Cabinet, N+1, The Believer, McSweeney's, to name just a few. These journals, many but not all out of Brooklyn, will be the subject of this course: we'll try to think about what role journals like these have in the broader scene of American intellectual life, what they're up to, and how they position themselves both alongside and well outside the university, the usual go-to site for the conversations about culture, politics, and art these journals are way into. Do these journals offer alternate ways of engaging with culture (Cabinet, for example, recently held a séance in honor of James Merrill's Ouija-board poem, The Changing Light of Sandover)? What does intellectual life look like outside the academy? We'll have editors from some of these magazines to class in order to talk about their aims, as well as the nuts and bolts of journal editing. The final project: a journal of one's own, a pitch, as it were, for your own arts and culture journal.
We will meet three times a week for two hour sessions. There will be significant outside reading, and we may make a field trip to New York.
Evaluation will be based on the final project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to English majors and interview.
Cost: $25.
Meeting time: mornings.

MCWEENY

ENGL 14 Writing Nonfiction
Students will explore the craft of writing nonfiction-principally through frequent journalism and reporting assignments, but also in the form of essays and criticism. Twice-weekly three-hour seminars will review fundamental principles and practices; analyze examples of excellent writing in diverse forms pertinent to students' writing assignments (the examples will be read aloud and analyzed in class discussions, as will samples from the students' work); and discuss solutions to common writing problems and challenges. There are no required readings outside of class; rather, students will be expected to complete seven pieces of written work (one after each seminar meeting, following the initial class), and to discuss their work and possible revisions in individual meetings with the instructor. It is envisioned that research or reporting, drafting, consultation with the instructor, and revision will require 20 hours of additional weekly work, at least, for conscientious students who seek to get the most out of the course.
Instructor evaluation of writing assignments, student meetings, and revisions, completed on a timely basis, 80%; class participation and out-of-class meetings with instructor, 20%.
Prerequisites: a written statement of interest (one page or less), and a NON-academic writing sample (i.e., not a term or course paper). Students need not major in English or a similar humanities discipline-in fact, those studying social sciences or natural/life sciences are strongly encourage to apply-nor to have active experience in a writing-related extracurricular activity. Diversity of backgrounds, activities, and interests will enrich the course for fellow students. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost: $24 for two paperback books.
Meeting time: Monday and Friday afternoons.

JOHN ROSENBERG (Instructor)
LIMON (Sponsor)

John Rosenberg has been a professional writer and editor for three decades; his most recent experiences have been as editor of Vermont Magazine, 1991-1994, and of Harvard Magazine (harvardmagazine.com), 1995-present. In the latter capacity, he has overseen all assignments and contents for the magazine in print and online; written extensively for each issue; and selected and supervised two undergraduate student fellows chosen to join the editorial staff each year.

ENGL 15 Teaching High School English
Are you interested in teaching English at the secondary school level?  If so,
this course is designed for you.  We will cover three topics any aspiring
teacher should be familiar with: (1) how to design new courses and construct
effective syllabi; (2) how to lead engaging classroom discussions about
challenging works of literature; and (3) how to grade and constructively
comment on student writing.  This course will emphasize practice over theory,
and throughout the winter term, we will jump in and try our hands at all three
of these fundamental teaching skills: each student will dream up and design the
syllabi for two elective courses meant to appeal to high school students; lead
one 30-minute mock classroom discussion on a poem or short story of his or her
own choosing (with the other students "acting" as 10th or 11th graders); and
practice commenting on and grading various samples of student writing.  Near
the end of the course, we will also touch upon some of the nuts and bolts of
landing your first teaching position, including how to prepare a strong job
application and how to ready yourself for an interview and on-campus visit.
There will be no single final paper, but much writing and work will be required
throughout: sample course descriptions and syllabi; written and mental
preparation to lead a 30-minute classroom discussion; written comments on a
number of sample student papers; and finally, various short written reflections
on teaching which will be assigned throughout the course.  Evaluation will be
holistic, based on written work, discussion-leading performance, and overall
effort and engagement.
Prerequisites: Interested students should send a brief email to the instructor
(bernard.j.rhie@williams.edu) explaining why they want to take the course.
 I will use these emails to decide whom to admit, should the course end up
over-enrolled.  Potential students should obviously have a solid background in
the study of literature, ideally having already taken at least 6 courses at
Williams in English or in some other literature department. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost to student: none.
Meeting time: mornings.

RHIE

ENGL 16 Henry James, The Golden Bowl
In this course we will read Henry James' last novel, The Golden Bowl, which dramatizes many of James' crucial preoccupations. Centered on a wealthy American collector living in England at the turn of the twentieth century, the novel examines the personal and cultural costs of an American obsession with amassing relics of a collapsing European empire, as well as the potentially ruinous effects of wealth and refined sensibility on tangled love relations. The novel's ethical and perceptual intricacies are conveyed in an ingeniously demanding style that presses syntax to its limits. We will read critical essays on the novel, and draw on Walter Benjamin's work on collecting and on the Arcades of 19th century Paris.
Requirements: 10-page paper.
Prerequisites: 100- or 200-level English course. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference based on major and seniority.
Cost: approximately $20.
Meeting time: afternoons.

SOKOLSKY

ENGL 17 Anarchism and Form: Conrad
Europe around the turn of the twentieth century was deeply alarmed by the specter of anarchism and revolutionary terrorism: bombings, assassinations, uprisings, and strikes seemed to announce a dreadful upheaval in European society and culture. Several of Joseph Conrad's novels offer among the most compelling accounts of this sense of crisis, staging dramatic confrontations between revolutionaries and authorities in their narratives, and enacting in their own aesthetic form analogous conflicts between order and its negation or subversion. In this course we will spend one to two weeks studying the theory of anarchism and surveying celebrated instances of terrorism in the late 19th and early 20th century, before turning to two of Conrad's studies of revolutionary violence and its complex moral, political, and aesthetic implications: The Secret Agent (1907) and Under Western Eyes (1911). Class meetings three times a week, reading assignments, and writing, totalling about 20 hours per week.
Requirements: two or three class presentations and a short final paper, totalling about 10 pages of writing.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference to majors.
Cost: about $30 for books and photocopies.
Meeting time: afternoons.

TIFFT

ENGL 18 Stories and Pictures
What would you do if Vladimir Nabokov suddenly appeared and said: "Read this thing I wrote, and then make a twenty second stop-motion animation that captures what it feels like to long for a country that doesn't exist anymore. You have a week."? What if Miranda July asked you to make a drawing or a performance that offers a realistic solution to a magical problem? You don't even want to know what Kurt Vonnegut would want from you.
"Stories and Pictures" can help you prepare for these kinds of situations. In this class, we will read a short story every week, and produce a visual response to it. We will talk about the different ways in which the written word can provide fuel for image-making, and figure out how to make good art fast. In our meetings we will discuss the stories we've read, see how other visual artists have used literature and narrative to inform their work and try out various art-making techniques such as drawing, digital photography and video, the intricate art of the flip book, and other ways to make awesome things. We will meet 2-3 times a week for 3-hour sessions, and students should plan to invest an equal amount of time on their projects outside of class.
Requirements: active discussion in class and four artworks.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference will be given to students with literary/art background.
Cost: $65 for art supplies and photocopies.
Meeting time: mornings.

GABRIELA VAINSENCHER (Instructor)
LIMON (Sponsor)

Gabriela Vainsencher is a Brooklyn-based visual artist, whose drawings, videos and installations have been exhibited in the US and abroad. She was Williams College's Levitt artist-in-residence in 2009.

ENGL 19 Humor Writing (Same as Mathematics 19) CANCELLED!

ENGL 20 Tavern of Crossed Destinies: The Video (Same as Philosophy 20)
(See under PHIL 20 for full description.) WHITE

ENGL 25 Morocco (Same as International Studies 25 and Philosophy 25)
Students in this course will spend winter study in Morocco. Morocco presents a compelling blend of historical influences and modern world currents. Threads of Islam, Arab traditions, and the heritage of the native Berber people are woven into a distinctive cultural tapestry, while traces of French colonialism can still be seen in the political and social structure. Morocco is at the intersection of the West, the Middle East, and Africa. Travel there is therefore a powerful way to introduce intellectual themes that require and reward a subtle blending of insight from history, political science, religion, and philosophy.
We will take the first steps in engaging some of these challenging topics in order to enable independent study facilitated by serious and multifaceted exposure to the country. For the first two weeks, students will study at the Center for Cross Cultural Learning (CCCL) in Rabat, taking Arabic lessons (classical or Moroccan dialect) each morning and then gathering for lectures by local university faculty in the afternoon. During this span students will live with Moroccan families in the Rabat medina. In the third week of the course students will travel in the interior of Morocco, exploring Fez and Marrakech, riding camels in the desert, and hiking through Berber villages in the Atlas Mountains.
Students will be expected to attend all seminars, lead a group presentation, and complete a substantial research paper (10-15 pages). The presentation and research paper will be occasions to explore a special topic in depth including, for instance, justice and gender, art, literature, colonial studies, or Islam.
No prerequisites. Arabic is the official spoken language of Morocco, and French is spoken widely. While desirable, neither is required. Enrollment limit: 11. Preference: Student interest is more important than class year or academic major. Final participants will be chosen on the basis of interviews regarding student goals and intellectual interests.
Estimated cost: $4000.

KNOPP and BARRY

ENGL 27 Printmaking on Paper Clay
This course introduces the technical and creative possibilities of print making on paper clay without the use of a press. Students will learn how to make paper clay and will explore monoprinting, relief printing, and offset printing. Historical examples will be introduced through lectures, field trips and assignments. Students will receive feedback on their work through group critiques and open studio sessions. They will be evaluated based on completion of assignments with attention to detail, content, and development of their work. Attendance and participation are required along with a group exhibition on the last day of Winter Study.
Requirements: attendance, assignments and final exhibition.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8-10. Preference based on seniority.
Cost: $100.
Meeting time: mornings.

DIANE SULLIVAN (Instructor)
LIMON (Sponsor)

Diane Sullivan is an artist who lives and works in North Adams, MA.

ENGL 29 Peer Writing Tutor Workshop (Same as INTR 29)
The purpose of this course is to train peer writing tutors and assistants to be more effective reviewers and editors of student work. Format: workshop/discussion. Students will read and discuss literature on the teaching of writing; they will also do analytical writing assignments, which they will then bring into the workshop.
Evaluation will be based on analytic writing assignments and course participation. Students who complete this training will be eligible for assignment as Writing Workshop tutors and/or as Writing Assistants for selected Williams classes.
Prerequisites: admission to Williams Writing Writing Pilot or by permission of the instructor. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: under $50.
Meeting time: MWF 2-4.

STEPHANIE E. DUNSON, Writing Coordinator at Williams

ENGL 30 Honors Project: Specialization Route
Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the specialization route.

ENGL 31 Honors Project: Thesis
Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the thesis route.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

ENVI 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Geosciences 12)
(See under GEOS 12 for full description.)

ENVI 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Past, Its Uncertain Future (Same as Legal Studies 13)
(See under LGST 13 for full description.) PHILIP R. MCKNIGHT '65

ENVI 14 Environmental Education--What, Why, and How
Public school teachers are in the best position to take us safely across the precipice at which humanity finds itself. Our side of the abyss: business as usual with dirty fuels, rampant growth of population and pollution, and consumption practices that use up natural resources at an accelerating rate. The other side: industry mimics nature by recycling resources, waste is eliminated, consumers consider factors other than price; a paradigm shift in collective consciousness where environmental impact is at the forefront of decisions rather than an afterthought.
Public school teachers are in the best position to teach the fundamentals of environmental education, which will arm students with the knowledge set they need to live a life that accounts for the human
impact on ecosystems and make informed decisions for the rest of their lives. How to optimize the effectiveness of environmental education in classes K-12 is the question this course will explore.
We will examine several environmental education models, then focus on California's Education and the Environment Initiative as the leader, as being the largest lever ever attempted to raise environmental literacy to the same level of importance as the three "Rs": reading, 'riting and 'rithmatic. We'll learn how the landmark legislation came about that created the curriculum and consider other countries and states already hoping to duplicate its success. We'll use case studies to assess implementation in the school districts that have adopted it over the last two years. We'll explore ways of making the curriculum adoption even more widespread. And we'll discuss how success can be measured. We will explore education theories including studies that show better student engagement when topics are taught through an environmental lens. We'll discuss theories about how learning happens and how it affects behavior change, looking especially at the Transcendent Function. And we'll discuss the efficacy of using the education system to foster behavior change.
The class will be conducted mostly as a seminar, with some short lectures, a lot of discussion, debates, and presentations. We will meet three times a week in sessions lasting approximately two hours each; there will be guest speakers and one or two field trips to local schools. There will be some reading required outside of class.
Evaluation will be based on a 4-page paper with an audiovisual presentation or other effort as approved by the instructor. Attendance and participation will also be taken into account.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: afternoons.

WILL PARISH '75 (Instructor)
FRENCH (Sponsor)

Will Parish '75, has been teaching Environmental Science at a San Francisco Public Charter School for nine years and was appointed to the California State Board of Education's Curriculum Commission in 2009 and chairs. In fall of 2010, he was elected to Chair the Executive Committee of the Education and the Environment Initiative. Prior to teaching, he flew airplanes for an environmental advocacy organization, ran an alternative energy development company, practiced law in San Francisco, and drove a Jeep around the world.

ENVI 25 Sustainable Eleuthera: Farming, Subsistence, and Food Security
This course is a hands-on group research and community development project that will initiate a community garden, conduct community outreach about gardening and nutrition, and work with a local school on a garden-based learning project. The focus area is Weymms Bight, South Eleuthera, a low-income underserved settlement, which was formerly an agricultural area, but is now suffering from high unemployment, high rates of nutrition based diseases, and a shortage of fresh nutritious food.
The class will work in conjunction with the permaculture manager at the Cape Eleuthera Institute, and will partner with a community development organization, the South Eleuthera Emergency Partners (SEEP). A site is already chosen for the garden, which will be adjacent to a planned emergency center/community center. Students will learn about cultivation techniques from the permaculture manager, and will work creating a demonstration organic garden along with community volunteers. Students will work with the community organization to develop an outreach program to involve people in the garden, including workshops and written materials on gardening and nutrition. We will also collaborate with the local school to involve the children and to help develop a garden-based learning curriculum focusing on cultivation, soil maintenance, and nutrition.
Requirements: active and involved participation in group research project, including conducting interviews, farm tours, group discussions, taking photos and film footage, conducting primary research, data analysis, writing group report, and preparing and delivering two public presentations. Last week of winter study class meets on campus finalizing written report and power point presentation and/or film.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Selection will be based on relevant coursework or extracurricular involvement in environmental, sustainability or agriculture projects. Not open to first-year students.
Cost: approximately $2100 (airfare, room and board, course packet).
The class will spend the first two weeks of winter study on Eleuthera and the third week on campus writing and editing the report and editing and cutting a short film.

GARDNER

ENVI 31 Senior Research and Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Environmental Studies 493-494.

GEOSCIENCES

GEOS 10 Ultimate Wellness: Concepts for Living a Happy Healthy Life (Same as Maritime Studies 10)
(See under MAST 10 for full description.)

GEOS 11 Mapping Data-a Spatial Approach to Research
While visual presentation of research data can be an effective means of getting your point across, the use of GIS (Geographic Information Systems) to perform spatial and temporal analyses can lead to the discovery of interesting correlations in your data.
Using appropriate software, this course will take you through basic skills and advanced GIS statistical analysis topics. In addition to lab exercises, you will use yourr own research topic/data to explore and visualize hidden potentials. Additional readings on various GIS topics will be required.
Evaluation will be based on completion of assignments, discussions, process documentation and class presentation of your project work.
Cost: $0.
Prerequisites: basic computer skills and a project to work on. Enrollment limit: 10. If overenrolled, selection will be based on planned project.
Meeting time: mornings, 3 times a week for 3 hours with additional lab time required to complete assignments.

SHARRON MACKLIN (Instructor)
DEHTIER (Sponsor)

Sharron Macklin is an Instructional Technology Specialist at Williams College specializing in instruction and support of Geographic Information Systems. She has been an adjunct faculty member at MCLA for 5 years and also co-taught the Williams' ENVI/GEOS 214 course during the Spring 2010 semester.

GEOS 12 Landscape Photography (Same as Environmental Studies 12)
This class will broaden students' appreciation for the appearance and history of the landscape and teach the skills of making a successful photograph. Williamstown, situated in a valley between the Green and Taconic Mountains and bisected by the Green and Hoosic Rivers, is a place of great natural beauty. The local landscape is a subject that inspires both professional and amateur photographers alike. While Williamstown will be the subject of most of our work, we will use it to learn principles of universal application. Students will discover the importance of light in making a photograph. They will also learn camera skills and the mechanics of digital photography, which will be reviewed at biweekly class meetings. In addition to photographing and critiquing images, the class will visit collections at the Clark Art Institute and WCMA to see original work and examine and discuss books on reserve at Sawyer Library. An overview of the history of landscape photography will be provided with an emphasis on American workers such as Carlton Watkins, Eadweard Muybridge, Alfred Stieglitz, Eliot Porter and Ansel Adams. We will also demonstrate examples of different cameras such as medium format, view cameras, and panorama cameras. Students will produce a body of successful photographs that will be projected at the Winter Study presentation day and on display at http://drm.williams.edu/projects/. Students will submit short written explanations with each of their photographic assignments.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, the student's photography, and their presentation.
Prerequisites: students will need a digital single lens reflex camera (DSLR). See http://digital-photography-school.com/blog/how-to-buy-a-dslr-camera/. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to first-year students and sophomores.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: mornings.

NICHOLAS WHITMAN (Instructor)
DEHTIER (Sponsor)

Nicholas Whitman is a professional photographer and the former Curator of Photography at the New Bedford Whaling Museum. A 1977 graduate of the Rochester Institute of Technology, he has honed his craft to make landscape photographs of power and depth. See more at www.nwphoto.com.

GEOS 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Geology 493-494.

GERMAN

GERM S.P. Sustaining Program for German 101-102
Something new and different for students enrolled in German 101-102. Practice in the use of German for everyday purposes; creation and performance of short dramatic sketches through group collaboration; games; songs; storytelling; reading. No homework.
Requirements: active participation and regular attendance earn a "Pass" grade.
Prerequisites: German 101 or equivalent. Limited to German 101-102 students.
Cost: approximately $5 for photocopied materials.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week 9-9:50 a.m.

GERM 30 Honors Project
To be taken by honors candidates following other than the normal thesis route.

GERM 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for German 493-494.

HISTORY

HIST 10 Soccer Fandom: Race, Violence, and Hooligans
This course will examine the historical and cultural meanings of soccer fandom in specific national and transnational contexts. U.S. media sources often portray soccer fans as particularly violent. This course will examine both the construction of "rabid" soccer fans and the lived experience of those branded as hooligans. We will analyze both first-hand written accounts and film depictions to address questions that include: How and why does someone identify with a particular club or national side? What (and how) do soccer/football/futebol/fútbol teams mean to their supporters? Are racism and violence inevitable outgrowths of passionate team support or just objectionable but commonplace ones?
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites, but preference will be given to History majors and students with strong backgrounds in soccer. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost: about $50 for book and course packet.
Meeting time: mornings, twice per week, three hours per session.

KITTLESON

HIST 11 The Amber Room and Hidden Treasures: Impressionist Art Held Hostage? (Same as Astronomy 11 and Special 12)
(See under ASTR 11 for full description.) MARGO R. BOWDEN

HIST 12 Reading Childhood
In this course we will embark on two related projects. First, we will think about how literacy and children's literature shape childhood and our memories of childhood. To investigate this question, we will read memoirs about childhood and historiography on children's literature in America, as well as write our own essays on a well loved book from childhood or on a "reading experience". Second, we will work with local youngsters-primarily at the Williamstown elementary school-who are at the beginning of their reading lives. Each student will work alongside a local child, reading aloud and/or silently and discussing the books. The child and the Williams student will also co-author book reviews.
Evaluation will be based on class attendance and participation, successful meetings with their underage reading partners, and completion of all reading and writing assignments.
No prerequisites. Enrolment limit: 30 students; preference given to first-year students and sophomores.
Cost: approximately $40.
Meeting times: there will be four morning meetings per week (including class time and work with local youngsters); students must be able to walk from campus to the Williamstown elementary school.

LONG

HIST 14 "I Will Bear Witness Until the Bitter End": The Experience of a German Jew in the Third Reich, 1933-1945 (Same as Jewish Studies 14)
This course will be devoted to reading the two-volume diary of Viktor Klemperer, a German Jew living in Dresden, who managed to survive both the Holocaust and the fire-bombing of that city. From 1933 to 1945, Klemperer, a professor of Romance languages and literature, kept a diary in which he described his personal experiences in Nazi Germany. The diary raises important issues of identity, victimization, resistance, and the relationship between writing and life. It illuminates German-Jewish attitudes and relations over the course of the Third Reich and paints a vivid portrait of life in Germany from 1933 to 1945. But most of all, the diary gives an account of one person's day by day experience of the gradually tightening Nazi noose that takes the reader's breath away.
Evaluation: students will keep a journal in which they record their personal response to the diary entries and are expected to participate actively in class discussion.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25; preference will be given to juniors and seniors if the class is oversubscribed.
Cost: approximately $50 for three books.
Meeting time: afternoons.

KOHUT

HIST 15 CAMP IT UP! The Politics of Queer Performance (Same as Theatre 15 and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies 15)
Cher. Liberace. John Waters films. Swan Lake. 1920s women's fashion. Batman. Drag. The operas of Richard Strauss. What do they have in common? They are all items, performances, cultural artifacts and icons from the canon of Camp. Camp is a theoretical concept and aesthetic sensibility embraced by performers, writers, filmmakers and designers, and richly described and analyzed by scholars from various disciplinary perspectives. Whether naïve or intentional, camp is always over the top and passionately committed to artifice, emphasizing form and devaluing content. It is seriousness that fails; a mode of enjoyment; a taste for excess and larger than life personality; parody and self-parody served with tender feeling. This course is an exploration of the meanings, practices, and theories of camp. It looks at the uses of camp as performance and analytic tool, and asks if it is primarily an apolitical style or an ironic but nonetheless powerful mode of cultural criticism. We will watch ballet, 1960s sitcoms, drag shows, and opera to investigate camp from its first appearance in the eighteenth century court to its present manifestations in pop culture, queer spaces and discourses, theatre and literature. Through movies, animation, theoretical texts, and fashion blogs this course will attempt, as camp often does, to question, please, confuse, lampoon, and provoke cultural and social critique.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page final paper, or on a camp performance and 3-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15 students; preference will be given to juniors and seniors.
Estimated cost to students: negligible
Meeting times: Tuesday and Thursday afternoons, 3 hours per meeting.

FISHZON

HIST 22 Realities and Representations of Native Americans
In this course, we will explore the lives and times of four iconic Native Americans-as well as how their stories are constantly interpreted and reinterpreted-as a way of understanding more about the history of Native North America. Most of these figures are familiar from textbook and legend: Pocahontas, the original "Indian Princess"; Squanto, who famously taught the Pilgrims how to cultivate maize; Sacagawea, the quintessential guide, interpreter, and cultural go-between of the Lewis and Clark expedition; and Crazy Horse, a Lakota warrior and leader who participated in the Battle of the Little Big Horn. By considering how these individuals' stories have been told through a variety of media such as films, websites, historic sites, sculpture, and more, we will explore the symbolic uses of these individuals in American culture. We will also delve into the realities behind the symbols to contrast the actual experiences of diverse Native peoples with the stereotypes that continue to evolve into the present day. We will meet three days a week for two hours, and students will view films and other media and complete secondary reading assignments outside of class.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page paper analyzing at least three popular representations of a Native American individual.
No prerequisites, but preference will be given to History majors. Enrollment limit: 25.
Cost: about $50 for books and course packet.
Meeting time: mornings, twice per week, three hours per session.

LAURA KEENAN SPERO (Instructor)
WATERS (Sponsor)

Laura Keenan Spero received her Ph.D. in early American history from the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests include colonialism, Native North America, and gender studies.

HIST 23 Gaudino Winter Study Fellows Program
The Gaudino Winter Study Fellow designation is available to up to ten students who create their own independent projects that involve critical, reflective, and experiential learning during Winter Study. Each student works independently under the direction of a faculty sponsor, who will help shape and monitor the project. The project must receive approval from the Winter Study Committee, as well as from the Gaudino Scholar and Gaudino Board of Trustees. The Gaudino Board is looking for projects that address specific intellectual problems through direct experience, undertaken preferably in a social milieu that is previously unfamiliar or even uncomfortable to the applicant. Projects must be academically rigorous and worked out carefully with faculty sponsors. Projects should also entail systematic self-reflection on how the experiences affect students personally, and students may be asked to discuss their project with the Gaudino Board after it is completed. The Gaudino Scholar will meet with students as a group before and after Winter Study. All students whose projects are approved will receive the Gaudino Fellow designation. In addition, students on Financial Aid will receive Gaudino funding from a minimum of 50% to a maximum of 90% of the budget for the project up to $2,500, as determined by the Financial Aid office. No additional funding for students' projects will be provided by the College. Students selecting this course will register for HIST 23. More information about the Gaudino Fellows Winter Study Program and guidelines for applying can be found at: http://web.williams.edu/resources/gaudino/overview.php.

BERNHARDSSON

HIST 24 Politics and History in Cuba (Same as Africana Studies 24 and Political Science 24)
(See under PSCI 24 for full description.) BENSON and MAHON

HIST 26 Travel Course: Resettling Refugees in Maine (Same as Special 26)
(See under SPEC 26 for full description.) JEFF THALER '74

HIST 28 Sex and the First Amendment (Same as Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies 28)--CANCELLED!

HIST 29 Eyewitness to the Civil Rights Movement: Mississippi, 1964-1965 (Same as Africana Studies 29)
During sixteen months in 1964-1965, I worked as a civil rights organizer in rural Mississippi with the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). I witnessed and aided in the heroic efforts by black citizens to dismantle the pervasive structure of Jim Crow that had oppressed them for generations. I met relatively uneducated people with the stature of giants. What I encountered was an apartheid America-a vicious police state reinforced by government and random violence-beyond the understanding of most Americans and certainly beyond the imagination of young people today. This course will explore this transformative moment in recent American history, largely through discussion. Topics will include non-violence, the role of the black church, black nationalism, Malcolm X and Black Power, the role of women, the role of whites, the third party politics of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and the actions of the federal government during the civil rights era. The course will examine how these events and issues have played out over the ensuing decades, up to and including the election of Barack Obama. It is the intent of the instructor to convey the immediacy that only first person experience can invoke. Reading materials will include I've Got the Light of Freedom by Charles Payne, From the Mississippi Delta by Endesha Ida Mae Holland, and Freedom Summer: The Savage Season That Made Mississippi Burn and Made America a Democracy by Bruce Watson. The documentary films, Eyes on the Prize and Freedom on my Mind, as well as music from the time will be utilized. Other veterans of the civil rights movement will visit the class to tell their stories.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a final project in any media approved by the instructor.
Prerequisites: none. Enrollment limit: 20 (chosen randomly if the course is oversubscribed).
Cost: approximately $125.
Meeting times: afternoons.

CHRIS WILLIAMS (Instructor)
WATERS (Sponsor)

Chris Williams is the College architect. He has recently returned from a tour of the Deep South, where the events in this course took place. He has offered Winter Study courses at Williams on previous occasions and has taught courses in architecture at the Pratt Institute and Parsons School of Design in New York City.

HIST 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by all senior honors students who are registered for HIST 493 (Fall) and HIST 494 (Spring), HIST 31 allows thesis writers to complete their research and prepare a draft chapter, due at the end of WSP.

WATERS

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

INST 25 Morocco (Same as English 25 and Philosophy 25)
(See under PHIL 25 for full description.) BARRY and KNOPP

INST 30 Senior Honors Project
To be taken by candidates for honors in International Studies.

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

INTR 29 Peer Writing Tutor Workshop (Same as English 29)
(See under ENGL 29 for full description.)

JEWISH STUDIES

JWST 10 Diary Writing, Children, and Experiences of Genocide
Dozens if not hundreds of diaries from WWII and the Holocaust are extant, as are diaries written by children affected by modern war and genocide in such countries as Iraq, Israel, Palestine, Afghanistan, Bosnia and others. The diarists, often writing under life-threatening circumstances, are alternately terrified, insightful, courageous, hopeful, often humorous and poignant. In their diaries, they cut through politics with a universal question: How and Why have adults gone insane enough to start these wars? This course examines the meaning of diary writing to children under extreme circumstances and how children, in their own words, reflect on the nature of children's experiences of war. Students will meet twice a week for three hours a session. Readings will include Clara's War, based on the Holocaust-era diary of the Polish Jewish teenager Clara Schwarz, and other selected diaries chosen by the instructor and by students. Several diarists, including Zlata Filipovic, writer of Zlata's Diary, Clara (Schwarz) Kramer, and several additional diarists will be skyped into the classroom to discuss their diaries. Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation in class discussions, and two writing assignments. The first is a creative writing assignment in which each student will research a particular genocidal context and keep a diary written from the perspective of a person in that time and place. The diaries will be handwritten on a media similar to those used by the diarists. Students will also write a 10-page paper analyzing their writing experience.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference to students who have previously taken a course in Comparative Literature, English, History, Jewish Studies.
Cost: approximately $50 for books and materials, including composition book, old-style fountain pen, ink, pencils.
Meeting time: mornings.

STEPHEN GLANTZ (Instructor)
GARBARINI (Sponsor)

Stephen Glantz is a prolific writer and screenwriter whose work has ranged from feature films to documentary films, television series, theater, and journalism. For the last decade, Glantz's work has focused on the Holocaust and genocide with a special emphasis on children and children's diaries.

JWST 14 "I Will Bear Witness Until the Bitter End": The Experience of a German Jew in the Third Reich, 1933-1945 (Same as History 14)
(See under HIST 14 for full description.) KOHUT

LATINA/O STUDIES

LATS 10 Art and Exhibition (Same as ArtH 10)
(See under ARTH 10 for full description.) CHAVOYA

LATS 11 Race 2.0: Race and New Media Representations CANCELLED!


LATS 13 Understanding Similarities, Bridging Differences (Same as Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies 13)

This course is an introduction to issues of social identity, social & cultural diversity, and societal manifestations of power, privilege and oppression. Mini lectures, presentations, readings, dialogues, in-class activities, audio and visual materials will help us analyze social identity development, social group difference and similarities, and levels and types of oppression, including racism, classism, sexism, and heterosexism as well as, linkages between them.
Requirements: weekly readings, 3 short journals, a project, and a final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost: $42.51 for book.
Meeting time: afternoons.

TAJ SMITH (Instructor)
KITTLESON (Sponsor)

 

LATS 31 Latina/o Honors Thesis Seminar
Students must register for this course to complete an honors project begun in the fall or begin one to be finished in the spring.
Prerequisite: approval of program chair. Enrollment limited to senior honors candidates.

LEADERSHIP STUDIES

LEAD 10 Institutional Leadership and Social Responsibility
This course will examine a wide variety of issues related to leadership and responsibility, in both public-and private-sector settings. We will explore these issues through the experiences of men and women who have held leadership roles in these contexts. We will look at issues of corruption and fraud in the private sector. We will examine the changing role of lawyers in advising and guiding their clients. We will look at environmental issues from the perspective of both private institutions and government regulators. We will discuss issues facing leaders in higher education. We will look at questions of responsibility facing political leaders at the state level in our federal system. And we will examine leadership issues as they have arisen in historical contexts, including crucial questions regarding the origins and development of American involvement in Asia. The majority of class sessions will be led by guest speakers, most, though not all, of whom are distinguished alumni of the college. Students will be expected to take an active role in introducing and helping to lead discussions involving the guest speakers.
Students will be expected to take an active role in introducing and helping to lead discussions involving the guest speakers. Evaluation will be based on attendance, preparation, and participation in class discussions, and a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to Leadership Studies concentrators.
Cost: approximately $30 for reading materials.
Meeting time: mornings.

EARL C. DUDLEY and FRED HITZ (Instructors)
MCALLISTER (Sponsor)

Earl C. Dudley and Fred Hitz teach at the University of Virginia Law School.

LEAD 11 The Changing Landscape of Journalism Today (Same as English 11)
(See under ENGL 11 for full description.) KLEINER

LEAD 13 Epidemiology, Public Health, and Leadership in the Health Professions (Same as ANSO 13)
(See under ANSO 13) NICHOLAS H. WRIGHT '57

LEAD 14 Making Sense of the CIA (Same as Political Science 14)
(See under PSCI 14 for full description.) MCALLISTER and DONALD GREGG '51 (Instructors)

LEAD 18 Wilderness Leadership
This Winter Study project is for students who would like to participate in an off-campus experiential education opportunity. Students will be required to research an appropriate accredited program i.e. National Outdoor Leadership School, Outward Bound etc., that will provide a suitable learning environment and be at least 22 days in length. The Director of the Williams Outing Club will assist students in their search if necessary. Upon choosing a program and being accepted, students will meet with the Director in a pre-program meeting in December to create a framework for observing group dynamics and studying a variety of leadership styles. A required 10-page paper based on their journals will be required immediately after their return to campus for the start of third quarter. There will also be a follow up class to debrief the experience in the first week of February. All programs must meet with the approval of the Outing Club Director. In addition to off-campus opportunities, there will be a Wilderness First Responder Emergency Care course that will take place on campus. Contact Scott Lewis for details.
Requirements: course approval by WOC Director, daily journal writing with focus on leadership and group dynamics, 10-page paper and 2 class meetings pre and post trip. Student assessment will be based on ten page paper and class discussions.
No prerequisites. Off-campus opportunities are not open to first-year students. Interested students must consult with WOC Director before registration. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student will vary depending on the program selected-range is generally from $1,500-3,000.

SCOTT LEWIS, Director of the Outing Club

LEGAL STUDIES

LGST 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Past, Its Uncertain Future (Same as Environmental Studies 13)
Taught from the perspective of an experienced trial attorney, this course will examine the role environmental law plays in the United States today in light of how that role has developed during the nearly forty years since the modern era of environmental law began. As a preface, we will consider the significantly more limited influence of environmental law in our national affairs before 1970 and some of the historical and political reasons for that situation. We will examine the reasons why the law's early application in the first half of the 20th century almost exclusively to the conservation and preservation of natural resources took on in the second half a markedly different approach, one emphasizing pollution control and all but ignoring resource conservation.
The course will begin by tracing the development of an American consciousness towards the environment through an examination of our law and our literature. The term "law" includes state and federal judicial decisions and legislation, particularly during the presidency of Theodore Roosevelt and during the decades which followed the year 1970 when much of the legal basis for the American environmental protection movement was established. The term "literature" includes not just the written word (the first book we look at is "The Lorax" by your favorite childhood author, Dr. Seuss) but also painting, sculpture, and music. Nothing too heavy! We will examine the historical and legal choices we as Americans have made which have put our environment on trial. What has occurred in our development as a people that explains this quintessentially American phenomenon? Our journey begins with the Puritans of New England and the planters of Virginia and their predecessors in the New World and then moves swiftly to the beginning of the modern era in environmental law and to its now uncertain future.
In light of this historical situation students will examine state and federal legislative and judicial attempts to address environmental problems and then try to reach informed, rational conclusions as to whether those attempts were successful. What were the political, social and economic issues involved and, ultimately, how did their context affect the legal solutions imposed. Cases decided at the appellate level will be introduced and examined through their trial court memoranda opinions in order to observe how the legal system actually works and how frequently the reasoning behind the trial judge's decision changes as the case works its way through the appellate process.
This course will be presented from a litigator's point of view, that is to say, both the practical and the theoretical, emphasizing what is possible to achieve in the litigator's real world as informed by what the academician would present from the security of the classroom. Evaluation will be based on attendance and classroom participation. Students will prepare several short papers, including single page "clerk's notes," which will present one or more sides of an issue and form the basis for classroom discussion.
They will be asked to defend or reject the conclusions reached or approaches taken by our courts and legislatures and by our literature, as broadly defined, on environmental issues.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. This course is appropriate for students eager to explore the material presented and prepared to argue assigned positions on important legal, literary and historical issues.
Cost: approximately $80 for books and materials.
Meeting time: mornings, 3 two-hour sessions a week.

PHILIP R. MCKNIGHT '65 (Instructor)
SHANKS (Sponsor)

Philip R. McKnight '65 is a trial and appellate attorney. At Williams he completed the honors program for both American History and Literature and European History. He earned his law degree from The University of Chicago Law School and then practiced in the state and federal courts of New York and Connecticut, as well as in Europe.

LGST 14 Mock Trial: Simulation of a Civil Trial
This course provides the opportunity for students to simulate the role of a civil trial attorney formulating trial strategy, opening statement, direct and cross examination of witnesses, and closing argument. Using case materials from the American Mock Trial Association which has a website at www.collegemocktrial.org, teams of 5-6 students will prepare for a civil trial. The initial class will review the role of trials in the American legal system, the anatomy of a trial, approaches to witness presentation, styles for direct and cross examination, and the role of opening statement and closing arguments. After the initial lecture, the students will go through the process using the materials provided to select the necessary witnesses to present their case as both plaintiff and defendant. Students on each team will then play the roles of the attorneys and witnesses to present their case, once as the plaintiff and once as the defendant. Evaluation will be based on the following: (1) short (2-3 page) memo on the strategy for the case as plaintiff/defendant and reasons for witness selection; (2) preparation of direct and cross examinations; (3) preparation of opening and closing arguments; (4) effectiveness as witnesses and (5) oral presentation of the case to a panel of "judges" as plaintiff and defendant.
No prerequisites, but interest in the legal system and potential career in law helpful. Enrollment limit: 24.
Cost: less than $100 for photocopying of case materials.
Meeting time: two 4-hour sessions on Mondays at 12:00 to 4:00 and Tuesdays at 10:00-2:00.

DAVID C. OLSON '71 and GENE M. BAUER '71 (Instructors)
SHANKS (Sponsor)

David C. Olson graduated from Williams in 1971 and then from Ohio State's Law School in 1978. He joined what is now Frost Brown Todd 32 years ago and practices as a civil trial attorney. He handles a wide range of complex civil matters with a concentration on construction cases. Please see his attached firm profile for more details.

Gene M. Bauer graduated from Williams in 1971 and then from Harvard Law School in 1974. He held a variety of positions with law firms in New York for 6-7 years and thereafter assumed several positions as Associate General Counsel, General Counsel and other senior management positions with companies in New York, New Jersey and Massachusetts. Please see his attached Career Summary for more details.

LGST 17 Learning Intervention for Troubled Teens (LIFTT) (Same as ANSO 17 and Special 17)
The objective of this program and winter study course is to provide an alternative sentence for adolescents involved in the Juvenile Court system in Berkshire County. Many of these children cut school, are disruptive in the classroom, and do not find learning stimulating. The goal of this program is to teach these children, through experience, that learning can be fun, providing them with the motivation to succeed in school. These students, under the guidance of Williams College undergraduates, will select a topic of interest and learn how to research and present this topic to their peers in the program, with access to Williams College facilities. Williams undergraduate students will gain experience in teaching and motivating troubled teenagers and will also present a topic of their choosing to the students in the program, modeling a classroom setting. Furthermore, Williams students will be exposed to the Juvenile Court system, gaining insight into the causes of and solutions to the incidence of juvenile crime. Williams students will be expected to read relevant training materials, meet with their teenagers three times a week in the afternoons, give a final presentation, and keep a weekly journal detailing the meetings.
Evaluation will be based on the quality of the journal, the Williams students own topic presentations, and a final paper about the experience, with a focus on how to improve the program, the juvenile sentencing system, and what they learned about the social and psychological repercussions of adolescent crime.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 6. Students will be asked to write an essay describing why they want to take the course.
Cost: $0.
Meetings with the teens will be from 3-5 p.m. three times a week.

MIKE WYNN '93 (Instructor)
SHANKS (Sponsor)

Mike Wynn is the Chief of Police of the Pittsfield Police Department and graduated Williams College in 1993.

MARITIME STUDIES

MAST 10 Ultimate Wellness: Concepts for Living a Happy Healthy Life (Same as Geosciences 10)
This course provides an opportunity to drastically improve your life by introducing concepts that can start making a difference in the way you feel today. We will be approaching post-modern nutrition concepts such as: Bio-individuality, crowding out, deconstructing cravings, and primary food through discussion, reading material, and videos. Students will develop a healthy eating and feasible living approach that includes: Menu planning, food label reading, navigating the grocery store, overcoming sugar addiction, self-care, physical activity, journaling, and achieving balance.
Evaluation will be based on completion of assignments, class participation, reflective 10 page paper or equivalent creative project, and final presentation that demonstrates a level of personal growth.
After signing up for this course please email Nicole at nicole@zentreewellness.com with a brief statement describing your interest in the course and what you hope to get out of it. In the event of over-subscription, these statements will be used in the selection process.
There will be several books, videos, grocery store field trip and simple cooking required for this class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: $100.
Meeting time: mornings, twice a week for three-hour sessions.

NICOLE ANAGNOS (Instructor)
COX (Sponsor)

Nicole Anagnos is a local Health & Nutrition Coach and the founder and director of Zen Tree Wellness. She also holds a masters degree in education.

MATHEMATICS and STATISTICS

MATH

MATH 10 Contemporary Movie Criticism CANCELLED!

MATH 11 Lessons in Go (Same as Asian Studies 11) CANCELLED!

MATH 12 Modern Dance-Muller Technique
This dance class will be based on the modern dance technique developed by Jennifer Muller, with whom I danced professionally for 5 years in New York City and in Europe. Jennifer Muller was a soloist in the dance company of José Limon before she started her own company in 1974. She has added her own style of movement to the Limon technique, creating an expansive, free-flowing dance that is wonderful to do and to watch. The class will be multi-leveled and open to both men and women alike. Students will have the opportunity to choreograph a short piece either as a soloist or in small groups. We will finish the course with a short lecture-demonstration illustrating what we have learned.
Previous dance experience preferred, but not required. Enrollment limit: 24.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: Mornings. Six hours per week, 10-12, M, T, TH, F

SYLVIA LOGAN (Instructor)
SILVA (Sponsor)

Sylvia Logan received her B.A. in Slavic Literature from Stanford University. She danced professionally with the Jennifer Muller Dance Company, a modern company based in New York City for five years.

MATH 13 Visualization
The complexity and amount of information available to us is remarkable. But how do we make sense of all this data meaningfully? A revolution in visualization is taking place today, allowing us to comprehend and communicate by transforming massive quantities of information into meaningful, intuitive representations.
The goal of this course is to expose students to visualization methods and techniques, ranging from comic books and board games to cartography and architecture, and much more. We will think about how the human mind processes images and understand good design practices for visualization. The interests and curiosities of the students will strongly motivate our topics.
Evaluation will be based primarily on attendance, participation, and projects.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Priority will be given to students who wrestle with issues of visual design of any kind.
Cost to student: $0.
Meeting time: mornings.

DEVADOSS

MATH 14 The Art and Science of Baking
This course will provide an introduction to baking, including cakes, meringues, cookies, pastry, quick breads, and chocolate. We will study the science behind the baking in addition to techniques of baking. Students will also contribute to a food blog, where they will write about and display their creations. The course is aimed at those without extensive baking experience, though some knowledge would be helpful.
Assessment will be based on class participation (in the Williams College bakeshop in Paresky), homework, and a final project that will include both a baking and writing component.
Evaluation will be based on a final project and presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost: $200.
Meeting time: afternoons; class will meet afternoons (not Friday's, an average of three days (9 hours) per week.

PACELLI

MATH 15 Mathematics of the Rubik's Cube
The Rubik's cube, one of the greatest toys ever invented, hides deep and subtle mathematical concepts. In this course the students will learn how to solve the Rubik's cube and will investigate the solution using abstract mathematics and geometric intuition. The mathematical model associated with the cube is the Rubik's Group, an algebraic structure with more than 43 quintillion elements. We will study the basics of Group Theory, an area of algebra used in the study of symmetry in two- and three-dimensional geometric figures. The mathematical theory will help us understand the beauty and some of the complexity of the Rubik's cube. We will also briefly investigate the other Rubik's cubes: the 2x2x2 Mini Cube, the 4x4x4 Rubik's Revenge and the 5x5x5 Professor's Cube.
Should the course be oversubscribed, selection will be based on responses to a questionnaire.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and homework.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 104 or its equivalent. Enrollment limit: 25.
Cost: $15 for Rubik's cube.
Meeting time: mornings.

STOICIU

MATH 16 A Critical Study of the Coen Brothers
Over the past 25 years, Joel and Ethan Coen, known professionally as the Coen brothers, have established themselves as among the most important independent filmmakers of our time. They write, direct, and produce their own films and have won numerous critical distinctions for their work, including tying the existing record for the most Academy Award nominations for a single nominee for their 2007 blockbuster No Country for Old Men. Notorious for their dark humor and twisted plots based upon a simple storyline, their filmography pays tribute to nearly every classic American movie genre, with a particular recurring postmodern twist on film noir. We will watch and critique a wide ranging sample of Coen brothers movies, such as Raising Arizona, Fargo, The Big Lebowski, No Country for Old Men, and True Grit. The class will meet daily, with movie screenings and discussions on alternate days.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation in class discussions, and a 2-page critical essay due every other class meeting.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: Monday through Friday mornings, with 2-3 meetings per week at least 2 hours for movie screenings.

TOWNSEND BEAZLEY

MATH 19 Humor Writing (Same as English 19) CANCELLED

MATH 30 Senior Project
To be taken by candidates for honors in Mathematics other than by thesis route.

MATH 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Mathematics 493-494.

MUSIC

MUS 10 Black Gospel Music, History and Performance Ensemble (Same as Africana Studies 10)
(See under AFR 10 for full description.) AVERY SHARPE

MUS 11 Tuning and Temperament
Our musical system conceals a fundamental flaw-an inherent, mathematical incommensurability of its intervals: a finite collection of tones cannot be built from pure fifths and thirds and also be closed at the octave (i.e. twelve fifths from C returns not to another C, but to the distinct pitch B#). Equal temperament is our modern solution to this problem: we make the space between all tones exactly the same, spreading the discrepancy between C and B# evenly among all intervals, thereby making all intervals slightly impure. Historically, this was always the case; in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, myriad competing methods arose to distribute the discrepancy in uneven but usable ways. As a result, different keys had different sounds-some were more harmonious, others less so; triads in those keys were not simply major or minor, but involved many shades of major and minor. Drawing on ancient legends, writers ascribed specific characters to particular keys, and such key characters undoubtedly shaped composers' choices: Mozart, for instance, reserved g minor for particularly tragic topics; E-flat suggested particular paths for modulation by Bach. The class will explore the theory, the mythology, and most importantly, the practice of diverse, microtonal tuning systems from the Baroque era: much of the class work will involve learning how to tune a harpsichord, realizing various historical temperaments on the instrument, and performing works thereupon in multiple keys, exploring the distinct sound worlds those temperaments create. Evaluation will be based on a student's tuning project, and its accompanying presentation and paper.
Enrollment limit: 12. Preference given to music majors, performers, and students who have taken a music theory course.
Meeting time: mornings.

ED GOLLIN

MUS 12 African Marimba Music
Created in the 1960s, Zimbabwean marimba band has made its mark in countries around the world. The compositions of Alport Mhlanga are in the repertoire of virtually every marimba band that plays in Zimbabwean style. Beginning students (no musical prerequisites) will learn to play simpler Zimbabwe marimba songs, many composed by Alport Mhlanga. Advanced students will learn to play more advanced Zimbabwean songs and, time permitting, new compositions and arrangements commissioned by the Zambezi Marimba Band.
Students in this intensive course will learn to play Zimbabwean marimba music, perform with the Zambezi Marimba Band in the last week of WSP, and investigate the history, aesthetics, and acoustics of the African marimba. The course will be taught by Prof. Ernest Brown, Director of the Zambezi Marimba Band who designed the chromatic African marimbas played by Zambezi and broadened the repertoire of Zambezi, and Mr. Alport Mhlanga, a composer, teacher, and marimba virtuoso who helped develop the Zimbabwean marimba style and has toured internationally with his own marimba bands. Mr. Mhlanga currently teaches marimba at Maru a Pula School in Botswana.
Beginning Section: Mondays-Fridays 10 AM to 12 PM. Advanced Section: Mondays-Fridays 4-6 PM. Possible weekend rehearsals Jan. 21 and/or 22, 2012. Evening Concert in the last week of WSP. Students are required to practice individually and to come to group lessons prepared to play the material taught in the last lesson. Performing with the Zambezi Marimba Band in the last week of WSP. Students are expected to attend all lessons, rehearsals, and the final concert. Medical emergencies must be documented. Students who are not present for the first class will be dropped from the class and may not be allowed to re-enroll. Readings, listening, and video viewings will be assigned.
Method of evaluation: 50% from 1 five page paper, topic to be arranged. 50% from regular participation in lessons and rehearsals and progress as a marimba musician.
Prerequisites: No musical prerequisites for the beginning section. Musical ability is a prerequisite for the advanced section. For the beginning section, the student statement of interest will be used to select student. Students in the advanced section should have a high level of performance expertise on any instrument. All students should email Prof. Brown, indicating in one or two paragraphs, the level of their musical skills, their interest in the course, and their class year.
Enrollment limit: 14-7 in the advanced section and 7 in the beginning section. If over-enrolled: for the beginning section, the student statement of interest is the criteria. There are no musical prerequisites. For the advanced section, musical ability and the student statement of interest are the criteria. All else being equal, students who are earlier rather than later in their college career are preferred.
Cost: approximately $50.
Preferred meeting times: For the beginning section: Mondays-Fridays 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Advanced section: Mondays-Fridays, 4-6 p.m. Possible weekend rehearsals January 21 and/or January 22, 2012. Evening concert in the last week of WSP.

E. D. BROWN

MUS 13 I/O Fest '12
Students enrolled in the I/O Fest '12 Winter Study will direct, manage, perform in, and compose for the student run Iota Ensemble. Members of the ensemble will take part in every aspect of planning for the final concert, including choosing the program, organizing rehearsals, and producing the concert. Student performers will have the opportunity to rehearse and perform in an ensemble comprised completely of other students and explore the vast terrain of new music and contemporary performance practice. Composers will write for the ensemble and be able to work with it directly in a laboratory setting. Students will also work with the I/O Ensemble in presenting a professional concert, and will travel to New York to hear a concert and meet other musicians and composers. Meetings will include regular rehearsals and workshops, as well as several concerts.
Evaluation will be based on participation, preparation for performances, and a final written critical exercise on a relevant class topic.
Prerequisites: this course is open to composers, instrumentalists, singers, and others interested in contemporary music, at the discretion of the instructor. Enrollment limit: 20. If overenrolled selection will be based on experience and appropriate skills.
Cost: $0.
Meeting times will include rehearsals and concerts, and will be primarily in the afternoons and evenings.

MATTHEW GOLD (Instructor)
BLOXAM (Sponsor)

Matthew Gold is studio instructor of percussion at Williams, where he directs the Williams Percussion ensemble and I/O New Music. He is one of the leading contemporary percussionists in NYC, leading TimeTable Percussion and touring with many major New York based ensembles.

MUS 14 Classic American and European Musical Theatre
This Winter Study will give participants an opportunity to study and perform numbers for one or more singers in great American musicals and European light operas. You have sung a solo, you have sung in chorus--now practice the exacting art of singing in an ensemble on stage. Selections from Stephen Sondheim's Sweeney Todd will be a special focus. The course will culminate with a performance of ensembles, solos, and duets from a variety of musical theater shows. Other ensembles from European models may also be included. Singers, actors, and pianists are all welcome to participate. The course is intended especially for singers who wish to have some stage time, and for actors who wish to work on their singing. Evaluation: A student may fulfill the requirements of the course by performing, writing a 5-page discursive paper, or some combination of the two approved by the teacher.
A student may fulfill the requirements of the course by performing, writing a 5-page discursive paper, or some combination of the two approved by the teacher.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. If over-enrolled students will be accepted based on a discussion with the instructor.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: afternoons.

KEITH KIBLER (Instructor)
BLOXAM (Sponsor)

Keith Kibler is an adjunct teacher of voice at Williams College, and has performed under some of the finest directors currently working including David Alden, Peter Sellars, and Galina Vishnevskaya.

MUS 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as American Studies 15 and Special 15)
(See under SPEC 15 for full description.)

MUS 25 Choral Singing and South Africa
During the first two weeks of Winter Study, students will live on campus, rehearsing music South African and North American works, including a commissioned work by Prof. David Kechley. Readings on South African history and its musical traditions will be assigned. During the final two weeks the students will travel to South Africa where they will perform with and for South African choirs and singing communities. The trip will involve performing for and with Sinikithemba, a Durban choir-affiliated with a local hospita-in which all members are HIV positive. We also intend to perform with and for a choir of inmates at Polsmoor prison in Cape Town.
Students will be assessed on their level of proficiency in the music to be performed.
Prerequisties: Membership in Williams Concert Choir during the fall of 2011. Enrollment limit: 45 (preference based on seniority)
Meetings: four hours each day.

WELLS

MUS 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Music 493, 494.

NEUROSCIENCE

NSCI 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Neuroscience 493-494.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 10 Above Us Only Sky: Atheist Understandings of Reason, Morality and the Meaning of Life
Atheists are often defined by "that which they are not": they do not believe in God, they do not think that the universe was created by a powerful being for a good reason, the question about the purpose of human life makes no sense to them, and they live their lives without hope of eternal salvation or fear of eternal damnation. To enrich and deepen such a negative understanding of atheism, this course will explore the vibrant and diverse tradition of positive atheist thought in both theoretical and practical domains.
We will not consider arguments for and against atheism in this course; rather, taking the atheist position as our starting point, we will explore some aspects of atheist epistemology, metaphysics and moral philosophy, thus sketching a positive philosophical characterization of atheism. Specifically, we will consider the following questions: What is the relationship between skepticism and atheism? Must an atheist have a higher standard for justified belief than a theist? Should an atheist try to prove her position, should she try to recommend it to theists, or should she treat her religious stance as a private matter? Since, for an atheist, the universe is all there is, how does she ever experience wonder at the beauty of nature, the feeling of the numinous, the sense of reverence for the natural world? What is the source of atheists' morality? Must an atheist be a moral relativist or a moral nihilist? Finally, how can an atheist find meaning in her life, contingent and short as it is? How can she find joy in it despite what she must perceive as pointless suffering?
The readings for this course will mainly be drawn from the history of Western philosophy, starting with ancient Greek philosophers and ending with our contemporaries.
Requirements: Class attendance, preparedness, and participation; three short papers (2-3 pages each); and a final paper (4-5 pages).
Prerequisites: none. Open to first year students. Enrollment limit: 15. Priority will be given to philosophy majors, intended philosophy majors, and students seriously committed to the course.
Meeting times: three times a week, in the afternoons.

MLADENOVIC

PHIL 12 Bioethics According to The Simpsons
Active Euthanasia? Okely Dokely! Human cloning? Don't have a cow, man! Over the past twenty years The Simpsons has included a healthy dose of stinging and sometimes surprisingly illuminating critique of numerous bioethical issues. In this winter study course we will use clips and episodes from the classic animated series as a launch pad for investigating the deeper philosophical concepts and ethical questions involved in a variety of bioethical topics. Good comedy has a way of driving straight to the core of contested issues and painful circumstances, providing a point of entry for students in the class to more serious, academic material. Along the way, the course will also investigate what makes The Simpsons's treatment of these bioethical issues *funny*-how its satire plays on common misunderstandings, contradictions and inconsistencies in social policy and individual decisions, and how serious issues drive the comedic effect. During the first portion of the course, the instructor will present selections from The Simpsons that take up several core bioethical issues, paired with related readings from the bioethics literature and possibly from the philosophical literature on humor and on The Simpsons. In the second portion of the course, the students themselves will identify and present clips pertaining to bioethical issues. The final project for the course will be collaborative in nature: small groups of students will be asked to develop and pitch (to the other class members) a storyline for a Simpsons episode (or portion thereof) that centers on a bioethical topic. Classes will meet two or three afternoons each week, and students will be expected to read a substantial amount of philosophical material in preparation for these meetings. In addition, students will need to spend significant amounts of time outside of class viewing videos and developing their final projects.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, one in-class presentation, and the final collaborative project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference will be given to students who indicate intellectual seriousness about philosophical bioethics.
Cost: $20-$30 for reading packet; students may also wish to obtain their own copies of relevant video material, although one copy of all episodes should be available on library reserve or freely available on the internet.
Meeting time: ?

J. PEDRONI

PHIL 14 Plato's Symposium and Its Afterlife (Same as Classics 14, Comparative Literature 14, and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies 14)
(See under CLAS 14 for full description.) WILCOX

PHIL 15 Film and/as Philosophy (Same as English 15) CANCELLED!

PHIL 16 Chekhov, An Unlikely Revolutionary (Same as Comparative Literature 16, Russian 16, and Theatre 16)
"The Anglo-American theater finds it possible to get along without the services of most of the best playwrights. Aeschylus, Lope de Vega, Racine, Moliere, Schiller, Strindberg-one could prolong indefinitely the list of great dramatists who are practically unknown in England and America except to scholars…But why is Chekhov preserved from the general oblivion? Why is it that scarcely a year passes without a major Broadway or West End production of a Chekhov play? Chekhov's plays-at least by reputation, which in commercial theater is the important thing-are plotless, monotonous, drab, and intellectual: find the opposites of these four adjectives and you have a recipe for a smash hit." -Eric Bentley, Craftsmanship in Uncle Vanya
In this course, we will try to find an answer to Bentley's question through close readings of Chekhov's four major plays: Uncle Vanya, The Sea Gull, Three Sisters and The Cherry Orchard. We will trace the development of the revolution that Chekhov's plays have provoked in the practice of acting, directing and playwriting by reading excerpts from Stanislavski's works, Chekhov's correspondence with him, researching production history of Chekhov's major works and watching some major productions of his plays available on film.
Requirements: class attendance, preparedness and participation; one class presentation on production history; and a final paper (7-10 pages).
Prerequisites: none; open to first year students. Enrollment limit: 15. In case of overenrollment, priority will be given to students with some background in Chekhov, and to those students who demonstrate a serious commitment to the course.
Cost: about $40 for books and Course Packet.
Class meetings: Afternoons. The class will meet three times a week in three hour sessions. Two weekly meetings will be devoted to lecture and discussion, while the third will involve a screening, followed by discussion.

MILOS MLADENOVIC (Instructor)
GERRARD (Sponsor)

Milos Mladenovic is a theatre director (MFA, Yale School of Drama; National Endowment for the Arts Award) with extensive experience in European theatre.

PHIL 20 Tavern of Crossed Destinies: The Video (Same as English 20)
Italo Calvino's The Tavern of Crossed Destinies is a novella in which characters who are unable to speak tell their life stories by placing Tarot cards on a table. There are small, black-and-white reproductions of the cards printed in the margins of the book; as one reads, one must glance back and forth between the text and the images. In this course, we will make videos so that, as viewers hear the stories, they will see high-resolution color images of the cards, as the cards become relevant. The instructor, who has never before undertaken a project of this sort, hopes that imaginative and enthusiastic students will join him in bringing the project to at least partial completion.
Evaluation will be based on contributions to production of videos.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Selection will be based on letter explaining interest.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons.

WHITE

PHIL 25 Morocco (Same as English 25 and International Studies 25)
Students in this course will spend winter study in Morocco. Morocco presents a compelling blend of historical influences and modern world currents. Threads of Islam, Arab traditions, and the heritage of the native Berber people are woven into a distinctive cultural tapestry, while traces of French colonialism can still be seen in the political and social structure. Morocco is at the intersection of the West, the Middle East, and Africa. Travel there is therefore a powerful way to introduce intellectual themes that require and reward a subtle blending of insight from history, political science, religion, and philosophy.
We will take the first steps in engaging some of these challenging topics in order to enable independent study facilitated by serious and multifaceted exposure to the country. For the first two weeks, students will study at the Center for Cross Cultural Learning (CCCL) in Rabat, taking Arabic lessons (classical or Moroccan dialect) each morning and then gathering for lectures by local university faculty in the afternoon. During this span students will live with Moroccan families in the Rabat medina. In the third week of the course students will travel in the interior of Morocco, exploring Fez and Marrakech, riding camels in the desert, and hiking through Berber villages in the Atlas Mountains.
Students will be expected to attend all seminars, lead a group presentation, and complete a substantial research paper (10-15 pages). The presentation and research paper will be occasions to explore a special topic in depth including, for instance, justice and gender, art, literature, colonial studies, or Islam.
No prerequisites. Arabic is the official spoken language of Morocco, and French is spoken widely. While desirable, neither is required. Enrollment limit: 11. Preference: Student interest is more important than class year or academic major. Final participants will be chosen on the basis of interviews regarding student goals and intellectual interests.
Estimated cost: $4000.

BARRY and KNOPP

PHIL 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Philosophy 493-494.

PHYSICS

PHYS 10 Light and Holography
This course will examine the art and science of holography. It will introduce modern optics at a level appropriate for a non-science major, giving the necessary theoretical background in lectures and discussion. Demonstrations will be presented and students will make several kinds of holograms in the lab. Thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation, we have 7 well-equipped holography darkrooms available for student use. At the beginning of WSP, the class will meet for lecture and discussion three mornings a week and for lab 2 afternoons a week. Later classes will be mainly laboratory.
Students will be evaluated on the basis of regular attendance, completion of 4 laboratory exercises, and a holography laboratory project or a 10-page paper. Attendance at all classes and labs is required for a passing grade.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference will be given to students with no previous college course in physics more advanced than Physics 109.
Cost: about $50 for holographic film, chemicals, and photocopies.
Meeting time: lectures for all students will be in the morning; labs will be in the afternoon.

JONES

PHYS 12 Drawing as a Learnable Skill
Representational drawing is not merely a gift of birth, but a learnable skill. If you wanted to draw, but have never had the time to learn; or you enjoy drawing and wish to deepen your understanding and abilities, then this course is for you. This intensive course utilizes discoveries in brain research along with traditional drawing exercises to teach representational drawing. By using simple techniques and extensive exercises you will develop the perceptual shift from your symbol based left hemisphere to your visually based right hemisphere. This cognitive shift enables you to accurately see and realistically represent the physical world. You will learn to draw a convincing portrait, interior, and still life. This course is designed to develop your powers of observation and enhance your innate creative problem solving abilities, which are applicable in any field. Students need no previous artistic experience, just the willingness and desire to learn a new skill. Students will be expected to attend and participate in all sessions. They will also be required to keep a sketchbook recording their progress and complete a final project.
Evaluations will be based on participation, effort, and development.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 18. If overenrolled, selection will be based on seniority.
Cost: textbook and $5 for materials.
Meeting time: Tuesday and Thursday mornings from 10:00 until 12:45, with substantial additional independent student work. There will be an exhibition of coursework on the final day of Winter Study.

STELLA EHRICH (Instructor)
AALBERTS (Sponsor)

Stella Ehrich lived in Italy for sixteen years, where she spent seven years studying figurative realism in the atelier of Nera Simi in Florence. She holds an MFA in painting from Bennington College. Stella is a professional painter whose work includes portraits, landscapes and still life subjects.

PHYS 13 Media Immersion: Creativity through multimedia animation and video production
This course is designed to introduce concepts and workflows associated with multiple formats of video production, ranging from still image and 2D animation to live footage mixed with animation.
Class time will consist of lecture mixed with hands-on instruction/participation in concepts of project management, scriptwriting, storyboarding, copyright and fair use considerations, content research and creation, multimedia editing and digital publishing. We will frontload the course with critical analysis and deconstruction of examples of the various media formats we will be producing and allow students to explore the technical workflow, equipment and software required to produce each format. Midway, we will form groups to undertake production of a five-minute piece in the format of their choosing. We will meet for 3, two-hour sessions each week (lecture and workshop) with an additional required lab/production time (minimum of 6 hours/week, additional during final project weeks) Weekly assignments will be completed during (and outside of, as needed) three 2-hour lab sessions each week. There will also be a short 4 page paper on a select list of topics. Software introduced includes: iMovie, Final Cut Pro, Motion, Flash, Soundtrack, Photoshop.
Evaluation will be based on weekly assignments, short paper and final project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. If overenrolled, selection will be based on student interest.
Cost : $25 for blank media.

TREVOR MURPHY and TAMRA HJERMSTAD (Instructors)
AALBERTS (Sponsor)

Trevor Murphy has been an Instructional Technology Specialist at Williams College for 9 years. He has taught two winter study courses in the past that focused on video and animation. Tamra Hjermstad has been an Instructional Technologist and media production consultant for more than 14 years at both Williams and Mount Holyoke colleges. She has created and delivered course integrated workshops and multi-part learning modules on digital media production and animation.

PHYS 22 Research Participation
Several members of the department will have student projects available dealing with their own research or that of current senior thesis students. Approximately 35 hours per week of study and actual research participation will be expected from each student.
Students will be required to keep a notebook and write a five-page paper summarizing their work. Those interested should consult with members of the department as early as possible in the registration period or before to determine details of projects then expected to be available.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 1 or 2 per project.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: to be arranged with instructor.

TUCKER-SMITH and members of the department

PHYS 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Physics 493, 494.

POLITICAL ECONOMY

POEC 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as Political Science 21)
(See under PSCI 21 for full description.)

POEC 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (Same as Economics 22)
(See under ECON 22 for full description.)

POEC 23 Institutional Investment
This course is an internship with the Williams College Investment Office in Boston. This unique opportunity is a structured program designed to give students an overview of endowment and investment management. Through formal training and project work, students will gain a better understanding of how an institutional investment portfolio is managed and how investment managers are selected and monitored. Students will learn about global equities, hedge funds, venture capital, buyouts, commodities, real estate and fixed income. Students are integral members of the Investment Office team and will assist on projects that influence investment and operational decisions. Students will sharpen their professional skills and have the opportunity to meet investment professionals from across the investment industry. The instructors are investment professionals in the Williams College Investment Office.
The work will be based in Boston and will run for four weeks during Winter Study (January 3-January 26). Students are expected to work at the office for a minimum of 32 hours a week (four days/week), complete a set of relevant readings, keep a journal, and write an analytic essay. No prerequisites are required.
To apply for enrollment, please select this course (WS POEC 23) as your first choice when registering for Winter Study. Additionally, please send an email with your resume and a cover letter discussing why you are interested in this course and what you hope to gain from it to: investmentoffice@williams.edu by 11:59 PM ET on Thursday, October 13, 2011. Enrollment limit: 2. If oversubscribed, students will be selected via interviews.
Students are responsible for the cost of housing, food, and incidentals. The Investment Office will provide help in locating low-cost/no-cost housing in the Boston area if needed.

COLLETTE CHILTON, Chief Investment Officer (Co-instructor)
ABIGAIL WATTLEY, Investment Associate (Co-instructor)
ANNA SOYBEL, Investment Analyst (Co-instructor)

POEC 31 Honors Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Political Economy 493.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

PSCI 10 Opening Up the Corporate World: Research on Corporate Ethics
With the downsizing of government at all levels, large corporations have more than ever become the dominant institutions of American culture and politics, recently granted the rights of citizenship by the Supreme Court. Whether you are considering a career in corporations or wish to understand their dynamics and policy making, they remain relatively opaque compared to other major institutions. This course will explore the issue of corporate ethics from various perspectives and develop your skills in corporate research. You will conduct extensive research on the structure, policies, operations, and ethics of one large U.S. corporation, possibly collaborating with another student. The instructor, a social historian, coordinates community engagement at Williams.
Requirements: research findings on one large U.S. corporation, 10-page paper or equivalent, plus data appendix.
No prerequisites, however, research skills preferred. Enrollment limit: 15. If overenrolled, admission will be based on an interview with the instructor.
Cost: $100 for research guides.
Meeting time: afternoons.

STEWART BURNS (Instructor)
MAHON (Sponsor)

Stewart Burns, Williams Coordinator of Community Engagement and Professor of Community Leadership at Antioch University (Ph.D. Program in Leadership and Change), is a social historian specializing in the U.S. civil rights movement and an award-winning biographer of Martin Luther King Jr. He was an editor of the MLK Papers at Stanford and previously taught leadership studies at Williams.

PSCI 11 Editorial Cartooning and the Art of Propaganda (Same as ArtH 11)
(See under ARTH 11 for full description.) CHAN LOWE AND E.J. JOHNSON

PSCI 13 States, Foreigners and Famine in Africa
The Ethiopian famine of 1984 left two enduring images. First, it reinforced the conventional wisdom that African governments lack the technical capacity and political will to respond to famine. Secondly, because of the success of the Band Aid and Live Aid campaigns, it suggested that international humanitarian intervention and aid can (and should) make up for the inadequacies of domestic governments. This course considers the prescriptions to address the underlying problems with the African state, democratizing it and building its administrative capacity, on the one hand, and growing a robust international disaster relief industry, on the other hand. Have these prescriptions been successful in arresting famine across Africa?
Evaluation will be based on a final 10-page paper; class attendance and participation in discussion will also be taken into consideration.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference to seniors, juniors, sophomores and then first-year students.
Cost: $80 for books.
Meeting time: mornings.

MUNEMO

PSCI 14 Making Sense of the CIA (Same as Leadership Studies 14)
This course examines the origins and evolution of the Central Intelligence
Agency after the Second World War. We will explore the controversies over
the CIA from the Cold War to the war on terror. The course will pay
particular attention to questions of intervention, covert action,
intelligence collection, and torture. Course materials for the course will
include memoirs, primary documents, and critical histories such as Tim
Weiner's recent book Leqacy of Ashes.

MCALLISTER and DONALD GREGG '51 (Instructors)
Meeting Time: afternoons.

PSCI 16 Political Aikido, Embodied Leadership, and the State of the Union
Aikido is a Japanese martial tradition that combines the samurai arts of sword and grappling with the philosophical desire to forge a path of harmony in the midst of chaos. As such, it addresses situations of conflict that manifest themselves physically, but also offers insight into how to redirect the energies-social, psychological, or political that might otherwise become conflict in one or another aspect of our lives. As a martial art, Aikido teaches more than simply how to survive; it also teaches us how to physically express our noblest intentions-our compassion-in movements that protect not only ourselves but the attacker as well. Put another way, Aikido is ethical persuasion made physical.
By integrating physical and intellectual components, the course seeks to forge in each student a more coherent perspective not on how to avoid conflict, but how to actually eliminate it. The course also seeks to provide an opportunity for students to imagine and articulate what full commitment to an integrated and conflict- free life would be like, and for one intensive month, to live it.
The physical training (two hours each morning on mats in Currier Ballroom) will improve each student's strength, balance, posture, and flexibility. Everyone will also learn how to throw their friends across the room. About 25% of training time will be devoted to sword, staff, and dagger techniques.
The academic component of the course will engage with how the physical training resonates with the tactical practices of successful social change movements (Gandhi in India, King in the US, and 2011's events in Tunisia and Egypt). It will also investigate embodied leadership (the idea that much of what we find compelling in a leader is how they exist and communicate physically) and inspired rhetoric (language that moves hearts as well as minds, that reframes problematic issues, and that conveys a speaker's authentic conviction). All of this academic work will be undertaken mindful of the upcoming State of the Union address in late January. The 2012 SOTU will entail not just an articulation of priorities for the coming legislative calendar, but will also be given in the midst of a heated re-election campaign and as such will be subject to strategic considerations worth our time to examine.
Students will each be responsible for investigating a policy area likely to be discussed in the SOTU and then writing sections on those policy areas for the address consistent with the tactical insights of aikido they've been studying. Students of a more conservative bent are welcome to craft equivalent text suitable for the Republican response.
Additional relevant experiences, such as meditation practice, outdoor misogi, and Samurai films will be an integral part of the course.
Students will be evaluated on the quality of their participation in both physical and intellectual course components, and on the quality of the proposed policy text they generate, and present, for the
upcoming State of the Union address.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. If overenrolled, selection will be based on a questionnaire.
Cost: $135 (100 for uniform and wooden training weapons; 35 for books).
Meeting time: daily, 10 a.m.-noon.

ROBERT KENT '84 (Instructor)
MAHON (Sponsor)

Robert Kent '84 spent 3 years in Kyoto, Japan earning his Sho Dan (first degree black belt), directly after majoring in both Philosophy and Religion at Williams. He currently holds a Yon Dan rank (Fourth degree black belt), having studied since 1991 at Aikido West in Redwood City under Frank Doran Shihan, where he helped run the youth program for 18 years. He is currently President of Aiki Extensions, Inc, a nonprofit that supports programs that bring the strategic insights and practical wisdom of Aikido into non-traditional settings. He is also founding coordinator for The PeaceCamp Initiative (a scholarship program that seeks to use Aikido principles to heal the Israeli/Palestinian conflict a few kids at a time) for which he won Ben & Jerry's 2008 Peace Pioneer Prize. He earned a Masters degree in Philosophy at Claremont Graduate School in 1993, writing his thesis on the Ethics of Authenticity. This will be the sixth time he has offered an Aikido-based Winter Study course.

PSCI 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as Political Economy 21)
This course is a participant-observation experience in which students work full-time for a governmental agency, nongovernmental (including voluntary, activist, and grassroots) organization, or for a political campaign. Students may find placements in government and nonprofit organizations in which their work involves significant involvement with public issues. Examples include: town government offices; state or federal administrative offices (e.g., environmental agencies, housing authorities); interest groups that lobby government (e.g., ACLU, NRA); nonprofit organizations such as service providers or think tanks (e.g., Habitat for Humanity; Cato Institute); and grassroots, activist or community development organizations (e.g., Greenpeace or neighborhood association). The instructors will work with each student to arrange a placement; such arrangements must be made in advance of the Winter Term. Students should first make their own contacts with an institution or agency. The instructors and members of the Political Science department are available to help students find placements, if necessary. Each student's fieldwork mentor shall send a confirmation letter to the instructors verifying the placement and describing the nature of the work to be performed by the student. Students will read a few short articles distributed at the beginning of Winter Term and must agree to keep a journal, maintain weekly contact with the instructors, and write a final paper summarizing and reflecting upon the experience. A group meeting of all students will occur after winter study to discuss the experiences.
Requirements: 90 hours of fieldwork; satisfactory evaluation from the institutional sponsor; 10-page final paper or equivalent; participation in final meeting. At the time of registration, interested students should send a resume and letter of interest to Paula Consolini.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost: approximately $15 for readings, student covers transportation costs to and from internship site.

CATHY JOHNSON and PAULA CONSOLINI

PSCI 24 Politics and History in Cuba (Same as Africana Studies 24 and History 24)
A brief overview of recent Cuban history and politics, based mainly in Havana. After several days of reading, classes, and preparation in Williamstown, the class moves to Havana and engages in two weeks of course work with instructors from the Univerisidad de la Habana. We then travel to historically significant destinations in western Cuba before returning to the capital. We will also interview representatives of the Cuban revolutionary regime and civil-society leaders, visit museums and monuments to the Revolution, experience Cuban culture, and talk to Cubans.
Requirements: demonstrated interest in the subject; fluency in Spanish; an oral presentation (in Spanish); a journal; and a 10-page paper.
Not open to first-year students. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost: approximately $2000.

BENSON and MAHON

PSCI 25 Eye Care and Culture on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua
In cooperation with Ray Hooker, President and founder of FADCANIC (the Foundation for the Autonomy and Development of the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua) and optometrists from the New England College of Optometry, we prescribe and dispense reading and distance glasses to people in remote and often impoverished communities. In this, the tenth iteration of the course, we will return to a number of small villages on the rim of Pearl Lagoon where we have not visited for 6 or 7 years, then head north to Wawashan, the experimental school and from where students spend time in regular demanding high school classes and also learn how to tend their own farm when they graduate. If time and weather permits we may spend the last day of our stay on a trip to the Pearl Keys for a day of relaxation and recuperation after 10 solid days of clinics and travel to widely dispersed and seldom visited communities.
Evaluation will be based on a journal and final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites; not open to first-year students. Enrollment limit: 12. Selection will be based on enthusiasm and preparation.
Cost: approximately $2700.
Meeting time: mornings.

ROBERT PECK (Instructor)
MAHON (Sponsor)

Former Athletic Director of the College, Robert Peck has been doing this trip for ten years.

PSCI 26 Catholic Social Teaching and Practice in Jamaica
The Catholic Church has from its beginning thought and taught on social, political and economic relations, and counted works of `charity' (caritas, i.e., `love') as the foundation of Christian obligation and the highest virtue. Over the last century or so, however, the Catholic Church has devoted particular attention to the problems of modern economies - poverty, inequality, class conflict, private property, globalization and human freedom to name just a few - and wrestled with many foundational questions of modern economic life: What do the rich owe the poor? How do national boundaries affect our moral obligations? What are the merits and flaws of capitalism? Of socialism? Is love a relevant concept in political and economic analysis? What is an economy for?
This course involves both an experiential and intellectual engagement with one portion of the larger body of thought known as `Catholic Social Teaching,' namely the theme of poverty and inequality within a globalized economy. Students will have an opportunity to work for a week with a Catholic missionary group, Mustard Seed Communities, at their facility in Kingston, Jamaica dedicated to educating and assisting the country's most physically, mentally and financially vulnerable children. The rest of the term will be spent in Williamstown reading and discussing key papal and episcopal encyclicals as well as reflecting upon the relationship between the intellectual and charitable traditions and practices of the Church. Tentative schedule: January 3-6: introduction to Catholic Social Teaching; to academic debates and practical struggles both inside and outside the Catholic Church regarding poverty and development; and to the social/economic/political background of Jamaica; January 7-14: with Mustard Seed Community, Kingston, Jamaica; January 16-26: reading the most prominent Catholic Church encyclicals on the subject of poverty and development, as well as critical commentary.
Evaluation will be based on a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites; not open to first-year students. Enrollment limit: 10. Selection will be based on an interview.
Cost: $1500. (Funding for the trip to Jamaica with Mustard Seed Community is being provided by Williams Catholic Alumni.)
DAREL PAUL and Fr. GARY CASTER, Catholic Chaplain at Williams

PSCI 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Political Science 493-494.

PSCI 32 Individual Project
To be taken by students registered for Political Science 495 or 496.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 10 Group Dynamics and Leadership
This course will immerse students in group dynamics through experiential and didactic material. Readings will range from popular culture, group psychotherapy and organizational development. Students will learn group leadership and facilitation skills and explore group roles. Class structure will include 3 hour classes that will meet twice a week and may include guest presenters. In addition to readings, student may view video and internet based media for out-of-class assignments. This course will involve a level of self exploration and participation in role play and experiential exercises.
Evaluation will occur with process logs at the close of each class period an initial 3-page paper at the beginning of the course and a 5-page paper for the final assignment.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Selection criteria: seniority.
Cost: $10 for course packet.
Meeting time: afternoons

PAUL GITTERMAN (Instructor)
ZIMMERBERG (Sponsor)

Paul Gitterman holds a Masters Degree from the Smith College School for Social Work and a Masters Degree in Psychoanalytic Developmental Psychology from the University College London and the Anna Freud Center. He is a Certified Group Psychotherapist, an adjunct assistant professor for the Smith College School for Social Work, and has facilitated groups in a variety of human services settings. In addition, Paul provides psychotherapy services for Williams College Psychological Services and has a private practice in Pittsfield, MA and Williamstown, MA.

PSYC 12 Alternative Birth Choices (Same as Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies)
This course will consider the range of women's experiences surrounding pregnancy and childbirth. Among the topics we will cover are: alternative birthing choices (midwifery, homebirth, water-birth), the medicalization of childbirth, and attitudes regarding breastfeeding. We will view documentaries about pregnancy and childbirth, including films of labor and delivery; hear from a number of local professionals, such as a midwife, a doula, a childbirth educator, and a lactation consultant; and take a tour of a birthing center.
Method of Evaluation: Class presentation and participation in class discussions
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Student selection criteria: seniority.
Cost: $30 for photocopying expenses.
Meeting time: mornings.

KRISTEN SAVITSKY(Instructor)
ZIMMERBERG (Sponsor)

Kristen Savitsky holds a Bachelor's of Science degree in nursing and has worked as a labor and delivery nurse.

PSYC 13 Coming Down from the High: 12 Step Recovery and Counseling
This course will explore the history and culture of the 12 Step Recovery Movement as well as diagnosis rubrics and methods of counseling/interventions that are commonly used at clinics and Employee Assistance Programs throughout the world. Students will read the text Slaying the Dragon, a variety of texts published by different 12 Step groups and watch movies such as Days of Wine and Roses, My Name is Bill, Clean and Sober, and When Love is not Enough: The Lois Wilson Story. Students will be expected to attend and report on their impressions on two different 12 Step meetings that they attend per week. This class is designed to help familiarize students with the disease model of addiction and help act proactively and with understanding with addicts, be it personally, socially, or professionally.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25.
Cost: approximately $50 for books and course packet.
Meeting time: Monday and Wednesday 7:00-9:40 p.m.

RICK BERGER (Instructor)
DEAN OF FACULTY (Sponsor)

Rick Berger earned his M.A. in 2009 from Hazelden Graduate School of Addiction Studies.

PSYC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as Chemistry 14 and Special 14)
(See under CHEM 14 for full description.)

PSYC 15 Ephquilts: An Introduction to Traditional Quiltmaking
This studio course will lead the student through various piecing, appliqué and quilting styles and techniques, with some non-traditional methods included. Samples will be made of techniques learned, culminating in the completion of a sizeable project of the student's choosing (wall quilt or lap-size quilt). There will be an exhibit of all work (ephquilts), at the end of winter study. "Woven" into the classes will be discussions of the history of quilting, the controversy of "art" quilts vs. "traditional" quilts, machine vs. hand-quilting and the growing quilting market. Reading list: Pieces of the Past by Nancy J. Martin; Stitching Memories: African- American Story Quilts by Eva Ungar Grudin; Sunshine and Shadow: The Amish and Their Quilts by Phyllis Haders; A People and Their Quilts by John Rice Irwin; Treasury of American Quilts by Cyril Nelson and Carter Houck; The Quilt: New Directions for an American Tradition, Nancy Roe, Editor.
Requirements: attendance of all classes (two field trips inc), a love of fabric, design and color, an enthusiasm for handwork, participation in exhibit. Extensive time will be spent outside of class working on assigned projects.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: $200 for materials and supplies.
Meeting times: 1-3 p.m., MWF.

DEBRA ROGERS-GILLIG (Instructor)
ZIMMERBERG (Sponsor)

Debra Rogers-Gillig, one of the top quilters in New England, has been quilting for 32 years, and teaching classes and coordinating shows and exhibits for 27 years. She has received numerous prizes and awards from quilt shows in New York and New England and been published in quilt magazines.

PSYC 18 Residential Treatment Internship in the Berkshires
Hillcrest Educational Centers, Inc. (HEC), a leader in the field of residential treatment of children with behavior disorders, is excited to partner with Williams College in creating an internship program that provides Williams students with an opportunity to experience working in the human services field in the area of residential treatment.  This program would expose course participants to the boarding environment at HEC as well as provide them with first-hand experience in working with their clients.  All selected students will participate in New Staff Orientation (NSO).  This extensive training includes topics such as: HEC General/Policy Information, Skills for Life Treatment Model, and extensive training in Therapeutic Crisis Intervention. Upon completion of the NSO, students will be assigned to one of the HEC campuses to work in a direct care capacity.  Students will round out their experience by completing a paper on their HEC experience. All selected students must successfully complete a Background Record Check, and pre-employment physical which includes drug testing.
Note: Successful course participants will be offered the opportunity to apply for a summer-long internship at HEC.
Prerequisites: Must Contact Instructor Prior to Registration gcoleman@williams.edu
Enrollment limit:24
Meeting times: 8-4 p.m., Mon. through Fri.

G. COLEMAN and R. BELAIR (Instructors)
B. ZIMMERBERG (Sponsor)

Gina Coleman, Ph.D. ’90 (Associate Dean at Williams College & Board Member at HEC) & Richard Belair (Director of Human Resources at HEC)

PSYC 19 Psychology Internships
Would you like to explore applications of psychology in the "real world?" This course gives students an opportunity to work full time during winter study in a mental health, business, education, law or other setting in which psychological theories and methods are applied to solve problems. Students are responsible for locating their own potential internships whether in the local area, their hometowns, or elsewhere, and are welcome to contact the course instructor for suggestions on how to do this. In any case, all students considering this course must consult with the instructor about the suitability of the internship being considered before the winter study registration period. Please prepare a brief description of the proposed placement, noting its relevance to psychology, and the name and contact information of the agency supervisor. Before Thanksgiving break, the student will provide a letter from the agency supervisor which describes the agency, and the student's role and responsibilities during Winter Study. Enrolled students will meet the instructor before Winter Study to discuss matters relating to ethics and their goals for the course, and after Winter Study to discuss their experiences and reflections.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page minimum final paper summarizing the student's experiences and reflections, a journal kept throughout the experience, and the supervisor's evaluation.
Prerequisite: approval of Professor Kavanaugh is required. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost: Travel expenses in some cases.

KAVANAUGH

PSYC 22 Introduction to Research in Psychology
This course provides a research opportunity for students who want to understand how psychologists ask compelling questions and find answers about behavior. Several faculty members, whose subfields include behavioral neuroscience, cognitive psychology, social psychology clinical psychology, developmental psychology, and the psychology of education, will have student projects available. Since projects involve faculty research, interested students must consult with members of the Psychology Department before electing this course.
Evaluation will be based on the quality of research participation, student's lab journal and either an oral presentation or a written 10 page report of the research project.
Required Activities: A minimum of 20 hours per week of research participation will be expected of each student.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: space available in faculty research labs.
Student selection criteria: Decision will be based on evaluation of departmental application and number of faculty available as mentors.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: mornings.

P. SOLOMON

PSYC 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Psychology 493-494.

HANE

RELIGION

REL 10 Kierkegaard and Religion
This course will examine the works of the 19th century philosopher and proto-existentialist, Soren Kierkegaard, focusing on his importance to existentialism in the study of religion, identity, and meta-ethics. In addition to Fear and Trembling/Repetition, a course packet will contain samplings of works from the mid 1840's, his most productive period. Class will meet eight hours weekly, two hours daily in the afternoons except Monday, with a brief 10-page paper to conclude, along with active participation throughout.
Evaluation will be based on a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12. If overenrolled, preference will be based on strength of interest.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons.

SHUCK

REL 12 Wellness, Yoga, and the Art of Fully Thriving
The art and science of yoga invites us into an ongoing conversation of who we are, why we are here and how we manage our energy of mind, body, and heart. Inquire into the rich fabric of your life as you explore:

*The stress reductive effects of breath, yoga, attention, and meditation.
*The power of healthy food and non-dogmatic conscious nutrition.
*Practical tools to align what you think, feel, say and do to live the life you have always wanted.
*The potency of re-inhabiting your physical body with ease and grace.
*The way yoga poses have direct impact on the primary systems of the body including our nerves, heart, lungs, hormones, digestive organs and lymph.

This course meets M-W-Th 10am-1pm and includes yoga in every session (no prior experience needed), breath work, meditation, an optional discounted field trip to Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health, multimedia presentations, reflection papers, and two mandatory reading texts (Nourishing Wisdom by Marc David and Nourishing the Teacher: Inquiries, Contemplations, & Insights on the Path of Yoga by Danny Arguetty).
Evaluation will be based on the final project/presentation and a 5- to 10-page research paper on a topic related to the course.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. If overenrolled, students will be selected based on an essay explaining why they want to take the course.
Cost: $30 for book, $65 for field trip cost.
Meeting time: MWR 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

DANNY ARGUETTY (Instructor)
BUELL (Sponsor)

Danny Arguetty, M.A., E-RYT, has studied and practiced extensively in the Anusara and Kripalu approach to yoga. He blends a mix of skillful alignment cues, playful postures, and creative vinyasa flows to facilitate a heart-opening journey of conscious inquiry. Danny links the potency of posture practice and nature to the possibility of living in the world with mindfulness, skillfulness, and heartfelt intent. He is a faculty member at Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health and has been involved in Kripalu School of Yoga 200-hr and 500-hr teacher trainings over the last six years.

REL 13 Write a Novel
How many of you have always wanted to write a novel, but nevcr managed to find the time? This course will give you the chance to do just that. Inspired by National Novel Writing Month, participants in this class will be challenged to complete a significant portion of a novel over the course of Winter Study. We will gather four days a week for three-hour intervals to blitz write text for our respective projects. Over the course of these meetings, we will likely spend some time informally discussing the craft of creative writing, but our primary focus will simply be putting words down on the page every day. Although no formal experience with creative writing is required, students should come into the class prepared to begin writing and with at least some vague idea of the work they wish to produce. Students interested in using the class to complete other equivalent length writing projects (such as screenplays, memoires, etc) will be considered on a case-by-case basis.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. If overenrolled, selection will be based on the submission of a short letter describing the proposed novel (or other project).
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: afternoons.

JOSEPHSON

REL 14 Yoga as Integration of Knowledge and Practice
Many have encountered yoga. as a popular form of exercise. In this class we approach yoga as an interconnected system of embodied knowledge and intellectual knowledge. We will provide an overview of the traditional and contemporary dimensions of yoga. The yoga we will practice in the class is Anusara Yoga, a form of Hatha yoga which combines lite-affirming Tantric philosophy with universal principles of alignment and community. We shall investigate two classic Indian texts to elucidate yoga's context alongside some Western texts that resonate with yogic ideas. Class discussions will consider key issues such as the relationship of bodies to selves and of organic to inorganic existences, as well as the ethical implications of yoga. The overarching orientation will be to emphasize the synergy of practice and study of yoga for a life in the world. Required Texts: The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, Bhagavad Gita.
Evaluation is based on attendance and participation in all classes and sessions, a personal practice journal, one short reflection paper (2 pgs.), and a ten page final paper focusing on the relationship between textual study and yoga practice. To earn a passing grade, students must complete a1l practice hours and assignments.
Enrollment limit: 12. Apply by email explaining your experience and interest in the class to Natasha. Judson@gmail.com and Denise.K.Buell@williams.edu.
Cost: $70 for books and yoga mat.
Meeting time: MWF 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

NATASHA JUDSON and BUELL (Instructors)

Tasha Judson began practicing Hatha Yoga in 1980. She returned to yoga practice as an adult to heal from chronic low back and neck pain. In 1999 she met John Friend and in 2007 became a Certified Anusara Yoga teacher. Since 2008 she has held her classes at her studio Tasha Yoga in Williamstown, MA. As well as offering her own classes and workshops, she practices with John several times a year and has assisted Anusara Teachers as Kripalu Center. In addition to Hatha Yoga practice, Tasha loves meditation and contributes yoga instruction at two meditation retreats for young people annually at Insight Meditation Society. Currently also she is a meditation student of Paul Muller Ortega, founder of Blue Throat Yoga.

REL 25 Jerusalem
Jerusalem excites the imagination, the emotions, and the spiritual aspirations for many people. An ancient city that was the locus of holiness and conflict for one hundred generations still retains that description today. Through the first half of Winter Study, we will engage readings, (primarily Karen Armstrong's JERUSALEM), class discussions, and additional study, to prepare for travel to Jerusalem. We will leave Williamstown on January 11, taking up residence in Jerusalem on Monday morning, the 12th, through Thursday the 22nd. Our study in Jerusalem will feature many walking tours to various neighborhoods and historic sites, and will bring Christian, Jewish, and Muslim teachers to present the complicated series of narratives that describe the mosaic of Jerusalem's three thousand year history. Our educational program in Jerusalem will be led by Ophir Yarden, education director for the Interreligious Coordinating Council of Israel. When this course was offered in 2007, many students agreed that it was "the most amazing experience of my life!"
Students will submit a 10-12 page reflection paper discussing the meaning of Jerusalem. Further information available from the instructor, Cantor Bob Scherr, Jewish Chaplain for the College: rscherr@williams.edu, x 2483.
No prerequisites; not open to first-year students. Enrollment limit: 10. Each will submit essay to determine level of interest and social compatibility; we hope for a multi-faith group of participants.
Cost: approximately $3300.

ROBERT SCHERR, Jewish Chaplain for the College (Instructor)
WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

REL 26 Explorations in Solidarity: A Meeting of Minds and Hearts in Nicaragua
This course will explore the lived realities of the hemisphere's second most impoverished nation, and the relevance of faith and religious community to the continuing struggle for social justice. Students will reflect on these realities in the company of subsistence farmers, urban factory laborers, and leaders of grassroots organizations working for social change. The effects of free trade policies (CAFTA and FTAA) in an increasingly globalized economy, natural disasters, and the changeable attentions of the developed world will be explored, along with other influences-Christian, Marxist and neo-Liberal-on the material and spiritual well-being of Nicaraguan people. In particular, the course will explore ways in which the paradigms of liberation theology and the base Christian community movement have shaped some Nicaraguans' views of the economic system and the natural environment in which they live, and some of their traditional folkloric and contemporary artistic responses to it.
Nicaragua offers a unique lens through which to view the culture and influence of the U.S., as well as the daily struggles, the dignity, and the hope of some of the hemisphere's most marginalized citizens. The experience of the course will include approximately ten days of living (with minimal amenities) with families in a subsistence farming community. Students will also attend a number of Christian religious services, and take part in dialogues with communities in which liberation theology shapes perspectives and daily choices. (The course is open to students of any religious background or no affiliation.) And for a portion of the course we will be joined by Nicaraguan peers who are involved in youth empowerment movements or in the midst of university education, who will fully share in the experience of the course. Travels in Nicaragua will be organized by the staff of the Escuela Asociación Kairos para la Formación, an NGO that facilitates educational programs and fosters faith-based partnerships for communities in North America and Nicaragua. Throughout, students will be invited to accompany our Nicaraguan hosts as they live their daily lives, and to reflect on their own identities and assumptions as North Americans. The goal is to explore the relevance of religious community to the possibilities for restorative justice, and to discover what it would mean to shape a relationship with the people of Nicaragua according to a paradigm of solidarity-in contrast to the more familiar paradigms of charity and national self-interest.
The course will begin in Williamstown with several days of background reading (Nicaraguan history, liberation theology and current political and economic reporting), writing, and orientation. Once in Nicaragua there will be daily reflection sessions, in preparation for which students will keep a detailed personal journal. Other requirements include attendance at several orientation sessions during the latter weeks of the fall semester; participation in a group oral presentation to the Williams community upon return; and a final 10-page paper. As in years past, in order to get the maximum benefit from the opportunity to live among the Nicaraguans, the course will continue into the first 2 or 3 days of "Dead Week"; students will return to Williamstown on Saturday, January 28.
Conversational knowledge of Spanish is, of course, helpful; but we will be accompanied by several translators who will help to to make the experience accessible to non-Spanish speakers as well. Willingness to live in physically demanding situations is essential. Enrollment limit: 12.
By present estimates, the cost of the trip to each student (including all food, lodging, round-trip travel between Williamstown and Managua, all in-country transportation and fees) will be approximately $3,400. Students are individually responsible for the cost of travel to Williamstown at the beginning of WSP.

RICHARD SPALDING (Instructor)
BUELL (Sponsor)

REL 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Religion 493 or 494.

ROMANCE LANGUAGES

FRENCH

RLFR S.P. Sustaining Program for French 101-102
Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study period. There are five 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

TBA (Teaching Associates)

RLFR 10 Fictions of Domesticity (Same as English 10)
We visit an author's home in search of a connection to the origin of their writing: here's the site from which a novel or poem sprang. Museums dedicated to authors' homes feed this fantasy, that in looking at Melville's desk (complete with glasses) or at the room where Dickinson dwelt we are even closer to them than in their words. However, as we will explore in the course, far from an unmediated visit to the source of genius, museums of author's homes construct narratives of their own about authorship, art, even about the value of daily life. Moreover, the writers themselves shaped conceptions of domestic space in ways that do not always correspond to the tales told by the museums made of their homes. We will visit the homes of, and read works by, Herman Melville, Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, and Harriet Beecher Stowe.
Students will write a 5-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost: $97 (for transportation and museum admission).

PIEPRZAK and DAVIS

RLFR 16 Contemporary Queer Cinema in France (Same as Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies 16)
From the streets of "Gay Paris" to the cinematic premieres of the Cannes Film Festival, France has long been a beacon of queer representation. French writers from Gide and Proust to Colette and Genet have celebrated gay and lesbian identities in their novels. American expatriates Gertrude Stein and Natalie Barney have mentored new generations of queer writers and artists in their Parisian salons. And openly gay couturiers Jean-Paul Gaultier and Yves Saint-Laurent have projected fabulous French fashion out into the world. In the past few decades, queer political activism in France has led to the creation of the national "PACS" or domestic partnership law, as well as greater rights and protections for queer men, women, and people living with HIV/AIDS. This course will examine representations of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender identity in French cinema from 1968 to 2005. We will discuss a wide variety of issues on queer cinematic representation, including the closet and coming-out, race and ethnicity, lesbian (in)visibility, bisexuality, transgender identity, butch-femme and drag performativity, queer political engagement, and HIV/AIDS. Our film discussions will be complemented by readings from contemporary French and American queer theory. Films to include works by Balasko, Berliner, Chabrol, Collard, Denis, Ducastel, Epstein, Fassbinder, Friedman, Guibert, Lifshitz, Martineau, Molinaro, Ozon, Veber, and Vallée. Readings to include texts by Aaron, Butler, Castle, Garber, Halberstam, Martel, Russo, and Sedgwick.
Films in French with English subtitles. Discussions in English.
Requirements: active class participation and a 10-page paper in English.
No prerequisistes. Enrollment limit: 15. If overenrolled, preference given to majors in Romance Languages, Comparative Literature, and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Cost: approximately $35 for readings.
Meeting time: 2-3 mornings per week.

MARTIN

RLFR 30 Honors Essay
To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLFR 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for French 493-494.

ITALIAN

RLIT S.P. Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102
Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

NICASTRO

SPANISH

RLSP S.P. Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102
Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

TEACHING ASSOCIATES

RLSP 25 US-Mexico Border Issues (Same as Latina/o Studies 25)
This course takes a close look at life and issues along the US-Mexico border, specifically the border with Arizona. The first week will be on campus and devoted to investigating the political-economy of global immigration, cultural flows and identities in both a social science and literary context, social transformations and domestic political coalitions, security concerns in the wake of 9/11, and US immigration policy and practice, all with specific reference to US-Mexican immigration. The objective is to provide students with background and references in preparation of their experiential learning in Arizona and Mexico. The two-week travel portion of the course will be organized through the Borderlinks program, a non-profit that specializes in academic programs on the Arizona/Mexico borderlands (www.borderlinks.org). Students will extend their understanding of the immigration issues on-site with the Borderlinks delegation and profit from an intense experiential learning component where they have exchanges with migrants, youth groups, humanitarian activists, and community organizations in Arizona and neighboring Mexico. There will also be a service component in Arizona and/or Mexico with non-profit groups involved in border issues. Upon their return to campus, students will meet with the instructors to evaluate their experience in light of the reading they did before departing.
Each student will complete a 10-page paper on some facet of US-Mexico immigration and the borderlands.
No prerequisites; not open to first-year students.. Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost: approximately $2595.

JANE CANOVA and NICHOLAS GOODBODY (Instructors)
FOX (Sponsor)

Jane Canova is the Administrative Director of Center for Foreign Languages Literatures and Cultures at Williams College. Nicholas Goodbody is Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish.

RLSP 30 Honors Essay
To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLSP 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Spanish 493-494.

RUSSIAN

RUSS S.P. Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102
Required of all students enrolled in Russian 101-102. Three meetings per week, 50 minutes per session. Practice in speaking and comprehension based on material already covered as well as some new vocabulary and constructions. Designed to maintain and enhance what was acquired during fall semester, using new approaches in a relaxed atmosphere. No homework.
Regular attendance and active participation required to earn a "Pass." Open to all.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

INYASHKIN

RUSS 16 Chekhov, An Unlikely Revolutionary (Same as Comparative Literature 16, Philosophy 16, and Theatre 16)
(See under PHIL 16 for full description.) MILOS MLADENOVIC

RUSS 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Special 25)
Williams has a unique program in the Republic of Georgia, which offers students the opportunity to engage in three-week-long internships in any field. Our students have worked in the Georgian Parliament, helped in humanitarian relief organizations like Save the Children, interned in journalism at The Georgian Times, taught unemployed women computer skills at The Rustavi Project, documented wildlife, studied with a Georgian sculptor, done rounds at the Institute of Cardiology, and learned about transitional economies at the Georgian National Bank. In addition to working in their chosen fields, students experience Georgian culture through museum visits, concerts, lectures, meetings with Georgian students, and excursions. Visit the sacred eleventh-century Cathedral of Sveti-tskhoveli and the twentieth-century Stalin Museum, take the ancient Georgian Military Highway to ski in the Caucasus Range, see the birthplace of the wine grape in Kakheti and the region where Jason sought the Golden Fleece. Participants are housed in pairs with English-speaking families in Tbilisi, Georgia's capital city.
At the end of the course students will write a 10-page paper assessing their internship experience.
Knowledge of Russian or Georgian is not required.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Not open to first-year students.
Cost: approximately $2000.

SECKLER

RUSS 30 Honors Project
May be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RUSS 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Russian 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY-See under ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

THEATRE

THEA 10 Playwriting Studio: Art of the Everyday
This is a studio course designed for students interested in exploring what it means to write realism for today's theatre. Inspired by contemporary dramatists, like Annie Baker and Elizabeth Meriwether, as well as photographers, like Alec Soth and Stephen Shore, the class will focus on gaining an appreciation for the "art of the everyday." Participants will be asked to examine the daily, perhaps mundane, aspects of their own "realities" and form them into something meaningful for the stage. This class will involve extensive in-class writing and revising.
Students will complete weekly exercises and work towards a larger 10- to 12-page one-act project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to Studio Art, Art History, Theatre, and English majors.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: mornings.

HOLZAPFEL

THEA 15 CAMP IT UP! The Politics of Queer Performance (Same as History 15 and Theatre 15)
(See under WGSS 15 for full description.) FISHZON

THEA 16 Chekhov, An Unlikely Revolutionary (Same as Comparative Literature 16, Philosophy 16, and Russian 16)
(See under PHIL 16 for full description.) MILOS MLADENOVIC

THEA 17 Cabaret: Creation and Performance
This studio class will be dedicated to the creation and performance of original cabaret performance. Students will develop skills in song writing, staging, character development, performance and the use of the emotional voice through the creation of their own short cabaret performances individually or in small groups. The official class meetings (6 hours/week in the studio) will have to be supported by substantial commitment to collaborative work and rehearsal.
Evaluation will be based on the final performance.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to Theatre and Music majors.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: afternoons.

ABIGAIL and SHAUN BENGSON (Instructors)
BAKER-WHITE (Sponsor)

The Bengsons are internationally renowned performers, activists, and teachers, known for developing their own unique brand of performance dubbed Vaudevillian Indie Folk.

THEA 32 Senior Honors Thesis
See description of Degree with Honors in Theatre.

WOMEN'S, GENDER AND SEXUALITY STUDIES

WGSS 12 Alternative Birth Choices (Same as Psychology 12)
(See under PSYC 12 for full description.)

WGSS 13 Understanding Similarities, Bridging Differences (Same as Latina/o Studies 13)
(See under LATS 13 for full description.)

WGSS 14 Plato's Symposium and Its Afterlife (Same as Classics 14, Comparative Literature 14, and Philosophy 14)
(See under CLAS 14 for full description.) WILCOX

WGSS 15 CAMP IT UP! The Politics of Queer Performance (Same as History 15 and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies 15)
(See under WGSS 15 for full description.) FISHZON

WGSS 16 Contemporary Queer Cinema in France (Same as French 16)
(See under RLFR 16 for full description.) MARTIN

WGSS 28 Sex and the First Amendment (Same as History 28)--CANCELLED!
(See under HIST 28 for full description.) JOAN BERTIN

WGSS 30 Honors Project
To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

SPECIALS

SPEC 10 Quest for College: Early Awareness in Berkshire County Schools
CANCELLED!


SPEC 11 Science for Kids (Same as Chemistry 11)
(See under CHEM 11 for full description.)

SPEC 12 The Amber Room and Hidden Treasures: Impressionist Art Held Hostage? (Same as Astronomy 11 and History 11)
(See under ASTR 11 for full description.) MARGO R. BOWDEN

SPEC 13 Physical Computing: Playing with Technology (Same as Computer Science 15)
Get away from screen only computing,  and interface digital and analogue technologies including objects, lights, motors, sensors, sound and cameras.  Reading, research, presentations, workshops, design and practical exercises, Agile style sprints and scrums. Tools used will include Arduino micro-processor control boards, Processing and Flash.  Skills learned may include soldering, simple programming, project management, and working together to articulate and solve problems.
Requirements: attend group sessions, complete labs, blog, contribute to collaborative wiki, and a final individual and/or group project presentation equivalent to a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites, though students must have a laptop.  Enrollment limit: 12.
Group attendance: 6 hours per week.  Open labs: 12-15 hours per week (this is for designing and implementing your projects and problem solving.  You are welcome to work on your own.)
Cost: approximately $75 for hardware/software, but may be reduced depending on numbers.

DAVID FURLOW ’80 (Instructor)
Winter Study Committee (Sponsor)

David Furlow ‘80 is a European-based experience designer who has worked with interactive learning, games, simulation, toys, theme park attractions, tv set-top box DVRs, micro-transaction systems, electronic discovery, and digital archives, as well as database based investigations of fraud and money laundering.  His academic interests include surveillance and curiosity management.  He has helped to facilitate several previous WSP's and summer seminars in interaction design, experience design and media technology at Williams.  He has worked on several prize winning products including IAAPA theme park game of the year, and the Mila d'Or at Cannes, and has been a resident artist at the Banff Institute, at Performing Arts Labs in the UK and at Rotterdam Film Festival.

SPEC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as Chemistry 14 and Psychology 14)
(See under CHEM 14 for full description.)

SPEC 15 Contemporary American Songwriter (Same as American Studies 15 and Music 15)
This course will focus on learning how to write and perform songs in a contemporary style. Topics addressed will include song structure, how to create a lyric that communicates, vocal and instrument presentation, recording and performing techniques, publicity for events, and today's music industry. This class will culminate in a public performance of material written during the course. To successfully pass this course, students are required to create, edit, perform, and possibly record two original songs. These songs must be conceived during the course period (previously written material in not usable). Students will be guided to create both music and lyrics. They may also be required to participate in a co-write session. One of these songs will be presented during the final performance, preferably by the student. Attendance at classes, feedback sessions, and final presentation is mandatory. Please note: this class meets every day. A short writing assignment will be passed in on the last day of class.
No prerequisites. Students with a musical background and the ability to play an instrument may be given preference, but anyone interested is encouraged to register. (Bernice.Lewis@wililams.edu). Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: books plus $35 lab fee for recording and xeroxing costs.
Meeting time: M, Tu, W, Th, F 10 a.m.-noon.

BERNICE LEWIS (Instructor)
WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Bernice Lewis is an accomplished singer, songwriter, producer and educator. She has been a national touring artist for over twenty years and has performed at the Kerrville Folk Festival, PBS's Mountain Stage, and the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. She was recently chosen by the National Park Service to be an Artist in Residence. She has released six recordings of original material.

SPEC 16 Peer Support Training
Are you the person your friends seek out for support? Are you currently serving other students directly in an advising or counseling role? Good listening and communication skills are vital for students interested in these roles and in the helping professions, in particular. This course will help you improve your listening and relational skills, assist others with social, academic and personal relationships, facilitate decision-making without imposing your own values, and assess risk. You will learn how to communicate about sensitive issues, develop your identity in the helping role, and consider various other parameters such as personal limits and how/when to refer. This is an experiential training augmented by relevant readings and out-of-class assignments designed to deepen your understanding and practice of communication and helping skills.
Evaluation is based on attendance, class participation, and a 10-page paper composed of journal entries and a summary response to your experience and learning in the course.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 18.
Cost to students:$0.
Meeting time: afternoons.

KAREN THEILING and LANI SPORBERT (Instructors)
RUTH HARRISON (Sponsor)

Karen Theiling is a psychotherapist at Williams College Psychological Counseling Services and a licensed mental health counselor in private practice in Northampton, MA. She has led a variety of psychosocial, educational and mindfulness groups at Williams and in the Pioneer Valley of Massachusetts.

Laini Sporbert is the Health Educator in Williams College's Department of Health Services.

SPEC 17 Learning Intervention For Troubled Teens (LIFTT) (Same as ANSO 17 and Legal Studies 17)
(See under LGST 17 for full description.)

SPEC 19 Medical Apprenticeship
Firsthand experience is a critical component of the decision to enter the health professions. Through this apprenticeship, students can clarify their understanding of the rewards and challenges that accompany the practice of all types of medicine. Apprenticeships are arranged in two distinct ways: some students live on campus and are matched with a local practitioner, while others make independent arrangements to shadow a distant professional. The expectation is that each student will observe some aspect of medicine for the better part of the day, five days per week. In recent years, students have shadowed physicians, veterinarians, dentists, nurses, and public health experts.
A 5-page reflective paper is required, as is attendance (for those shadowing near campus) at three Tuesday evening programs. Students will meet from 6:30-8:30 p.m. over dinner to hear from invited speakers from the medical community as a stimulus to discussion about their apprenticeship experiences.
Prerequisites: Interested students must attend an information meeting in early October. Local enrollment is limited by the number of available practitioners. Preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the health professions.
Cost: local apprenticeships: required vaccinations, local transportation and possibly lunches. Distant apprenticeships: costs will vary based upon location.
TEACHING ASSOCIATES (Instructors): STEVEN ANISMAN, M.D.; DAVID ARMET. P.T.; CHILDSY ART, M.D.; DEBORAH AUGUST, M.D.; VICTORIA CAVALLI, M.D.; JONATHAN CLUETT, M.D.; LEE DELANEY, D.V.M.; MARIANNE DEMARCO, M.D.; MICHAEL DISIENA. D.O..; PAUL DONOVAN, D.O.; SIMON DREW, M.D.; STUART DUBUFF, M.D.; WILLIAM DUKE, M.D.; ROBERT FANELLI, M.D.; WADE GEBERA, M.D.; DAVID GORSON, M.D.; ALISON HASTINGS, D.O..; DEBORAH HENLEY, M.D.; ERIC HOLMGREN, D..D.S./M.D.; JUDITH HOLMGREN, M.D.; ORION HOWARD, M.D.; LAURA JONES, D.V.M.; JOSHUA KLEEDERMAN, D.M.D.; WILLIAM KOBER, M.D.; JONATHAN KRANT, M.D.; WILLIAM LEVY, M.D.; REBECCA MATTSON, D.V.M.; MARK MCDERMOTT, M.D.; RONALD MENSH, M.D.; GRAHAM MOORE, M.D.; BORIS MURILLO, M.D.; CHARLES O'NEILL, M.D.; JUDY ORTON, M.D.; DANIEL PERREGAUX, M.D.; FERNANDO PONCE, M.D.; RICHARD PROVENZANO, M.D.; DANIEL ROBBINS, M.D.; OSCAR RODRIGUEZ, M.D.; SCOTT ROGGE, M.D.; PAUL ROSENTHAL, M.D.; ROBERT SILLS, M.D.; THEMARGE SMALL, M.D.; ANTHONY SMEGLIN, M.D.; ANNE MARIE SWANN, M.D.; ELIZABETH TOOMAJIAN, N.P.; SPYRIDON TRIANTOS, M.D.; ELIZABETH WARNER, M.D.; ELIZABETH WHATLEY, M.D.; JAMES WHITTUM, M.D.; KATIE WOLFGANG, D.V.M.; NICHOLAS WRIGHT, M.D.; JEFFREY YUCHT, M.D.; MARK ZIMPFER, M.D.; and others.

JANE CARY Health Professions Advisor

SPEC 21 Experience the Workplace: an Internship with Williams Alumni/Parents
Field experience is a critical element in the decision to enter a profession. Through this internship, students can clarify their understanding of the rewards and challenges that accompany the practice of many different aspects within a profession, and understand the psychology of the workplace. Internship placements are arranged through the Office of Career Counseling, with selected alumni and parent acting as on-site teaching associates. The expectation is that each student will observe some aspect of the profession for the better part of the day, five days per week. It is also expected that the teaching associate will assign a specific project to be completed within the three-to-four week duration of the course depending upon appropriateness.
It is expected that students will complete assigned readings, keep a daily journal, and write a 5- to 10-page expository review and evaluation that will become public record as a resource for other students. The expectation is that each student will be in the field to observe some aspect of the profession for the better part of the day, five days per week. In addition to observation there may be an opportunity to
Prerequisites: interested students must attend an information meeting in early October, and meet individually with John Noble to go over the details of their placements. Preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the profession of interest.
Enrollment is limited by the number of available teaching associates (instructors). Preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the profession of interest. Teaching associates will make the final selections.
Meeting Times: each student will be in the field to observe some aspect of the profession five days per week, at least 6 hours per day.
Cost: Local apprenticeships-local transportation. Distant apprenticeships-costs will vary based upon location, BUT ARE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT. The college has no extraordinary funding to support the internship.
Teaching Associates (instructors): Williams College alumni and parents of current Williams students will be recruited to become instructors for this course. A broad range of professions will be represented as the course develops. Alumni and parents will receive individual orientations with the course director in person or via telephone conference.

JOHN NOBLE, Director of the Office of Career Counseling

SPEC 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as Russian 25)
(See under RUSS 25 for full description.)

SPEC 26 Travel Course: Resettling Refugees in Maine (Same as History 26)
Sponsored by the Gaudino Scholar and the Gaudino Fund in 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011, this Winter Study travel course will allow a small group of students to live in Portland, Maine for the month of January 2011, where they will experience and explore the impact of over thirty years of refugee resettlement in the `whitest' of the United States. Each student will live with a refugee family from one of the dozens of countries represented by the refugee communities of Portland and work with a service provider, and will encounter first-hand the issues confronting recent immigrants to the United States from Southeast Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe or Latin America. While only 4 hours from Williams, Portland students speak almost 60 languages in the school system. WSP students will learn a great deal not only about others, but also about their own assumptions and values. Students will be exposed to such issues as race, ethnicity, and national identity; the interplay of public and private values; and the wide variety of educational, health, governmental, and religious agencies and providers serving refugee families Students meet weekly with the course instructor to discuss how their experiences are going; they will also attend arranged community meetings or events. Students as a group will also have time in Maine at the beginning of the program for an orientation session, and at the conclusion to share experiences with each other and write a short reflection paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 6; not open to first year students. If student interest exceeds the enrollment limit, preference will be given to those students who demonstrate, in a short conversation with and 1-page essay submitted to the instructor, their interest in experiential learning generally and the problems confronting recent immigrants to the United States specifically.
Cost: here will be a small per diem paid to each host family for room and board. For financial aid students, costs for this WSP travel course will be paid by the Gaudino Fund.

JEFF THALER '74 (Instructor)
BERNHARDSSON (Sponsor)

Jeff Thaler '74 participated in Williams-at-Home with Professor Robert Gaudino in 1971-72. After Professor Gaudino's death in 1974, Jeff and some other alumni developed an initiative that eventually became the Gaudino Memorial Fund. Jeff served on the Board of the Fund for many years, including as its Chair; in 2010 he was elected to come back onto the Board,and now is Vice-Chair. Jeff graduated from Yale Law School in 1977, worked as a public defender in New York City from 1977-79, and has lived in Maine since 1979, where he has works as a trial and environmental attorney. He taught a course on refugee issues as an adjunct professor at the University of Southern Maine, as well as courses at Maine Law School and Bowdoin College. Jeff has volunteered with many refugee groups in Portland; was elected in 2009 to the Williams College Tyng Scholarship Committee; and has worked as a group facilitator for the past ten years at the Center for Grieving Children.

SPEC 28 Teaching Practica in New York City Schools
Students in this course learn about the front-line challenges of urban public education by working in one of New York City's public schools. Participants will be expected to pursue a full day's program of observing, teaching, tutoring and mentoring in their choice of more than 20 different school situations from elementary through high school. Each of the participating schools will have a resident supervisor who will meet with the January interns to arrange individual schedules and provide mentoring during the month. There will be weekly seminar meetings of all the interns who are expected to participate in group discussions, keep a journal and write a 5 page paper reflecting upon their experience. The course will conduct orientation meetings with students prior to January, matching each student's interest with appropriate teaching subject areas and a host school. Dormitory-style housing will be provided along with some assistance with transportation and food costs-estimated at $400 for the term. Further assistance is available for financial aid students.
Evaluation will be based on a journal and a 5-page paper.
Prerequisites: sophomore, junior or senior standing. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost: $400.
Meeting time: off-campus fieldwork: daily 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. and weekly seminar dinners.

TRACY FINNEGAN (Instructor)
WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Tracy Finnegan is a master's level teacher with training and teaching experience in a variety of approaches and settings.

SPEC 35 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel
Each class will begin with a lecture-demonstration, followed by practice on the potter's wheel. Each student will have the use of a potter's wheel for each class. We will work on mugs, bowls, pitchers, plates, jars, lids, vases, and bottles, and will finish these shapes as required by trimming and adding handles, lugs, lids, spouts, and knobs. We will also work on several different handbuilding projects. After the tenth class session, all class work will be biscuit-fired. The eleventh class will be devoted to glazing the biscuited pieces. Glazing techniques will include pouring, dipping, layering, brushing, and stamping, and using wax resist and other masking techniques to develop pattern and design. The completed work will then be glaze-fired. The last meeting will be devoted to a "final project" gallery show of your best work. Woven into lecture-demonstrations will be presentations on various topics relating to the science and history of pottery making.
Requirements: attendance at all class sessions and enthusiasm for learning the craft of pottery making.
No prerequisites or potterymaking experience necessary. Enrollment limit: 9.
Cost: $300 lab fee, plus makeup class fees ($45.00 per class) if applicable.
Meeting time: mornings.

RAY BUB (Instructor)
WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Ray Bub is a ceramic artist and teacher at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery in Pownal, Vermont, 10 minutes north of the Williams College campus. All classes except the slide show and final project exhibition take place at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery.

SPEC 39 "Composing a Life:" Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams
To be at Williams you have learned to be a successful student, but how do you learn to be successful in life? How will you define success in both your career and in your personal life? How will you achieve balance between the two? In short, what will constitute the "good life" for you? We borrow the concept of "composing a life" from Mary Catherine Bateson, as an apt metaphor for the ongoing process of defining success and balance in life. This course is designed: (1) To offer college students an opportunity to examine and define their beliefs, values, and assumptions about their future personal and professional lives before entering the "real" world; (2) To encourage students to gain a better understanding of how culture, ideology, and opportunity affect their life choices; (3) To provide an opportunity for students to consider different models of success and balance through "living cases" (in the form of guests from various professions and lifestyles); and (4) To aid students in contemplating their life/career options through individual advising and introducing various career and life planning resources. Using selected readings, cases, and guest speakers, we will explore both the public context of the workplace as well as the private context of individuals and their personal relationships in determining life choices.
Requirements: regular attendance, class participation, field interview, and a 10-page final paper
Weekly assignments include cases and readings from a variety of related fields, and some self-reflection exercises
No prerequisites. Questions about the course: please contact Michele Moeller Chandler at (413) 458-8106 or michele.chandler2@verizon.net Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: approximately $30-$35 for cases/reading materials
Meeting time: mornings, two-hour classes three times a week

MICHELE MOELLER CHANDLER and CHIP CHANDLER (Instructors)
TOOMAJIAN (Sponsor)

Michele Moeller Chandler ('73) and Chip Chandler ('72) have taught this Winter Study course for the past fifteen years. They have been both personally and professionally engaged in the course topic. Michele, a former college administrator, has an M.A. from Columbia, and a Ph.D. from Northwestern. Chip, a retired McKinsey senior partner, has an M.B.A. from Harvard, and currently teaches in the Leadership Studies Program.

WILLIAMS PROGRAM IN TEACHING
Students interested in exploring one or more of the following courses related to teaching and/or working with children and adolescents should contact Susan Engel, Director of Education Programs, who will be able to help you choose one that best suits your educational goals.

ANSO 12 Children and the Courts: Internship in the Crisis in Child Abuse
(See under ANSO 12 for full description.)

BIOL 11 Project BioEyes: Zebrafish Genetics and Development in the K-12 Classroom
(See under BIOL 11 for full description.)

CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as Special 11)
(See under CHEM 11 for full description.)

ENVI 14 Environmental Ed--What, Why, and How
(See under ENVI 14 for full description.)

LGST 17 Learning Intervention For Troubled Teens (LIFTT) (Same as Special 17)
(See under LGST 17 for full description.)

SPEC 28 Teaching Practica in New York City Schools

(See under SPEC 28 for full description.)

WILLIAMS-MYSTIC PROGRAM IN AMERICAN MARITIME STUDIES

An interdisciplinary one-semester program co-sponsored by Williams College and Mystic Seaport which includes credit for one winter study. Classes in maritime history, literature of the sea, marine ecology, oceanography, and marine policy are supplemented by field seminars: offshore sailing, Pacific Coast and Louisiana. For details, see "Williams-Mystic Maritime Studies Program" or our website: web.williams.edu/williamsmystic.



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