Office of the Registrar

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WINTER STUDY PROGRAM 2013

REMINDERS ABOUT WSP REGISTRATION

All students who will be on campus during the 2012-2013 academic year must register for WSP. Registration will take place in the early part of fall semester. If you are registered for a senior thesis in the fall which must be continued through Winter Study by departmental rules, you will be registered for your Winter Study Project automatically. In every other case, you must complete registration. First-year students are required to participate in a Winter Study that will take place on campus; they are not allowed to do 99's.

Even if you plan to take a 99, or the instructor of your first choice accepts you during the registration period, there are many things that can happen between registration and the beginning of Winter Study to upset your first choice, so you must list five choices. You should try to make one of your choices a project with a larger enrollment, not that it will guarantee you a project, but it will increase your chances.

If you think your time may be restricted in any way (ski meets, interviews, etc.), clear these restrictions with the instructor before signing up for his/her project.

Remember, for cross-listed projects, you should sign up for the subject you want to appear on your record.

For many beginning language courses, you are required to take the WSP Sustaining Program in addition to your regular project. You will be automatically enrolled in this Sustaining Program, so no one should list this as a choice.

The grade of honors is reserved for outstanding or exceptional work. Individual instructors may specify minimum standards for the grade, but normally, fewer than one out of ten students will qualify. A grade of pass means the student has performed satisfactorily. A grade of perfunctory pass signifies that a student's work has been significantly lacking but is just adequate to deserve a pass.

If you have any questions about a project, see the instructor before you register.

Finally, all work for WSP must be completed and submitted to the instructor no later than January 25, 2013. Only the Dean can grant an extension beyond this date.

WINTER STUDY 99'S

Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible to propose "99's," independent projects arranged with faculty sponsors, conducted in lieu of regular Winter Study courses. Perhaps you have encountered an interesting idea in one of your courses which you would like to study in more depth, or you may have an interest not covered in the regular curriculum. In recent years students have undertaken in-depth studies of particular literary works, interned in government offices, assisted in foreign and domestic medical clinics, conducted field work in economics in developing countries, and given performances illustrating the history of American dance. Although some 99's involve travel away from campus, there are many opportunities to pursue intellectual or artistic goals here in Williamstown.

99 forms are available online: http://web.williams.edu/Registrar/winterstudy/99direct.html

The deadline for submitting the proposals to faculty sponsors is September 27, 2012.

AFR 13 The Political Theology of Bob Marley (same as PSCI 13 and REL 13)
AFR 14 Africa, Islam, and the Novel (Same as HIST 14 and REL 14)
AFR 25 Touring Black Religion in the `New' South (Same as ENVI 26 and REL 26)
AFR 30 Senior Project
AMST 11 The Changing Landscape of Journalism (Same as ENGL 11, ENVI 11 and LEAD 11)
AMST 13 Virtual Communities: Ethno-Racial Identity, Gender, and Class Online (Same as LATS 13 and WGSS 13) CANCELLED!
AMST 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as Special 15)
AMST 16 Narratives of Terror: 9/11 in the American Cultural Imagination (Same as ARAB 15 and COMP 15)
AMST 26 Teaching, Doctoring and Living With Refugees and Immigrants (Same as HIST 26 and SPEC 26)
AMST 30 Senior Honors Project
ANSO 11 Berkshire Farm Internship
ANSO 12 Children and the Courts
ANSO 14 Workshop in Ethnography
ANTH 25 Paleoanthropology in Egypt (Same as CHEM 25)
ANTH 31 Senior Thesis
SOC 31 Senior Thesis
ARAB S.P. Sustaining Program for Arabic 101-102
ARAB 14 Orham Pamuk, Nobel Laureate (Same as COMP 17, ENGL 15 and INST 15)
ARAB 15 Narratives of Terror: 9/11 in the American Cultural Imagination (Same as AMST 16 and COMP 15)
ARAB 31 Senior Thesis
ARTH 10 Chinese CalligraphyCANCELLED!
ARTH 25 Williams in NOLA: Recovery and Rebuilding in Post-Katrina New Orleans
ARTH 31 Senior Thesis
ARTH 33 Honors Independent Study
ARTS 11 Drawing as a Second Language
ARTS 12 Cut it, Fold it, Pleat it, Sit on it: Cardboard Sculpture and Furniture
ARTS 14 Working Together/Declarations of Independence
ARTS 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as CHEM 16)
ARTS 18 Stories and Pictures (Same as ENGL 18)
ARTS 31 Senior Studio: Independent Project Art Studio
ASST 12 The Art of War (Same as PSCI 12)
ASST 13 Urban Culture in Seventeenth Century China: The Fiction of Feng Menglong (Same as HIST 13)
ASST 31 Senior Thesis
CHIN S.P. Sustaining Program for Chinese 101-102
CHIN 25 Study Tour to Taiwan
CHIN 31 Senior Thesis
JAPN S.P. Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102
JAPN 10 Looking into Nihongo and Its Culture
JAPN 11 The Yakuza in Japanese Film
JAPN 31 Senior Thesis
ASTR 14 Are You Smarter than a Harvard Graduate? CANCELLED!
ASTR 31 Senior Research
BIOL 10 Observational Drawing From The Natural World
BIOL 11 BioEYES : Teaching Fourth Graders about Zebrafish
BIOL 15 Epidemiology and Public Health
BIOL 21 Science Beyond Williams
BIOL 22 Introduction to Biological Research
BIOL 31 Senior Thesis
CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as SPEC 11) CANCELLED!
CHEM 12 Spanish for Health Sciences CANCELLED!
CHEM 13 What Was Monet Thinking?-Understanding Art, for Non-Art Majors (Same as SPEC 13)
CHEM 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as SPEC 14)
CHEM 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as ARTS 16)
CHEM 18 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry
CHEM 20 Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry
CHEM 23 Introduction to Research in Organic Chemistry
CHEM 24 Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry
CHEM 25 Paleoanthropology in Egypt (Same as ANTH 25)
CHEM 31 Senior Research and Thesis
CLAS 10 Versions of Homer: An Introduction to Translation Theory (Same as COMP 10)
CLAS 12 Love, Ancient and Modern (Same as COMP 12 and REL 11)
CLAS 31 Senior Thesis
COGS 12 Introduction to Research in Cognitive Science CANCELLED!
COGS 31 Senior Thesis
COMP 10 Versions of Homer: An Introduction to Translation Theory (Same as CLAS 10)
COMP 11 Reading and Writing Magical Realism
COMP 12 Love, Ancient and Modern (Same as CLAS 12 and REL 11)
COMP 13 Enlightened Leadership (Same as LEAD 13) CANCELLED!
COMP 14 Teach Public Speaking (Same as SPEC 10)
COMP 15 Narratives of Terror: 9/11 in the American Cultural Imagination (Same as AMST 16 and ARAB 15)
COMP 16 "Crime and Punishment": the Novel and Its Adaptations (Same as RUSS 16)
COMP 17 Orham Pamuk, Nobel Laureate (Same as ARAB 14, ENGL 15 and INST 15)
COMP 18 Foreign Cinema: Mexico, Brazil and the Arab World
COMP 25 Transnational Narratives on the Mexico-US Border (Same as LATS 25) CANCELLED!
COMP 31 Senior Thesis
LIT 31 Senior Thesis
CSCI 10 Designing and Building a Desktop Computer
CSCI 12 Using a Computer to do the Math You Cannot Do

CSCI 13 3D Printer Construction: A Self-Replicating Printer (Same as PHYS 13)
CSCI 23 Introduction to Research and Development in Computing
CSCI 31 Senior Honor Thesis
CMAJ 31 Senior Thesis
DANC 10 The Rite of Spring, a Revolution of Rhythm and Movement
ECON 10 Dollars, Sense and US Health Care
ECON 11 Public Speaking
ECON 12 Turning Inspiration into a Business-Understanding the Business Plan
ECON 13 Introduction to Indian Cinema
ECON 16 Mechanisms of Arbitrage
ECON 17 Social Entrepreneurship: Innovating in the Social Sector (Same as LEAD 19 and POEC 17)
ECON 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (Same as POEC 22)
ECON 23 Introduction to the Economics, Geography and Appreciation of Wine
ECON 30 Honors Project
ECON 31 Honors Thesis
ECON 52 Micro-Simulation Modeling for Ex Ante Policy Analysis
ECON 53 Practical Quantitative Tools for Development
ECON 54 Applied Development Macroeconomics
ENGL 10 Rimbaud in English
ENGL 11 The Changing Landscape of Journalism (Same as AMST 11, ENVI 11 and LEAD 11)
ENGL 12 Making Jewelry
ENGL 13 The Art of Producing (Same as THEA 13)
ENGL 15 Orham Pamuk, Nobel Laureate (Same as ARAB 14, COMP 17 and INST 15)
ENGL 16 Theories of Justice and Community
ENGL 17 The Pleasures of Horror
ENGL 18 Stories and Pictures (Same as ARTS 18)
ENGL 19 Demon Children
ENGL 20 How to Tell a Story (Same as HIST 20)
ENGL 22 Shakespeare in Film (Same as THEA 12)
ENGL 23 War and Peace
ENGL 30 Honors Project: Specialization Route
ENGL 31 Honors Project: Thesis
ENVI 11 The Changing Landscape of Journalism (Same as AMST 11, ENGL 11 and LEAD 11)
ENVI 12 Landscape Photography (Same as GEOS 12)
ENVI 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Past, Its Uncertain Future (Same as JLST 13) CANCELLED!
ENVI 14 Environmental Education: What, How, and Why
ENVI 15 Environmental Dispute Resolution CANCELLED!
ENVI 25 California Agriculture
ENVI 26 Touring Black Religion in the `New' South (Same as AFR 25 and REL 26)
ENVI 31 Senior Research and Thesis
GEOS 12 Landscape Photography (Same as ENVI 12)
GEOS 25 Field Geology in the Colorado Front Range-the Geologic Evolution of the Southern Rocky Mountains
GEOS 31 Senior Thesis
GERM S.P. Sustaining Program for German 101-102
GERM 12 New/Old Netherland(s)-the Fourteenth, Forgotten Colony (See under HIST) CANCELLED!
GERM 30 Honors Project
GERM 31 Senior Thesis
HIST 10 Traveling through the Berkshires: The Past Meets the Present
HIST 12 New/Old Netherland(s)-the Fourteenth, Forgotten Colony (Same as GERM 12) CANCELLED!
HIST 13 Urban Culture in Seventeenth Century China: The Fiction of Feng Menglong (Same as ASST 13)
HIST 14 Africa, Islam, and the Novel (Same as AFR 14 and REL 14)
HIST 16 American Wars: Directed Independent Reading and Research
HIST 20 How to Tell a Story (Same as ENGL 20)
HIST 22 Realities and Representations of Native Americans
HIST 23 Gaudino Winter Study Fellows Program
HIST 26 Teaching, Doctoring and Living With Refugees and Immigrants (Same as AMST 26 and SPEC 26)
HIST 31 Senior Thesis
INST 15 Orham Pamuk, Nobel Laureate (Same as ARAB 14, COMP 17 and ENGL 15)
INST 25 Art of Experience in Egypt: Visual Documentation of Journey and Encounter
INST 30 Senior Honors Project
JLST 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Past, Its Uncertain Future (Same as ENVI 13) CANCELLED!
JLST 14 Mock Trial: Simulation of a Civil Trial
JLST 17 Learning Intervention for Troubled Teens (LIFTT)
LATS 13 Virtual Communities: Ethno-Racial Identity, Gender, and Class Online (Same as AMST 13 and WGSS 13) CANCELLED!
LATS 25 Transnational Narratives on the Mexico-US Border (Same as COMP 25) CANCELLED!
LATS 31 Latina/o Honors Thesis Seminar
LEAD 10 Institutional Leadership and Social Responsibility
LEAD 11 The Changing Landscape of Journalism (Same as AMST 11, ENGL 11 and ENVI 11)
LEAD 13 Enlightened Leadership (Same as COMP 13) CANCELLED!
LEAD 14 The CIA and the War on Terror: A Scalpel, not a Broadsword (Same as PSCI 14)
LEAD 18 Wilderness Leadership
LEAD 19 Social Entrepreneurship: Innovating in the Social Sector (Same as ECON 17 and POEC 17)
LEAD 25 Justice and Public Policy (Same as PSCI 15)
MAST 10 Ultimate Wellness: Concepts for Living a Happy Healthy Life
MATH 10 LQWURGXFWLRQ WR FUBSWRJUDSKB
MATH 11 A Taste of Austria
MATH 12 Modern Dance-Muller Technique
MATH 14 Introductory Photography: People and Places (Same as SPEC 12)
MATH 15 The Science of Star Trek (Same as PHYS 15)
MATH 17 Tournament Bridge
MATH 25 The History, Geography and Economics of the Wines of France
MATH 30 Senior Project
MATH 31 Senior Thesis
MUS 10 Microtonal Eartraining, Performance and Composition CANCELLED!
MUS 11 The Rite of Spring, Rhythm Unlocked
MUS 12 Composers Without Borders
MUS 17 Cabaret: Creation and Performance (Same as THEA 17)
MUS 25 The Calusa Indians of Southern Florida: The Cultural Legacy and Inspiration of an Extinct Civilization
MUS 31 Senior Thesis
NSCI 31 Senior Thesis
PHIL 10 The Later Foucault: Biopolitics and Self-Government
PHIL 11 The Philosophy of Chess
PHIL 12 Bioethics According to The Simpsons
PHIL 13 Boxing
PHIL 31 Senior Thesis
PHYS 10 Light and Holography
PHYS 11 Elementary Cooking Techniques
PHYS 12 Drawing as a Learnable Skill
PHYS 13 3D Printer Construction: A Self-Replicating Printer (Same as CSCI 13)
PHYS 14 Electronics
PHYS 15 The Science of Star Trek (Same as MATH 15)
PHYS 16 Quantum Mechanics and the Nature of Reality CANCELLED!
PHYS 22 Research Participation
PHYS 31 Senior Thesis
POEC 17 Social Entrepreneurship: Innovating in the Social Sector (Same as ECON 17 and LEAD 19)
POEC 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as PSCI 21)
POEC 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (Same as ECON 22)
POEC 23 Institutional Investment
POEC 31 Honors Thesis
PSCI 10 Occupy Wall Street and Beyond: Activists and Activism CANCELLED!
PSCI 11 Politicization of American History
PSCI 12 The Art of War (Same as ASST 12)
PSCI 13 The Political Theology of Bob Marley (same as AFR 13 and REL 13)
PSCI 14 The CIA and the War on Terror: A Scalpel, not a Broadsword (Same as LEAD 14)
PSCI 15 Justice and Public Policy (Same as LEAD 15)
PSCI 16 Aikido and the Art of Persuasive Political Speech
PSCI 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as POEC 21)
PSCI 25 Eye Care and Culture on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua
PSCI 31 Senior Thesis
PSCI 32 Individual Project
PSYC 10 The Group Experience
PSYC 12 Alcohol 101: Examining and Navigating the College Drinking Scene
PSYC 14 Mindfulness and Psychotherapy
PSYC 15 Ephquilts: An Introduction to Traditional Quiltmaking
PSYC 18 Residential Treatment Internship in the Berkshires
PSYC 19 Psychology Internships
PSYC 22 Introduction to Research in Psychology
PSYC 31 Senior Thesis
REL 11 Love, Ancient and Modern (Same as CLAS 12 and COMP 12)
REL 12 Yoga, Wellness, and the Art of Fully Thriving
REL 13 The Political Theology of Bob Marley (same as AFR 13 and PSCI 13)
REL 14 Africa, Islam, and the Novel (Same as AFR 14 and HIST 14)
REL 15 American Muslims CANCELLED!
REL 16 Stained Glass Self-Portraits: An Interaction Between Emotion, Expression, Tools and Technique
REL 25 Jerusalem: One City, Two Cultures, Three Faiths, Many Narratives
REL 26 Touring Black Religion in the `New' South (Same as AFR 25 and ENVI 26)
REL 31 Senior Thesis
RLFR S.P. Sustaining Program for French 101-102
RLFR 30 Honors Essay
RLFR 31 Senior Thesis
RLIT S.P. Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102
RLSP S.P. Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102
RLSP 30 Honors Essay
RLSP 31 Senior Thesis
RUSS S.P. Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102
RUSS 16 "Crime and Punishment": the Novel and Its Adaptations (Same as COMP 16)
RUSS 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as SPEC 25)
RUSS 30 Honors Project
RUSS 31 Senior Thesis
THEA 12 Shakespeare in Film (Same as ENGL 22)
THEA 13 The Art of Producing (Same as ENGL 13)
THEA 16 What's Playing on the New York Stage and Why
THEA 17 Cabaret: Creation and Performance (Same as MUS 17)
THEA 32 Senior Honors Thesis
WGSS 13 Virtual Communities: Ethno-Racial Identity, Gender, and Class Online (Same as AMST 13 and LATS 13) CANCELLED!
WGSS 25 Computer Trainings for HIV Positive Youth in Rural Uganda
WGSS 30 Honors Project
SPEC 10 Teach Public Speaking (Same as COMP 14)
SPEC 11 Science for Kids (Same as CHEM 11) CANCELLED!
SPEC 12 Introductory Photography: People and Places (Same as MATH 14)
SPEC 13 What Was Monet Thinking?-Understanding Art, for Non-Art Majors (Same as CHEM 13)
SPEC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as CHEM 14)
SPEC 15 Contemporary American Songwriter (Same as AMST 15)
SPEC 16 Peer Support Training
SPEC 17 Coming Down from the High: 12 Step Recovery and Counseling
SPEC 18 The Evolution of Sportswriting: From Grantland Rice to Grantland.com
SPEC 19 Medical Apprenticeship
SPEC 20 Student Leadership Development
SPEC 21 Experience the Workplace: an Internship with Williams Alumni/Parents
SPEC 23 Literary Journalism in Practice
SPEC 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as RUSS 25)
SPEC 26 Teaching, Doctoring and Living With Refugees and Immigrants (Same as AMST 26 and HIST 26)
SPEC 28 Class of 1959 Teach NYC Urban Education Program
SPEC 35 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel
SPEC 39 "Composing a Life:" Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams
SPEC 42 International Student Curricular Practical Training (CPT)

AFRICANA STUDIES

AFR 13 The Political Theology of Bob Marley (same as PSCI 13 and REL 13)

The Jamaican thinker Nesta Robert ("Bob") Marley was one of the twentieth century's foremost figures. During his short life, Marley became arguably the most visible member of the Rastafari movement and a critical voice in global discourses surrounding war, peace, human rights, freedom, and the role of religion in politics. This course brings together two sets of literatures that are currently experiencing a resurgence in intellectual inquiry: the first, scholarship on political theology and debates concerning tensions between religiosity and secularism in the public realm; and the second, the political philosophy of Rastafari. We will analyze documentaries, written texts, and audio-visual works on the life and times of Marley. This shall include the study of Marley before his conversion to Rastafari, the impact of the Wailers on his political theology, rebel music, messianism, the influence of non-state actors on state policies, the transformation in Marley's thought after membership in Rastafari, Marley's subsequent parting with the Wailers, and the devotion of substantial time internationally in the latter years to Pan-Africanism and humanitarianism across color lines. Guest lectures by select scholars and personages with intimate knowledge of Marley, political philosophy, and religion in the public sphere will serve to enrich our collective experience. A goal of this Winter Study is provide students with the context to ascertain the unique contributions of Marley to political theology, Rastafari, lyrical thought, and contemporary discussions in global politics over three decades since Marley's untimely death.
Format: lecture and discussion
Evaluation will be based upon class participation, leading one discussion on an assigned reading or audio-visual text, and an 8-page Final Paper.
No prerequisites, though students who took the lecture course, "Rastafari," are encouraged to enroll.
Cost: $50 for books and music.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: afternoons, two hours per session, Tues/Wed/Thurs.
ROBERTS

AFR 14 Africa, Islam, and the Novel (Same as HIST 14 and REL 14)

(See under HIST 14 for full description.)

AFR 25 Touring Black Religion in the `New' South (Same as Religion 26)

This course will give students the unique opportunity to explore the question-"What is black religion?"-from the inside. We will travel to the west coast of Florida to visit three very different church communities-a small mainstream denominational church, a Pentecostal-holiness church, and a mega-church-in order to understand the modern features of Black Protestant religion as expressed in the `New' South. Students are expected to enter as critical participant-observers who will take part in worship services and speak to local residents to assess the role each of the churches play in their respective communities. In addition to learning about black religion along the western coast of Florida through participant observation, students will visit and tour local historical sites significant to black religious experience including Eatonville, the home of Zora Neale Hurston. While no previous experience (or religious affiliation) is necessary, we especially invite students who are interesting in experiential learning.
Evaluation will be based on a field journal (presented in a blog format) and an oral presentation during colloquies.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Not open to first-year students.
Cost: $3,454.
JAMES MANIGAULT-BRYANT and RHON MANIGAULT-BRYANT

AFR 30 Senior Project

To be taken by students registered for Africana Studies 491 who are candidates for honors.

AMERICAN STUDIES


AMST 11 The Changing Landscape of Journalism
(Same as ENGL 11, ENVI 11 and LEAD 11)

(See under ENGL 11 for full description.)

AMST 13 Virtual Communities: Ethno-Racial Identity, Gender, and Class Online (Same as LATS 13 and WGSS 13)
CANCELLED!

(See under LATS 13 for full description.)

AMST 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as Special 15)

(See under SPEC 15 for full description.)

AMST 16 Narratives of Terror: 9/11 in the American Cultural Imagination (Same as ARAB 15 and COMP 15)

(See under ARAB 15 for full description.)

AMST 26 Teaching, Doctoring and Living With Refugees and Immigrants (Same as HIST 26 and SPEC 26)

(See under SPEC 26 for full description.)

AMST 30 Senior Honors Project

To be taken by students registered for American Studies 491 or 492.

ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

ANSO 11 Berkshire Farm Internship

An experiential field placement at Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth in Canaan, New York. Berkshire Farm Center is a residential treatment program for adolescent males with traumatic histories impacting their ability to function successfully in their home, school and community environment. The youth have either been remanded by the Family Court System or placed throug their School District for treatment and intervention. These youths come primarily from lower socio-economic strata, are very ethnically diverse, and hail from both urban and rural areas throughout New York State. The issues that bring them to placement are mainly a result of the psychological scars developed from physical, emotional, and sexual abuse. The manifested behaviors include chemical dependency, juvenile delinquency, inability to function in the school setting, inability to follow the rules at home, running away and/or mental health issues. The residential treatment model is strength based and focuses on teaching healthy decision making.
Williams students will commute to Berkshire Farm and work under supervision in various settings including school, cottage life, recreation, adventure-based therapy, animal husbandry or individual tutoring. The students are responsible to be proactive in developing their learning experience.
Requirements: students will be responsible to coordinate transportation among their classmates (van licenses to secure a college van is recommended), keep a journal reflecting on their experiences, and a weekly seminar with the instructor will draw on service learning experience. Students will also be required to submit a final 10-page paper at the end of the course or arrange a campus tour with the Berkshire Center youth.
Prerequisites: YOU MUST REVIEW THE WEBSITE AT www.berkshirefarm.orgr, COMPLETE THE APPLICATION AND SIGN OFF ON AGENCY POLICIES. Questions can be directed to Donelle Hauser at 518-461-2685 or dhauser@berkshirefarm.org. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: $25 to cover transportation to and from Berkshire Farm Center.
Meeting times to be arranged.

DONELLE HAUSER (Instructor)
NOLAN (Sponsor)

Donelle Hauser, LMSW, Vice President of the Residential Program, Berkshire Farm Center.

ANSO 12 Children and the Courts

This is an interdisciplinary, experiential course taught by a Justice of the Juvenile Court. Students will have the opportunity to observe court proceedings, mainly in the juvenile court, but also in the other trial court departments in Berkshire County. The course involves a weekly journal relevant to what the student has observed during the previous week, a mock trial at the conclusion of the course and a final project of the students choosing. Students are also invited to a weekly dinner at the home of the instructor to discuss issues relating to the course. It is the hope that students will take advantage of the wealth of experience and knowledge that the professionals who work within the juvenile justice system possess and that through these interactions the students will gain an understanding of this part of the judicial branch.
Requirements: final project, mock trial participation and journal entry.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to seniors.
Cost: none.
Meeting time: students go to court with the instructor or another attorney.

JUDITH LOCKE (Instructor)
NOLAN (Sponsor)

Honorable Judith A. Locke, Circuit Justice of the Juvenile Court Department, Trial Court of the Commonwealth, 12 year tenure as a judge, 10 year tenure as a staff attorney for DSS, prior experience as both a prosecutor and defense attorney. Teaching this course for many years, recently team teaching with my spouse, David L. Chenail, Esq., local attorney with over 25 years experience.

ANSO 14 Workshop in Ethnography

This course is a hands-on workshop in ethnographic field method that allows students to craft their own microethnography in a setting of their choice. The first week, spent in the classroom, will consider the main logistical and ethical issues associated with ethnography. The balance of the course requires independent research developed in consultation with the instructor. Each project will be expected to include a mix of observational material and extended interviews. In view the sheer volume of material generated by interviews and oral histories, the expectation for the final paper is at least 25 pages.
Requirements: 25-page paper. May be supplemented by still photographs and video materials.
No prerequisites, but preference given to Anthropology and Sociology majors or students contemplating either of these majors. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to majors in Anthropology or Sociology.
Cost: no more than $75 for books and reading materials. Students enrolled in the course should have access to some kind of audio or video recording device, although it need not be sophisticated. Students who choose to conduct part of their research off-campus are entirely responsible for their own travel expenses.
Meeting time: afternoon classes for first week, followed by individual consultations with instructor for balance of WSP. Students are expected to spend 8-10 hours per week collecting, transcribing, and analyzing their ethnographic material.
M. F. BROWN

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 25 Paleoanthropology in Egypt (Same as CHEM 25)

(See under CHEM 25 for full description.)

ANTH 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Anthropology 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Sociology 493-494.

ARABIC STUDIES

ARAB S.P. Sustaining Program for Arabic 101-102

Students registered for Arabic 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Arabic Sustaining Program.
Prerequisite: Arabic 101.
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation.
Meeting time: mornings, 9:00-9:50.

ARAB 14 Orham Pamuk, Nobel Laureate (Same as COMP 17, ENGL 15 and INST 15)

(See under ENGL 15 for full description.)

ARAB 15 Narratives of Terror: 9/11 in the American Cultural Imagination (Same as AMST 16 and COMP 15)

With the collapse of the Twin Towers on September 11, 2001, many scholars wrote that the course of American culture was forever altered. The attack, many believed, ushered in an era of sobriety and fear for Americans, and with it a new "culture of anxiety" emerged. Among the questions this class will explore is exactly this: Are we, as Americans, living in a perpetual state of fear and anxiety? Is our collective unconscious governed by the threat of terror presumably by an Arab or Muslim other? Through the course of this Winter Study we will examine a selection of post 9/11 literary, cinematic, pop culture and visual art narratives in an effort to investigate the way in which the events of September 11th and the subsequent war on terror has shaped our American psyche. We will use this body of work as an archive to think about issues related to trauma and cultural memory, representations of the Arab and Muslim as national menace, violence as staged spectacle, perceptions of American foreign policy, the entertainment value of terrorism as a literary and cinematic storyline, as well as the way in which certain war narratives enable or resist catharsis and closure for us as readers and viewers. Discussions will focus on selected film and television programs, which may include: Syriana, Munich, In the Valley of Elah, World Trade Center, The Kingdom, Traitor, Fahrenheit 9/11, No End in Sight, as well as select episodes of 24 and Homeland. Short fiction, poetry and criticism by writers such as John Updike, Susan Sontag, Ian McEwan, Suheir Hammad, Dunya Mikhail, Susan Buck Morss, and Brian Turner will be considered as well.
Requirements: final project or paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to majors in Arabic Studies, Comparative Literature, American Studies and English.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons and additional film screenings outside of class.
NAAMAN

ARAB 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for ARAB 493-494.

ART

ART HISTORY

ARTH 10 Chinese Calligraphy CANCELLED!

ARTH 25 Williams in NOLA: Recovery and Rebuilding in Post-Katrina New Orleans

Students will be involved in rebuilding projects through Common Ground Relief (a grass-roots organization), Habitat for Humanity, or other ongoing rebuilding efforts in the city. Projects may involve carpentry, painting, landscaping, or other manual labor in residential areas, or assisting in restoration of city facilities. In addition to their exposure through their own work, students will have tours and/or lectures on the construction and geology of the levee system and how and where it failed, sites of new construction and development in New Orleans (chosen in consultation with the Tulane School of Architecture), and a broader tour of the city's various districts, with emphasis on the impact of Katrina on and subsequent recovery in those districts. Recommended background sources will include Breach of Faith (by Jed Horne), Rising Tide (by John Barry), One Dead in Attic (by Chris Rose), and Spike Lee's 2 documentaries, "When the Levees Broke" and "If God is Willing and da Creek Don't Rise". Speakers will include faculty from Tulane, a state representative, and residents of New Orleans, including the Lower Ninth Ward. Students will have the opportunity to discuss their experiences, both amongst themselves and facilitated by faculty. Students will be expected to keep a journal and will meet formally with the instructors on a weekly basis to discuss their experiences and relevant topics. On their return to Williams, each student will write a 10-page paper about the experience.
Itinerary: Jan. 2-3: Arrive in New Orleans Jan. 3-4: Orientation meeting with instructors Jan. 4-22: Lectures, meetings, and tours to be arranged Jan. 22-23: Return to campus Jan. 24-25: Final meeting to hand in papers, process course experience with instructors.
Requirements: evaluation of journal, discussions, and 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Not open to first-year students. Preference given to sophomores and juniors. Students will be selected based on an interview with the instructors.
Cost: $1525
JAMES SAMENFELD-SPECHT and JEFF MCBRIDE (Instructors)
E.J. JOHNSON (Sponsor)

ARTH 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for ArtH 493, 494.

ARTH 33 Honors Independent Study

To be taken by candidates for honors by the independent study route.

ART STUDIO

ARTS 11 Drawing as a Second Language

In the first part of this course students are introduced to non-linear ways of thinking using images as metaphors in the problem solving process. In the second part of the course students learn simplified methods for representing objects, the figure and for defining three-dimensional space. These skills are applied to time- based sequential drawing methods such as mapping and storyboarding. The third section of the course is devoted to design drawing techniques. Students learn to create simple measured orthographic drawings and translate them into single-view isometric drawings. Students will also learn a fast and accurate perspective drawing technique that can be employed to create quick sketches as well as sophisticated renderings, without the use of cumbersome projected views. In the fourth section of the course students identify a problem or need in their personal environment or society that could be solved by design. Students develop and refine their ideas then present their solution to appropriate audiences. Students are taught and guided in various media and presentation techniques.
Sketchbooks and journaling are used extensively in this course.
By visualizing and analyzing their ideas students learn a balanced approach to design and decision making by fully utilizing both their linear and non-linear thinking processes. You will learn to arrive at more complete solutions to problems by combining drawing and language skills to accurately depict your ideas. You will learn efficient techniques for originating, recording, communicating and presenting your creative ideas so that you can be realized. Students learn how to become innovators and inventors in all aspects of their lives by introducing visualizing techniques to their traditional methods of problem solving.
Requirements: final project, class assignments, sketchbook and a reflective or analytical journal.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost: $160.
Meeting time: mornings.
KENT MIKALSEN (Instructor)
H. EDWARDS (Sponsor)

ARTS 12 Cut it, Fold it, Pleat it, Sit on it: Cardboard Sculpture and Furniture

Cardboard and paper are everyday, expendable materials that we often overlook, yet precisely because they are inexpensive, recyclable, and commonplace, they offer creative possibilities to artists interested in minimizing their environmental footprint. In this class, we will reinterpret these materials and investigate their art-making possibilities. Appropriate for students with little or no studio art experience, this course will introduce students to three-dimensional design and to the work of artists such as Frank Gehry and Shigeru Ban who have worked in cardboard. Students will sketch and develop simple model making skills as they use basic hand tools such as knives, scissors, and metal rulers. We will begin by investigating different techniques for translating planar elements into three-dimensional forms, including: folding, pleating, cutting, stacking, and paper maché. Then, in small groups, students will create large-scale sculptures that challenge notions of permanence and sustainability. Each student will take these skills to design and build a functional piece of furniture that will support his or her weight for the final review. Since this is a studio art course, additional outside-of-class time will be expected for students to complete assignments.
Requirements: assignments and final project
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to art majors.
Cost: $100.
Meeting time: mornings.
JOSHUA ENCK (Instructor)

Joshua Enck is a sculptor and furniture maker who works in wood and metal. He has a BSAS in Architecture from the University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign and an MFA in Furniture Design from the Rhode Island School of Design, where he has taught since 2005 in the Furniture Department and in Foundation Studies.

ARTS 14 Working Together/Declarations of Independence

Working Together/Declarations of Independence will be an intensive, performance training towards the development of a durational, movement-based performance to take place throughout the gallery spaces at WCMA on the evening of January 17th. Our work together will draw upon a range of traditions in dance, music, art, and relational practices, and will facilitate students in deepening their sensory and somatic capabilities with the aim of expanding their possibilities for movement, vocalization, and embodied collaboration. Students will also learn how to follow open, improvisational scores, or instructions for improvising movement and vocalization within a pre-determined structure, eventually participating in creating such scores. One of our primary foci will be cultivating and noticing the ways in which these movement approaches address and reflect the negotiations between disorder v. order and individuality v. collectivity. How might this work, through and with our bodies, allow us to confront and examine political questions relating to "speaking" one's truth v. collaborating and working together? Featuring costumes, movement, vocalization, audience participatory elements, and the 18-piece, Gypsy, punk brass band The What Cheer? Brigade, the performance will invite audience members to witness and, in some cases, participate in embodied negotiations of these binaries. After an initial period of working outside of the museum space in a studio, we will come into the galleries to develop our work specifically for the WCMA spaces. At that time we will also begin to draw from what is on view in the museum, including The Declaration of Independence and works featuring grids and other spatial structuring systems. The performance will not be a representation of these pieces, but will rather be conceptually and formally informed by them and by the students' personal relationships to them.
Evaluation will be based on rehearsal participation, final performance participation.
Requirements: some performance experience is required for this course, but it is most important that you are willing to take risks and work intensively through the body. Students will do a minimal amount of reading to contextualize our work.
Prerequisites: performance experience. Enrollment limit: 16. If overenrolled, method of selection will be based on statement of interest; priority will be given to seniors.
Cost: $0.
Meeting times: In addition to afternoon meetings we will meet on Saturdays from 1 to 5pm and on Thursday evenings for 3 hours. Our project and time together will culminate on January 17th and our final meeting will be on the 18th.
Schedule:
Thurs January 3rd 1-4pm & 7-10pm (studio) Fri 4th 1-4pm (studio) Sat 5th 1-5pm (studio) Sun 6th day off Mon 7th 1-4pm (studio) Tues 8th 1-4pm (museum) Wed 9th 1-4pm (museum) Thurs 10th 1-4pm & 7-10pm (museum & studio) Fri 11th 1-4pm Sat 12th 1-5pm (museum/studio) Sun 13th day off Mon 14th 1-4pm (museum) Tues 15th 1-4pm (museum) Wed 16th 1-4pm (museum) Thurs 17th show (call time 5pm) Fri 18th 1-4pm (studio)
HANA VAN DER KOLK (Instructor)
H. EDWARDS (Sponsor)

Hana van der Kolk is an independent performer, choreographer, and movement educator. Her choreographic projects exist at the boundaries between post modern dance and conceptual practice and occur in a wide range of sites. She has worked throughout the U.S. and in Berlin, Amsterdam, Estonia, and Singapore, and was the 2011-12 Arthur Levitt Fellow in Dance and Art at Williams. www.hanavanderkolk.com

ARTS 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as CHEM 16)

(See under CHEM 16 for full description.)

ARTS 18 Stories and Pictures (Same as ENGL 18)

(See under ENGL 18 for full description.)

ARTS 31 Senior Studio: Independent Project Art Studio

Independent project to be taken by candidates for honors in Art Studio.

ASIAN STUDIES

ASST 12 The Art of War (Same as PSCI 12)

(See under PSCI 12 for full description.)

ASST 13 Urban Culture in Seventeenth Century China: The Fiction of Feng Menglong (Same as HIST 13)

(See under HIST 13 for full description.)

ASST 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Asian Studies.

CHINESE

CHIN S.P. Sustaining Program for Chinese 101-102

Students registered for Chinese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Chinese Sustaining Program. Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9:00-9:50. Prerequisite: Chinese 101. Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation. Cost: one xerox packet.

LANGUAGE FELLOWS

CHIN 25 Study Tour to Taiwan

Interested in learning first-hand about Taiwanese and Chinese culture and becoming acquainted with the so-called Taiwan (economic and political) "miracle"? Want to improve your knowledge of Mandarin, the language with the largest number of native speakers? Then join us on this 23-day study tour to Taiwan, Republic of China. We'll spend the first two weeks in Taipei, the capital city, where three hours of Mandarin language classes will be scheduled each morning at the Mandarin Center of National Taiwan Normal University. After class each day, we'll meet as a group for lunch and discussion. Activities with Taiwanese university students and visits to cultural and economic sites of interest will be scheduled for some afternoons and Saturdays, with other afternoons, evenings, and Sundays free for self-study and individual exploration. During the last week, we'll travel to central and southern Taiwan, overnighting at various small hotels and youth hostels. Two orientation sessions will be conducted on campus in the fall to help participants prepare for their experience.
Requirements: satisfactory participation in the language course and active participation in the other scheduled activities.
Prerequisites: none, bu priority will be given to students with basic proficiency in Chinese.
Enrollment limit: 10. Not open to first-year students.
Cost: $2500 (includes round-trip air fare from New York City, tuition, textbooks, accommodations, weekday lunches, local excursions, and trip to central and southern Taiwan; does not include breakfasts, dinners, and some weekend lunches while in Taipei, estimated at $400, or incidental expenses. Participants should note that, to enhance learning and to stay within budget, accommodations and most meals will be local student-not foreign tourist-standard.).
KUBLER

CHIN 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Chinese.

JAPANESE

JAPN S.P. Sustaining Program for Japanese 101-102

Students registered for Japanese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Japanese Sustaining Program. Classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 9:00-9:50. Prerequisite: Japanese 101. Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation. Cost: one xerox packet.

TBA

JAPN 10 Looking into Nihongo and Its Culture

Have you ever studied Japanese or thought of studying Japanese? This is an ideal course for students who are curious about the Japanese language and culture. It will examine different aspects of Japanese language (Nihongo) in comparison to English and other languages through broader theoretical perspectives and how Nihongo is used in its cultural contexts. We will discuss variation and change in Nihongo, sounds and scripts of Nihongo, gestures and signals in Nihongo, interaction strategies in Nihongo, selected popular culture genres from comics to cell-phone novels, and more. Students will be asked to collect speech samples.
Requirements: 6- to 7-page research paper and presentation on selected issues on Japanese language or a language of student's interest.
No prerequisites; no Japanese language ability is required to take this course, but some knowledge would be very helpful. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference by seniority.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: mornings.
YAMAMOTO

JAPN 11 The Yakuza in Japanese Film

In the flesh they are vicious, violent and step aside for no one. On screen, the Yakuza seems as though he has just stepped out of a trash novel, where he was either romanticized, reviled or caricatured as a ultranationalist brute or buffoon; a man of valor or vile deeds, whose distinctive individuality of tattoos, hairstyle and clothes, theatrical displays of bravado and insolence are as recognizable throughout Japanese society as they are dreaded. His persona is unmistakable, no less than his ruthless, cold-blooded presence in post-war Japanese society.
Like the samurai and Geisha, the Yakuza, the gangster, is an iconic and quintessentially Japanese cultural and criminal figure. Since their first appearance in the Edo-Era of 16th century Japan, their personage has achieved such a longevity and permanence in Japanese media culture that they even comprise an entire film genre in their own right. Why this homage, durability and appeal accorded to a hoodlum?
This course will examine these questions within the context of an emergent Japanese post-war film genre through some of its most esteemed auteurs, like Fukasaku, Suzuki, Miike, Gosha and later, Kitano. It will examine the Yakuza's evolution, stature and controversial presence in Japanese culture, and who, unlike the samurai, did not have the historical curtain drawn down upon them. Instead, the Yakuza has endured and thrived over time, with no end in sight for his unrepentant ways to be corrected, let alone redeemed.
Requirements: 4- to 5-page response essays after each screening.
No prerequisites but class attendance and participation are mandatory. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost: $15 for photocopying fees.
Meeting time: mornings.
FRANK STEWART (Instructor)
YAMAMOTO (Sponsor)

From 1990-2004 Frank Stewart was an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law at Hiroshima Shudo University in Hiroshima, Japan. He lived a short distance from Heiwa Koen, the Peace Park, the epi-center of where the A-bomb was detonated.

JAPN 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Japanese.

ASTRONOMY/ASTROPHYSICS

ASTR 14 Are You Smarter than a Harvard Graduate? CANCELLED!

ASTR 31 Senior Research

To be taken by students registered for Astronomy 493, 494.

BIOLOGY

BIOL 10 Observational Drawing From The Natural World

This is a drawing course for science students and others who are interested in developing their skills in observing and drawing from nature. Much of the class work will deal directly with drawing from plant forms and specimens from the animal world and to this end we will be using an interesting collection of stuffed mounts and skeletons that belong to the Williams Biology department. We will also spend time in the Morley greenhouse. Beyond the subject matter at hand, assignments will also address and analyze the more formal aspects of drawing and two-dimensional design with outside assignments including independent visits to the Clark, the WCMA study collection and the Chapin Library of Rare Books.
Evaluation will be based on both the completion of in-class work and outside drawing assignments, with a focus on the depiction of content, level of effort, and development of the work. Evidence of technical and skill development as well as attendance and participation will also be taken into consideration. There will be scheduled time outside of regular class meetings for additional assignments. Exhibition and review of work at the final class meeting is required.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. If overenrolled, selection will be based on seniority.
Cost: $75.
Meeting time: 3 hours, twice a week.
JOHN RECCO (Instructor)
SWOAP (Sponsor)

John Recco lives and works in Hoosick, NY and holds an MFA from Columbia University. He has taught at a variety of institutions including Bennington College and Williams. He is the recipient of numerous awards including a Fulbright, fellowships at Yaddo, The Millay Colony, The European Cultural Centre of Delphi, Greece and a NYSCA Individual Artist Grant. His work is included in two recent publications; 100 Boston Painters published by Schiffer Publishing and Galvanized Truth: A Tribute to George Nick, By: Kimberlee C. Alemian. He is represented by the Katharina Rich Perlow Gallery in New York.

BIOL 11 BioEYES : Teaching Fourth Graders about Zebrafish

BioEYES brings tropical fish to 4th grade classrooms in Williamstown and beyond, in a science teaching workshop. Elementary school students will breed fish in the classroom, then study their development and pigmentation during one week. Williams students will adapt BioEYES lesson plans to the science curriculum for the schools we visit, work with classroom teachers to introduce concepts in genetics and development, help the 4th grade students in the classroom, and assess elementary student learning. A final eight-page paper describing the goals and outcomes for each grade level is required. No zebrafish experience is necessary; during the first week students will learn to set up fish matings, and learn about embryonic development and the genetics of fish pigmentation as well as practice teaching the 4th grade BioEYES lesson plans with hands-on experiments using living animals. In the subsequent two weeks we will work at the schools, and in the final week, students will write up the assessment data.
Requirements: 8-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Preference given to seniors.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: varies depending on needs of schools and laboratory requirements.
JENNIFER SWOAP (Instructor)
SWOAP (Sponsor)

Jennifer Swoap, an elementary school teacher, currently coordinates Williams Elementary Outreach, where Williams students teach hands-on science lessons at area elementary schools.

BIOL 15 Epidemiology and Public Health

The aim of this course is to give an introduction to epidemiological theory and practice, with a focus on public health and lifestyle factors.
The course covers basic principles regarding design, analysis, bias and interpretation of epidemiological studies. The course includes lectures, group discussions and various forms of exercises. The course focuses on active learning, i.e., putting knowledge into practice and critical reflection upon knowledge, rather than memorization of facts. There will be hands-on exercises where the students collect data on physical activity, evaluate the results, and consider potential bias. No previous knowledge in statistics is necessary.
Learning outcomes:
After successful completion of this course each student is expected to be able to:

* Give examples of the contribution of epidemiology to science and discuss the importance of epidemiology as a research discipline.

* Estimate and interpret measures of disease occurrence and measures of association, and describe how a specific measure is governed by the study design.

* Explain strengths and weaknesses of common epidemiological study designs.

* Identify and explain possible sources of bias in epidemiological studies.

* Apply knowledge of epidemiological concepts when critically reviewing scientific literature.

Meeting time: lectures 3 x 2 hours per week plus various forms of exercises and assignments, individually or in groups.
Requirements: data collection exercises and an oral presentation.
No prerequisites; no previous knowledge in statistics is necessary. Enrollment limit: 30. Priority based on seniority.
Cost: $40 for textbook.
Meeting time: afternoons.
KATARINA BÄLTER (Instructor)
SWOAP (Sponsor)


Katarina Bälter is Associate Professor at the Department of Medical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, in Sweden. Her research focuses on lifestyle factors and health. She has been teaching epidemiology at Karolinska Institutet and has done research at Boston University and Harvard School of Public Health.

BIOL 21 Science Beyond Williams

Are you interested in hands-on experience in a science-related field beyond the Purple Valley? Are you curious to explore science in a university or medical school research lab, a government agency, or a not-for-profit organization? This course is designed to help students take part in scientific work or research going on outside of Williams in order to provide them with a broader sense of what it is like to work in a professional scientific setting. Any field of science or technology can be explored via this course.
In consultation with the course instructor, students will use resources such as the Office of Career Counseling, science faculty members, and Williams alumni/ae to locate a mentor in the student's area of interest at a work site in the United States. Once the course instructor approves the arrangement for a mentored, hands-on experience for three weeks of Winter Study, the student will prepare for the internship by reading literature related to the project, and discuss the readings with a faculty sponsor here at Williams in November/December. Once on site, students must remain in contact with their Williams faculty sponsor by having a weekly phone conference. Participating students would not have to be on campus during WSP prior to beginning their fieldwork. Strong interest, enthusiasm and willingness to plan and prepare for the internship are required for this course.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper and post-WSP public presentation to a relevant department or program on the goals and accomplishments of the project.
Prerequisites: two semesters of relevant course work in science and/or mathematics.
Enrollment limit: 10.

MORALES

BIOL 22 Introduction to Biological Research

An experimental research project will be carried out under the supervision of Biology Department faculty. It is expected that the student will spend 20 hours per week in the lab at a minimum, and a 10-page written report is required. This experience is intended for, but not limited to, first-year students and sophomores. Interested students must submit an application form available on the Biology Department webpage:http://biology.williams.edu/biol-022-winter-study-application/
Prerequisites: Biology 101. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: none
Meeting time: mornings

MORALES

BIOL 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Biology 493, 494.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as SPEC 11) CANCELLED!

CHEM 12 Spanish for Health Sciences CANCELLED!

CHEM 13 What Was Monet Thinking?-Understanding Art, for Non-Art Majors (Same as SPEC 13)

This course introduces non-art majors to the ways in which artists see and understand painting, both the meaning of the work (the art) and painting techniques (the craft). Following a traditional method, students will create two paintings (subject matter of their choosing) using the basic elements of visual art: line, composition, color, and value. Each of these elements of the painting process will be presented simply and in clearly defined steps through the use of visuals, demonstrations, and exercises. Supplementing the painting periods, the class will visit WCMA to examine and discuss how artists, from the Old Masters to contemporary artists, have approached the art and craft of painting. Students will begin to see paintings as artists do.
Evaluation is be based on the completion of two paintings by the student as well as a written analysis of one painting from the WCMA collection. The evaluation of the student's painting is based not on artistic merit but on the effort made and understanding gained. There is also outside reading requirements. Because of the step-by-step methodology, class attendance is mandatory.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference will be given to seniors and juniors.
Cost: $150.
Meeting time: afternoons (T,W,R 1:00-4:00 p.m.).
JOHN MACDONALD (Instructor)
SMITH (Sponsor)

John MacDonald, a painter and freelance illustrator, holds a BFA from Washington University in St. Louis and an MA from Purdue University. A member of the Graphic Artist Guild, Illustrators Partnership of America, and the Society of Illustrators, John is also a certified creativity coach.

CHEM 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as SPEC 14)

Looking back on past loves and crushes, have you ever wondered "What on earth was I thinking?!" or "Why do I keep picking the wrong guys/girls for me?" While intense sexual attraction or urges may first call the shots, people who take the time to carefully choose and build caring, mutual relationships tend to be happier, healthier and more successful in their lives than those who don't. So how do we get there from here and make sense of all this? Well, no matter where you are on the dating spectrum, this self-exploration and relationship-skill-building course is for you if you are ready to learn how to follow your heart AND your mind to co-create a fulfilling relationship within the vortex of the "hook up" culture. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, "How to Avoid Falling In Love with A Jerk," and "Keeping the Love You Find" curricula will guide this introspective, interactive relationship mastery course through meaningful discussions and exercises that explore the common issues, dirty fighting tactics, subconscious directives and emotional allergies that often sabotage relationships. Experiential exercises, personal experiences and journaling will also give you the opportunity to practice effective communication and conflict resolution skills that honor the constructive use of differences and promote intimacy.
Evaluation is based on 8 hours of attendance per week, class participation, MBTI inventory completion, 20-hours per week of assigned readings, journaling, assignments, 1:1 consultations, and final 10-page reflective paper/event proposal and project. Email your statement of interest to ssmith@williams.edu if you are curious about relationships, ready and willing to BE the change, delve into personal growth and take your relationships to the next level.
Requirements: attendance, class participation, reading, journaling, 1:1 meetings with instructor, assignments and 10-page final paper/project.
Prerequisites: statement of interest. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference will be based on meaningful statement of interest.
Cost: $100.
Meeting time: Tuesdays and Thursdays., sometime between 10-3 pm.
RACHELLE SMITH (Instructor)
SMITH (Sponsor)

Rachelle Smith, MSW, is a holistic, strengths-based Clinical Social Worker, Consultant, Educator & Mentor bridging Relationships, Wellness and Energy Psychology.

CHEM 16 Glass and Glassblowing (Same as ARTS 16)

This course provides an introduction to both a theoretical consideration of the glassy state of matter and the practical manipulation of glass. We do flameworking with hand torches for at least 12 hours per week. While no previous experience is required, students with patience, good hand-eye coordination, and creative imagination will find the course most rewarding. The class is open to both artistically and scientifically oriented students.
Evaluation is based on class participation, exhibition of glass projects, a 10-page paper, and a presentation to the class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference is given to juniors, sophomores, and those who express the most and earliest interest and enthusiasm by e-mail to Professor Thoman.
Cost: $75 for supplies.
Meeting time: 9:00 a.m. to noon, M-F.
THOMAN

CHEM 18 Introduction to Research in Biochemistry

An independent experimental project in biochemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in biochemistry. Biochemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the molecular details of living systems including the interaction of biologically important molecules. In the Chemistry Department, studies are underway to investigate the structure/function relationship of proteins, the interaction between proteins and RNA and DNA, and the molecular basis of bacterial gene regulation.
Requirements: a 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate. Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: mornings.
GEHRING and KAPLAN

CHEM 20 Introduction to Research in Inorganic Chemistry

An independent experimental project in inorganic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in inorganic chemistry. Representative projects include: a) the study of complexes of transition metals as catalysts for polymerization and oxidations, with applied and industrial significance and b) studies of self-assembling systems, focusing primarily on the design, synthesis, and characterization of new materials for use in organic solar cells and the testing of photovoltaic efficiencies. Students working in these areas gain expertise in the synthesis of a diverse range of compounds, including organic molecules, metal containing complexes, and polymers and their characterization by modern spectroscopic techniques.
Requirements: a 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate.
Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons
C. GOH and PARK

CHEM 23 Introduction to Research in Organic Chemistry

In this course, students will engage in an experimental project based on the general aim of improving the role of polymers in drug delivery by expanding synthetic tools, incorporating both covalent and non-covalent self-assembly triggers, defining their materials properties on the basis of molecular structure, and improving their biocompatibility and degradability. Depending upon the project, students use techniques in organic synthesis, materials characterization, biochemical assays, and cell culture. Representative projects include the synthesis and evaluation of: (a) amino acid-based polymers as amphiphilic drug delivery vehicles; (b) polymers bearing targeting agents for improved cellular specificity; (c) temperature sensitive polymers for stimulus-controlled aggregation. These self-assembled materials are loaded with protein or small molecule drugs for anti-cancer therapies.
Requirements: A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate.
Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons
S. GOH

CHEM 24 Introduction to Research in Physical Chemistry

An independent experimental project in physical chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in physical chemistry. Current research projects in the Department include computer modeling of non-linear, chaotic chemical and biochemical systems, laser spectroscopy of chlorofluorocarbon substitutes, and observing the dynamics in glasses using single molecule spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.
Requirements: A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate.
Enrollment limited to space in faculty research labs.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: mornings and afternoons
PEACOCK-LOPEZ

CHEM 25 Paleoanthropology in Egypt (Same as ANTH 25)

Before the trip we will meet to discuss basic field techniques. The students will do some supplementary reading, but virtually nothing has been published on these sites. When we return they will be expected to help catalog samples.
Itinerary: Leave Williamstown January 1st; arrive Cairo January 2nd. Leave Cairo for the field January 4th. Return to Cairo from the field January 18th. Two days in Cairo. Leave Cairo January 20th; return Williamstown January 21st; unpack samples, clean equipment and write papers.
Students will be evaluated primarily on their participation in site activities. They will also be expected to write a paper either on the site or on some related topic in Egyptian prehistory.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 4. Preference will be given to those with some background in archaeology or chemistry. Preliminary selection must be done in the spring due to the lengthy visa process. Students will need to provide passport information.
Cost: $3250.
ANNE SKINNER (Instructor)
SMITH (Sponsor)

Anne Skinner is Safety Officer and Senior Lecturer in Chemistry, Emerita.

CHEM 31 Senior Research and Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Chemistry 493, 494.

CLASSICS

CLAS 10 Versions of Homer: An Introduction to Translation Theory (Same as COMP 10)

In Jorge Luis Borges' essay "Some Versions of Homer," he (or rather Suzanne Jill Levine, who translated the article into English) posits that "No problem is more essential to literature and its small mysteries than translation." This class will read essays on the theory of translation (by, e.g., Walter Benjamin, Jorge Luis Borges, Roman Jakobson, W.V. Quine, Andre Lefevere, Itamar Even-Zohar, Lawrence Venuti) as we consider versions of Homer, from the translations of Chapman and Hall, Cowper and Pope, Lattimore, Fitzgerald, and Fagles, to the Coen brothers' film, Oh Brother, Where Art Thou? Focusing on specific passages from the Iliad and Odyssey, we will examine the choices that are made and shifts that occur when Homer is rendered into another language as well as other media. Finally, we will read Zachary Mason's The Lost Books of the Odyssey and discuss the difference, if any, between translation and adaptation.
Students are not expected to have any knowledge of ancient Greek. Familiarity with the Homeric texts (in English) will be useful but not necessary.
Requirements: this discussion class will culminate in an independent project on a version of Homer not covered in class (a 10-page paper; some students may be permitted to submit a creative project accompanied by a shorter paper).
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. If the course is overenrolled, preference will be given to majors and prospective majors in Classics, Comparative Literature, and English or other literatures.
Cost: about $40.
Meeting time: mornings.
SHANNON K. FARLEY `97 (Instructor)
HOPPIN (Sponsor)

Shannon K. Farley is an alumna of Williams College, where she majored in Classics and History. She is currently a PhD candidate in Comparative Literature at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where she has been teaching since 2004. Email skfarley@complit.umass.edu to contact the instructor.

CLAS 12 Love, Ancient and Modern (Same as COMP 12 and REL 11)

If we were to point to what is most important in our lives, we would point to the things we love. Yet we would also be hard pressed to define love. In this course, we will explore love in representative authors of the ancient Greek and Roman world and in Biblical literature. Readings will include selections from Homer's Iliad, Plato's Symposium, Sappho's poems, Lucretius's De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), the Book of Genesis, the Psalms, the Song of Songs, John's Gospel, and Paul's letters. We will also consider how these authors have definitively shaped our own views of love by reading selections from such modern authors as Shakespeare, Hobbes, Montaigne, Pascal, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche. Throughout our discussion we will consider the roles that the divine, reason, community, and biology play in the way these authors understand love. We will also consider how these authors have definitively shaped our own views of love.
Requirements: students will take turns leading discussion and will write a 10-page comparative essay at the end of the course.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. If the course is overenrolled, preference will be given to majors and prospective majors in Classics and Religion.
Cost: under $50.
Meeting time: afternoons.
SCOTT MORINGIELLO `01 (Instructor)
HOPPIN (Sponsor)

Scott D. Moringiello graduated from Williams in 2001 with majors in philosophy and classics. He received graduate degrees in theology from Cambridge University and Notre Dame, and he has taught a humanities seminar at Villanova University.

CLAS 31 Senior Thesis

May be taken by students registered for Classics 493, 494.

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

COGS 12 Introduction to Research in Cognitive Science CANCELLED!

COGS 31 Senior Thesis

May be taken by students registered for Cognitive Science 494.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

COMP 10 Versions of Homer: An Introduction to Translation Theory (Same as CLAS 10)

(See under CLAS 10 for full description.)

COMP 11 Reading and Writing Magical Realism

What does it mean when a maiden soars into the air one afternoon in a small Colombian village, or when a son looks for his father in a Mexican shanty town only to discover that both his father and he himself are dead, or when a man is jailed by the local police for the sole crime of bringing a salty sea wave to his apartment in a big city? These eerie tales from Gabriel García Márquez' Hundred Years of Solitude, Juan Rulfo's Pedro Paramo and Octavio Paz' "My Life with the Wave" are examples of magical realism. Magical realism, defined as a literary movement, style or genre, is often seen as a unique product of Latin American hybrid cultures. As its name suggests, magical realist fiction incorporates magical elements into everyday life, bringing together indigenous mythologies, local history, folklore, Christian and pagan symbols and epic narratives that stretch across generations. By reading a variety of seminal texts from Latin America-Alejo Carpentier's The Kingdom of This World, Jorge Luis Borges' Ficciones, Márquez' One Hundred Years of Solitude, Miguel Ángel Asturias' Men of Maize, Julio Cortázar's Blow-up and Other Stories, etc.-in this course, we will explore the origins and peculiarities of magical realism and think of its political and cultural significance. Students will be encouraged to look for answers to the following questions: what is the difference between magical realism, science fiction and fantasy novels? How has magical realism influenced the reception of Latin American culture around the world? Is magical realism a phenomenon specific to Latin America, or is it rather an example of postcolonial discourse? Students will have the option of reading the texts in the English translation or in the Spanish original. For the final project, students will choose one of three options: a 10-page paper undertaking a comparative analysis of two texts of their preference; a 10-page paper comparing a text read in this class to a non-Latin American work of fiction that matches the definition of magical realism; or a short fictional narrative of their own that incorporates elements of magical realism.
Requirements: 10-page paper or fictional narrative.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference given to Comparative Literature and Spanish majors.
Cost: $15 for course package.
Meeting time: afternoons.
DINA OCHNOPOZOVA (Instructor)
C. BOLTON (Sponsor)

Dina Odnopozova is a PhD candidate at Yale University. She is working on a dissertation on Russian-Argentine literary exchanges.

COMP 12 Love, Ancient and Modern (Same as CLAS 12 and REL 11)

(See under CLAS 12 for full description.)

COMP 13 Enlightened Leadership (Same as LEAD 13) CANCELLED!

COMP 14 Teach Public Speaking (Same as SPEC 10)

In this course, students will be trained to teach public speaking to local fourth- through eighth-graders. Each week is divided into two types of activities. The first involves weekly Tuesday afternoon meetings, during which students will learn pedagogical skills related to teaching public speaking. The second part, which students will self-schedule based on the availability of local educators, involves spending time in local classrooms, at either Williamstown Elementary, Brayton Elementary, Mt. Greylock Regional High, Pownal Elementary, or BART Charter School. Classroom visits will be used to observe model public speaking lessons;coach/mentor students in small groups; and ultimately, design and teach lessons independently. To pass the course, students will be required to spent at least four hours in the classroom a week. (Ample opportunities will be available to do so). Students will be asked to prepare two polished final public speaking lesson plans, complete with handouts and any other materials. They'll also be required to teach these lesson plans at least once each. No prior experience with public speaking is required. Kairav Sinha `15 will be the primary instructor of the course. Sinha has four years experience teaching public speaking and is the director of Williams Speak!, Williams's public speaking outreach program, which provides public speaking instruction to over 800 students in grades 4-8.
Requirements: preparing and teaching two final lesson plans. Final evaluation will be based on course participation and a 5-page analytic paper submitted to Professor Newman.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Priority will go to first-year students.
Cost: $15.
Meeting time: afternoons.
NEWMAN

COMP 15 Narratives of Terror: 9/11 in the American Cultural Imagination (Same as AMST 16 and ARAB 15)

(See under ARAB 15 for full description.)

COMP 16 "Crime and Punishment": the Novel and Its Adaptations (Same as RUSS 16)

(See under RUSS 16 for full description.)

COMP 17 Orham Pamuk, Nobel Laureate (Same as ARAB 14, ENGL 15 and INST 15)

(See under ENGL 15 for full description.)

COMP 18 Foreign Cinema: Mexico, Brazil and the Arab World

In this course, we will analyze works emanating from three dynamic cinematic traditions. Themes such as religion, sexuality, family dynamics and poverty will figure prominently in our discussions, as well as the role of art in times of crisis. We will focus on modern works from Mexico, Brazil and the Arab World and uncover what to many might be surprising similarities and connections between them. Works to be analyzed might include Y tu mamá también, Amores Perros, The Yacoubian Building, Jackal Nights, Central Station and City of God. We will also read theoretical material by Nagib, Naficy and Shafik (among others).  All films will have English subtitles.  Theoretical readings will be posted on Glow. This course requires a 10 page paper upon its conclusion.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. In case of over-enrollment, preference will be given to students with some background in the material, to be determined by submitting a paragraph to the instructor.
Cost: $0
Meeting time: afternoons
VARGAS

COMP 25 Transnational Narratives on the Mexico-US Border (Same as LATS 25) CANCELLED!

COMP 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Comparative Literature 493, 494.

LIT 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Literary Studies 493, 494.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CSCI 10 Designing and Building a Desktop Computer
This course introduces the student to computer hardware and the methods used to design and construct a fully working system. Students will also learn about operating systems, wired and wireless networking, firewalls, viruses, software productivity packages and other tools for Windows, Mac and Linux. We will look at emerging computer technology, trends and theoretical computer advancements.
For the hardware there will be in-depth study of the purpose of each part and of the different options available when purchasing. Research will include finding suppliers to acquire the parts online and will require deciphering and explaining the jargon used. The students will have the choice of purchasing their own parts to assemble a computer which they can take home, or using existing spare parts from OIT to end up with a computer suitable for donation off campus or to use as a campus email station. After assembly the student will install an operating system, find and download appropriate drivers and install useful diagnostic software. The class will be in a lab equipped with the hardware, spare parts and tools for assembly.
Evaluation will be based on research papers, quizzes and the completion of a working system along with presentation to the class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to upperclass students.
Cost: $0, unless the student chooses to build their own computer.
Meeting time: afternoons.
SETH ROGERS (Instructor)
FREUND (Sponsor)

Seth Rogers is the Director of Desktop Systems in the Office for Information Technology. He handles computer purchasing for the college as well as hardware and software support for personal computers.

CSCI 12 Using a Computer to do the Math You Cannot Do

Math is an excellent tool to understand an idealized world, but in the ugly real world there are integrals that cannot be solved analytically (e.g., the normal distribution), functions that need to be maximized without being differentiable or even continuous, equations that need to be solved when there is no closed-form solution (e.g., a fifth degree polynomial).
In this course we will introduce the programming and math skills you need to handle such real life calculation problems. At the same time you will learn the basics of a programming language of your choice.
We will use social media and peer-instruction for parts of the course for teaching, learning, evaluation and assessment.
Requirements: weekly assignments, presented in class or on the web and a final 5-page paper..
Prerequisites: MATH 103. Enrollment limit: 20. If overenrolled, selection will be based on seniority.
Meeting time: mornings.
OLLE BALTER (Instructor)
FREUND (Sponsor)

Olle Balter is an associate professor at KTH-Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden where he is researching Technology Enhanced Learning. He was a research scholar in Computer Science at Williams College in 2008.

CSCI 13 3D Printer Construction: A Self-Replicating Printer (Same as PHYS 13)

3D printing is a technology used to create three dimensional objects from digital information. The field is expanding rapidly, creating vast opportunities for research and business. Low-cost 3D printing has the potential to put the capability for creating physical objects in every business and home, much in the way the personal computer changed the paradigm of computing from expensive, centralized mainframe computers to low-cost, widespread personal computers. One direction of development is pursuing an open-source approach to making the technology widely available. A central goal of this effort is the capability for 3D printers to "self-replicate". That is, for one printer to be able to create the parts required to assemble additional 3D printers. We will explore this technology and its implications for society by building an operational "RepRap" 3D printer. Additionally, we will investigate how 3D printing technology may disrupt the traditional manufacturing economy and create new opportunities. Time permitting, we will fabricate the parts require to build a "child" 3D printer. A presentation, including a demonstration of the printer, and documentation of the project on a web site will be required. The class will utilize a multi-discipline team approach with opportunities for concentration in basic mechanical and electrical fabrication, software, 3D object modeling/CAD, or web-based documentation.
Requirements: attendance and participation.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference will be based on enthusiasm and background in any of the indicated areas.
Cost: $25.
Meeting time: afternoons.
MICHAEL TAYLOR and MCGUIRE

Michael Taylor is Design Engineer/Model Maker in the Bronfman Science Center with extensive background in design, CAD and prototyping.

CSCI 23 Introduction to Research and Development in Computing

An independent project is completed in collaboration with a member of the Computer Science Department. The projects undertaken will either involve the exploration of a research topic related to the faculty member's work or the implementation of a software system that will extend the students design and implementation skills. It is expected that the student will spend 20 hours per week working on the project. At the completion of the project, each student will submit a 10-page written report or the software developed together with appropriate documentation of its behavior and design. In addition, students will be expected to give a short presentation or demonstration of their work. Students should consult with the instructor before the beginning of the Winter Study registration period to determine details of projects that might be undertaken.
Requirements: final paper and presentation/demonstration.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to sophomores and juniors.
Cost: $0.
HEERINGA

CSCI 31 Senior Honor Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Computer Science 493-494.

CONTRACT MAJOR

CMAJ 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Contract Major 493, 494.

DANCE

DANC 10 The Rite of Spring, a Revolution of Rhythm and Movement

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of the premiere of Igor Stravinsky's seminal composition "Le Sacre du Printemps (The Rite of Spring,) participants in this course will study the historic collaboration of music and provocative choreography created by dance legend Vaslav Nijinsky, and the purported "riot" that broke out at the 1913 Paris premier. Students will learn and perform contemporary responses to segments of the score, working in groups and/or solo. Film viewings, including the study of a selection of choreographic responses to the score, historic and contemporary readings, and documentation of creative process will be assigned. Dancers will participate in at least one lecture/workshop led by the Music Department and vice-versa. Studio practice and rehearsal slots will be organized according to the abilities and experience of the participants, and will be held Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, from 1:00-4:00 pm. An informal showing of the Winter Study process will be held on the evening of January 23, 2013.
*Following Winter Study, selected participants will be invited to perform sections of "The Rite of Spring" in two interdisciplinary concerts with the Music, Theater and Dance departments on March 8 and 9, 2013. Selected participants must be available to rehearse on designated weekends and must be available for all performance technical and dress rehearsals.
Requirements: participation/progress in creative work and rehearsals, active participation in discussion, written journal of process, and quality of final project.
Prerequisites:: students with dance experience: none. Students who demonstrate interest and ability in theater, movement and/or research/dramaturgy may be admitted by permission of the Instructor. Enrollment limit: 25. Students with demonstrated ability in Dance, and/or who have taken courses in the Dance Dept. will have priority.
Cost: field trip: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.
JANINE PARKER (Instructor)
DANKMEYER (Sponsor)

Janine Parker is a former dancer and has taught ballet and modern dance for over 25 years at institutions such as the Boston Ballet School and the Walnut Hill School for the Arts, and has written extensively about dance for publications including The Boston Globe. In addition to teaching ballet technique and history as adjunct faculty at Williams, she is the assistant artistic director of CoDa, the contemporary dance ensemble on campus.

ECONOMICS

ECON 10 Dollars, Sense and US Health Care

ECON 10 is designed to explore the economics of health care in America and the implications of health care reform. Through lectures, readings, videos and guest speakers we will examine the reasons why health care has come to account for nearly 20% of GDP and the consequences of this into the future. The issues of access, quality and cost as they pertain to health care will be explored, as will the problems inherent in the US spending many more dollars per capita on health care than other developed nations without enjoying better outcomes. Classroom time will account for six hours each week, with out-of-class assignments to include brief synopses for presentations of current events, readings from a packet and textbook, and an ongoing commentary on Glow.
Requirements: 15-minute in-class presentation and a final 5-page paper on a class-related topic.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference to seniors.
Cost: $40.
Meeting time: mornings.
KAREN ENGBERG and DOUGLAS JACKSON (Instructors)
MONTIEL (Sponsor)

Drs. Engberg and Jackson own and operate a small primary care medical group with three offices in the Santa Barbara, CA area. This will be their third year teaching ECON 10.

ECON 11 Public Speaking

This course will help students become effective and organized public speakers, whether public speaking means giving a class presentation, participating in a debate, or giving a formal speech before a large audience. We will primarily use extemporaneous and prepared class presentations as a means of learning this skill, but we will also study the great American speeches and presidential debates of the twentieth century for further insights into persuasive public speaking techniques. The class will provide a supportive environment to help each student create his or her own public speaking style that is comfortable, confident, and conversational. We will also focus on organizational techniques, handling visual aids effectively, eye contact and body language. Finally, receiving feedback and providing constructive criticism to other students in the class will be an important part of the course.
Evaluation will be based on in-class presentations, class participation, and a 10-page written critique of the student's own videotaped presentations.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference to juniors and seniors and reasons for enrolling.
Cost: $25.
Meeting time: mornings.
ZIMMERMAN and NAFZIGER

ECON 12 Turning Inspiration into a Business-Understanding the Business Plan

This course will analyze various business plans in teams to understand how the business plan works. Teams will present various parts of each plan. Speakers will address starting a business and the role of business plans in refining ideas, gaining financing, and launching successful businesses. Over the course of Winter Study, participants will also work in teams to create and present business plans for a business of their choosing.
Participants will be evaluated based on class contribution, team contribution, and their business plans.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Priority to those committed to enter the Williams Business Plan competition.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: afternoons.
STEVEN FOGEL (Instructor)
MONTIEL (Sponsor)

Steven Fogel has helped over 1,000 people write business plans and start businesses over the past 20 years.

ECON 13 Introduction to Indian Cinema

Though the Indian film industry is the world's most prolific, American audiences have little exposure to it. This course provided an introduction, focusing on Hindi cinema, and showing how its themes have evolved in response to changes in Indian society. In particular, we will examine ways in which Hindi films reflect the threats perceived by the nation, and the resolutions attempted. We will also compare Hindi cinema's norms and conventions to those used by Hollywood. We will meet twice a week to watch the films (a total of seven) and once a week for discussion. Readings will consist of articles from film journals like Screen and Jump Cut.
Requirements: students will write a page response paper to each film.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference to students with prior class on South Asia at Williams.
Cost: $25 for readings.
Meeting time: afternoons.
SWAMY

ECON 16 Mechanisms of Arbitrage

Arbitrage is a central concept of economics. This course is an introduction to mechanisms in markets which cause arbitrage to occur, as well as a discussion of factors which limit arbitrage, particularly when mechanisms counteract others. The emphasis will be on markets in public instruments and the firms which issue them as well as on markets e.g. commodities, which overlap with those in public securities. Emphasis will be on distortions caused by agency issues, regulations, venues and intellectual "bucketing". The processes by which these issues are at least partially resolved in current markets will be emphasized, although there will be historical readings and backgrounds in market mechanisms.
Requirements: there will be an average of 100 pages of reading per class provided by the instructor and there will be an expectation of 10-12 pages of papers, typically as 1- to 2-page papers for class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25. Priority in inverse order of years remaining to graduation.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: afternoons
PAUL ISAAC `72 (Instructor)
MONTIEL (Sponsor)

Paul Isaac, Williams Class of `72 and a former Watson fellow, has 35 years of buy side investment experience in a broad range of securities and markets. He is currently Chief Investment Officer of an $3 billion fund of hedge funds as well as an active portfolio manager. He served as Chair of the Security Industry Association's Capital Rules Committee.

ECON 17 Social Entrepreneurship: Innovating in the Social Sector (Same as LEAD 19 and POEC 17)

Operating as consultants, students will work in small teams to develop and propose solutions to challenges that leading organizations face in fields such as environmental sustainability, economic development in low-income communities, and health care. Projects will focus on current, actual challenges, e.g. how best to evaluate the impact of a particular type of programming, or how to engage a target constituency more effectively, or how to market a new product or service. Students will assemble and analyze relevant information and present findings and recommendations to staff of participating organizations. Williams alums will be available to the teams as mentors. The class will visit New York City to present to participating organizations.
Classroom discussion will focus on the circumstances of participating organizations, including their financial models, organizational structures and governance arrangements. In addition, readings and guest speakers will address developments and trends in the field of social entrepreneurship more broadly.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, contribution to team-based problem solving, the quality of final written and oral presentations, and the value of the input that students provide to participating organizations.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16. If oversubscribed, selection will be based on a statement of your interest in the course.
Cost: $250 (for trip to NYC for final presentations and other meetings).
Meeting time: mornings.
WILLIAM MCCALPIN `79 and JEFFREY THOMAS (Instructors)
MONTIEL (Sponsor)

Bill McCalpin `79 spent 22 years in a variety of capacities in two private, endowed grantmaking foundations (the Rockefeller Brothers Fund and the MacArthur Foundation). Currently, he chairs the boards of two mutual fund families and consults with foundations and other nonprofit organizations.
Jeffrey Thomas holds an M.D. and Ph.D. from Indiana University. He helped start two biotechnology companies, Millennium Pharmaceuticals and Genstruct, Inc.

ECON 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (Same as POEC 22)

This course examines tax policy towards low-income families in the United States, and has the following three objectives: 1) For students to understand the shift of redistributive policy in the United States from income support through the transfer system (Aid to Families with Dependent Children/Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) towards support of working individuals through the tax system (primarily the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC)); 2) For students to understand the challenges that low income individuals have "making ends meet" and to understand the role that the EITC has played in increasing the standard of living of the working poor; and 3) To enable students to understand the tax code well enough to prepare simple income tax returns, including those for filers claiming the EITC. Students will be trained by the IRS to prepare income tax returns for low-income individuals and families. At the end of the term, students will use their newly acquired expertise to help individuals and families in Berkshire County prepare and file their returns. Class meetings will involve a mixture of discussion of assigned readings, and exercises that help develop tax preparation skills and understanding of poverty. Assignments outside of class include: a variety of short readings on tax policy, the challenges of living in poverty in the U.S., and public policies that address these challenges; completion of an online course in IRS VITA training; and staffing approximately six hours of tax preparation assistance during the final week of winter term.
Evaluation is based on the results of the IRS certification test, students' work as tax preparers, and a 10-page analytical and reflective essay.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 14. Priority will be based on written statement of interest.
Cost: $25.
Meeting time: mornings.
GENTRY and PAULA CONSOLINI

ECON 23 Introduction to the Economics, Geography and Appreciation of Wine

This course provides an introduction to the economics, geography and appreciation of wine. We will be studying the economics and geography of wine production, and will also learn to identify, understand and appreciate the major wine types of the world. The course will involve lectures, outside readings, and in-class wine tastings. We will focus primarily on the Old World wine styles and regions of France, Italy, Germany, Austria, Spain and Portugal. The course has been expanded to also cover some New World wine regions, including California, Oregon, Chile, Argentina, South Africa, New Zealand and Australia.
Evaluations will be based on short quizzes, including blind tastings, and either an oral presentation or 10 page paper at the conclusion of the course.
Prerequisites: Students must be 21 years old on or before January 3, 2013. Enrollment limit: 10. If overenrolled, selection will be on the basis of a mix of academic record and diversity of backgrounds and interests.
Cost: approximately $275.00 in the form of a course fee, to be used for the cost of wine purchases for the course.
Meeting time: evenings, two nights a week.
P. PEDRONI

ECON 30 Honors Project

The "Specialization Route" to the degree with Honors in Economics requires that each candidate take an Honors Winter Study Project in January of their senior year. Students who wish to begin their honors work in January should submit a detailed proposal. Decisions on admission to the Honors WSP will be made in the fall. Information on the procedures will be mailed to senior majors in economics early in the fall semester.
Seniors who wish to apply for admission to the Honors WSP and thereby to the Honors Program should register for this WSP as their first choice.
Some seniors will have begun honors work in the fall and wish to complete it in the WSP. They will be admitted to the WSP if they have made satisfactory progress. They should register for this WSP as their first choice.

ECON 31 Honors Thesis

To be taken by students participating in year-long thesis research (ECON 493-W31-494).

ECON 52 Micro-Simulation Modeling for Ex Ante Policy Analysis

Micro-simulation modeling provides one of the most powerful tools for ex ante evidence-based analysis of economic and social policy interventions. Rooted in representative household surveys of a country's population, the models provide a picture of poverty, employment, consumption and income levels throughout the country. A micro-simulation model enables researchers to investigate the impact of existing economic and social policy interventions (such as tax and public benefit interventions) on income levels, poverty, inequality and other outcomes. In addition, researchers are able to simulate the impact and estimate the cost of new policy interventions.
During this course, students will learn to apply these methods to analyze public policies and interpret the findings. The course examines measurement issues, analytical tools and their application to household survey data for a range of developing countries. The course also links the outcomes of the analysis with the challenges of policy implementation, exploring how the political environment and/or institutional setting may result in the implementation of second-best options. This is a hands-on modeling course, and students will build a micro-simulation model for a country of their choice and use this model in completing the course requirements. The course will employ Excel, Stata and advanced micro-simulation packages. The final requirement for the course is a policy paper that provides students with an opportunity to write accessible prose that communicates the methodology adopted and the key lessons of the analysis.
Requirements: exercises, presentation, policy paper.
Enrollment limit: 15. The course is intended for CDE students and undergraduate enrollment is limited and by permission of the instructor.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: afternoons.

SAMSON

ECON 53 Practical Quantitative Tools for Development

In the day-to-day work as an economist for a developing country, you often lack the time, data, or software recreate the models detailed elsewhere in the CDE curriculum. This course is designed to bridge the gap between academic research and real world answers. We will focus on using Excel to answer the types of questions that require answers within a short time frame. Some examples of topics are: creating price indices from CPI data, growth accounting with applications, IMF FPP scenarios, and cost-benefit analysis.
This course will meet daily for the entirety of winter study. Evaluation will focus on homeworks and a long paper due at the end. I expect students to work at least two hours outside of class for every hour of class. The class is expected to take a minimum of 30 hours per week.
Evaluation will be based on home works and final project.
Prerequisites for undergraduate students: ECON 110, 120. Enrollment limit: 20.
Course is intended for CDE students and undergraduate enrollment is limited and by permission of the instructor.
Meeting time: afternoons.

ROLLEIGH

ECON 54 Applied Development Macroeconomics

This course focuses on the empirical impacts of fiscal and monetary policy in developing countries. We will begin with a review of the goals and limitations of macroeconomic policy in a developing country setting, with an emphasis on the roles of legal, political, and financial institutions. We will then turn to the effects of government spending and taxation on economic stability, debt sustainability, and economic growth. Finally, we will consider the effects of monetary policy rules and the transmission mechanism of monetary policy in developing and emerging market economies.
Requirements: two short papers and a case study.
Prerequisites: intended for CDE students, undergraduate enrollment is limited and only with permission of the instructor. Enrollment limit: none.
Cost: $25.
Meeting time: afternoons.
LOVE

ENGLISH

ENGL 10 Rimbaud in English

Arthur Rimbaud (1854-1891) had reinvented poetry by the age of sixteen, with his tender lyric verse and hallucinatory prose poems. Five years later he gave up writing to wander the world and finally settled in Africa, where he led caravans trading in gold, ivory, and guns. By the time of his death he was almost forgotten, but in the twentieth century his influence became a major influence in the rise of modernism, in English as much as in French. Rimbaud also created the archetype of the artist as rebel, and was a hero to iconic rock musicians such as Bob Dylan, Jim Morrison, and Patti Smith. The core of the course is a reading of Rimbaud’s major poetry and select letters in English translation, with key works to be read in parallel with the French texts. Edmund White’s brief biography of the poet and my own book Rimbaud in Java complete the optional reading list. Class will meet three times a week for 90 minutes, with additional sessions devoted to an illustrated lecture about Rimbaud’s voyage to Java, a program of music inspired by Rimbaud, and a screening of Total Eclipse, Agnieszka Holland’s film starring Leonardo DiCaprio as Rimbaud.
Requirements: 10-page paper or creative project to be approved by the instructor.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. If the class is overenrolled, the instructor requests applicants to write him a letter briefly explaining their interest.
Cost: $60 for books.
Meeting time: mornings.
JAMIE JAMES `73 (Instructor)
LIMON (Sponsor)

Jamie James `73 is a novelist, critic, and nonfiction author based in Bali since 1999. A former art critic for The New Yorker and frequent contributor to the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and other national newspapers and magazines, he is the author of nine books, most recently Rimbaud in Java: The Lost Voyage.


ENGL 11 The Changing Landscape of Journalism (Same as AMST 11, ENVI 11 and LEAD 11)

The purpose of this course is to give students an in-depth, personal view of the inner workings of various facets of journalism. The course will feature distinguished Williams alumni from a broad spectrum of today's media universe, including print, broadcast, and newer media formats. Past organizations have included the Wall Street Journal, nytimes.com, ABC News and Bloomberg News. Each guest lecturer will discuss specific skills and experience in his or her background. In accordance with this year's theme of energy and the environment, students will be given reporting assignments in various media formats on a set of topics developed in conjunction with the Zilkha Center for Environmental Initiatives.
A two-night trip to New York City is planned, with visits expected to include the Columbia School of Journalism, airings of Good Morning America and Morning Joe, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and more.
Enrollment is limited to 16, with preference given to Juniors and Seniors.
Requirements: final project. Students will be evaluated on their class participation as well as their project output.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 16. Preference given to juniors and seniors.
Cost: $300 (for NYC trip).
Meeting time: mornings.
SCHLEITWILER

ENGL 12 Making Jewelry

This course will teach students to design and create jewelry in a wide range of styles and materials. We'll start with basic techniques for assembling beaded jewelry and move on from there to decorative wire wrapping and twisting, working with moldable epoxy and resin to create our own beads and components, cutting, shaping and fastening metals, making metal settings for stones, and using metal clay. We will also study gemstones in their historical and cultural context, and students will be expected to incorporate aspects of their research into their jewelry designs. Class will be held in Professor Case's jewelry studio in her home in North Adams, meeting for three 3-hour classes per week. The studio will also be open to students for work outside of class hours, and students will be able to borrow tools and materials to work at home as well.
Requirements: multiple assigned projects, participation in an exhibition of your work at the end of Winter Study and a final 5-page paper on some aspect of jewelry making.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Selection will be based on an interview with some preference for seniority.
Cost: $100.
Meeting time: afternoons.
CASE

ENGL 13 The Art of Producing (Same as THEA 13)

This course will teach the basic tenets of theater producing, including an overview of both non-profit and commercial theater producing, contract and union overviews, essential budgeting and conversations about different models of producing and the art of empowering creative people. The course will include a trip to New York City to see performances and meet other professionals working in the field.
Requirements: final project
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference will be based on a very brief letter of interest.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: afternoons.
JENNY GERSTEN (Instructor)
LIMON (Sponsor)

Jenny Gersten is currently the Artistic Director of the Williamstown Theatre Festival and has produced theater in Williamstown and on and off Broadway for the past 16 years.

ENGL 15 Orham Pamuk, Nobel Laureate (Same as ARAB 14, COMP 17 and INST 15)

Regarding novels as our best hope to understanding the unique history of other peoples, Nobel Prize-winning Turkish novelist Orhan Pamuk views "the history of the novel" as "a history of human liberation. By putting ourselves in another's shoes, by using our imagination to shed our identities, we are able to set ourselves free." Just as Turkey connects Europe and Asia, Pamuk's writings link East and West, European and Islamic, self-knowledge and knowledge of the other. In this course, we will read and discuss three Pamuk novels: "The White Castle" (1979, Engl. trans. 1985), at once a fable and a sinuous treatise on the enigmatic nature of identity formation and East-West relations; "My Name is Red (1998, Engl. trans. 2001), a murder mystery and philosophical thriller told from multiple points of view that pit Eastern and Western ways of seeing and painting against each other while wearing its erudition lightly; and "The Museum of Innocence" (2008, Engl. trans. 2009 ), an enchanting but painful story of first love sustained over a lifetime that simultaneously evokes Turkey's struggle with modernity. We will discuss the novels both as literary texts and as windows into contemporary Turkey and East-West relations.
Requirements: attendance, participation in class discussions, and 10-page final paper.
Prerequisites: at least one writing intensive course. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference will be give to seniors, juniors, sophomores, first-years in that order.
Cost: $100.
Meeting time: afternoons.
SUZANNE GRAVER (Instructor)
LIMON (Sponsor)

Professor Suzanne Graver is an Emerita Professor of English Literature who taught at Williams full time for for 24 years and also served as Dean of Faculty at Williams for 4 years.

ENGL 16 Theories of Justice and Community

Can we imagine possibilities of justice not dictated by already determined norms? What would a community founded on such a conception of justice look like? Can we imagine a version of community not founded on exclusion? And what would the members of such a community look like-what versions of subjectivity would it imply? This course will look at recent, theoretically-oriented writing on justice and community, with an emphasis on the work of Maurice Blanchot, Jacques Derrida, Jean-Luc Nancy and Giorgio Agamben. No prior knowledge of these writers is expected, but the course does require a willingness to wrestling with demanding (and rewarding) theoretical argument. We will place the philosophical work in relation to some short fiction and films. Class will consist of three two hour meetings per week.
Requirements: 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Selection will be based on gender balance and seniority.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: mornings.
PYE

ENGL 17 The Pleasures of Horror

This course will explore both the phenomenology of cinematic horror and the underlying logic of the genre. We'll consider the way horror films express and restructure deep-seated tensions regarding sexuality and gender identity, the Promethean risks of science and technology, and the social world of post-industrial capitalism. Readings will be drawn from film history, cultural studies, and psychoanalytic theory. Students will also be required to attend three film screenings per week, to keep a viewing journal, and to write a final essay.
Requirements: final paper, class presentations, journal
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Selection will be based on the basis of short written explanations of their interest.
Cost: $75.
Meeting time: mornings.
ROSENHEIM

ENGL 18 Stories and Pictures (Same as ARTS 18)

What would you do if Vladimir Nabokov suddenly appeared and said: "Read this thing I wrote, and then make a twenty second stop-motion animation that captures what it feels like to long for a country that doesn't exist anymore. You have a week."? What if Julio Cortazar demanded you made a drawing which offered a realistic solution to a magical problem? You don't even want to know what Kurt Vonnegut would want from you. "Stories and Pictures" can help you prepare for these kinds of situations. In this class, we will read a short story every week, and produce a visual response to it. We will talk about the different ways in which the written word can provide fuel for image-making, and figure out how to make good art fast. In our meetings we will discuss the stories we've read, see how other visual artists have used literature and narrative to inform their work and try out various art-making techniques such as drawing, painting, digital photography and video. We will meet three times weekly for 2-hour sessions, and students should plan to invest at minimum an equal amount of time on their projects outside of class.
Requirements: four artworks and one class presentation, as well as ongoing participation in class discussion.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference will be given to students writing to the instructor with a short paragraph about why they want to be in this class. Cost: $45.
Meeting time: mornings.
GABRIELA VAINSENCHER (Instructor)
LIMON (Sponsor)

Gabriela Vainsencher is a visual artist living and working in Philadelphia and Brooklyn. She was Williams College's Levitt fellow in 2009 when she taught this class for the first time. Since then she has taught it as a winter study class in January 2012. Her recent exhibitions include a solo show at RAC gallery in NY, NY and "Tzeva Tari" art fair in Tel Aviv, Israel.

ENGL 19 Demon Children

If there is one generalization you can make about horror movies that will hold up pretty well over time it is that they tend to be leery of men, guys, the male of the species: slashers, serial killers, rapist-werewolves, seducer-vampires. Monsters in horror movies are sometimes women (or otherwise female), but those films tend to play as experiments, more or less teasing, on the established boy-genres: What if the werewolf were a girl? Can we even imagine a lady slasher? There is,however, a conspicuous subgenre of horror movies about evil children, some of them not yet born. It will be our task to figure out why. We'll watch some dozen or so evil-child movies, a half-century's worth, in order to understand why some people think that babies aren't cute or why they think that cuteness can kill you. Movies: The Village of the Damned, Rosemary's Baby, Joshua, Inside, The Children, Splice, &c. Questions: Are demon children just peewee versions of ordinary movie monsters, or are there certain fears that get attached specifically to kids? Do we fear children when they are least childlike or when they are most so? And whatever happened to the idea that the very young are burbling and blameless? A film journal is required, and a taste for psychoanalysis wouldn't hurt.
Grade is based on the film journal mentioned in the description.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference will be given to English majors.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: afternoons.
THORNE

ENGL 20 How to Tell a Story (Same as HIST 20)

(See under HIST 20 for full description.)

ENGL 22 Shakespeare in Film (Same as THEA 12)

(See under THEA 12 for full description.)

ENGL 23 War and Peace

Winter Study is the perfect occasion to lose yourself in the enormous world of a book many people consider the greatest novel of all time. In this course we will read all 1,296 pages of Tolstoy's War and Peace, as translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, the A-team of Russian-to-English translators. We will read alone and together, aloud and silently, with and without crackling fires. We will read in unusual places. We will discuss the novel and turn to histories of politics, society, philosophy and art to supplement our understandings of the book that Tolstoy himself said was "not a novel, still less a poem, and even less still a historical chronicle." We will watch film adaptations and other responses to the novel.
Throughout the reading process each student will produce a creative piece: in any medium (visual arts, dance, theater, creative writing, film, etc.) The only requirement in respect to the final project is that you NOT produce a 10-page literary critical essay.
Prerequisites: readiness to read for 20 hours per week. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference given to seniors first, then juniors, then sophomores, then first-year students.
Cost: book.
Meeting time: mornings.
CLEGHORN

ENGL 30 Honors Project: Specialization Route

Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the specialization route.

ENGL 31 Honors Project: Thesis

Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the thesis route.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

ENVI 11 The Changing Landscape of Journalism (Same as AMST 11, ENGL 11 and LEAD 11)

(See under ENGL 11 for full description.)

ENVI 12 Landscape Photography (Same as GEOS 12)

(See under GEOS 12 for full description.)

ENVI 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Past, Its Uncertain Future (Same as JLST 13) CANCELLED!

(See under JLST 13 for full description.)

ENVI 14 Environmental Education: What, How, and Why

Public school teachers are in the best position to take us safely across the precipice at which humanity finds itself. Our side of the abyss: business as usual with dirty fuels, rampant growth of population and pollution, and consumption practices that use up natural resources at an accelerating rate. The other side: industry mimics nature by recycling resources, waste is eliminated, consumers consider factors other than price; a paradigm shift in collective consciousness where environmental impact is at the forefront of decisions rather than an afterthought.
Public school teachers are in the best position to teach the fundamentals of environmental education, which will arm students with the knowledge set they need to live a life that accounts for the human impact on ecosystems and make informed decisions for the rest of their lives. How to optimize the effectiveness of environmental education in classes K-12 is the question this course will explore.
We will examine several environmental education models, then focus on California's Education and the Environment Initiative as the leader, as being the largest lever ever attempted to raise environmental literacy to the same level of importance as the three "Rs": reading, `riting and `rithmatic. We'll learn how the landmark legislation came about that created the curriculum and consider the efforts of other countries and states already hoping to duplicate its success. We'll use case studies to assess implementation in the school districts that have adopted it over the last three years.
We'll explore ways of making the curriculum adoption even more widespread. And we'll discuss how success can be measured. We'll explore education theories including studies that show better student engagement when topics are taught through an environmental lens. We'll discuss theories about how learning happens and how it affects behavior change, looking especially at the Transcendent Function. And we'll discuss the efficacy of using the education system to foster behavior change. We'll also look at the important functions that a partnership between a private non-profit organization and the state can play in advancing environmental education.
The class will be conducted mostly as a seminar, with some short lectures, a lot of discussion, debates, and presentations. There will be some reading required outside of class.
Evaluation will be based on a 4-8-page essay and a PowerPoint presentation to the class on a topic of your choosing and approved by the instructor. Attendance and participation will also be taken into account.
No prerequisites: Enrollment limit: 16.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday from 10:00 to 12:00; there will be a guest speaker and a field trip to a local "green" school.
WILL PARISH `75 (Instructor)
FRENCH (Sponsor)

Will Parish `75, is CEO of Friends of Environmental Education, the non-profit organization that he founded to partner with the state of California bringing the state-approved environmental education to all the schools in the state. Will also serves on the Instructional Quality Commission of the California State Board of Education. From 2002-2012, he was a public high school teacher in San Francisco where he taught Civics and Environmental Science. In the 1990s, he ran an environmental organization that used airplanes to fly environmental education missions. In the 1980s, he founded an alternative energy development company that produced electricity for 40,000 people from cattle manure and crop wastes. He also practiced law in San Francisco. In the 1970's he was a professional flight instructor. In the two years after graduating from Williams, he drove a Jeep around the world. Will lives in San Francisco with his wife of thirty years where they raised two sons and many pets.

ENVI 15 Environmental Dispute Resolution CANCELLED!

ENVI 25 California Agriculture

Students will gain hands-on experience with the incredible diversity of agricultural practices in California on farms from vineyards in San Luis Obispo County to the winter vegetable, livestock, and diversified farms in the Salinas Valley and Santa Cruz region. We will examine agriculture on different scales, from small 5-acre single-person farms to mega-scale operations operated by corporations. We will experience a diversity of approaches within various crops, contrasting and comparing biodynamic and organic approaches with other forms of conservation agriculture and conventional petrochemical-intensive methods of producing food.   The course will conclude by participating in the Ecological Farming (EcoFarm) Conference in Pacific Grove, CA.
This field course will be structured to give students as much hands-on experience as possible by engaging them in work experiences in exchange for interviewing the farm operators and touring the facilities. For the most part we will be lodged in yurts, bunk-houses, and similar accommodations, and working under whatever weather conditions we encounter. 
 The WSP field trip course will segue to the spring 2013 seminar BIOL/ENVI 422 Ecology of Sustainable Agriculture.
Readings (some in advance, some in January include): Starrs, P. and P. Goin, Field Guide to California Agriculture; Guthman, J., Agrarian Dreams; Estabrook, B., Tomatoland: How Modern Industrial Agriculture Destroyed Our Most Alluring Fruit; Nestle, M., Politics of Food; Hesterman, O.B., Fair Food; Pollan, M., In Defense of Food.
Evaluation will be based on a field journal in addition to a 10-page paper dealing with the intersection of the readings and field experiences.
Prerequisites: none, but since preference will be given to ENVI and BIOL majors, BIOL/ENVI 230 is suggested. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference will be given to students registering for ENVI/BIOL 422 in the Spring Semester. If the demand still exceeds 10, students will be asked to submit a short essay giving reasons for wanting to participate in the course.
Cost: $1000 plus airfare to and from San José, CA.
ART

ENVI 26 Touring Black Religion in the `New' South (Same as AFR 25 and REL 26)


(See under AFR 25 for full description.)

ENVI 31 Senior Research and Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Environmental Studies 493-494.

GEOSCIENCES

GEOS 12 Landscape Photography (Same as ENVI 12)

This class will broaden students' appreciation for the appearance and history of the landscape and teach the skills of making a successful photograph. Williamstown, situated in a valley between the Green and Taconic Mountains and bisected by the Green and Hoosic Rivers, is a place of great natural beauty. The local landscape is a subject that inspires both professional and amateur photographers alike. While Williamstown will be the subject of most of our work, we will use it to learn principles of universal application. Students will discover the importance of light in making a photograph. They will also learn camera skills and the mechanics of digital photography, which will be reviewed at biweekly class meetings. In addition to photographing and critiquing images, the class will visit collections at the Clark Art Institute and WCMA to see original work and examine and discuss books on reserve at Sawyer Library. An overview of the history of landscape photography will be provided with an emphasis on American workers such as Carlton Watkins, Eadweard Muybridge, Alfred Stieglitz, Eliot Porter and Ansel Adams. We will also demonstrate examples of different cameras such as medium format, view cameras, and panorama cameras. Students will produce a body of successful photographs that will be projected at the Winter Study presentation day and on display at http://drm.williams.edu/projects/. Students will submit short written explanations with each of their photographic assignments.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, the student's photography, and their presentation.
Prerequisites: students will need a digital single lens reflex camera (DSLR) or a new generation electronic viewfinder (DSL) camera such as those by Sony or Olympus. See http://digital-photography-school.com/blog/how-to-buy-a-dslr-camera/. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to first-year students and sophomores.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: mornings.
NICHOLAS WHITMAN (Instructor)
DETHIER (Sponsor)

Nicholas Whitman is a professional photographer and the former Curator of Photography at the New Bedford Whaling Museum. A 1977 graduate of the Rochester Institute of Technology, he has honed his craft to make landscape photographs of power and depth. See more at www.nwphoto.com.

GEOS 25 Field Geology in the Colorado Front Range-the Geologic Evolution of the Southern Rocky Mountains

Rising 8000 feet vertically above Colorado Springs and the Great Plains, 14,000 foot Pikes Peak heralds the beginning, both topographically and geologically, of the Rocky Mountains. The region beneath the Peak vividly portrays one of the most complete records of geologic history in the West, spanning nearly 2 billion years. Precambrian granite plutons and their metamorphic wall rocks are the "basement" for a stratigraphic succession stretching from Cambrian to Pleistocene. Thickness and types of sedimentary layers, some tilted vertically, document repeated uplift and erosion of mountain ranges. Volcanism 40-20 million years ago produced flows of lava, glowing incandescent ash, and mud, as well as the major gold deposit at Cripple Creek. Fossil localities contain marine organisms, world-class dinosaur remains, and, at the Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument, one of the richest assortments of Tertiary plants and insects found anywhere.
This winter study project culminates in a 10-day field trip to explore this geologically rich and diverse region. The program begins with a week and a half at Williams, where daily meetings will introduce the material and methods needed for the field work to follow. Classes and labs will deal with rock types, geologic structures and landforms, the time scale, and topographic and geologic maps. During this time each student will select a particular topic or locale to review independently and to present to the entire group while on-site in Colorado.
In Colorado we will be based at the 6000-acre Colorado Outdoor Education Center, adjoining the Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument. Daily field trips on foot and by van will take us to key outcrops that provide field evidence for the geologic and topographic evolution of the region. Observations and measurements at each site will be recorded in field notebooks, documenting a first-hand introduction to the region's physical and historical geology.
Evaluation: The quality of the independent site-specific study and its presentation in the field, along with the field notebooks, will serve as the basis for evaluation.
Prerequisites: consent of the instructor. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference to underclassmen with a strong interest in geology as well as to current upper-level geology majors, who may serve as mentors for less advanced students.
Cost: All transportation, meals, and lodging will be covered by a grant from the Freeman Foote Field Trip Fund for the Sciences. Books (approx. $50) and incidental expenses away from campus are additional.
Climate: The field area is a high semi-desert (~14" precipitation/year) ranging in elevation from 5000 to 10,000 feet. Abundant sunshine even in mid-winter will melt any rare snowfall, but cold and possibly windy conditions can be expected. Each participant should have suitable winter outer gear (similar to that needed to survive January outdoors at Williams).
WOBUS

GEOS 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Geology 493-494.

GERMAN

GERM S.P. Sustaining Program for German 101-102

Something new and different for students enrolled in German 101-102. Practice in the use of German for everyday purposes; creation and performance of short dramatic sketches through group collaboration; games; songs; storytelling; reading. No homework.
Requirements: active participation and regular attendance earn a "Pass" grade.
Prerequisites: German 101 or equivalent. Limited to German 101-102 students.
Cost: approximately $5 for photocopied materials.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week 9-9:50 a.m.

GERM 12 New/Old Netherland(s)-the Fourteenth, Forgotten Colony (Same as HIST 12) CANCELLED!

GERM 30 Honors Project

To be taken by honors candidates following other than the normal thesis route.

GERM 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for German 493-494.

HISTORY

HIST 10 Traveling through the Berkshires: The Past Meets the Present

In this course, students will travel to important historical sites and museums throughout the Greater Berkshires to learn about the history of the region and to study how the past is presented to the public. The sites visited will chronicle the history of the region from its first settlement to the twentieth century. The content of each site visit will place the local history within a larger national context. Topics will include the Berkshires as a frontier outpost, as a place of revolution, as a site of the industrial revolution, and as a mecca for arts and culture. Visits will also introduce students to how history is preserved, commemorated, exhibited, and reenacted. Sites include museums, living history centers, historic buildings, battlefields, and monuments. As often as possible, students will meet with museum staff and other public history professionals who will talk about their work. Diaries, memoirs, and travel narratives from The Berkshire Reader: Writings from New England's Secluded Paradise and other sources will complement the historic sites visited.
Students will be required to complete three projects for the course. The class will work together to create a website that interprets the history of the region based on the site visits. Students will also keep individual blogs that chronicle their travels. Finally, the class will culminate with students attempting to recreate authentic food in a living history demonstration. Attendance on all trips is mandatory. Visits may include Bennington, Deerfield, North Adams, Albany, Sturbridge, and inside the 1753 House in Williamstown.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. If overenrolled, preference will be given to History majors and especially to those who have taken other classes with the instructor.
Cost: $25.
Meeting time: Mondays for one hour and on one other day during the week (which will vary) for a 5- to 6-hour trip/discussion.
SPERO

HIST 12 New/Old Netherland(s)-the Fourteenth, Forgotten Colony (Same as GERM 12) CANCELLED!

HIST 13 Urban Culture in Seventeenth Century China: The Fiction of Feng Menglong (Same as ASST 13)

The short stories collected by Feng Menglong drew upon the tales of teahouse storytellers, novel currents in philosophical discourse, and the burgeoning world of urban commerce in early seventeenth century China. Written in a vernacular style, these stories contain highly unconventional depictions of merchant life, gender, sexuality, and ethics. In this course, we will examine Feng's stories in both their literary and historical contexts to examine the cultural world of late Ming Dynasty China. Readings will include selected stories as well as secondary works on literary history, commercial publishing, urban culture, and ethical philosophy.
Evaluation in the course will be based on presentations, brief papers, and a final project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference to those with a demonstrated interest in the topic.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons, Tuesdays and Thursdays.
A. REINHARDT

HIST 14 Africa, Islam, and the Novel (Same as AFR 14 and REL 14)

In the fourteen centuries since the origin of Islam, Muslims have played important roles in Africa's development. Muslims were important in the process of state-building, in creating commercial networks between parts of the continent, in introducing literacy, as well as in exchanges of inter-state diplomacy within Africa and beyond. This course will examine the representation of Islam and Muslims in novels written by Africans. How has gender, class, age, nationality, politics, and colonialism affected the relationships among African Muslims as well as their relationships with non-Muslims? How effective is the novel as a genre in representing these issues? Some of the novels we will read include: Tayeb Salih, Wedding of Zein, Mariama Ba, So Long a Letter, Sembene Ousmane, Xala, Hamidou Kane, Ambiguous Adventure, and Camara Laye, Dark.
Requirements: 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost: $80-90 for books.
Meeting time: afternoons.
MUTONGI

HIST 16 American Wars: Directed Independent Reading and Research

An independent reading and research course on American wars from colonial times to the present. All participants will share a few common readings, but there will be no formal classes. Instead, each participant will meet individually with the instructor to develop a unique reading list on a topic of their choice. Once their topic is decided, they will spend the rest of the Winter Study researching and writing a substantial paper (at least 25 pages) on their topic.
No prerequisites except interest in American military history.
Requirements: a research paper of at least 25 pages in length.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference will be given to History majors and those students who have demonstrated an interest in the history of warfare.
Cost: $40.
Meeting time: individual meetings; no formal classes.
WOOD

HIST 20 How to Tell a Story (Same as ENGL 20)

For you would-be journalists and writers, here's a chance to try your hand. NPR correspondent and author Barbara Bradley Hagerty offers some tips to writing stories (and exams) with grace and speed. We will go through the process of writing a story for publication or broadcast: Where you get ideas, whom you interview, how you conduct interviews, how to write on deadline, and most of all, how to tell a great story that no one will forget. We will watch some movies and read some great journalistic books. Evaluation will be based on regular in-class writing assignments, class participation, and a 10-page paper that requires reporting a controversy on campus or an unsolved crime in the Williamstown area.
Requirements: in-class writing assignments, 10-page final project and presentation.
No prerequisites, but this is for those with serious writing aspirations. Enrollment limit: 15. Selection based on a brief essay telling me why they want to take this course. Some preference given to seniors and juniors.
Cost: approximately $60.
Meeting time: mornings.
BARBARA BRADLEY HAGERTY `81 (Instructor)
SINIAWER (Sponsor)

Barbara Bradley Hagerty, whose 30-year career includes reporting for The Christian Science Monitor (as a national and foreign correspondent) and (currently) for National Public Radio. She is the author of the bestselling book, Fingerprints of God: The Search for the Science of Spirituality.

HIST 22 Realities and Representations of Native Americans

In this course, we will explore the lives and times of four iconic Native Americans - as well as how their stories are constantly interpreted and reinterpreted - as a way of understanding more about the history of Native North America. Most of these figures are familiar from textbook and legend: Pocahontas, the original "Indian Princess"; Squanto, who famously taught the Pilgrims how to cultivate maize; Sacagawea, the quintessential guide, interpreter, and cultural go-between of the Lewis and Clark expedition; and Crazy Horse, a Lakota warrior and leader who participated in the Battle of the Little Big Horn. By considering how these individuals' stories have been told through a variety of media such as films, websites, historic sites, sculpture, and more, we will explore the symbolic uses of these individuals in American culture. We will also delve into the realities behind the symbols to contrast the actual experiences of diverse Native peoples with the stereotypes that continue to evolve into the present day. We will meet three days a week for two hours, and students will view films and other media and complete secondary reading assignments outside of class.
Requirements: 10-page paper analyzing at least three popular representations of a Native American individual.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25. Preference will be given to History majors.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: mornings.
LAURA SPERO (Instructor)
SINIAWER (Sponsor)

Laura Spero received her Ph.D. in History at the University of Pennsylvania. She is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture. Her research interests include colonialism, Native North America, and gender studies.

HIST 23 Gaudino Winter Study Fellows Program

The Gaudino Winter Study Fellow designation is available to up to ten students who create their own independent projects that involve critical, reflective, and experiential learning during Winter Study. Each student works independently under the direction of a faculty sponsor, who will help shape and monitor the project. The project must receive approval from the Winter Study Committee, as well as from the Gaudino Scholar and Gaudino Board of Trustees. The Gaudino Board is looking for projects that address specific intellectual problems through direct experience, undertaken preferably in a social milieu that is previously unfamiliar or even uncomfortable to the applicant. Projects must be academically rigorous and worked out carefully with faculty sponsors. Projects should also entail systematic self-reflection on how the experiences affect students personally, and students may be asked to discuss their project with the Gaudino Board after it is completed. The Gaudino Scholar will meet with students as a group before and after Winter Study. All students whose projects are approved will receive the Gaudino Fellow designation. In addition, students on Financial Aid will receive Gaudino funding from a minimum of 50% to a maximum of 90% of the budget for the project up to $2,500, as determined by the Financial Aid office. No additional funding for students' projects will be provided by the College. Students selecting this course will register for HIST 23. More information about the Gaudino Fellows Winter Study Program and guidelines for applying can be found at: http://web.williams.edu/resources/gaudino/overview.php.
BERNHARDSSON

HIST 26 Teaching, Doctoring and Living With Refugees and Immigrants (Same as AMST 26 and SPEC 26)

(See under SPEC 26 for full description.)

HIST 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by all senior honors students who are registered for HIST 493 (Fall) and HIST 494 (Spring), HIST 31 allows thesis writers to complete their research and prepare a draft chapter, due at the end of WSP.

SINIAWER

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

INST 15 Orham Pamuk, Nobel Laureate (Same as ARAB 14, COMP 17 and ENGL 15)

(See under ENGL 15 for full description.)

INST 25 Art of Experience in Egypt: Visual Documentation of Journey and Encounter

This course is a studio art course that immerses students in the contemporary culture of Egypt through travel in Luxor, Aswan and Cairo. Using watercolor, graphite, and pen, students explore approaches for visually documenting experiences and encounters. As traveling artists, we repeatedly return to the following questions: How do we make sense of new and sometimes disorienting visual information? How do we translate experience into a visual language? What does it mean to be an artist traveler?
In the fall before departure, students attend several studio art classes and cultural orientation sessions. While in Egypt, students are expected to visually document their day's encounters in sketchbooks, attend studio workshops and critique sessions, and complete drawing and watercolor assignments. We spend the first 4 days in Cairo where students visit artist studios, museums and other cultural sites. Students then spend one week in Luxor, Upper Egypt where they have the opportunity to work with art students and faculty from the Luxor College of Fine Art. Through sketchbook work and assignments on larger format paper, students will draw at cultural and historical sites like Hassan Fathy's New Gourna Village and Karnak Temple, in the marketplace, and on the Luxor College campus. We will then spend four days in Aswan with a focus on landscape drawing, and then finish our time in Cairo with visiting the Giza Pyramids and participating in a final group critique.
Note: This course requires more preparation than is usual for a WSP course; there will be mandatory evening orientation meetings and a studio workshop during the Fall semester. Preliminary sketchbook work and assigned readings including a complete text by a contemporary Egyptian author must be completed by the start of Winter Study Period. The first three days of Winter Study will take place on the Williams College campus for reading discussions, presentations, and studio workshops. Only those who can attend from the first day of Winter Study are eligible for this trip. Students will mount an exhibition of their artwork on campus after the trip, and present their work to the Williams Community.
Requirements: completed sketchbooks and assignments, participation in group critiques, and successful execution of final project. In addition, a supportive demeanor throughout the trip and group critique participation are required.
No prerequisites, but drawing experience highly recommended. Enrollment limit: 8. Selection will be based on application essays, interviews, references and seniority in that order.
Cost: $3400.
JULIA MORGAN-LEAMON (Instructor)
BERNHARDSSON (Sponsor)

Julia Morgan-Leamon is a painter, installation artist, and media producer. She received her MFA in Visual Arts from Vermont College of Fine Arts, and her BA in Studio Art from Mount Holyoke College. In 2009, she was one of 25 international artists invited to participate in the Luxor International Painting Symposium and residency.

INST 30 Senior Honors Project

To be taken by candidates for honors in International Studies.

JUSTICE AND LAW

JLST 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Past, Its Uncertain Future (Same as ENVI 13) CANCELLED!

JLST 14 Mock Trial: Simulation of a Civil Trial

This course provides the opportunity for students to simulate the role of a civil trial attorney formulating trial strategy, opening statement, direct and cross examination of witnesses, and closing argument. Using case materials from the American Mock Trial Association which has a website at www.collegemocktrial.org, teams of 5-6 students will prepare for a civil trial. The initial class will review the role of trials in the American legal system, the anatomy of a trial, approaches to witness presentation, styles for direct and cross examination, and the role of opening statement and closing arguments. After the initial lecture, the students will go through the process using the materials provided to select the necessary witnesses to present their case as both plaintiff and defendant. Students on each team will then play the roles of the attorneys and witnesses to present their case, once as the plaintiff and once as the defendant. Evaluation will be based on the following: (1) short (2-3 page) memo on the strategy for the case as plaintiff/defendant and reasons for witness selection; (2) preparation of direct and cross examinations; (3) preparation of opening and closing arguments; (4) effectiveness as witnesses and (5) oral presentation of the case to a panel of "judges" as plaintiff and defendant.
No prerequisites, but interest in the legal system and potential career in law helpful. Enrollment limit: 24.
Cost: less than $100 for photocopying of case materials.
Meeting time: two 4-hour sessions on Mondays at 12:00 to 4:00 and Tuesdays at 10:00-2:00.

DAVID C. OLSON `71 and GENE M. BAUER `71 (Instructors)
SHANKS (Sponsor)

David C. Olson graduated from Williams in 1971 and then from Ohio State's Law School in 1978. He joined what is now Frost Brown Todd 33 years ago and practices as a civil trial attorney. He handles a wide range of complex civil matters with a concentration on construction cases. Please see his attached firm profile for more details.

Gene M. Bauer graduated from Williams in 1971 and then from Harvard Law School in 1974. He held a variety of positions with law firms in New York for 6-7 years and thereafter assumed several positions as Associate General Counsel, General Counsel and other senior management positions with companies in New York, New Jersey and Massachusetts. Please see his attached Career Summary for more details.

JLST 17 Learning Intervention for Troubled Teens (LIFTT)

The objective of this program and winter study course is to provide an alternative sentence for adolescents involved in the Juvenile Court system in Berkshire County. Many of these children cut school, are disruptive in the classroom, and do not find learning stimulating. The goal of this program is to teach these children, through experience, that learning can be fun, providing them with the motivation to succeed in school. These students, under the guidance of Williams College undergraduates, will select a topic of interest and learn how to research and present this topic to their peers in the program, with access to Williams College facilities. Williams undergraduate students will gain experience in teaching and motivating troubled teenagers and will also present a topic of their choosing to the students in the program, modeling a classroom setting. Furthermore, Williams students will be exposed to the Juvenile Court system, gaining insight into the causes of and solutions to the incidence of juvenile crime. Williams students will be expected to read relevant training materials, meet with their teenagers three times a week in the afternoon, give a final presentation, and keep a weekly journal detailing the meetings.
Evaluation will be based on the quality of the journal and the Williams students' own topic presentations.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Preference to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Students will be asked to write a paragraph describing why they want to take the course.
Cost: $0.
Meetings with the teens will be from 3-5 pm three times per week.
MICHAEL WYNN `93 (Instructor)
SHANKS (Sponsor)

Mike Wynn is the Chief of the Pittsfield Police Department and graduated from Williams in 1993.

LATINA/O STUDIES

LATS 13 Virtual Communities: Ethno-Racial Identity, Gender, and Class Online (Same as AMST 13 and WGSS 13) CANCELLED!

LATS 25 Transnational Narratives on the Mexico-US Border (Same as COMP 25) CANCELLED!

LATS 31 Latina/o Honors Thesis Seminar

Students must register for this course to complete an honors project begun in the fall or begin one to be finished in the spring.
Prerequisite: approval of program chair. Enrollment limited to senior honors candidates.

LEADERSHIP STUDIES

LEAD 10 Institutional Leadership and Social Responsibility

This course will examine a wide variety of issues related to leadership and responsibility, in both public- and private-sector settings. We will explore these issues through the experiences of men and women who have held leadership roles in these contexts. We will look at issues of corruption and fraud in the private sector. We will examine the changing role of lawyers in advising and guiding their clients. We will look at environmental issues from the perspective of both private institutions and government regulators. We will discuss issues facing leaders in higher education. We will look at questions of responsibility facing political leaders at the state level in our federal system. And we will examine leadership issues as they have arisen in historical contexts, including crucial questions regarding the origins and development of American involvement in Asia. The majority of class sessions will be led by guest speakers, most, though not all, of whom are distinguished alumni of the college. Students will be expected to take an active role in introducing and helping to lead discussions involving the guest speakers.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, preparation, and participation in class discussions, and a final 10-page paper. You should do the readings assigned before class. All readings are online with the exception of one reading packet, which will be handed out in class, and one book. You are expected to purchase the latter, available at Water Street Books: Profiles in Leadership, edited by Walter Isaacson.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 18.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: mornings.
EARL DUDLEY and PETER BEREK (Instructors)
MELLOW (Sponsor)

Earl Dudley-Professor of Law, University of Virginia School of Law, 1989-2008; Private law practice, Washington, DC 1968-1975, 1977-1989; General Counsel, Judiciary Committee, U.S. House of Representatives, 1975-1977.
Peter Berek-Professor of English, Williams College, 1967-1990; Dean of the College, Williams, 1975-78; Special Assistant to the President, Williams, 1987-90; Dean of Faculty and Provost, Mount Holyoke College, 1990-1998 (Interim President, Fall 1995); Professor of English, Mount Holyoke, 1990-2011; Visiting Professor of English, Amherst College, 2009-present.

LEAD 11 The Changing Landscape of Journalism (Same as AMST 11, ENGL 11 and ENVI 11)

(See under ENGL 11 for full description.)

LEAD 13 Enlightened Leadership (Same as COMP 13) CANCELLED!

(See under COMP 13 for full description.)

LEAD 14 The CIA and the War on Terror: A Scalpel, not a Broadsword (Same as PSCI 14)

(See under PSCI 14 for full description.)

LEAD 18 Wilderness Leadership

This Winter Study project is for students who would like to participate in an off-campus experiential education opportunity. Students will be required to research an appropriate accredited program i.e., National Outdoor Leadership School, Outward Bound etc., that will provide a suitable learning environment and be at least 22 days in length. The Director of the Williams Outing Club will assist students in their search if necessary. Upon choosing a program and being accepted, students will meet with the Director in a pre-program meeting in December to create a framework for observing group dynamics and studying a variety of leadership styles. A required 10-page paper based on their journals will be required immediately after their return to campus for the start of third quarter. There will also be a follow up class to debrief the experience in the first week of February. All programs must meet with the approval of the Outing Club Director. In addition to off-campus opportunities, there will be a Wilderness First Responder Emergency Care course that will take place on campus. Contact Scott Lewis for details.
Requirements: course approval by WOC Director, daily journal writing with focus on leadership and group dynamics, 10-page paper and 2 class meetings pre and post trip. Student assessment will be based on ten page paper and class discussions.
No prerequisites. Off-campus opportunities are not open to first-year students. Interested students must consult with WOC Director before registration. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student will vary depending on the program selected-range is generally from $1,500-3,000.
TBA, Interim Director of the Outing Club

LEAD 19 Social Entrepreneurship: Innovating in the Social Sector (Same as ECON 17 and POEC 17)

(See under ECON 17 for full description.)

LEAD 25 Justice and Public Policy (Same as PSCI 15)

The course will examine several public policy issues which have been resolved by the judicial system. These may include affirmative action and other gender and racial issues, death penalty, free speech/obscenity, and environmental issues. The focus of the course will be on the process involved in resolving the issues in the courts, including the importance of the trial courts in that process, the competing interests involved, the public impact of the decisions and, in most cases, the difficulty of resolution. Students will spend the second week in Boston where they will have the opportunity to witness activities at the Office of the Attorney General for Massachusetts and meet with representatives of the federal and state judiciary.
Requirements: 10-page paper/oral report and regular participation in class.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10; not open to first-year students. If overenrolled, students will be asked to write a short essay to determine selection.
Cost: $?????*; students will be responsible for obtaining lodging for four nights in Boston, MA and will be responsible for transportation to and from Boston and most meals.
Meeting time: at Williams, one morning and one afternoon, the first and third week; in Boston, Monday through Thursday, all day during the second week. Students will meet in December prior to break to discuss logistics and expectations for the course.
MARTHA COAKLEY `75 and MICHAEL KEATING `62 (Instructors)
MELLOW (Sponsor)

The course will be taught by Michael B. Keating `62, a trial lawyer with the Boston law firm of Foley Hoag LLP, and Martha Coakley `75, Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

MARITIME STUDIES

MAST 10 Ultimate Wellness: Concepts for Living a Happy Healthy Life

This course provides an opportunity to drastically improve your life by introducing concepts that can start making a difference in the way you feel today. We will be approaching post-modern nutrition concepts such as: Bio-individuality, crowding out, deconstructing cravings, and primary food through discussion, reading material, and videos. Students will develop a healthy eating and feasible living approach that includes: Menu planning, food label reading, navigating the grocery store, overcoming sugar addiction, self-care, physical activity, journaling, and achieving balance. Evaluation will be based on completion of assignments, class participation, reflective 10-page paper or equivalent creative project, and final presentation that demonstrates a level of personal growth.
After signing up for this course please email Nicole at nicole@zentreewellness.com with a brief statement describing your interest in the course and what you hope to achieve in it. In the event of over-subscription, these statements will be used in the selection process.
We will meet twice a week for three-hour sessions.
There will be several books, videos, grocery store field trip and simple cooking required for this class.
Requirements: 10-page paper or project and presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. If overenrolled, selection will be based on a statement of interest.
Cost: $100.
Meeting time: mornings.
NICOLE ANAGNOS (Instructor)
KARABINOS (Sponsor)

Nicole Anagnos is a local Health & Nutrition Coach and the founder and director of Zen Tree Wellness. She also holds a masters degree in education.

MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS

MATH 10 LQWURGXFWLRQ WR FUBSWRJUDSKB

The ability to encode information so that only certain recipients can read it (or, conversely, to read information you are not supposed to have!) contains some of the most exciting applications of pure and applied mathematics. Since at least the time of Julius Ceasar (the title to this course is encoded with the cipher he made famous), codes and ciphers have been used to protect important information. We'll discuss various cryptosystems used over the years. The course will be a mix of history and theory.
Requirements: TeX-ing solutions to problems, small writing assignments, possible presentation.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 18. Selection will be based on a short essay and background.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: mornings.
MILLER

MATH 11 A Taste of Austria

This course introduces students to elements of the Austrian culture around the turn of the 19th century up to today. Students will learn about significant contributions to the arts and science from Austrians such as musician Gustav Mahler, artist Gustav Klimt, scientist Karl Landsteiner or poet Stefan Zweig. Other activities include learning how to dance the Viennese waltz composed by Johann Strauss (in case you want to attend Austria's main annual society event, the Opernball in Vienna) and how to bake Sachertorte (the delicious cake offered by the Hotel Sacher in Vienna). We will also pursue typical Austrian winter activities such as down hill or cross country skiing, sledding or skating. The course will be conducted in German and English.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, small weekly group presentations on some topic of Austrian significance, followed by class discussions and a final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites, although some fluency in German is welcome. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost: $90 (Lift ticket plus equipment rental for skiing, less if no lift ticket is purchased).
Meeting time: mornings.
SOPHIA KLINGENBERG (Instructor)
S. JOHNSON (Sponsor)

Sophia Klingenberg was born in Graz, Austria. She graduated from the Vienna University Medical School with a doctorate in Medicine in 2004. She has worked at the University of Florida, Dept. of Pathobiology as a research scholar for three years and is currently a resident at the Department of Internal Medicine at the Hospital in Fuerstenfeld, Austria.

MATH 12 Modern Dance-Muller Technique

This dance class will be based on the modern dance technique developed by Jennifer Muller, with whom I danced professionally for 5 years in New York City and in Europe. Jennifer Muller was a soloist in the dance company of José Limon before she started her own company in 1974. She has added her own style of movement to the Limon technique, creating an expansive, free-flowing dance that is wonderful to do and to watch. The class will be multi-leveled and open to both men and women alike. Previous dance experience preferred, but not required. Students will have the opportunity to choreograph a short piece either as a soloist or in small groups.
Class will meet 4 times per week, 2 hours at a time. Preferably M, T, TH, F, from 10:30 am - 12:30 pm.
Requirements: We will finish the course with a short lecture-demonstration illustrating what we have learned.
No prerequisites; no previous dance experience necessary. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: mornings.
SYLVIA LOGAN (Instructor)
S. JOHNSON (Sponsor)

Sylvia Logan received her B.A. in Slavic Literature from Stanford University. She danced professionally with the Jennifer Muller Dance Company, a modern company based in New York City for five years.

MATH 14 Introductory Photography: People and Places (Same as SPEC 12)

This is an introductory course in photography, with an emphasis on color photography and using the digital camera. The main themes will be portraiture and the landscape. No previous knowledge is assumed, but students are expected to have access to a 35 mm (or equivalent) digital camera, with manual override or aperture priority. The topics covered will include composition, exposure, camera use, direction and properties of light, and digital imaging. Students will develop their eye through the study of the work of well-known photographers and the critical analysis of their own work. We will discuss the work of contemporary photographers such as Mary Ellen Mark, Joel Meyerowitz, Constantine Manos, and Eugene Richards.
Students will be expected to spend a considerable amount of time practicing their own photography outside of class. There will be one required local half-day field trip. Students will also be introduced to the program Photoshop, and will work on their own pictures with this program.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, an in-class quiz and a final project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Selection will be based on an email questionnaire.
Cost: $50 for book.
Meeting time: mornings.
SILVA

MATH 15 The Science of Star Trek (Same as PHYS 15)

(See under PHYS 15 for full description.)

MATH 17 Tournament Bridge

We'll study, prepare, and play in as many bridge tournaments in the area as possible, coupled with analysis, reading, and writing. Tournament play followed by analysis and the writing up of lessons learned is an essential part of the study of bridge. At this level, it is much more than a "game": it is an intense intellectual and academic activity. Tournament time (including days, nights, and weekends) averaging about 10 hours per week, other class time about 6 hours per week.
Reading List: Commonsense Bidding by William Root; How to Play a Bridge Hand by William Root; How to Defend a Bridge Hand by William Root; Modern Bridge Conventions by Root and Pavlicek; 5 Weeks to Winning Bridge by Alfred Sheinwold. A good supplementary text is Bridge by Audrey Grant, especially as supplemented by the related columns in the ACBL Bulletin. In addition there are many excellent collections of illustrative bridge hands. Fortunately much is on the web, with new ones appearing every month. Three excellent websites are Bridge Clues at http://www.bridgeclues.com/ by Michael Lawrence, Frank Stewart's daily column http://www.baronbarclay.com/stewart.html, and Larry Cohen's website http://www.larryco.com/BridgeArticles/
Evaluation will be based on participation in all activities and the writing.
Prerequisites: you have to know how to play bridge. Enrollment limit: 15. Selection will be based on bridge playing experience.
Cost: $150 for entry fees and 1-3 overnights (you provide your own food on the road).
Meeting time: tournament time (including days, nights, and weekends) averaging about 10 hours per week, other class time about 6 hours per week.
MORGAN

MATH 25 The History, Geography and Economics of the Wines of France

In this course, during the first week in Williamstown, we will study the factors that have resulted in the French wine industry of today. The history of wine making in France is long, dating back to the Greeks and later the Romans. Not surprisingly, the first areas to be planted were the areas around present day Marseille, (Massalia in Ancient Greece) in Provence, and the areas just north farther up the Rhône river valley. We will study the history of wine in France from the Romans through the middle ages, the influence of monasteries on wine production, the impact of the French revolution and the evolution of the modern classification system in the 19th century which is still in place today. The late 19th century saw a series of catastrophes that had devastating effects on both the quantity and quality of wine produced. The solutions to these problems are varied and fascinating and resulted in the hybridization of American and French vines which exist to this day. Recent history includes the spread of quality wines to the Languedoc area which now rivals some of the more prestigious traditional areas of Bordeaux and Burgundy. Later, we will visit the Agricultural Research Center (INRA) in Montpellier which both helped with understanding the Phylloxera epidemic of the 1850's, and also contributes to the continuing evolution of the quality of the Languedoc wine industry.
Geography and climate play an essential and important role in grape growing. Due to its temperate and incredibly varied climates, France, while not holding a monopoly on fine wine production, is blessed with being able to grow a wide range of different styles of grapes whose sugar and acidity lend themselves to the production of quality wines. We will visit four different areas of French wine production: Bordeaux, Languedoc and the two oldest areas of the Rhône and Provence. During our first week we will also study the impact of global warming on the future of wine production in France and the potential economic impact. We will look at temperature data and study the relationship between temperature change and quality using statistical regression analysis. Finally, we will discuss the role of wine in French cuisine and the importance of wine to French culture.
STRUCTURE OF THE COURSE:
During the first week in Williamstown, we will read about the history of wine production, study the geography of France and perform various statistical analyses relating to quality, temperature and production. In particular we will study the relationship between price and quality as judged by experts for the 2000 Bordeaux vintage. Depending the ages of the students, we may do some wine tasting and discussion as well.
Proposed itinerary
Day 1: Fly from Albany to Paris, arriving in the morning. We will get acclimated and in the afternoon I plan to organize a lecture by a wine merchant who will give his perspective on the current state of the French wine industry (at the store Les Caprices de l'Instant).
Days 2-4: Train to Bordeaux. We will visit the famous wine town of St. Emillion and visit several chateaux during our 3 days in this area. Possible chateaux to visit include Haut Brion (or if still being renovated La Mission Haut
Brion), Chateau Pichon Longueville, Chateau Margaux and Chateaux Mouton-Rothschild. Visits will include tours of the facility and a history of each chateau, some of which date back to the 16th century.
Days 5-7 We next travel to Montpellier the center of the Languedoc wine region. We will visit INRA (the agricultural research center) where we will talk with experts about the history of wine production in the area including the devastation of the Phylloxera epidemic as well as the evolution of the past 30 years which has seen the region go from an area which produced only table wine to some of the most prestigious wines of the world. We will visit several producers in the region, possibly Mas de Daumas Gassac, Domaine de La Grange des Pères and Château La Roque. Side visits will include a trip to Saint-Guilhem-le-Désert, one of the most beautiful medieval villages of France.
Days 8-10 Next is the Rhône with possible stops in Hermitage for a visit to the cave of M. Chapoutier, the domaine of Trevallon in Baux les Provinces, an incredible wine that lost it's "appellation" for political reasons and it now a designated only as a "vin de table", but it sought after by chefs all over France, and at least one Chateauneuf du Pape vineyard, possible Beaucastel or Domaine de la Janasse. One day will be spent in Avignon to visit the Palais des Papes the papal site during the 14th century. From Marseille we will take the train back to Paris and then fly back to Albany on day 11 or 12.
Enrollment limit: 10. Not open to first-year students.
Cost: $3900.
DEVEAUX

MATH 30 Senior Project

To be taken by candidates for honors in Mathematics other than by thesis route.

MATH 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Mathematics 493-494.

MUSIC

MUS 10 Microtonal Eartraining, Performance and Composition CANCELLED!

MUS 11 The Rite of Spring, Rhythm Unlocked

To celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the 1913 premiere of Igor Stravinsky's "Le Sacre du Printemps" (The Rite of Spring), and as a prelude to the March performances by the Berkshire Symphony, Dance and Theater Departments, the Departments of Music and Dance will collaborate on an interdisciplinary project studying Stravinsky's "Rite."
Arguably no 20th century composition so influenced the art of music as this seminal work. Participants will study the conceptual themes and percussive elements of the music. In addition we will demonstrate how rhythm, released from the traditions of the 19th century, unlocked new rhythmic possibilities for composers from that point forward. Relying on musicians both playing their instruments and or singing, we intend to perform sections of the score. Musicians will join with the Dance Department to recreate sections of the ballet, studying Nijinsky's original choreography as well as performing sections with more contemporary approaches. The course will be part lecture, in class study of film, and listening to audio recordings.
Participants will study the history of the riotous first performance.
Independent reading will include; Peter Hill's Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring, Robert Craft's, Stravinsky: Glimpses of Life.
Requirements: individual preparation of music, participating in discussion, written journal.
Prerequisites: students who read music. Enrollment limit: 25. Preference given to instrumentalists first.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons; classes will be held of Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 1-3 The course will culminate in a performance.
FELDMAN

MUS 12 Composers Without Borders

Focus will be on the creation, performance, analysis, and critique of cutting edge composition both individually and as a group.
Emphasis will on "work for public spaces" in connection with the I/O Festival in early January as well as at least one group composition also for performance on one of the festival concerts. Other activities include working with guest composers, analysis of works presented at the festival and others to be chosen, musical criticism when no criteria for evaluation exist, the use of simple electronics, and possibly the invention of new instruments as appropriate. Will require some evenings and weekend meetings.
Requirements: interim and final projects.
Prerequisites: music literacy, i.e., music reading skills required, some performance and/or composition experience highly desirable, Music 203 or 204 desirable. Enrollment limit: 8. Selection based on composition and performance experience.
Meeting time: evening rehearsals and performances as well as afternoon meetings.
KECHLEY

MUS 17 Cabaret: Creation and Performance (Same as THEA 17)

(See under THEA 17 for full description.)

MUS 25 The Calusa Indians of Southern Florida: The Cultural Legacy and Inspiration of an Extinct Civilization

This course will focus on creative work inspired by the Calusa Indians, their legacy, and history. We will discuss the history and culture of the Calusa Indians, their system of government, construction of canal system, their religion, and the many art forms that they created. We will also discuss the relationship of the Calusas with other cultures, and their impact and legacy to our society. Students will use the knowledge acquired during field trips, lectures, and group discussions as a source of inspiration for their creative work in one or more of the following fields: music composition, visual arts, literature, and theater. They can create their projects individually or could form teams to create interdisciplinary works. If teamwork is selected for the creation of a project there will be a limit of one student per discipline in each team.
Projects will be discussed with the instructor prior to our departure, during our first meeting at Williams on January 3rd. We will travel to Florida on January 6th and will stay in South West Florida until our return to Williams on January 24th. Once in Florida we will visit Research Centers that specialize on the Calusa Indians, meet specialists on this subject, and will visit museums and historical sites. Field trips will be scheduled during the mornings. Afternoons will be dedicated to study articles on the Calusas and individual or team creative work. Students will have a travel journal reflecting on their experiences and their artistic response as they occur. Their projects in progress will be shared with members of the Pine Island community. Student creative projects will be shared with the Williams College community after our return to Williams. Students will keep a journal describing their creative response to each one of the field trips.
Prior to our departure for St. James City, Florida, students should have read the following book: MacMahon, Darcie A. and Williams Marquardt 2004 "The Calusa and their Legacy: South Florida People and their Environments" University Press of Florida, Gainesville.
Requirements: creative project and travel journal, as specified above.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 7. Priority given to students interested in creating original works in response to field trips and visits to Research Centers and museums. Preference will be given to students interested on music composition, theater, studio art, anthropology, English, and comparative literature.
Cost: $2424.
ILEANA PEREZ VELAZQUEZ

MUS 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Music 493, 494.

NEUROSCIENCE

NSCI 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Neuroscience 493-494.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 10 The Later Foucault: Biopolitics and Self-Government

Michel Foucault's later course lectures at the College de France on biopolitics, neoliberalism, and governmentality continue to exert a powerful influence on critical theorists. This course will be attractive to students interested in the emergence of and transformations in the power to administer and manage human life at the level of populations and individuals. In this seminar we will do close readings of selections from several of Foucault's recently translated course lectures (such as The Birth of Biopolitics, The Government of Self and Others, and The Courage of Truth) to assess their value and relevance for thinking about how power is exercised today.
Requirements: two 4- to 5-page seminar papers-one of which may be presented in a tutorial format.
Prerequisites: one upper-level course in critical or political theory or permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 10. The instructor will request that students provide information about their reason for selecting the course.
Cost: $60.
Meeting time: afternoon seminars and perhaps some tutorial meetings.
SAWICKI

PHIL 11 The Philosophy of Chess

Chess is one of the noblest and most fascinating of human endeavors. We will examine chess in many of its facets: its history, philosophy and literature. We will look at the art of chess and the art that chess has inspired. Above all, we will work together on improving our playing skills: we will study chess openings, middle games and endgames, and engage in continual tournament play. Evaluation will be based on class participation and problem assignments.
Requirements: class participation, problem assignments.
Prerequisites: all students should know the rules of chess and be able to read chess notation. Enrollment limit: 20. If the class is overenrolled, students will be selected according to playing strength, as indicated by USCF ratings, results in the College chess club, or other measures.
Cost: $50 for books.
Meeting time: afternoons.
GERRARD

PHIL 12 Bioethics According to The Simpsons

Active Euthanasia? Okely Dokely! Human cloning? Don't have a cow, man! Over the past twenty years The Simpsons has included a healthy dose of stinging and sometimes surprisingly illuminating critique of numerous bioethical issues. In this winter study course we will use clips and episodes from the classic animated series as a launch pad for investigating the deeper philosophical concepts and ethical questions involved in a variety of bioethical topics. Good comedy has a way of driving straight to the core of contested issues and painful circumstances, providing a point of entry for students in the class to more serious, academic material. Along the way, the course will also investigate what makes The Simpsons's treatment of these bioethical issues *funny*-how its satire plays on common misunderstandings, contradictions and inconsistencies in social policy and individual decisions, and how serious issues drive the comedic effect. During the first portion of the course, the instructor will present selections from The Simpsons that take up several core bioethical issues, paired with related readings from the bioethics literature and possibly from the philosophical literature on humor and on The Simpsons. In the second portion of the course, the students themselves will identify and present clips pertaining to bioethical issues. The final project for the course will be collaborative in nature: small groups of students will be asked to develop and pitch (to the other class members) a storyline for a Simpsons episode (or portion thereof) that centers on a bioethical topic.
Classes will meet two or three afternoons each week, and students will be expected to read a substantial amount of philosophical material in preparation for these meetings. In addition, students will need to spend significant amounts of time outside of class viewing videos and developing their final projects.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, one in-class presentation, and the final collaborative project. Enrollment limit: 12. Preference will be given to students who indicate intellectual seriousness about philosophical bioethics.
Cost to student: $20-$30 for reading packet/printing
Meeting time: afternoons
PEDRONI

PHIL 13 Boxing

Boxing is one of the world's oldest sports, and there are 3000 year old artistic representations of boxing from ancient Egypt. The history of boxing in the United States during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries reflects the history of the nation. Issues of class, ethnicity, race, and gender have played a central role in the sport. Stories about boxing also play a central role in the popular culture. In this course we will look at some treatments of boxing by social historians, examine some depictions of boxing in documentary and dramatic films, and watch some classic fights.
We will also learn some of the fundamental skills involved in boxing. Training as a boxer will give men and women a better appreciation of the physical demands involved. Four days a week we will engage in an intensive training regimen working on basic punching technique, footwork, defense and conditioning. The workouts will involve minimal contact, but will be physically demanding. Students will need to purchase boxing gloves, handwraps, and a jump rope.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation, and a 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student: $150.
Meeting time: mornings workouts; movies, discussions and seminars in the afternoon and evening
MCPARTLAND

PHIL 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Philosophy 493-494.

PHYSICS

PHYS 10 Light and Holography

This course will examine the art and science of holography. It will introduce modern optics at a level appropriate for a non-science major, giving the necessary theoretical background in lectures and discussion. Demonstrations will be presented and student will make several kinds of holograms in the lab. Thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation, we have 7 well-equipped holography darkrooms available for student use. At the beginning of WSP, the class will meet for lecture and discussion three mornings a week and for lab 2 afternoons a week. Later classes will be mainly laboratory.
Students will be evaluated on the basis of regular attendance, completion of 4 laboratory exercised, and a holography laboratory project or a 10-page paper. Attendance at all classes and labs is required for a passing grade.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference to students with no physics above Physics 109; then seniors, juniors, sophomores and first-years.
Cost: $50 for holographic film and chemicals.
Meeting time: lectures will be in the morning, labs will be in the afternoon.
LOPES

PHYS 11 Elementary Cooking Techniques

Students will practice fundamental cooking skills, visit area farms, and tour commercial kitchens over 18 sessions. All sessions are mandatory. The kitchen sessions will teach basic cooking skills, including knife cuts, stocks, sauces, and soups, as well as five cooking techniques: roast, sauté, braise, pan fry, and shallow poach. The field trips will offer insights to farm-to-table cooking from the perspective of farmers and chefs. It is important to note that this course teaches cooking methods; students will not prepare full meals or collect a significant number of recipes. The field trips include visits to two area farms, two Berkshire County restaurants, and a tour of the kitchens of prominent farm-to-table restaurants in New York City. This field trip to New York City will take place on Saturday, January 19, and it will take all day.
Students will be evaluated on their ability to successfully implement the cooking techniques assigned to them, and on their ability to plan and execute a complete meal during the final week of the course. This meal will be served to Professor Peter Pedroni's wine students in a wine pairing exercise. Assigned readings focus on the philosophies of historic and contemporary chefs, culinary science, and culinary culture. A final 10-page paper will ask students to assess the role of professional chefs in consumer education about food and taste.
No prerequisites. This course is strictly limited to 10 students. Preference will be given to first-year students who demonstrate a keen interest in fostering a stronger cooking culture at Williams; seniors will not be admitted to this course.
Meeting times: All sessions are mandatory. Please carefully study the hours of the course, which fall outside of typical class meetings times.
Monday through Friday: 12:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.
Saturday, January 19: 6:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.
January 24: afternoon and evening; TBD
Each student must provide:

* clean apron

* clean hat (baseball cap is fine)

* 9" to 12" whisk

* chef's knife (8" or 10" blade; forged blades are highly recommended over stamped blades)

* paring knife (3" or 4" blade)

* large cutting board, of wood or plastic

Cost: $400.
BRENT WASSER (Instructor)
AALBERTS (Sponsor)

Brent Wasser manages the Williams College Sustainable Food & Agriculture Program. He is a graduate of The Culinary Institute of America and has worked in professional bakeshops and kitchens. Brent has taught food and culture travel courses at The Culinary Institute of America, and he holds a Diploma in Wine and Spirits from The Wine and Spirit Education Trust.

PHYS 12 Drawing as a Learnable Skill

Representational drawing is not merely a gift of birth, but a learnable skill. If you wanted to draw, but have never had the time to learn; or you enjoy drawing and wish to deepen your understanding and abilities, then this course is for you. This intensive course utilizes traditional drawing exercises to teach representational drawing, accompanied by a text on brain research and how it pertains to drawing. By using simple techniques and extensive exercises you will discover and develop the perceptual shift from your symbol based left hemisphere to your visually based right hemisphere. This cognitive shift enables you to accurately see and realistically represent the physical world. You will learn to draw a convincing portrait, interior, and still life. This course is designed to develop your powers of observation and enhance your innate creative problem solving abilities, which are applicable in any field. Students need no previous artistic experience, just the willingness and desire to learn a new skill.
Students will be expected to attend and participate in all class sessions as well as mandatory study sessions in museums once a week. They will also be required to keep a sketchbook recording their progress and complete a final project. Evaluations will be based on participation, effort, and development. All class sessions are mandatory as well as one session per week at the Clark and Williams College Museums.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 18. If overenrolled, selection will be based on seniority.
Cost: textbook (Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain) and $5 for materials.
Meeting time: mornings.
STELLA EHRICH (Instructor)
AALBERTS (Sponsor)

Stella Ehrich lived in Italy for sixteen years, where she spent seven years studying figurative realism in the atelier of Nera Simi in Florence. She holds an MFA in painting from Bennington College. Stella is a professional painter whose work includes portraits, landscapes and still life subjects.

PHYS 13 3D Printer Construction: A Self-Replicating Printer (Same as CSCI 13)

(See under CSCI 13 for full description.)

PHYS 14 Electronics

Electronic instruments are an indispensable part of modern laboratory work throughout the sciences. This course will cover the basics of analog electronic circuits, including transistors and operational amplifiers, and will briefly introduce digital circuits. Students will build and test a variety of circuits chosen to illustrate the kinds of electronic devices and design problems a scientist is apt to encounter. Evaluation will be based on participation, completion of both laboratory work and occasional homework, and the quality of the final project or paper. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 or equivalent calculus. No prior experience with electronics is required. Enrollment limit: 16 Cost to student: $50 for course packet and electronic parts. Meeting time: afternoons, for a mixture of lab, lecture, and discussion, providing ample opportunity for hands-on experience. In the last week, students will design and build a final project, or will write a 10-page paper.
Requirements: final project or 10-page paper.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 104 or equivalent calculus. No prior experience with electronics is required. Enrollment limit: 16. Priority given to seniors first, first-years last.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons.
STRAIT

PHYS 15 The Science of Star Trek (Same as MATH 15)

Comprising eleven motion pictures and five major television series, totaling over 500 hours of film, Star Trek has had a profound impact on pop culture and the scientific imagination. In this Winter Study course, we will board Star Trek as a vehicle towards a critical discussion of science, technology, and their consequences to society. We will boldly question topics such as the nature of reality, the (uni/multi)verse according to quantum theory and general relativity, the origins of consciousness and the possibility and consequences of extraterrestrial and artificial intelligence. We will view select episodes and films from the franchise, discussing their basis in actual science and using them as a prism to understand issues facing us on Earth.
Evaluation: class participation, the completion of two short essays (3 to 4 pages) and a final project, and the Kobayashi Maru test.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25. Selection based on a small assignment and/or conversations with the instructors.
Additional: No prerequisites, course costs at most $15, enrollment limit: 25
Meeting time: Three two-hour meetings each week, time and place TBD.
For more details, see: http://web.williams.edu/Mathematics/sjmiller/public_html/1701.

Cost: at most $15.
Meeting time: three two-hour meetings each week, time and place TBD.
STRAUCH and MILLER

PHYS 16 Quantum Mechanics and the Nature of Reality CANCELLED!

PHYS 22 Research Participation

Several members of the department will have student projects available dealing with their own research or that of current senior thesis students. Approximately 35 hours per week of study and actual research participation will be expected from each student.
Students will be required to keep a notebook and write a 5-page paper summarizing their work. Those interested should consult with members of the department as early as possible in the registration period or before to determine details of projects then expected to be available.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: 1 or 2 per project.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: to be arranged with instructor.
TUCKER-SMITH and members of the department

PHYS 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Physics 493, 494.

POLITICAL ECONOMY

POEC 17 Social Entrepreneurship: Innovating in the Social Sector (Same as ECON 17 and LEAD 19)

(See under ECON 17 for full description.)

POEC 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as PSCI 21)

(See under PSCI 21 for full description.)

POEC 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (Same as ECON 22)

(See under ECON 22 for full description.)

POEC 23 Institutional Investment

This course is an internship with the Williams College Investment Office in Boston. This unique opportunity is a structured program designed to give students an overview of endowment and investment management. Through formal training and project work, students will gain a better understanding of how an institutional investment portfolio is managed and how investment managers are selected and monitored. Students will learn about global equities, hedge funds, venture capital, buyouts, commodities, real estate and fixed income. Students are integral members of the Investment Office team and will assist on projects that influence investment and operational decisions. Students will sharpen their professional skills and have the opportunity to meet investment professionals from across the investment industry. The instructors are investment professionals in the Williams College Investment Office.
The work will be based in Boston and will run for four weeks during Winter Study (January 3-January 25). Students are expected to work at the office for a minimum of 32 hours a week (four days/week), complete a set of relevant readings, keep a journal, and write an analytic essay. No prerequisites are required.
To apply for enrollment, please select this course (WS POEC 23) as your first choice when registering for Winter Study. Additionally, please send an email with your resume and a cover letter discussing why you are interested in this course and what you hope to gain from it to: investmentoffice@williams.edu by 11:59 PM ET on Thursday, October 11, 2012. Enrollment limit: 2. If oversubscribed, students will be selected via interviews.
Students are responsible for the cost of food, and incidentals. The Investment Office will provide help in locating low-cost/no-cost housing in the Boston area if needed.
COLLETTE CHILTON, Chief Investment Officer (Co-instructor)
ABIGAIL WATTLEY, Investment Associate (Co-instructor)
ANNA SOYBEL, Investment Analyst (Co-instructor)
SHARA SINGH, Investment Analyst (Co-instructor)

POEC 31 Honors Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Political Economy 493.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

PSCI 10 Occupy Wall Street and Beyond: Activists and Activism CANCELLED!

PSCI 11 Politicization of American History

Politicians today use American history to fit their political agendas such as Tea Partiers who claim their views are the same as those of the Founding Fathers. Also, History text book publishers,for profit, choose material to accommodate political views of school committees in large states. This course will challenge students to sort out historical fact from political fiction to better understand today's political discourse about history. For example: Was America founded as a Christian nation? Were corporations intended to be persons with constitutional rights? Can the president, as commander-in-chief, act above the law? Should America celebrate Columbus? Were political parties part of the Founders governing plan?
Evaluation will be based on classroom participation and a 10-page paper in two parts, one a review of the books "Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything You're American History Teacher Got Wrong" by James W. Loewen and "The Whites of Their Eyes; The Tea Party's Revolution and the Battle over American History" by Jill Lepore. The other part of the paper will be on the student's view of today's political use of American history.
No prerequisites, other than the reading of the two above books either before or during the course. Enrollment limit: 30. Preference given to Political Science majors.
Cost: none, unless a student cannot get these books from the library and must purchase one or both.
Meeting time: afternoons.
ROBERT JAKUBOWICZ (Instructor)
CRANE (Sponsor)

Robert Jakubowicz has extensive experience in politics. One of his interest in writing columns for the Berkshire Eagle and lecturing at local venues like the Osher Lifetime Learning Institute and winter study courses is to debunk the nonsense politicians peddle about American history.

PSCI 12 The Art of War (Same as ASST 12)

This course will examine the meaning and uses of the classical Chinese text, The Art of War, by Sun Tzu. Students will consider Sun Tzu's insights both in the context of ancient Chinese philosophy and in terms of their contemporary relevance. The first half of the course will concentrate on placing Sun Tzu in historical and philosophical context; the second half will examine how The Art of War has been used in a variety of modern fields.
Evaluation will include mandatory class attendance and participation, and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Seniors and juniors will have priority.
Cost to student: price of books.
Meeting time: mornings.
CRANE

PSCI 13 The Political Theology of Bob Marley (same as AFR 13 and REL 13)

(See under AFR 13 for full description.) ROBERTS

PSCI 14 The CIA and the War on Terror: A Scalpel, not a Broadsword (Same as LEAD 14)

This course will trace the evolution of CIA from an organization largely focused, in its early days, on coups and regime change under the Dulles brothers, to its present role in the war on terror. Some of the Agency's signal successes and failures will be examined, and some of its directors will be evaluated. The fluctuating relationship between CIA and the FBI will also be discussed. Stress will be placed on the personal experiences of those who have served in the Agency. One of the final class sessions will focus on how the Agency may be influenced by the November 2012 presidential election.
Requirements: 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 18. Political Science majors and Leadership Studies concentrators receive preference.
Cost: $40.
Meeting time: afternoons.
DONALD GREGG (Instructor)
CRANE (Sponsor)

Gregg served in CIA from 1951-82, worked in the White House from 1979-89, and was US Ambassador to South Korea from 1989-93. He is now chairman emeritus of The Korea Society.

PSCI 15 Justice and Public Policy (Same as LEAD 25)

(See under LEAD 25 for full description.)

PSCI 16 Aikido and the Art of Persuasive Political Speech

Aikido is a Japanese martial tradition that combines the samurai arts of sword and grappling with the philosophical desire to forge a path of harmony in the midst of chaos. As such, it addresses situations of conflict that manifest themselves physically, but also offers insight into how to redirect the energies-social, psychological, or political that might otherwise become conflict in one or another aspect of our lives. As a martial art, Aikido teaches more than simply how to survive; it also teaches us how to physically express our noblest intentions-our compassion-in movements that protect not only ourselves but the attacker as well. Put another way, Aikido is ethical persuasion made physical.
Political oratory seeks to inspire one's dedicated allies, undercut one's committed opponents, and persuade the undecided in a context where, typically, use of force is not an option. Gifted and strategic oratory is therefore the ammunition and armament occupying the nonviolent side of Clausewitz's infamous equivalency ("war is a mere continuation of politics by other means").
The physical training (two hours each morning on mats in Currier Ballroom) will improve each student's strength, balance, posture, and flexibility. Everyone will also learn how to throw their friends across the room. About 25% of training time will be devoted to sword, staff, and dagger techniques.
The academic component of the course will engage with how the physical training resonates with the tactical practices of successful political rhetoric and the strategic thinking that it helps implement. Students will read influential speeches (by Lincoln, Churchill, Roosevelt, Gandhi, King, Reagan, Obama, etc.) and analyze the linguistic (framing), acoustic (cadence, rhythm), narrative, and cultural elements that made them successful. Students will also be responsible for crafting speech text, inspired by the great speeches they've analyzed and their growing understanding of aikido principles, suitable for the Inauguration on January 20th.
By integrating physical and intellectual components, the course seeks to forge in each student a more coherent perspective on how the pursuit and embodiment of harmony can eliminate the conflict that some falsely contend is endemic and inevitable. The course also seeks to provide an opportunity for students to imagine and articulate what full commitment to an integrated and conflict-free life would be like, and for one intensive month, to live it. Additional relevant experiences, such as meditation practice, outdoor misogi, and episodes from West Wing will be an integral part of the course.
Students will be evaluated on the quality of their participation in both physical and intellectual course components, and on the quality of the proposed text they generate, and present, for the upcoming inaugural address.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. If overenrolled, selection will be based on a questionnaire.
Cost: approximately $175 (100 for uniform and wooden training weapons; 35 for books and incidental expenses).
Meeting time: daily, 10 a.m.-noon for aikido training, 2-3 times a week for academic discussions, typically over lunch.
ROBERT KENT '84 (Instructor)
MAHON (Sponsor)

Robert Kent '84 spent 3 years in Kyoto, Japan earning his Sho Dan (first degree black belt), directly after majoring in both Philosophy and Religion at Williams. He currently holds a Yon Dan rank (Fourth degree black belt), having studied since 1991 at Aikido West in Redwood City under Frank Doran Shihan, where he helped run the youth program for 18 years. He is currently President of Aiki Extensions, Inc, a nonprofit that supports programs that bring the strategic insights and practical wisdom of Aikido into non-traditional settings. He is also founding coordinator for The PeaceCamp Initiative (a scholarship program that seeks to use Aikido principles to heal the Israeli/Palestinian conflict a few kids at a time) for which he won Ben & Jerry's 2008 Peace Pioneer Prize. He earned a Masters degree in Philosophy at Claremont Graduate School in 1993, writing his thesis on the Ethics of Authenticity. This will be the seventh time he has offered an Aikido-based Winter Study course.

PSCI 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as POEC 21)

This course is a participant-observation experience in which students work full-time for a governmental or nongovernmental (including voluntary, activist, and grassroots) organization or for a political campaign. Students may find placements in government and nonprofit organizations in which their work involves significant involvement with public issues. Examples include: town government offices; state or federal administrative offices (e.g., environmental agencies, housing authorities); interest groups that lobby government (e.g., ACLU, NRA); nonprofit organizations such as service providers or think tanks (e.g., Habitat for Humanity; Cato Institute); and grassroots, activist or community development organizations (e.g., Greenpeace or neighborhood associations). The instructors will work with each student to arrange a placement; such arrangements must be made in advance of the Winter Term. Students should first make their own contacts with an institution or agency. The instructor and members of the Political Science department are available to help students find placements, if necessary. Each student's fieldwork mentor shall send a confirmation letter to the instructor verifying the placement and describing the nature of the work to be performed by the intern. Students will read a few short articles distributed at the beginning of Winter Term and must agree to keep a journal, maintain weekly contact with the instructor, and write a final paper summarizing and reflecting upon the experience. A group meeting of all students will occur after winter study to discuss the experiences.
Requirements: 90 hours of fieldwork; satisfactory evaluation from the institutional sponsor; 10-page final paper or equivalent; participation in final meeting.
At the time of registration, interested students should send a resume and letter of interest to Paula Consolini.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Selection will be based on a resume and letter of interest
Cost: approximately $15 for readings, student covers transportation costs to and from internship site.
Meeting time: some meetings will take place prior to Winter Study and at the end, as students are off-site in internships during the term.
MELLOW and PAULA CONSOLINI

Paula Consolini is the Coordinator of Experiential Education at Williams.

PSCI 25 Eye Care and Culture on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua

In cooperation with Ray Hooker, President and founder of FADCANIC (the Foundation for the Autonomy and Development of the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua) and optometrists from the New England College of Optometry, we prescribe and dispense reading and distance glasses to people in remote and often impoverished communities. In this, the eleventh iteration of the course, we will return to a number of small villages on the rim of Pearl Lagoon where we have not visited for 6 or 7 years, then head north to Wawashan, the experimental school and from where students spend time in regular demanding high school classes and also learn how to tend their own farm when they graduate. If time and weather permits we may spend the last day of our stay on a trip to the Pearl Keys for a day of relaxation and recuperation after 11 solid days of clinics and travel to widely dispersed and seldom visited communities.
Evaluation will be based on a journal and final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites; not open to first-year students. Enrollment limit: 12. Selection will be based on enthusiasm and preparation.
Cost: approximately $2700.
Meeting time: mornings.
ROBERT PECK (Instructor)
CRANE (Sponsor)

Former Athletic Director of the College, Robert Peck has been doing this trip for ten years.

PSCI 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 493-494.

PSCI 32 Individual Project

To be taken by students registered for Political Science 495 or 496.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 10 The Group Experience

In this course students will learn about group dynamics and their roles in groups through experiential group process. The groups will be facilitated by the instructor and will include didactic and question/answer period following each 1.5 hr group to debrief and integrate the reading material. The experiential aspect of this course has the potential for therapeutic benefit but is NOT a therapy group. As the experiential part of the course is so central, attendance is mandatory at teach 3 hour meeting twice a week.
Requirements: 3-page paper at the beginning of the course and a 5-page paper for the final assignment.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Selection based on seniority.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: mornings.
PAUL GITTERMAN (Instructor)
ZIMMERBERG (Sponsor)

Paul Gitterman holds a Masters Degree from the Smith College School for Social Work and a Masters Degree in Psychoanalytic Developmental Psychology from the University College London and the Anna Freud Center. He is a Certified Group Psychotherapist, an adjunct assistant professor for the Smith College School for Social Work, and has facilitated groups in a variety of human services settings. In addition, Paul provides psychotherapy services for Williams College Psychological Services and has a private practice in Williamstown and Pittsfield, MA.

PSYC 12 Alcohol 101: Examining and Navigating the College Drinking Scene

Seventy-two percent of college students report that they used alcohol at least once within the past 30 days. Where is the line between fun and danger? This course will examine the realities of the role of alcohol in the social lives of college students. Students will engage in active discussions of readings, videos, and myths vs. facts, as well as personal observations and opinions. Class structure will involve 3-hour classes that meet twice weekly. Participants will learn scientific facts about alcohol, including how it gets metabolized in the body differently in men and women, and how to recognize and respond to the signs of alcohol poisoning. Films will include evocative footage and interviews, such as "College Binge Drinking and Sober Reflections." We will hear from emergency personnel about alcohol-related medical emergencies and problem-solve strategies to stay safe when choosing to use alcohol. Statistical data from colleges here in the Northeast will be reviewed, including survey results from the Core Institute and the Harvard School of Public Health Alcohol study.
Requirements: in-class participation and the final presentation of a project aimed at educating peers.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 20. Preference to first-year students.
Cost: $60 for course packet.
Meeting time: afternoons.
KATHRYN NIEMEYER (Instructor)
ZIMMERBERG (Sponsor)

Kathy Niemeyer holds an M.A. in Counseling Psychology from Boston College and is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor with current private practices in Williamstown and Pittsfield. She has worked in Fitchburg State and Stonehill College Counseling Centers and was also the AOD Prevention Program Coordinator at Stonehill. She taught Alcohol and Other Drugs at Boston College and has been a regular guest lecturer at Williams.

PSYC 14 Mindfulness and Psychotherapy

Mindfulness mediation has been increasingly integrated into evidenced-based treatments for psychopathology. This course will provide students with an understanding of current mindfulness-based psychotherapy approaches, including the effectiveness of these approaches as well as their underlying mechanisms of change. Course meetings will include lecture, discussion and mindfulness practice. Outside of class, students will be expected to practice mindfulness on a daily basis and complete short readings, including scientific journal articles. Required field trips will include visits to local centers offering mindfulness-based practice, including mediation and yoga. Students will be expected to complete a ten page paper and lead the class through mindfulness practice.
Requirements: 10-page paper, lead a mindfulness practice.
Prerequisites: Psychology 101. Enrollment limit: 12. Priority given to Psychology majors, seniors, juniors.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: mornings.
STROUD

PSYC 15 Ephquilts: An Introduction to Traditional Quiltmaking

This studio course will lead the student through various piecing, appliqué and quilting styles and techniques, with some non-traditional methods included. Samples will be made of techniques learned, culminating in the completion of a sizeable project of the student's choosing (wall quilt or lap-size quilt). There will be an exhibit of all work (ephquilts), at the end of winter study. "Woven" into the classes will be discussions of the history of quilting, the controversy of "art" quilts vs. "traditional" quilts, machine vs. hand-quilting and the growing quilting market. Reading list: Pieces of the Past by Nancy J. Martin; Stitching Memories: African- American Story Quilts by Eva Ungar Grudin; Sunshine and Shadow: The Amish and Their Quilts by Phyllis Haders; A People and Their Quilts by John Rice Irwin; Treasury of American Quilts by Cyril Nelson and Carter Houck; The Quilt: New Directions for an American Tradition, Nancy Roe, Editor.
Requirements: attendance of all classes (two field trips inc), a love of fabric, design and color, an enthusiasm for handwork, participation in exhibit. Extensive time will be spent outside of class working on assigned projects.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Priority given to seniors, juniors, sophomores and then first-years.
Cost: $250.
Meeting time: afternoons.
DEBRA ROGERS-GILLIG (Instructor)
ZIMMERBERG (Sponsor)

Debra Rogers-Gillig, one of the top quilters in New England, has been quilting for 33 years, and teaching classes and coordinating shows and exhibits for 28 years. She has received numerous prizes and awards from quilt shows in New York and New England and been published in quilt magazines.

PSYC 18 Residential Treatment Internship in the Berkshires

Hillcrest Educational Centers, Inc. (HEC), a leader in the field of residential treatment of children with behavior disorders, is excited to partner with Williams College in creating an internship program that provides Williams students with an opportunity to experience working in the human services field in the area of residential treatment.  This program would expose course participants to the boarding environment at HEC as well as provide them with first-hand experience in working with their clients. All selected students will participate in New Staff Orientation (NSO).  This extensive training includes topics such as: HEC General/Policy Information, Skills for Life Treatment Model, and extensive training in Therapeutic Crisis Intervention. Upon completion of the NSO, students will be assigned to one of the HEC campuses to work in a direct care capacity.  Students will round out their experience by completing a paper on their HEC experience. All selected students must successfully complete a Background Record Check, and pre-employment physical which includes drug testing.
Prerequisites: Must Contact Instructor Prior to Registration gcoleman@williams.edu
Enrollment limit:24
Meeting times: 8-4 p.m., Mon. through Fri.
G. COLEMAN and R. BELAIR (Instructors)
B. ZIMMERBERG (Sponsor)

Instructors: Gina Coleman, Ph.D. '90 gcoleman@williams.edu (Associate Dean & board member at HEC) * Richard Belair (Director of Human Resources at HEC)

PSYC 19 Psychology Internships

Would you like to explore applications of psychology in the "real world?" This course gives students an opportunity to work full time during winter study in a mental health, business, education, law or other setting in which psychological theories and methods are applied to solve problems. Students are responsible for locating their own potential internships whether in the local area, their hometowns, or elsewhere, and are welcome to contact the course instructor for suggestions on how to do this. In any case, all students considering this course must consult with the instructor about the suitability of the internship being considered before the winter study registration period. Please prepare a brief description of the proposed placement, noting its relevance to psychology, and the name and contact information of the agency supervisor. Before Thanksgiving break, the student will provide a letter from the agency supervisor which describes the agency, and the student's role and responsibilities during Winter Study. Enrolled students will meet the instructor before Winter Study to discuss matters relating to ethics and their goals for the course, and after Winter Study to discuss their experiences and reflections.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page minimum final paper summarizing the student's experiences and reflections, a journal kept throughout the experience, and the supervisor's evaluation.
Prerequisites: approval of Professor Heatherington is required. Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost: travel expenses in some cases.
HEATHERINGTON

PSYC 22 Introduction to Research in Psychology

This course provides a research opportunity for students who want to understand how psychologists ask compelling questions and find answers about behavior. Several faculty members, whose subfields include behavioral neuroscience, cognitive psychology, social psychology clinical psychology, developmental psychology, and the psychology of education, will have student projects available. Since projects involve faculty research, interested students must consult with members of the Psychology Department before electing this course. Required Activities: A minimum of 20 hours per week of research participation will be expected of each student.
Evaluation will be based on the quality of research participation, student's lab journal and either an oral presentation or a written 10 page report of the research project.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Enrollment limit: space available in faculty research labs. Selection will be based on evaluation of departmental application and number of faculty available as mentors.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: mornings.
M. SANDSTROM

PSYC 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Psychology 493-494.
CROSBY

RELIGION

REL 11 Love, Ancient and Modern (Same as CLAS 12 and COMP 12)

(See under CLAS 12 for full description.)

REL 12 Yoga, Wellness, and the Art of Fully Thriving

The art and science of yoga invites us into an ongoing conversation of who we are, why we are here and how we manage our energy of mind, body, and heart. Inquire into the rich fabric of your life as you explore:

* The stress reductive effects of breath, yoga, attention, and meditation.

* The power of healthy food and non-dogmatic conscious nutrition.

* Practical tools to align what you think, feel, say and do to live the life you have always wanted.

* The potency of re-inhabiting your physical body with ease and grace.

* The way yoga poses have direct impact on the primary systems of the body including our nerves, heart, lungs, hormones, digestive organs and lymph.

Requirements: class participation, projects, readings, yoga mat and blanket, and a final 5-page reflective paper on the value of course to you.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Selection based on a statement of interest.
Cost: $60.
Meeting time: mornings.
DANNY ARGUETTY (Instructor)
WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Danny Arguetty, M.A., E-RYT, has studied and practiced extensively in the Anusara and Kripalu approach to yoga. He blends a mix of skillful alignment cues, playful postures, and creative vinyasa flows to facilitate a heart-opening journey of conscious inquiry. He is a faculty member at Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health and leads Yoga Teacher Trainings in Southern California and India.

REL 13 The Political Theology of Bob Marley (same as AFR 13 and PSCI 13)

(See under AFR 13 for full description.) ROBERTS

REL 14 Africa, Islam, and the Novel (Same as AFR 14 and HIST 14)

(See under HIST 14 for full description.)

REL 15 American Muslims CANCELLED!

REL 16 Stained Glass Self-Portraits: An Interaction Between Emotion, Expression, Tools and Technique

This hands-on glasspainting course provides insight into the technical aspects of stained glass and explores how materials, medium, tools and technique affect creative expression.
Using self-portraits as a vehicle, students learn how to translate photographs into stained glass through a process of graphic analysis. Visual information from a photograph is `traced' onto vellum using different brushes, quills and other tools. Photocopies of these drawings are then rendered (shaded or modeled) with charcoal using the original photo as a reference.
The vellum drawing is placed under a pane of glass and the image "traced" over with vitreous enamels. The glass is kiln-fired to fix the drawing permanently into the surface of the glass. Using the rendered photocopy as reference, two or more subsequent layers of paint are added and kiln-fired to add texture and shading.
This is an inexact process because you cannot simply copy a drawing from one medium to another. The viscosity of the paint, the intention and emotion of the painter, the tools employed, and the method of application all affect the outcome.
Each student will paint several portraits over the course of Winter Study, using different tools. Technical limitations are specified for some of these in order to frustrate any natural desire to be precise and accurate. This provides personal and visceral insight into how tools, materials and technique can handicap and/or enrich the outcome of a specific intention. These exercises generally produce pleasant surprises as well as frustration, and it's an opportunity to explore how uncomfortable and/or liberating it is to have our `control' button disabled when we're trying to achieve a particular goal.
The curriculum also includes time for individual expression and free choice of subject matter. Students are required to design and paint decorative borders and backgrounds for their portraits.
The role of glasspainting in historic and contemporary stained glass will be covered briefly through video and slide presentations.
Instructional sessions on the use of tools and safe handling of materials are included where necessary.
Exhibition of work on the last day of Winter Study is mandatory.
Evaluation will be based on quality of completed assignments plus 6- to 12-page written paper, and includes an assessment of content, effort, technique and personal expression. Overall attendance, participation in group critiques, and teamwork whilst mounting final exhibition will also be taken into account.
Prerequisites: no previous drawing or painting experience required. Applicants should have an interest in drawing and creativity, reasonably good hand skills, a willingness to visit new artistic territory, and be able to commit to minimum required attendance on the days specified. Enrollment limit: 8. Preference given to seniors.
Cost: $236 covers materials (colored mouth-blown glass, enamels); wood frame for permanent display of stained glass; general art supplies; photocopies/prints; transportation to the studio location in Vermont; lunches at the studio.
Meeting time: instruction and supervised workshop sessions will be held Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 am-4.30 pm in Readsboro, Vermont (25 mins drive from Williams College campus). Attendance is mandatory because the schedule requires mini-deadlines to accommodate multiple kiln firings. Lunch will be provided. Studio facilities will also be available for independent study on Wednesdays from 10 am-4.30 pm or by arrangement.
DEBORA COOMBS (Instructor)
BUELL (Sponsor)

Debora Coombs is a Fellow of the British Society of Master Glass Painters with an MFA from London's Royal College of Art. She has 35 years experience in the design and fabrication of stained glass windows and her work is exhibited and commissioned internationally. http://www.coombscriddle.com.

REL 25 Jerusalem: One City, Two Cultures, Three Faiths, Many Narratives

Students will read Karen Armstrong's JERUSALEM to learn Jewish, Christian, and Muslim orientations of the city. We will read Mark Twain's INNOCENTS ABROAD to learn about the differences between being a "traveler" or a "tourist," and thinking about "expectations" with regard to Jerusalem in particular. Additional articles and videos are available on our GLO site. Seven class sessions will explore the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim perspectives, Pilgrimage and Crusades, Zionism and other claims, and Modern History of the Ottoman, British, and Israeli eras in Jeerusalem.
Requirements: a 10-page reflection paper will give students an opportunity to wrestle with the spinning/conflecting/confusing narratives they will have collected.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Not open to first-year students.
Cost: $3500.
ROBERT SCHERR, Jewish Chaplain for the College (Instructor)
BUELL (Sponsor)

REL 26 Touring Black Religion in the `New' South (Same as AFR 25)

(See under AFR 25 for full description.)

REL 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Religion 493 or 494.

ROMANCE LANGUAGES

FRENCH

RLFR S.P. Sustaining Program for French 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study period. There are five 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

TBA (Teaching Associates)

RLFR 30 Honors Essay

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLFR 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for French 493-494.

ITALIAN

RLIT S.P. Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

NICASTRO

SPANISH

RLSP S.P. Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102

Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

TEACHING ASSOCIATES

RLSP 30 Honors Essay

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLSP 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Spanish 493-494.

RUSSIAN

RUSS S.P. Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102

Required of all students enrolled in Russian 101-102. Three meetings per week, 50 minutes per session. Practice in speaking and comprehension based on material already covered as well as some new vocabulary and constructions. Designed to maintain and enhance what was acquired during fall semester, using new approaches in a relaxed atmosphere. No homework.
Regular attendance and active participation required to earn a "Pass." Open to all.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

TBA

RUSS 16 "Crime and Punishment": the Novel and Its Adaptations (Same as COMP 16)

A masterpiece of nineteenth-century Russian literature, Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment (1866) is a novel that speaks, above all, to the universality of human existence across cultures and generations. For this reason, it remains one of the most "translated" and "translatable" texts in the world canon-not only from one language into another, but also from the language of literature into the language of theater, cinema and other creative media. The main question raised in this seminar will be, how and why do Dostoevsky's characters, plot and ideas contribute to the ever growing variety of such "intersemiotic translations" and adaptations? Discussions will include-though will not be limited to-the following: the role of the city of St. Petersburg in Crime and Punishment in comparison with its adaptations involving a different urban setting; the reception of Dostoevsky's novel across cultures, languages and historical periods (for example, based on book reviews); Crime and Punishment as a "hypertext" of world literature and culture; the role of the social "depths" in writing a work of world literature; the differences between "adaptation," "appropriation" and "rewriting"; etc.
Requirements: class attendance and participation, one presentation (10-15 minutes), a final paper (7-10 pages) or a creative project based on Crime and Punishment (upon approval of the instructor)
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 30. Priority given to Russian and Comparative Literature majors.
Cost: $30-70.
Meeting time: mornings.
KLOTS

RUSS 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as SPEC 25)

Williams has a unique program in the Republic of Georgia, which offers students the opportunity to engage in three-week-long internships in any field. Our students have worked in the Georgian Parliament, helped in humanitarian relief organizations like Save the Children, interned in journalism at The Georgian Times, taught unemployed women computer skills at The Rustavi Project, documented wildlife, studied with a Georgian photographer, done rounds at the Institute of Cardiology, and learned about transitional economies at the Georgian National Bank. In addition to working in their chosen fields, students experience Georgian culture through museum visits, concerts, lectures, meetings with Georgian students, and excursions. Visit the sacred eleventh-century Cathedral of Sveti-tskhoveli and the twentieth-century Stalin Museum, take the ancient Georgian Military Highway to ski in the Caucasus Range, see the birthplace of the wine grape in Kakheti and the region where Jason sought the Golden Fleece. Participants are housed in pairs with English-speaking families in Tbilisi, Georgia's capital city. At the end of the course students will write a 10-page paper assessing their internship experience. Knowledge of Russian or Georgian is not required.
Requirements: 10-page paper.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 8. Not open to first-year students.
Cost: $2100.
CASSIDAY

RUSS 30 Honors Project

May be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RUSS 31 Senior Thesis

To be taken by students registered for Russian 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY-See under ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

THEATRE

THEA 12 Shakespeare in Film (Same as ENGL 22)

The greatest English language playwright composed his dramas for a remarkably spare and simple theatrical setting. Yet that same playwright is undoubtedly the one whose work has spawned more film productions and adaptations than any other in history. (Wikipedia lists over 410 full-length film and TV versions of his works.) How do we reconcile Shakespeare's minimalist Elizabethan theatrical vision with his explosion onto the high-tech screens of the 20th and 21st centuries? What happens when the "unworthy scaffold" of the Globe Theater's "wooden O" morphs into wide angles, cross cuts, live action, and even digital animation. This Winter Study course will investigate these questions through reading and then viewing film versions of a selection of Shakespeare's major plays. Classes will involve discussion, viewing, eating popcorn, and bridging the aesthetic gap of 400 years. Participants will each present a short presentation on a selected film, and engage in a final imaginative exercise detailing the filmic possibilities of his or her own hypothetical Shakespearean adaptation.
Requirements: final presentation with written, visual, and audio components.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference give to active or prospective Theatre and English majors.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: mornings.
BAKER-WHITE

THEA 13 The Art of Producing (Same as ENGL 13)

(See under ENGL 13 for full description.)

THEA 16 What's Playing on the New York Stage and Why

The course will look at the theatre seasons for selected Regional Theatres in the United States, and abroad, and travel at least twice during the Winter Study period to see theatre productions in New York City.
Requirements: a "Theatre Critic's review" of all plays we will have seen in New York. And a presentation to the class about a regional theatre season.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Selection based on past theatre experiences and theatre-going.
Cost: $100.
Meeting time: afternoons.
EPPEL

THEA 17 Cabaret: Creation and Performance (Same as MUS 17)

This studio class will be dedicated to the creation and performance of original cabaret performance. Students will develop skills in song writing, staging, character development, performance and the use of the emotional voice through the creation of their own short cabaret performances individually or in small groups. The official class meetings (6 hours/week in the Studio) will have to be supported by a substantial commitment to collaborative work and rehearsal.
Requirements: final performance
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference given to Theatre and Music majors.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: Tuesday/Thursday afternoons.
ABIGAIL BENGSON and SHAUN BENGSON (Instructor)
EPPEL (Sponsor)

The Bengsons are internationally renowned performers, activists, and teachers, known for developing their own unique brand of performance dubbed Vaudevillian Indie Folk.

THEA 32 Senior Honors Thesis

See description of Degree with Honors in Theatre.

WOMEN'S, GENDER and SEXUALITY STUDIES

WGSS 13 Virtual Communities: Ethno-Racial Identity, Gender, and Class Online (Same as AMST 13 and LATS 13) CANCELLED!

(See under LATS 13 for full description.)

WGSS 25 Computer Trainings for HIV Positive Youth in Rural Uganda

In this fourth decade of the global AIDS pandemic, and with increasing global availability of treatment, we are now facing a new phenomenon: a generation of youth who were born and have grown up with the virus in their bodies. Now in their teens and twenties, these youth have become, or are becoming sexually active and often want to have children of their own. They are crucial actors in the future of the pandemic, whether it will become more deeply entrenched in intergenerational cycles of stigma, poverty and inequality or communities will be able to lift themselves out of those spirals. When supported and mobilized they make extraordinary activists. Yet many of these positive youth find themselves isolated and stigmatized, unable to disclose their status to friends, colleagues or teachers, or find support from other youth in similar situations.
Among African countries Uganda is at the forefront of these issues. The country was hit early and hard by the epidemic, with the prevalence rate peaking in 1991 at around 15% of all adults, and 30% of urban pregnant women. Civil society and government mobilized in response, and Uganda continues to be a model of active engagement, although not without serious problems. Uganda presents such a successful experience of mobilizing HIV positive youth that the leaders of this process are now being asked to promote such mobilization in other African countries, but at the same time there are still areas of Uganda with little or no support or activism among youth. We propose to exploit this disjuncture to create a pilot project in Southwest Uganda, working alongside positive Ugandan youth from the capital, Kampala, to build the capacity of a fledgling support group for positive youth in the community around Kisoro, a town close to the borders with Rwanda and the DRC.
This WSP project will build on Honderich's experience taking a group from Bennington College to Kisoro in January/February of 2012. That group first trained HIV positive youth in Kampala to make and edit videos, then brought them to Kisoro to train positive youth in that town. While the trainings were very successful in creating video trainers among the Kampala activists, we found that the situation in Kisoro was so difficult that more basic strategies were needed. Positive youth there are heavily stigmatized, isolated, and silenced, feeling unable to reveal their status, and unable to find support in one another. The economy of the area is challenging for any youth, with very high population density resulting in fragmentation and concentration of land ownership, and flows of refugees through a nearby UNHCR camp producing instability and economic distortions. For positive youth these difficulties can be attenuated, with some relatives feeling reluctant to `waste' school fees on them, and employers also being wary. The formation of a stable support group is difficult when members lack the resources to pay for transport into town for meetings, and need help to meet their basic needs - food, school fees, and clothing. During our video training we found that only 1 of the 8 young trainees had ever sat in front of a computer before, but that they were thrilled and excited to have the chance to learn computer skills, and that particularly the youngest (teenage) members of the group picked things up extremely quickly.
Our proposal, then, is to return to Uganda in January 2013 with a group of 10 Williams students and 10 donated laptop computers. The students will work in pairs to train first Kampala activists and then (working alongside the Kampala activists) Kisoro youth in computer maintenance, repair, and the computer programs that have been judged most useful to the capacity of their group to do outreach and sensitization in their community, begin to generate income, and build the skills and education of individual members. The Kampala activists are a very important component of this work: first, by training them to become trainers themselves we leave the networks with the capacity to multiply these trainings after our departure. And second, the activists are a vital resource for the Kisoro youth in their experience of living positively and openly with HIV and mentorship on issues such as disclosure, treatment adherence, and activism.
Kisoro displays the common pattern that on the one hand, the membership of such groups as exist for HIV+ youth or adults is heavily tilted towards girls and women, but on the other hand computer skills and assets are more often gendered male. The fact that the training would push against this pattern in both directions seems an important benefit. The District Office in Kisoro has promised to give the group an office that would be a secure space to leave the computers and a meeting place to continue with trainings, meetings and income-generating activities.
Our Ugandan partners will be two networks based in Kampala, the Global Coalition of Woman against AIDS in Uganda (GCOWAU) and the Ugandan Network of Young People with AIDS (UNYPA). Both of these networks are dynamic nationwide networks that work to empower, do advocacy, and build the capacity of small grassroots organizations across Uganda. Honderich has worked with them both for more than five years, on projects including video trainings, a care labor training, and a 2009 summer fieldwork project pairing 5 Williams students with 5 students from Makerere University. The national coordinators of both networks, Flavia Kyomukama and Paddy Masembe, are very enthusiastic about this computer project and optimistic that this will be the first step in building something larger and longer term. In the long term, we are particularly interested in how best to convert this seed training into marketable skills, perhaps as a group enterprise, and to explore opportunities for outside financing to finance a larger initiative.
Ashok Rai has worked on income-generation and microfinance in Western Kenya (and other development contexts). Kiaran Honderich has taken several travel WSP classes to Senegal, Tanzania and Uganda to do capacity building work with grassroots activists.
Enrollment limit: 10. Not open to first-year students.
Cost: $3570.
HONDERICH and MORGAN-LEAMON

WGSS 30 Honors Project

To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

SPECIALS

SPEC 10 Teach Public Speaking (Same as COMP 14)

(See under COMP 14 for full description.)

SPEC 11 Science for Kids (Same as CHEM 11) CANCELLED!

(See under CHEM 11 for full description.)

SPEC 12 Introductory Photography: People and Places (Same as MATH 14)

(See under MATH 14 for full description.)

SPEC 13 What Was Monet Thinking?-Understanding Art, for Non-Art Majors (Same as CHEM 13)

(See under CHEM 13 for full description.)

SPEC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as CHEM 14)

(See under CHEM 14 for full description.)

SPEC 15 Contemporary American Songwriter (Same as AMST 15)

This course will focus on learning how to write and perform songs in a contemporary style. Topics addressed will include song structure, how to create a lyric that
communicates, vocal and instrument presentation, recording and performing techniques, publicity for events, and today's music industry. This class will culminate in a public performance of material written during the course. To successfully pass this course, students are required to create, edit, perform, and possibly
record two original songs. These songs must be conceived during the course period (previously written material in not usable). Students will be guided to create
both music and lyrics. They may also be required to participate in a co-write session. One of these songs will be presented during the final performance, preferably by the student. Attendance at classes, feedback sessions, and final presentation is mandatory. Please note: this class meets every day. A short writing assignment will be passed in on the last day of class.
No prerequisites. Students with a musical background and the ability to play an instrument may be given preference, but anyone interested is encouraged to
register. (Bernice.Lewis@wililams.edu). Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: books plus $35 lab fee for recording and xeroxing costs.
Meeting time: M, Tu, W, Th, F 10 a.m.-noon.
BERNICE LEWIS (Instructor)
WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Bernice Lewis is an accomplished singer, songwriter, producer and educator. She has been a national touring artist for over twenty years and has performed
at the Kerrville Folk Festival, PBS's Mountain Stage, and the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. She was recently chosen by the National Park Service
to be an Artist in Residence. She has released six recordings of original material.

SPEC 16 Peer Support Training

Are you the person your friends seek out for support? Are you currently serving other students directly in an advising or counseling role? Good listening and communication skills are vital for students interested in these roles and in the helping professions, in particular. This course will help you improve your listening and relational skills, assist others with social, academic and personal relationships, facilitate decision-making without imposing your own values, and assess risk. You will learn how to communicate about sensitive issues, develop your identity in the helping role, and consider various other parameters such as personal limits and how/when to refer. This is an experiential training augmented by relevant readings and out-of-class assignments designed to deepen your understanding and practice of communication and helping skills. We will hold 2 3-hour afternoon sessions each week.
Evaluation is based on attendance, class participation, and a 10-page paper composed of journal entries and a summary response to your experience and learning in the course.
Prerequisites: you MUST be able to attend the first class meeting in order to take in the class. Enrollment limit: 18. Selection based on a case by case evaluation.
Cost: 0.
Meeting time: afternoons.
KAREN THEILING, LMHC (Instructor)
WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Karen Theiling is a psychotherapist at Williams College Psychological Counseling Services and a licensed mental health counselor in private practice in Northampton, MA. She has led a variety of psychosocial, educational and mindfulness groups at Williams and in the Pioneer Valley of Massachusetts.


SPEC 17 Coming Down from the High: 12 Step Recovery and Counseling

This course will explore the history and culture of the 12 Step Recovery Movement as well as diagnostic rubrics and methods of counseling/interventions that are commonly used at clinics and Employee Assistance Programs throughout the world. Students will read the text Slaying the Dragon, a variety of texts published by different 12 Step groups and watch movies such as Days of Wine and Roses, My Name is Bill, Clean and Sober, and When Love is not Enough: The Lois Wilson Story. Guest speakers will come to class and report on their personal experiences in recovery. Students will report on their impressions of at least three different 12 Step meetings that they will attend during the month of January, do some fieldwork, and take short quizzes. There will be a final research paper (5-7 pages) on a topic chosen by the student. This class is designed to help familiarize students with the disease model of addiction and help them act proactively when encountering addiction and the problems that can come from the disease(s) in personal, social, or professional contexts.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 25.
Cost: approximately $50 for books and course packet.
Meeting time: Monday and Wednesday 7:00-9:40 p.m.
RICK BERGER (Instructor)
WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Rick Berger earned his M.A. in 2009 from Hazelden Graduate School of Addiction Studies.

SPEC 18 The Evolution of Sportswriting: From Grantland Rice to Grantland.com

Students will study the art and craft of sportswriting across a timeline that begins in the early 20th century, when the likes of Grantland Rice penned reverential, poetic newspaper paens from the distance and comfort of the press box; to the latter half of the century, when sportswriters pulled back the curtain on athletes and institutions with aggressive reporting, detail-driven longform features and investigations; and to the current day blogosphere, where the internet has created a new chapter of sports journalism that is heavy on snark and statistical analysis, where many writers (in some ways, much like Grantland Rice) make no attempt to interact with their subjects and yet where writing has never been better. And worse. And where social media (most pointedly, Twitter) has become the strongest driving and disseminating force behind sportswriting.
Class time will consist of two three-hour sessions per week and will be utilized to 1) Examine and discuss the works of notable writers like Grantland Rice, Damon Runyon, Red Smith, W.C. Heinz, Dan Jenkins, The ``Chipmunks'' of New York writing in the 1960s, Jim Murray, Frank Deford, Gary Smith, Leigh Montville, Rick Reilly Peter King, Charles P. Pierce, Bill Simmons and many others (including the instructor); and 2) Practice writing pieces utilizing the various forms of sportswriting studied.
Students will be asked to follow and read daily a variety of websites, including the New York Times, ESPN, Sports Illustrated, Grantland and a changing list of others that will include suggestions from students. Sites will be studied during class time, as well as outside class. Students should bring laptops to class.
Requirements: a final 10-page paper, constructed as a piece of sportswriting in one of the forms studied, as agreed upon by instructor and student. Class time may be utilized to organize and hone the project.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15. Preference will be given to students who have shown an interest in sports journalism.
Cost: $20 (for one-month subscription to the New York Times.
Meeting time: mornings; two three-hour sessions per week.
TIM LAYDEN (Instructor)
FARLEY (Sponsor)

Tim Layden `78 has been a senior writer at Sports Illustrated and SI.com for the last 19 years, and a professional sports journalist for more than three decades. He has covered multiple Super Bowls, Olympic Games and Final Fours and written more than 100 cover stories for SI on some of the most significant athletes and issues in modern sports.

SPEC 19 Medical Apprenticeship

Firsthand experience is a critical component of the decision to enter the health professions. Through this apprenticeship, students can clarify their understanding of the rewards and challenges that accompany the practice of all types of medicine. Apprenticeships are arranged in two distinct ways: some students live on campus and are matched with a local practitioner, while others make independent arrangements to shadow a distant professional. The expectation is that each student will observe some aspect of medicine for the better part of the day, five days per week. In recent years, students have shadowed physicians, veterinarians, dentists, nurses, and public health experts.
A 5-page reflective paper is required, as is attendance (for those shadowing near campus) at three Tuesday evening programs. Students will meet from 6:30-8:30 p.m. over dinner to hear from invited speakers from the medical community as a stimulus to discussion about their apprenticeship experiences.
Prerequisites: Interested students must attend an information meeting in early October. Local enrollment is limited by the number of available practitioners. Preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the health professions.
Cost: local apprenticeships: required vaccinations, local transportation and possibly lunches. Distant apprenticeships: costs will vary based upon location.
TEACHING ASSOCIATES (Instructors): STEVEN ANISMAN, M.D.; DAVID ARMET. P.T.; CHILDSY ART, M.D.; DEBORAH AUGUST, M.D.; VICTORIA CAVALLI, M.D.; JONATHAN CLUETT, M.D.; LEE DELANEY, D.V.M.; MARIANNE DEMARCO, M.D.; MICHAEL DISIENA. D.O..; PAUL DONOVAN, D.O.; SIMON DREW, M.D.; STUART DUBUFF, M.D.; WILLIAM DUKE, M.D.; ROBERT FANELLI, M.D.; WADE GEBERA, M.D.; DAVID GORSON, M.D.; ALISON HASTINGS, D.O..; DEBORAH HENLEY, M.D.; ERIC HOLMGREN, D..D.S./M.D.; JUDITH HOLMGREN, M.D.; ORION HOWARD, M.D.; LAURA JONES, D.V.M.; JOSHUA KLEEDERMAN, D.M.D.; WILLIAM KOBER, M.D.; JONATHAN KRANT, M.D.; WILLIAM LEVY, M.D.; REBECCA MATTSON, D.V.M.; MARK MCDERMOTT, M.D.; RONALD MENSH, M.D.; GRAHAM MOORE, M.D.; BORIS MURILLO, M.D.; CHARLES O'NEILL, M.D.; JUDY ORTON, M.D.; DANIEL PERREGAUX, M.D.; FERNANDO PONCE, M.D.; RICHARD PROVENZANO, M.D.; DANIEL ROBBINS, M.D.; OSCAR RODRIGUEZ, M.D.; SCOTT ROGGE, M.D.; PAUL ROSENTHAL, M.D.; ROBERT SILLS, M.D.; THEMARGE SMALL, M.D.; ANTHONY SMEGLIN, M.D.; ANNE MARIE SWANN, M.D.; ELIZABETH TOOMAJIAN, N.P.; SPYRIDON TRIANTOS, M.D.; ELIZABETH WARNER, M.D.; ELIZABETH WHATLEY, M.D.; JAMES WHITTUM, M.D.; KATIE WOLFGANG, D.V.M.; NICHOLAS WRIGHT, M.D.; JEFFREY YUCHT, M.D.; MARK ZIMPFER, M.D.; and others.

JANE CARY Health Professions Advisor

SPEC 20 Student Leadership Development

As students move through their time in college, many will opt to take on roles of leadership in their community. This desire to be engaged and involved leads to the development of life skills and abilities that become highly desirable traits post-graduation. Student Leadership Development is focused on assisting students in developing a new understanding of the involvement and activities they already do/plan to participate in as students and as a leaders in their groups, college, community, and world. Additionally, this course will supply student development theories, and best practices through case study analysis and class discussion. Topics of focus will include the social change model, identifying your own leadership style, ethical leadership, community building strategies, communication tactics, working with constructive feedback, personal assessment, developing purposeful programming, transferrable skill set development and expression, professionalism, servant leadership, and finding balance. Through the duration of the course, students will engage in ongoing dialogue as a whole class, and will also have the opportunity to create and share a small group presentation connected to one of the topics of focus as related to a selected case study. Students will leave the course having an intimate awareness of their own leadership skills, the skills of their peers, and the research and depth of development that goes along with the day-to-day interactions that culminate into their experience as student leaders and eventually engaged citizens and community builders.
Requirements: Students will be evaluated via 2 papers (total of 10 pages combined), involvement in class discussion and activities, and a small group presentation.
No prerequisites: Enrollment limit: 20. Preference given to first-years and sophomores.
Cost: approximately $50 for books and photocopies.
Meeting time: Monday, Tuesday for 3 hours each, plus 1 hour each week for planned small group work.
BENJAMIN LAMB and PATRICIA LEAHEY-HAYS (Instructors)
WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Benjamin Lamb is the Assistant Director for Student Involvement in the Office of Student Life at Williams, Ben has worked in higher education for the last 4 years, specializing in student leadership and involvement, but also has experience in Career Services, Admissions, College Access, Community Service and Residence Life.

Patricia Leahey-Hays is the Assistant Director for Upperclass Residential Programs in the Office of Student Life at Williams has worked in the field higher education since 2003 in the areas of Residential Life and Education as well as the Co-operative Educational Experience, Professional Development and Business Ethics. Prior to 2003 Patricia worked at The White House under the Clinton Administration and in the Government Relations office of the accounting firm, Arthur Anderson, during the Enron financial crisis.

SPEC 21 Experience the Workplace: an Internship with Williams Alumni/Parents

Field experience is a critical element in the decision to enter a profession. Through this internship, students can clarify their understanding of the rewards and challenges that accompany the practice of many different aspects within a profession, and understand the psychology of the workplace. Internship placements are arranged through the Career Center, with selected alumni and parent acting as on-site teaching associates. The expectation is that each student will observe some aspect of the profession for the better part of the day, five days per week. It is also expected that the teaching associate will assign a specific project to be completed within the three-to-four week duration of the course depending upon appropriateness.
Intellectual Merit: Participation in this winter study will require the student to quickly assess the work environment, make inferences about corporate culture, performance norms and expectations, and to take initiative not only to learn from this experience, but also to contribute where and when appropriate. Understanding the dynamics within a work environment is critical to success in any organization and this hands-on experience will illuminate lessons learned in the classroom. Upon completion of the winter study, it is expected that the student write a thorough report evaluating and interpreting the experience.
Requirements: It is expected that students will complete assigned readings, keep a daily journal, and write a 5- to 10-page expository review and evaluation that will become public record as a resource for other students. Required activities and meeting times: The expectation is that each student will be in the field to observe some aspect of the profession for the better part of the day, five days per week. In addition to observation there may be an opportunity to work on distinct projects generated by the instructor depending upon appropriateness.
Prerequisites: interested students must attend an information meeting in early October, and meet individually with John Noble to go over the details of their placements. Enrollment is limited by the number of available teaching associates (instructors). Preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the profession of interest. Preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the profession of interest. Teaching associates will make the final selections.
Meeting times: each student will be in the field to observe some aspect of the profession five days per week, at least 6 hours per day.
Cost: local apprenticeships-local transportation.
Distant apprenticeships-costs will vary based upon location, BUT ARE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT. The college has no extraordinary funding to support the internship.
Teaching Associates (Instructors): Williams College alumni and parents of current Williams students will be recruited to become instructors for this course. A broad range of professions will be represented as the course develops. Alumni and parents will receive individual orientations with the course director in person or via telephone conference.
JOHN NOBLE, Director of the Career Center (Sponsor)

If students arrange internships with alumni/parents on their own, they may petition the course director to be included in the course. Deadline for such request is November 16th.

SPEC 23 Literary Journalism in Practice

What are the best methods we can borrow from long-form journalism masters to tell a story? In this course, we'll explore ways to tell a story in depth, thinking about techniques from fiction, academic disciplines, and the arts. Classwork will include a number of brief assignments to focus on specific elements-ways to physically describe something, overhearing and transcribing dialogue, conducting interviews, and finding the right tone of voice. During our meetings, we'll read and critique each other's work to consider what works. We'll include regular readings from masters of nonfiction-ranging from early and overlooked pioneers like Mark Twain and Jack London, through popular writers like Tom Wolfe, Hunter S. Thompson, and David Foster Wallace.
Requirements: the final piece will be a minimum 10-page profile of a person or institution around campus that will go through several revisions.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 10. Preference for students with a demonstrated interest in a career in journalism or a related field.
Cost: $75.
Meeting time: afternoons.
CHRISTOPHER MARCISZ (Instructor)
WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Christopher Marcisz is a freelance writer and editor based in Williamstown whose work has appeared in places like The Boston Globe, The International Herald Tribune, and the Moscow News. For many years he was a reporter for the Berkshire Eagle, where he wrote arts and cultural features and editorials. He now works as a book editor.


SPEC 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as RUSS 25)

(See under RUSS 25 for full description.)

SPEC 26 Teaching, Doctoring and Living With Refugees and Immigrants (Same as AMST 26 and HIST 26)

Without getting on an airplane, you can have an international experience that gives you the chance to truly live and reflect upon critical issues in your Williams courses such as national identity, migration, immigration, human rights, the state of our public schools and health care facilities, and ultimately your own identity. Sponsored by the Gaudino Scholar and Gaudino Fund since 2008, this Winter Study course will allow a small group of students to have a relatively low-cost (compared to abroad trips) but rich and rewarding international experience in the U.S. Portland, Maine, a refugee resettlement city for over 30 years, with only 65,000 people has over 60 languages spoken by students in its schools, and residents from over 80 countries all over the world. Inspired by the transformative Williams-at-Home program, each student will live with a refugee or immigrant host family, and work either as a teacher or medical apprentice. Most students will work in one of the Portland school or adult education classrooms with students whose families are new to America. The Williams student will gain practical experience as a teacher, tutor, and mentor in multiple classrooms with many diverse students. Students will also have a chance to talk with senior teachers and administrators about the challenges facing 21st century American schools in an increasingly diverse society and global economy. There will also be an opportunity for a student or two seeking medical or public health experience to shadow doctors and nurses in the Portland community clinic with low income residents, including refugees who were tortured.
Students will learn a great deal not only about others, but also about their own assumptions and values. In December students will receive articles and orientation materials to prepare for their experience, and must write a 5-page reflective essay due on arrival in Maine on how forces like ethnicity, national identity, race, and class have impacted them personally up to now. Each student must also keep a journal during the program and at the end turn in a 5-page reflective essay addressing how her or his impressions, assumptions, or values were challenged or changed concerning those topics addressed in the opening essay. We will meet weekly to share insights and challenges, and also share a host families-student pot luck.
Prerequisites. Open only to sophomores, junior and seniors. Information sessions will be held on campus approx. September 20-21. Enrollment limit: 6 (A car is not required; but if a car/s are brought, the instructor may accept more than 6).
Cost: $625 ($25/day) for room and board to host families, plus travel to and from Portland. Students on Financial Aid will receive Gaudino funding as determined by the Financial Aid office.
JEFF THALER `74 (Instructor)
WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Jeff Thaler '74 participated in Williams-at-Home with Professor Robert Gaudino in 1971-72. After Professor Gaudino's death in 1974, Jeff and some other alumni developed an initiative that eventually became the Gaudino Memorial Fund. Jeff served on the Board of the Fund for many years, including as its Chair; in 2010 he was elected to come back onto the Board,and now is Vice-Chair. Jeff graduated from Yale Law School in 1977, worked as a public defender in New York City from 1977-79, and has lived in Maine since 1979, where he has works as a trial and environmental attorney. He taught a course on refugee issues as an adjunct professor at the University of Southern Maine, as well as courses at Maine Law School and Bowdoin College. Jeff has volunteered with many refugee groups in Portland; was elected in 2009 to the Williams College Tyng Scholarship Committee; and has worked as a group facilitator for the past ten years at the Center for Grieving Children.

SPEC 28 Class of 1959 Teach NYC Urban Education Program

Students in this course learn about the front-line challenges of urban public education by working in one of New York City's public schools. Participants will be expected to pursue a full day's program of observing, teaching, tutoring and mentoring in their choice of more than 20 different school situations from elementary through high school. Each of the participating schools will have a resident supervisor who will meet with the January interns to arrange individual schedules and provide mentoring during the month. There will be weekly seminar meetings of all the interns who are expected to participate in group discussions, keep a journal and write a 5 page paper reflecting upon their experience. The course will conduct orientation meetings with students prior to January, matching each student's interest with appropriate teaching subject areas and a host school. Dormitory-style housing will be provided along with some assistance with transportation and food costs-estimated at $400 for the term. Further assistance is available for financial aid students.
Evaluation will be based on a journal and a 5-page paper.
Prerequisites: sophomore, junior or senior standing. Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost: $400.
Meeting time: off-campus fieldwork: daily 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. and weekly seminar dinners.
TRACY FINNEGAN (Instructor)
WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Tracy Finnegan is a master's level teacher with training and teaching experience in a variety of approaches and settings.

SPEC 35 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel

Each class will begin with a lecture-demonstration, followed by practice on the potter's wheel. Each student will have the use of a potter's wheel for every class. Pottery making classes will be held in the mornings, 9 AM to 12:15 PM, at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery in Pownal, Vermont. We will work on mugs, bowls, pitchers, plates, jars, lids, vases, and bottles, and will finish these shapes as required by trimming and adding handles, lugs, lids, spouts, and knobs. We will also work on several different handbuilding projects. Early in the Winter Study Session there will be a 1.5-hour slide presentation held one afternoon at a location on Campus. One written paper exploring the work of a contemporary ceramic artist will be required as part of the course. After the tenth pottery making class meeting, all completed work will be biscuit-fired. The eleventh meeting will be devoted to glazing the biscuited pieces. Glazing techniques will include pouring, dipping, layering, brushing, and stamping, and using wax resist and other masking techniques to develop pattern and design. The completed work will then be glaze-fired. The last meeting, held at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery early in the new Semester, will be devoted to a "final project" (positive-orientation) critique in the studio of your finished work. Woven into lecture-demonstrations will be presentations on various topics relating to the science and history of pottery making. All classes except the slide show take place at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery.
Requirements: attendance at all class sessions and enthusiasm for learning the craft of pottery making.
No prerequisites or potterymaking experience necessary. Enrollment limit: 9.
Cost: $315 lab fee, plus makeup class fees ($48.00 per class) if applicable.
Meeting time: mornings, plus one afternoon slide presentation.
RAY BUB (Instructor)
WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

Ray Bub is a ceramic artist and teacher at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery in Pownal, Vermont, 10 minutes north of the Williams College campus. All classes except the slide show and final project exhibition take place at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery.

SPEC 39 "Composing a Life:" Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams

To be at Williams you have learned to be a successful student, but how do you learn to be successful in life? How will you define success in both your career and in your personal life? How will you achieve balance between the two? In short, what will constitute the "good life" for you? We borrow the concept of "composing a life" from Mary Catherine Bateson, as an apt metaphor for the ongoing process of defining success and balance in life. This course is designed: (1) To offer college students an opportunity to examine and define their beliefs, values, and assumptions about their future personal and professional lives before entering the "real" world; (2) To encourage students to gain a better understanding of how culture, ideology, and opportunity affect their life choices; (3) To provide an opportunity for students to consider different models of success and balance through "living cases" (in the form of guests from various professions and lifestyles); and (4) To aid students in contemplating their life/career options through individual advising and introducing various career and life planning resources. Using selected readings, cases, and guest speakers, we will explore both the public context of the workplace as well as the private context of individuals and their personal relationships in determining life choices. Questions about the course: please contact Michele Moeller Chandler at (413) 458-8106 or michele.chandler2@gmail.com.
Requirements: regular attendance, class participation, field interview, and a 10-page final paper. Weekly assignments include cases and readings from a variety of related fields, and some self-reflection exercises.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: approximately $30 for cases/reading materials.
Meeting time: mornings, 2-hour classes three times a week.
MICHELE MOELLER CHANDLER and CHIP CHANDLER (Instructors)
S. BOLTON (Sponsor)

Michele Moeller Chandler ('73) and Chip Chandler ('72) have taught this Winter Study course for the past sixteen years. They have been both personally and professionally engaged in the course topic. Michele, a former college administrator, has an M.A. from Columbia, and a Ph.D. from Northwestern. Chip, a retired McKinsey senior partner, has an M.B.A. from Harvard, and currently teaches in the Leadership Studies Program.

SPEC 42 International Student Curricular Practical Training (CPT)

International students, in F1 status are allowed under US immigration law, to do any training that domestic students customarily do, with certain limited exceptions (that don't apply to Williams College such as flight training, English Language instruction) and within parameters set forth in regulations. The regulations for Curricular Practical Training (CPT) allow International students to work on campus, work off-campus, engage in summer training, and otherwise do the typical things that college students do as part of their education. The purpose of CPT is to allow international students to gain the same types of educational work experiences that domestic students are required or encouraged to experience such as on campus and summer work. CPT is available to international students after completion of at least one full academic year at the F-1 sponsoring institution and must be within a framework that is "an integral part of an established curriculum." Winter Study CPT allows Williams students to meet the criteria set out by US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and engage in practical training work. Winter Study CPT will earn the international student academic credit. However, Winter Study CPT will not count toward the Winter Study graduation requirement. International students participating in Winter Study CPT must take another Winter Study course to meet their graduation requirement. The course "Winter Study CPT" does not meet the Winter Study graduation requirement.
The method of evaluation for the Winter Study CPT course for F-1 international students will be as follows: The international student will maintain a weekly journal during the practical training experience. Using the journal entries, the international student will write a capstone paper on how it their Curricular Practical Training experience relates to their academic major. The capstone paper must be a minimum of three (3) pages. The international student must also prepare a five (5) minute presentation which will combine oral presentation with another media (e.g., demonstration of skills acquired, photographs of work environment, creative mixed media presentation depicting the experience).
The learning objectives for the course are;
1) Recognize and understand how US institutions work in their chosen field of study,
2) Interpret and apply personal skills and perspectives to be able to contribute to the institution or project,
3) Analyze and evaluate personal experience and critique behaviors that need to be altered to improve success for continued participation in the field of study.
JENIFER HASENFUS and BOLTON (Instructor)
WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE (Sponsor)

 


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