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WINTER STUDY PROGRAM 2014

WINTER STUDY PROGRAM

REMINDERS ABOUT WSP REGISTRATION

All students who will be on campus during the 2013-2014 academic year must register for WSP. Registration will take place in the early part of fall semester. If you are registered for a senior thesis in the fall which must be continued through Winter Study by departmental rules, you will be registered for your Winter Study Project automatically. In every other case, you must complete registration. First-year students are required to participate in a Winter Study that will take place on campus; they are not allowed to do 99's.

Even if you plan to take a 99, or the instructor of your first choice accepts you during the registration period, there are many things that can happen between registration and the beginning of Winter Study to upset your first choice, so you must list five choices. You should try to make one of your choices a project with a larger enrollment, not that it will guarantee you a project, but it will increase your chances.

If you think your time may be restricted in any way (ski meets, interviews, etc.), clear these restrictions with the instructor before signing up for his/her project.

Remember, for cross-listed projects, you should sign up for the subject you want to appear on your record.

For many beginning language courses, you are required to take the WSP Sustaining Program in addition to your regular project. You will be automatically enrolled in this Sustaining Program, so no one should list this as a choice.

The grade of honors is reserved for outstanding or exceptional work. Individual instructors may specify minimum standards for the grade, but normally, fewer than one out of ten students will qualify. A grade of pass means the student has performed satisfactorily. A grade of perfunctory pass signifies that a student's work has been significantly lacking but is just adequate to deserve a pass.

If you have any questions about a project, see the instructor before you register.

Finally, all work for WSP must be completed and submitted to the instructor no later than January 30, 2014. Only the Dean can grant an extension beyond this date.

WINTER STUDY 99'S

Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible to propose "99's," independent projects arranged with faculty sponsors, conducted in lieu of regular Winter Study courses. Perhaps you have encountered an interesting idea in one of your courses which you would like to study in more depth, or you may have an interest not covered in the regular curriculum. In recent years students have undertaken in-depth studies of particular literary works, interned in government offices, assisted in foreign and domestic medical clinics, conducted field work in economics in developing countries, and given performances illustrating the history of American dance. Although some 99's involve travel away from campus, there are many opportunities to pursue intellectual or artistic goals here in Williamstown.

99 forms are available online: http://www.williams.edu/Registrar/winterstudy/99direct.html

The deadline for submitting the proposals to faculty sponsors is September 26, 2013.

AFR 10 The South in Black and White (Same as HIST 10)
AFR 30 Senior Project
AMST 13 The Horse Wrote History (Same as HIST 13)
AMST 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as Special 15)
AMST 18 Sex in the Berkshires (Same as HIST 18 and WGSS 18)
AMST 26 Teaching, Doctoring and Living With Refugees and Immigrants (Same as HIST 26 and SPEC 26)
AMST 30 Senior Honors Project
ANSO 10 Facebook in the Developing World: Boon or Bain?
ANSO 11 Berkshire Farm Internship
ANSO 12 Children and the Courts
ANSO 25 Traditional Silk and Cotton Weaving in Thailand and Laos
ANTH 31 Senior Thesis
SOC 31 Senior Thesis
ARAB 88 S.P. Sustaining Program for Arabic 101-102
ARAB 31 Senior Thesis
ARTH 10 Inventing Joan of Arc: The History of a Hero(ine) in Pictures and Film
ARTH 12 Writing Objects (Same as THEA 12 and WGSS 12)
ARTH 24 Art History and Art Studio Practice in Siena, Italy (Same as ARTS 24)
ARTH 31 Senior Thesis
ARTH 33 Honors Independent Study
ARTS 10 The Art of Abstraction: Chinese Calligraphy (Same as CHIN 10 and JAPN 10)
ARTS 11 Salvaging Words, Objects, and Environments
ARTS 12 Figure Drawing
ARTS 13 How to Be a Medieval Stone Mason
ARTS 14 Observational Drawing From The Natural World (Same as BIOL 10)
ARTS 15 Creating ESOPUS 21 (Same as DANC 15, ENGL 15, and THEA 15)
ARTS 18 Stories and Pictures (Same as ENGL 18)
ARTS 24 Art History and Art Studio Practice in Siena, Italy (Same as ARTH 24)
ARTS 25 Art of Experience in Egypt (Same as INST 25)
ARTS 26 Urban Design for Climate Change (Same as ENVI 26)
ARTS 31 Senior Studio: Independent Project Art Studio
ASST 31 Senior Thesis
CHIN 88 S.P. Sustaining Program for Chinese
CHIN 10 The Art of Abstraction: Chinese Calligraphy (Same as ARTS 10 and JAPN 10)
CHIN 31 Senior Thesis
JAPN 88 S.P. Sustaining Program for Japanese
JAPN 10 The Art of Abstraction: Chinese Calligraphy (Same as ARTS 10 and CHIN 10)
JAPN 11 The Kamikaze in Japanese Film
JAPN 31 Senior Thesis
ASTR 25 Astronomy in the Twenty-First Century: California and Washington (Same as ASPH 25)
ASTR 31 Senior Research
ASPH 25 Astronomy in the Twenty-First Century: California and Washington (Same as ASTR 25)
BIOL 10 Observational Drawing From The Natural World (Same as ARTS 14)
BIOL 11 BioEYES : Teaching Fourth Graders about Zebrafish
BIOL 12 New Orleans-Style Jazz and Street Performance
BIOL 13 Introduction to Animal Tracking
BIOL 21 Science Beyond Williams
BIOL 22 Introduction to Biological Research
BIOL 31 Senior Thesis
CHEM 10 Zymurgy
CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as SPEC 11)
CHEM 12 Tech Entrepreneurship (Same as CSCI 12)
CHEM 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as PSYC 14 and SPEC 14)
CHEM 18 Introduction To Research In Biochemistry
CHEM 20 Introduction To Research In Inorganic Chemistry
CHEM 23 Introduction To Research In Organic Chemistry
CHEM 24 Instroduction To Research In Physical Chemistry
CHEM 31 Senior Research and Thesis
CLAS 10 Rewrites of Homer (Same COMP 10)
CLAS 11 Alexander the Great (Same as HIST 11)
CLAS 12 Greek Myth and the Modern Cinema
CLAS 31 Senior Thesis
COGS 31 Senior Thesis
COMP 10 Rewrites of Homer (Same CLAS 10)
COMP 11 Contemporary Scandinavian Film
COMP 12 Spain in Film: Introduction to Spanish Cinema and Film Analysis (Same as RLSP 12)
COMP 13 Organized Crime in Contemporary Culture (Same as RUSS 13)
COMP 15 By Foot: Walking As Method and Experience (Same as RLFR 15)
COMP 16 The Grand Hotel in Modern Fiction and Film
COMP 17 How To Be a Princess: A Performance Studio Course (Same as THEA 17 and WGSS 17)
COMP 19 Cabinets of Curiosity and Wonder (Same as RLFR 17)
COMP 31 Senior Thesis
CSCI 10 Designing and Building a Desktop Computer
CSCI 11 Introduction to Web Programming
CSCI 12 Tech Entrepreneurship (Same as CHEM 12)
CSCI 13 The Williams Game Jam
CSCI 14 Bots, Malware, and The Underground Economy
CSCI 23 Introduction to Research and Development in Computing
CSCI 31 Senior Honor Thesis
CMAJ 31 Senior Thesis
DANC 10 The MELT Method-The Art of Self Care and Hydrating Your Connective Tissue
DANC 12 Intermediate/Advanced Ballet Tech and Repertory
DANC 15 Creating ESOPUS 21 (Same as ARTS 15, ENGL 15, and THEA 15)
DANC 16 Embodying the Poetry of Gertrude Stein (Same as ENGL 16)
ECON 10 Dollars and Sense in Healthcare
ECON 11 Public Speaking
ECON 12 Introduction to Management of Industrial and Nonprofit Organizations
ECON 13 Reality Checks for Entrepreneurs
ECON 14 Economics of Housing and Community Portrayed in Film
ECON 17 Social Entrepreneurship: Innovating in the Social Sector (Same as LEAD 17 and POEC 17)
ECON 21 Fieldwork in International Development
ECON 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) (Same as POEC 22)
ECON 30 Honors Project
ECON 31 Honors Thesis
ENGL 10 Hamlet
ENGL 11 The Changing Landscape of Journalism (Same as LEAD 11)
ENGL 12 Noir/Neo-noir
ENGL 13 Uncreative Writing
ENGL 14 Infinite Jest
ENGL 15 Creating ESOPUS 21 (Same as ARTS 15, DANC 15 and THEA 15)
ENGL 16 Embodying the Poetry of Gertrude Stein (Same as DANC 16)
ENGL 17 The Winter Naturalist's Journal (Same as ENVI 17)
ENGL 18 Stories and Pictures (Same as ARTS 18)
ENGL 25 Morocco (Same as INST 26 and PHIL 25)
ENGL 30 Honors Project: Specialization Route
ENGL 31 Honors Project: Thesis
ENVI 10 Campus Sustainability: Culture Shift and Personal Behavior Change
ENVI 11 The Winter Woods
ENVI 12 Landscape Photography (Sames as GEOS 12)
ENVI 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Past, Its Uncertain Future (Same as JLST 13)
ENVI 14 Rethinking School: Connecting Education, Environment and Community
ENVI 15 Geology of the National Parks (Same as GEOS 15)
ENVI 16 Shaping an Eco-Activist's LifeAddressing
ENVI 17 The Winter Naturalist's Journal (Same as ENGL 17)
ENVI 26 Urban Design for Climate Change (Same as ARTS 26)
ENVI 27 Snowed-in on a Vermont farm: Understanding Patterns in a Community Through Food (Same as SPEC 27)
ENVI 31 Senior Research and Thesis
GEOS 12 Landscape Photography (Sames as ENVI 12)
GEOS 15 Geology of the National Parks (Same as ENVI 15)
GEOS 31 Senior Thesis
GERM 88 S.P. Sustaining Program for German 101-102
GERM 11 A Taste of Austria (Same as MATH 11)
GERM 30 Honors Project
GERM 31 Senior Thesis
HIST 10 The South in Black and White (Same as AFR 10)
HIST 11 Alexander the Great (Same as CLAS 11)
HIST 12 Soccer and Fever Pitch in the 21st Century
HIST 13 The Horse Wrote History (Same as AMST 13)
HIST 14 The Name of the Rose
HIST 15 Education Reform: Is it Innovation or Destruction? (Same as PSCI 15)
HIST 16 From Pocahontas to Crazy Horse: Realities and Representations of Iconic Native Americans
HIST 17 Eyewitness to the Civil Rights Movement: Mississippi 1964-'65
HIST 18 Sex in the Berkshires (Same as AMST 18 and WGSS 18)
HIST 26 Teaching, Doctoring and Living With Refugees and Immigrants (Same as AMST 26 and SPEC 26)
HIST 31 Senior Thesis
INST 25 Art of Experience in Egypt (Same as ARTS 25)
INST 26 Morocco (Same as ENGL 25 and PHIL 25)
INST 30 Senior Honors Project
JWST 10 Russian Jewish Filmmakers and Writers as Critics of Power
JWST 31 Senior Thesis
JLST 12 The Work of the Supreme Court: A Simulation (Same as SPEC 12)
JLST 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Past, Its Uncertain Future (Same as ENVI 13)
JLST 17 Learning Intervention for Troubled Teens (LIFFT)
LATS 25 The US-Mexico Border (Same as RLSP 25)
LATS 31 Latina/o Honors Thesis Seminar
LEAD 10 Institutional Leadership and Social Responsibility
LEAD 11 The Changing Landscape of Journalism (Same as ENGL 11)
LEAD 12 Three Roosevelt Elections
LEAD 14 The CIA and the War on Terror (Same as PSCI 14)
LEAD 17 Social Entrepreneurship: Innovating in the Social Sector (Same as ECON 17 and POEC 17)
LEAD 18 Wilderness Trip Leadership & Leadership in Wilderness Emergency Care
LEAD 20 Student Leadership Development (Same as SPEC 20)
MATH 10 A Revolution: Physical Mathematics
MATH 11 A Taste of Austria (Same as GERM 11)
MATH 12 The Mathematics of Legos
MATH 13 Calculus Preparation
MATH 14 An Introduction to the Chinese Tea Culture
MATH 30 Senior Project
MATH 31 Senior Thesis
MUS 10 Crime of the Century: The Kennedy Assassination
MUS 11 Tuning and Temperament
MUS 12 The Operas of Giuseppe Verdi
MUS 13 History of American Popular Music
MUS 14 Classic American and European Musical Theatre (Same as THEA 14)
MUS 31 Senior Thesis
NSCI 31 Senior Thesis
PHIL 10 Food for Thought
PHIL 20 Derrida's Greatest Hits (PSCI 20)
PHIL 24 Eye Care and Culture on the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua
PHIL 25 Morocco (Same as ENGL 25 and INST 26)
PHIL 31 Senior Thesis
PHYS 10 Light and Holography
PHYS 12 Drawing as a Learnable Skill
PHYS 13 3D Printer Construction: Beyond the Basics
PHYS 17 The Science of Musical Sound
PHYS 22 Research Participation
PHYS 31 Senior Thesis
POEC 17 Social Entrepreneurship: Innovating in the Social Sector (Same as ECON 17 and LEAD 17)
POEC 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as PSCI 21)
POEC 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (Same as ECON 22)
POEC 23 Institutional Investment
POEC 31 Honors Thesis
PSCI 11 The Great American Novel
PSCI 12 Baseball and Sabermetrics
PSCI 13 Do Political Campaigns Matter?
PSCI 14 The CIA and the War on Terror (Same as LEAD 14)
PSCI 15 Education Reform: Is it Innovation or Destruction? (Same as HIST 15)
PSCI 16 Aikido and the Peaceful Warrior
PSCI 17 American Films of the 1970's
PSCI 18 Infectious Diseases, Public Health Crises and Human Development (Same as PHLH 18)
PSCI 19 Same-Sex Marriage in America (Same as WGSS 19)
PSCI 20 Derrida's Greatest Hits (PHIL 20)
PSCI 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as POEC 21)
PSCI 25 In Collaboration with the Bard Prison Initiative-Going Wild: Nature in the Political Imagination
PSCI 31 Senior Thesis
PSCI 32 Individual Project
PSYC 10 Introduction to Complex Skill Acquisition
PSYC 11 Community Screening for Alzheimer's Disease
PSYC 12 Alcohol 101: Examining and Navigating the College Drinking Scene
PSYC 13 Economic Justice Dialogue
PSYC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as CHEM 14 and SPEC 14)
PSYC 15 Ephquilts: An Introduction to Traditional Quiltmaking
PSYC 18 Residential Treatment Internship in the Berkshires
PSYC 19 Psychology Internships
PSYC 22 Introduction to Research in Psychology
PSYC 31 Senior Thesis
PHLH 18 Infectious Diseases, Public Health Crises and Human Development (Same as PSCI 18)
REL 10 Hearts, Hands, and Minds
REL 12 Yoga, Wellness, and the Art of Fully Thriving
REL 14 Yoga as Integration of Knowledge and Practice
REL 31 Senior Thesis
RLFR 88 S.P. Sustaining Program for French 101-102
RLFR 15 By Foot: Walking As Method and Experience (Same as COMP 15)
RLFR 16 Contemporary Queer Cinema in France (Same as WGSS 16)
RLFR 17 Cabinets of Curiosity and Wonder (Same as COMP 19)
RLFR 30 Honors Essay
RLFR 31 Senior Thesis
RLIT 88 S.P. Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102
RLSP 88 S.P. Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102
RLSP 12 Spain in Film: Introduction to Spanish Cinema and Film Analysis (Same as COMP 12)
RLSP 25 The US-Mexico Border (Same as LATS 25)
RLSP 30 Honors Essay
RLSP 31 Senior Thesis
RUSS 88 S.P. Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102
RUSS 13 Organized Crime in Contemporary Culture (Same as COMP 13)
RUSS 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as SPEC 25)
RUSS 30 Honors Project
RUSS 31 Senior Thesis
THEA 10 Life of Pie
THEA 12 Writing Objects (Same as ARTH 12 and WGSS 12)
THEA 13 Making a Career in Performance
THEA 14 Classic American and European Musical Theatre (Same as MUS 14)
THEA 15 Creating ESOPUS 21 (Same as ARTS 15, DANC 15, and THEA 15)
THEA 16 Creating a Web Series
THEA 17 How To Be a Princess: A Performance Studio Course (Same as WGSS 17 and COMP 17)
THEA 32 Senior Honors Thesis
WGSS 12 Writing Objects (Same as ARTH 12 and THEA 12)
WGSS 16 Contemporary Queer Cinema in France (Same as RLFR 16)
WGSS 17 How To Be a Princess: A Performance Studio Course (Same as COMP 17 and THEA 17)
WGSS 18 Sex in the Berkshires (Same as AMST 18 and HIST 18)
WGSS 19 Same-Sex Marriage in America (Same as PSCI 19)
WGSS 25 Creating Social Enterprises with Marginalized Ugandan Youth
WGSS 30 Honors Project
SPEC 10 Intentional Communities and the American College
SPEC 11 Science for Kids (Same as CHEM 11)
SPEC 12 The Work of the Supreme Court: A Simulation (Same as JLST 12)
SPEC 13 Facing Violent Crime
SPEC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as CHEM 14 and PSYC 14)
SPEC 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as AMST 15 and MUS 15)
SPEC 16 Peer Support Training
SPEC 17 Coming Down from the High: 12 Step Recovery and Counseling
SPEC 19 Medical Apprenticeship
SPEC 20 Student Leadership Development (Same as LEAD 20)
SPEC 21 Experience the Workplace; an Internship with Williams Alumni/Parents
SPEC 24 Community Development Work and Study Project in Liberia, West Africa
SPEC 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as RUSS 25)
SPEC 26 Teaching, Doctoring and Living With Refugees and Immigrants (Same as AMST 26 and HIST 26)
SPEC 27 Snowed-in on a Vermont farm: Understanding Patterns in a Community Through Food (Same as ENVI 27)
SPEC 28 Class of 1959 Teach NYC Urban Education Program
SPEC 35 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel
SPEC 39 "Composing A Life:" Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams
SPEC 42 International Student Curricular Practical Training (CPT)

AFRICANA STUDIES

AFR 10 The South in Black and White (Same as HIST 10)
(See under HIST 10 for full description.)

AFR 30 Senior Project
To be taken by students registered for Africana Studies 491 who are candidates for honors.

AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 13 The Horse Wrote History (Same as HIST 13)
(See under HIST 13 for full description.)

AMST 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as Special 15)
(See under SPEC 15 for full description.)

AMST 18 Sex in the Berkshires (Same as HIST 18 and WGSS 18)
(See under WGSS 18 for full description.)

AMST 26 Teaching, Doctoring and Living With Refugees and Immigrants (Same as HIST 26 and SPEC 26)
(See under SPEC 26 for full description.)

AMST 30 Senior Honors Project
To be taken by students registered for American Studies 491 or 492.

ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

ANSO 10 Facebook in the Developing World: Boon or Bain?
Celebrity-led social media campaigns. Cell phone text donations. Spring break "voluntourism." In the age of new social media, international development has shifted to support these diverse and (some would say) innovative initiatives to mitigate the developing world's woes. But are these initiatives effective? Using Haiti as a case study, this course will look at the human rights and development literature to analyze the recent trends in international development (from student- led volunteering trips and Facebook campaigns to celebrity-led non-profits and twitter donations). Students will then select a development issue of interest and either: critique or defend an already existing initiative that addresses it; or craft an original social media tool (online campaign, civic engagement app, etc.). Students will be evaluated on their final projects (either a final report and presentation for students who choose the first option or a proposal and presentation of the new tool for students who choose the second). Students will be expected to back up their final projects with evidence from a variety of sources (extant literature, primary interviews with stakeholders in the U.S. development community, etc.). We will meet twice a week for three-hour sessions, with extra supervised time scheduled as necessary.
Requirements: final written report and oral presentation.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost: $50 for books.
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructor: NICOLE KREISBERG (nkreisberg@gmail.com)
Sponsor: SCHEVCHENKO

Nicole Kreisberg has her Master's degree in Social Policy from the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration. She has worked in the fields of research, policy analysis, and development in the U.S. and throughout Latin America and the Caribbean.

ANSO 11 Berkshire Farm Internship
An experiential field placement at Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth in Canaan, New York. Berkshire Farm Center is a residential treatment program for adolescent males with traumatic histories impacting their ability to function successfully in their home, school and community environment. The youth have either been remanded by the Family Court System or placed through their School District for treatment and intervention. These youths come primarily from lower socio-economic strata, are very ethnically diverse, and hail from both urban and rural areas throughout New York State. The issues that bring them to placement are mainly a result of the psychological scars developed from physical, emotional, and sexual abuse. The manifested behaviors include chemical dependency, juvenile delinquency, inability to function in the school setting, inability to follow the rules at home, running away and/or mental health issues. The residential treatment model is strength based and focuses on teaching healthy decision making.
Williams students will commute to Berkshire Farm and work under supervision in various settings including school, cottage life, recreation, adventure-based therapy, animal husbandry or individual tutoring. The students are responsible to be proactive in developing their learning experience.
Requirements: students will be responsible to coordinate transportation among their classmates (van licenses to secure a college van is recommended), keep a journal reflecting on their experiences, and a weekly seminar with the instructor will draw on service learning experience. Students will also be required to submit a final 10-page paper at the end of the course or arrange a campus tour with the Berkshire Center youth.
Prerequisites: YOU MUST REVIEW THE WEBSITE AT www.berkshirefarm.org, COMPLETE THE APPLICATION AND SIGN OFF ON AGENCY POLICIES. Questions can be directed to Donelle Hauser at 518-461-2685 or dhauser@berkshirefarm.org.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: $60 to cover transportation to and from Berkshire Farm Center.
Meeting: times to be arranged.
Instructor: DONELLE HAUSER
Sponsor: SCHEVCHENKO

Donelle Hauser, LMSW, Vice President of the Residential Program, Berkshire Farm Center.

ANSO 12 Children and the Courts
This is an interdisciplinary, experiential course taught by a Justice of the Juvenile Court. Students will have the opportunity to observe court proceedings, mainly in the juvenile court, but also in the other trial court departments in Berkshire County. The course involves a weekly journal relevant to what the student has observed during the previous week, a mock trial at the conclusion of the course and a final project of the students choosing. Students are also invited to a weekly dinner at the home of the instructor to discuss issues relating to the course. It is the hope that students will take advantage of the wealth of experience and knowledge that the professionals who work within the juvenile justice system possess and that through these interactions the students will gain an understanding of this part of the judicial branch.
Requirements: final project, mock trial participation and journal entry.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: none.
Meeting time: students come to court with instructor or another attorney.
Instructor: JUDITH LOCKE (dlchenail@roadrunner.com)
Sponsor: SCHEVCHENKO

Honorable Judith A. Locke, Circuit Justice of the Juvenile Court Department, Trial Court of the Commonwealth, 12 year tenure as a judge, 10 year tenure as a staff attorney for DSS, prior experience as both a prosecutor and defense attorney. Teaching this course for many years, recently team teaching with my spouse, David L. Chenail, Esq., local attorney with over 25 years experience.

ANSO 25 Traditional Silk and Cotton Weaving in Thailand and Laos
The trip is designed for about 8 Williams Students to study the craft and cultural meanings of traditional silk and cotton weaving in Thailand and Laos, and to weave their own silk fabric on traditional handlooms under expert supervision in Vientiane.
The Winter Study period and this course begins in Chiang Mai, Thailand on Monday, January 6. This will require that we depart from the US on January 2 in order to begin a one week experience in sericulture, silk dyeing, weaving and its cultural importance in the lives of women with Prof Patricia Cheesman, Chiang Mai University. Prof Cheesman is the author of several well-regarded books and papers on the traditional textiles of SE Asia, and, during the week of January 6 will conduct a hands-on workshop in the production and dyeing of silk and a series of field trips in northern Thailand. There will be time in the evening to assess local silk textile production for the casual tourist in the active Chiang Mai marketplace, as well as selected small shops dealing in antique examples.
Leaving Chiang Mai on or about January 12, we head north toward Chiang Khong, on the Mekong River. There, we will catch the river ferry downstream to Luang Prabang in Laos on January 14 or 15, arriving two days later after an overnight stop in Pak Beng. En route to Chiang Khong, we will stop in Chiang Rai to visit a Williams alum who lives in Thailand, and may be able to provide further access to local collections, especially of cotton weaving. In Luang Prabang, we will see the famous night market, and a sampling of silk and cotton textiles produced for modern uses. We will leave Luang Prabang on, or about January 19 to visit two or three Lao villages on the Vietnam border to see traditional weaving in situ. I am told that traditional textiles are still worn in these villages, where the pace of economic development has been very slow. Our guide will be Ms. Taykeo Sayavongkhamdy, a Laotian woman in the business of making reproduction Lao silk/cotton textiles. Returning to Luang Prabang on January 22, we will fly south to Vientiane.
In Vientiane from January 22-29, students will have access to the looms in Ms. Taykeo's atelier, and, under the supervision of some of her master weavers, can work on their own weavings.
On January 30, the group will fly to Bangkok. Some may wish to stay in Bangkok for a few more days on their own account; others will return directly to the US. Classes begin on February 5. The ticket arrangements will be made accordingly, with students responsible for any charges incurred after the official end of the Course.
Requirements: required reading and 8 packets of key articles will be assembled to carry with us, as well as single copies of 1-3 key books. Student weavings will be available for an exhibition on campus on their return. Students will also be asked to write an up to 10-page paper as an aesthetic critique and structural and cultural description of an old or new Southeast Asian textile (or a tribal group of textiles) they have seen on the trip. The paper will include illustrative digital shots of the textile(s), and, if possible, their surround, e.g., a village, a loom, etc. Since all needed references may not be available in the field, the papers will be due soon after our return to the US.
Prerequsites: none, but all applicants for this course will be interviewed by the leader.
Cost: roughly, about $3,500-$4,000 per student.
Instructor: NICHOLAS WRIGHT '57
Sponsor: SCHEVCHENKO

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Anthropology 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Sociology 493-494.

ARABIC STUDIES

ARAB S.P. Sustaining Program for Arabic 101-102
Students registered for Arabic 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Arabic Sustaining Program.
Prerequisite: Arabic 101.
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation.
Meeting time: mornings, 9:00-9:50.

ARAB 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for ARAB 493-494.

ART

ART HISTORY

ARTH 10 Inventing Joan of Arc: The History of a Hero(ine) in Pictures and Film
Joan of Arc (known during her own lifetime most commonly as Jeanne "la Pucelle," or Joan "the Maid") was one of the most dynamic and yet enigmatic personalities of the European Middle Ages. Born into a peasant family in the French border province of Lorraine in 1412, she gained control of an army, won brilliant military victories, crowned a king, and was burnt at the stake as a heretic, all before her twentieth birthday. Triply marginalized by gender, age, and socio-economic status, she nonetheless managed to shake the Church and State establishments to their very core. But who was Joan of Arc? Nationalist martyr? Pioneer feminist? Champion of the people? Instrument of God's grace? Victim of post-traumatic stress disorder? Over the centuries since her death, artists-and not just politicians and scholars-have attempted to answer this question, creating myriad visions of la Pucelle under the influence of an ever-changing lens of contemporary tastes and concerns. Through readings and discussion, this course will survey the history of representations of Joan of Arc in painting, prints, sculpture, and film, from the time of her death to the present.
Requirements: 10-page paper or comparable creative project.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Method of selection: according to interest level and GPA.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons.
LOW

ARTH 12 Writing Objects (Same as THEA 12 and WGSS 12)
How do we use and value objects? This course examines fiction, memoir, scholarly texts, film, and selected works in the WCMA collection to explore how we animate objects and how they enliven us. It will adopt a modified tutorial format in which half the students write and read aloud a short paper about an assigned work each week and the other half write and read a critique of a paper. Possible texts are Mark Doty, Still Life with Oysters and Lemon (2001), Miranda July, It Chooses You (2011), Edmund de Waal, The Hare with Amber Eyes (2010), Roland Barthes, Camera Lucida (1981) writings by Arjun Appadurai, Bill Brown, and Sherry Turkle, films such as The Red Violin (François Girard, 1998) and Marwencol (Jeff Malmberg, 2010) as well as works by artists such as Ann Hamilton, Patty Chang, and Cindy Sherman. Students will be evaluated on the basis of attendance, class participation, two papers, two written critiques, as well as a revised and expanded version of one of the two papers. Two to four film screenings are required and possibly one or two performance events.
Prerequisites: permission of the instructor based on one-page writing sample about an object of your choice
Enrollment: limited to 10
Selection if overenrolled determined by the writing sample.
Cost: approximately $40 for books.
OCKMAN

ARTH 24 Art History and Art Studio Practice in Siena, Italy (Same as ARTS 24)
This course is a unique, layered exploration of art, based on the intersection of past and present. The phenomenological study of past objects, and exploration of the physical site and the cultural contexts and processes of their creation, will become the foundation, over the duration of the course, for the student's own experience as a working artist today. Living and studying in Siena Italy will provide students with the opportunity, impossible in Williamstown, to experience works from the past while immersing themselves in the culture of the city-both past and present-in which they were created. They will then take these firsthand experiences into the studio. This exploration of art from a double temporal perspective will allow students to ask questions about the past-not simply the past as a storehose of images, but the past as a dynamic site of the production of visual culture that we can still experience, and challenge themselves to explore and understand how such a historical presence and consciousness might translate into their own present day work.
In Siena we will view and study key historic art works, in and around Siena, as well as bring that experience to the studio, and create original artworks in the studio.
Evaluation will be based on one 5 page paper and original art work, each counting 50 percent.
Prerequisites: one art studio and one art history course, or permission of instructor.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Students will be accepted according, first, to prerequiste requirements and, secondly, to written student statements.
Cost: $3735
SOLUM

ARTH 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for ArtH 494. For requirements of entry into the course, please see "The Degree with Honors in Art, Art History" in the catalogue or on the Art Department's webpage.
Enrollment limited to 8.
Students need permission of the department to register for this course.
FILIPCZAK

ARTH 33 Honors Independent Study
To be taken by candidates for honors by the independent study route.

ART STUDIO

ARTS 10 The Art of Abstraction: Chinese Calligraphy (Same as CHIN 10 and JAPN 10)
Beginning in the fourth century, Chinese calligraphy has remained one of the highest art forms in China and in East Asia generally practiced by the literati, or highly erudite scholars. Primarily a studio art course, this will also offer students an opportunity to acquire an understanding of the theoretical and aesthetic principles of Chinese calligraphy. Studio practice allows students to apply theories to creating beautiful writing, or calligraphy (from Greek kallos "beauty" + graphe "writing"). Students will also have an opportunity to investigate contemporary artists whose works are either inspired or influenced by Chinese calligraphy, and those whose works are akin to Chinese calligraphy in their abstraction.
Requirements: class attendance; weekly assignments; class discussion participation; and a final artistic project. An exhibition will be arranged to display students' artworks at the end of WSP. Missing 2 or more classes will result in dismissal from class.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost: $120.
Meeting time: mornings.
JANG

ARTS 11 Salvaging Words, Objects, and Environments
Everyday objects, whether freshly mass-produced plastic Dollar Store combs or rusty tin cans, are routinely utilized by artists as raw material for their artistic explorations. Often this scavaging and reappropriation of objects yields artwork with powerful historical, social, and emotional narratives.
In this class we will scavenge for objects that already exist in the material and natural worlds. Students will collect, evaluate and arrange these materials to explore how this kind of art-making can convey meaning. Students will be encouraged to think about how the arrangement and juxtaposition of objects can affect the viewer.
This course has a multidisciplinary approach that will introduce students to the practices of a variety of sculptors, architects, and performance artists who communicate in this manner. From hair to rubber tires to surplus carpet tiles and taxidermied animals, artists like Sonya Clark, Chakaia Booker, Rural Studio, and Punchdrunk single out objects to reframe how we see the world around us.
We will make a studio visit to a professional artist currently working in this style. There will also be field trips to regional salvage outlets to "pick" for materials. The class will culminate in a public exhibition of individual and group projects.
Outside-of-class work will include viewing films, research, and studio time to complete projects.
Requirements: final project.
Prerequisites: appropriate for students with little or no studio art experience.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost: $100.
Meeting time: mornings; instructors will meet with students once a week, outside of class, to provide guidance and feedback on the development of the final project.
Instructor: ANNE KENNEDY (aannemal@earthlink.net) and TERESE WADDEN (tewadden@yahoo.com)
Sponsor: PODMORE

Anne Kennedy is a costume designer who works on regional and off-Broadway theater productions. She is a regularly visiting artist at the Juilliard School. She studied at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Terese Wadden is a costume designer working in opera, film, and theatre. She is a graduate of the Motley Theatre Design Course in London, UK and Vassar College.

ARTS 12 Figure Drawing
In this course students will develop representational, technical, and expressive skills through studies in drawing from the life model. We will inform our practice in drawing through the study of accomplished figure drawings from the history of western art. Creating your own studies "in the manner of" such drawings, you will learn to develop methods suitable for varied approaches to the human figure. In addition to working directly from the model during class meetings, you will also be expected to develop drawings outside of class times, including copies of drawings, anatomical studies, self portraiture, and working up figure sketches into more developed compositions. In addition to studio work we will allow some time for brief slide lectures and for critique.
Evaluation will be based on the level of achievement in the drawings.
Prerequisites: ARTS 100.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Method of selection: permission of instructor.
Cost: approximately $75 for materials and model fees.
Meeting time: afternoons.
LEVIN

ARTS 13 How to Be a Medieval Stone Mason
Students will learn the rudiments of medieval stone carving from Marcel Müller, a German stone mason who has worked on some of Europe's most important Gothic churches, who will lead them step by step through the making of a Gothic rose window. They will design the window according to Gothic practice, prepare full-scale templates, and then carve the entire window from stone. In the process they will learn something of the physical properties of stone, the use of stone-cutting tools, and the practice of stereotomy (the art of projecting geometrical forms onto three-dimensional solids). Students should be willing to work in the studio a minimum of twenty hours a week. We will spend a day visiting a stone quarry in Vermont and inspecting the building stones used on the Williams College campus.
Requirements: students will be evaluated just as a medieval stone apprentice would: by the care and quality of their workmanship and their effort in the studio.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Preference will be given to students who have taken ARTS 100 and/or courses in medieval art and architecture.
Cost: $150.00.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Instructor: MACRCEL MÜLLER (marcel.muller@skanska.se)
Sponsor: LEWIS

Marcel Müller, from Hannover, Germany, is a trained stone mason with over twenty years experience; he has repaired and recreated medieval carving on Gothic cathedrals throughout Germany and Sweden.

ARTS 14 Observational Drawing From The Natural World (Same as BIOL 10)
(See under BIOL 10 for full description.)

ARTS 15 Creating ESOPUS 21 (Same as DANC 15, ENGL 15, and THEA 15)
(See under ENGL 15 for full description.)

ARTS 18 Stories and Pictures (Same as ENGL 18)
(See under ENGL 18 for full description.)

ARTS 24 Art History and Art Studio Practice in Siena, Italy (Same as ARTH 24)
(See under ARTH 24 for full description.)

ARTS 25 Art of Experience in Egypt (Same as INST 25)
(See under INST 25 for full description.)

ARTS 26 Urban Design for Climate Change (Same as ENVI 26)
Ecological forces have triumphed over man-made efforts to keep our coastal cities dry and safe. New weather patterns will become the norm and it is time to approach urban planning in a different spirit. New Orleans has not been idle in the seven years since Hurricane Katrina, and it is here where the new synthesis of environmental and urban planning is being studied and tested. Here we will learn about and visit wetlands reclamation projects at the macro and micro levels, neighborhood floodways, sponge parks, and housing sites that are using new zoning and building requirements to make houses less vulnerable to weather. Students will learn about the conflicts between private and public interests, short and long term thinking, and environmental versus engineering solutions. We will learn how stewardship of the land and water upon which the city depends can work in harmony with measures to protect the city and withstand the onslaughts of climate change. Students will build upon the knowledge they absorb from the service work, lectures and tours in a final design project in Williamstown. Armed with their new knowledge, as well as lectures and readings on basic urban design strategies, students will work in the Architecture Studio to design their own new neighborhood at the Spruces mobile home park. Working as a team, the class will develop an ecologically sustainable neighborhood built to withstand weather onslaughts.
The class will spend the first two weeks in New Orleans and the third week back on campus. There will be a weekend trip to the Delta region as well as well as some service days working on a Habitat for Humanity project.
Prerequisites: none; appropriate for architecture and planning students, and also a good opportunity for students who are not in either of these programs to learn about planning and design and to get hands-on experience.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Preference to Art or Environmental Studies students, and to those with a demonstrated interest in Urban Planning.
Cost: $1,656.
Instructors: ANN MCCALLUM and SARAH GARDNER

ARTS 31 Senior Studio: Independent Project Art Studio
Independent project to be taken by candidates for honors in Art Studio.
TAKENAGA

ASIAN STUDIES

ASST 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Asian Studies.

CHINESE

CHIN S.P. Sustaining Program for Chinese
Students registered for Chinese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Chinese Sustaining Program.
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation.
Prerequisite: Chinese 101.
Meeting time: MTR 9:00-9:50.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.
LANGUAGE FELLOWS

CHIN 10 The Art of Abstraction: Chinese Calligraphy (Same as ARTS 10 and JAPN 10)
(See under ARTS 10 for full description.)

CHIN 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Chinese.

JAPANESE

JAPN S.P. Sustaining Program for Japanese
Students registered for Japanese 101-102 are required to attend and pass the Japanese Sustaining Program.
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and active participation.
Prerequisite: Japanese 101.
Meeting time: MTR 9:00-9:50.
Cost to student: one Xerox packet.
JINHWA CHANG

JAPN 10 The Art of Abstraction: Chinese Calligraphy (Same as ARTS 10 and CHIN 10)
(See under ARTS 10 for full description.)

JAPN 11 The Kamikaze in Japanese Film
They made their first appearance in the Battle of Leyte Gulf in October 1944 in The Philippines. By 1945, Admiral William Halsey, the commander of the US 3rd Fleet declared that the kamikaze was "the only weapon I fear in war." Indeed, no figure in the annals of military history, let alone the Pacific War, has aroused such a mixture of dread, revulsion and sometimes, even pity, than the kamikaze. Often just teenagers, the kamikaze, "winds of god," were pilots sent off on one way missions with just enough fuel to reach their intended target. As the Pacific War moved toward its inevitable end, few survived, virtually none returned. And during those final days of the war, as that end hastened, the fatal missions escalated, the losses mounted as the kamikaze embarked on a mission to sink as many US warships as possible. But the mission was futile from the start. The futility of the kamikaze sacrifices only deepened their tragic demise: kamikaze naval assaults would have no effect on the outcome of the war.
Service in the elite Tokkotai Special Attack Squadron was supposed to be completely voluntary. Was it really? Who were the kamikaze, these comrade-in-arms, and what were their origins? Why are they still so honored in Japanese culture? And what did they think or feel on that last day, that last flight to the Fates? This course will be attentive to questions such as these in the context of films of the kamikaze, who sought glorious death in certain defeat, in this, their chosen destiny of self-sacrifice. It will look at the purity of intention they embraced, the devout fealty that inspired them, and the fatalistic, if not flawed decision they deployed in the name of duty to deliver a coup de grace for an utterly lost cause.
Requirements: class participation, attendance, final paper roughly 6-7 pages in length.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost: $25 for books and photocopies.
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructor: FRANK STEWART
Sponsor: YAMAMOTO

From 1990-2004 Frank Stewart was an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law at Hiroshima Shudo University in Hiroshima, Japan. He lived a short distance from Heiwa Koen, the Peace Park, the epi-center of where the A-bomb was detonated.

JAPN 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by all students who are candidates for honors in Japanese.

ASTRONOMY/ASTROPHYSICS

ASTR 25 Astronomy in the Twenty-First Century: California and Washington (Same as ASPH 25)
In the late 19th-century, the center of astronomy moved from the east (where Alvan Clark, who had made his first telescope for Williams College in 1851 ultimately made what is still the largest refracting telescope in the world, in Wisconsin in the 1890s) to California, where first the 100" and then the 200" telescopes on Mt. Wilson and Palomar Mountain, respectively, were the largest in the world from 1917 through 1995. The current largest generation of telescopes, about 400 inches across in Hawaii (built by Caltech and the University of California system) and Spain, are being superseded by 30-meter (1200-inch) telescopes, the Thirty Meter Telescope (www.tmt.org) and the Giant Magellan Telescope (gmto.org), both based in California, as well as by the 39-meter European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT; www.eelt.org). We will visit the headquarters of the TMT and of the GMT in Pasadena, California, to learn about the optical, laser, mechanical, and other aspects of the planning, as well as NASA's ExoPlanet Science Center at Caltech. We will also visit the latest observational facilities at the Mt. Wilson Observatory, including the new interferometric array, and at the Palomar Observatory. Our two weeks of travel will follow participation in the annual meeting of the American Astronomical Society near Washington, DC, where these and other contemporary observational projects, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, will be discussed. Schedule: January 5-10 in and near Washington, DC; January 10-20 in and near Pasadena, CA. We will finish WSP with discussion and consideration in Williamstown of what the current status of observational astronomy is.
Requirements: journal, blogs and 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 8.
Method of selection: email description of desire.
Cost: $3000.
PASACHOFF

ASTR 31 Senior Research
To be taken by students registered for Astronomy 493, 494.

ASPH 25 Astronomy in the Twenty-First Century: California and Washington (Same as ASTR 25)
(See under ASTR 25 for full description.)

BIOLOGY

BIOL 10 Observational Drawing From The Natural World (Same as ARTS 14)
This is a drawing course for students interested in developing their skills in observing and drawing from nature. Much of the class work will deal with drawing directly from plant forms and specimens from the animal world and to this end we will be using an interesting collection of stuffed mounts and skeletons that belong to the Williams Biology department. We will also spend time in the Morley greenhouse. Beyond the subject matter at hand, assignments will also address and analyze the more formal aspects of drawing and two-dimensional design with outside assignments including independent visits to the Clark, the WCMA study collection and the Chapin Library of Rare Books.
Evaluation will be based on both the completion of in-class work and outside drawing assignments, with a focus on the depiction of content, level of effort, and development of the work. Evidence of technical and skill development as well as attendance and participation will also be taken into consideration. There will be a considerable amount of scheduled time outside of regular class meetings for additional assignments. Exhibition and review of work at the final class meeting is required.
Requirements: ongoing review of work and final exhibition.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Method of selection: seniority.
Cost: $80.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Instructor: JOHN RECCO (jrecco@roadrunner.com)
Sponsor: SWOAP

John Recco lives and works in Hoosick, NY and holds an MFA from Columbia University. He has taught at a variety of institutions including Bennington College and Williams. He is the recipient of numerous awards including a Fulbright, fellowships at Yaddo, The Millay Colony, The European Cultural Centre of Delphi, Greece and a NYSCA Individual Artist Grant. His work is included in two recent publications; 100 Boston Painters published by Schiffer Publishing and Galvanized Truth: A Tribute to George Nick, By: Kimberlee C. Alemian. He is represented by the Katharina Rich Perlow Gallery in New York.

BIOL 11 BioEYES : Teaching Fourth Graders about Zebrafish
BioEYES brings tropical fish to 4th grade classrooms in Williamstown and beyond, in a science teaching workshop. Elementary school students will breed fish in the classroom, then study their development and pigmentation during one week. Williams students will adapt BioEYES lesson plans to the science curriculum for the schools we visit, work with classroom teachers to introduce concepts in genetics and development, help the 4th grade students in the classroom, and assess elementary student learning. A final eight-page paper describing the goals and outcomes for each grade level is required. No zebrafish experience is necessary; during the first week students will learn to set up fish matings, and learn about embryonic development and the genetics of fish pigmentation as well as practice teaching the 4th grade BioEYES lesson plans with hands-on experiments using living animals. In the subsequent two weeks we will work at the schools, and in the final week, students will write up the assessment data.
Requirements: 8-page paper.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 8.
Preference given to seniors.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: varies depending on needs of schools and laboratory requirements.
Instructor: JENNIFER SWOAP
Sponsor: SWOAP

Jennifer Swoap, an elementary school teacher, currently coordinates Williams Elementary Outreach, where Williams students teach hands-on science lessons at area elementary schools.

BIOL 12 New Orleans-Style Jazz and Street Performance
This course has a focus on making music based on the principles of improvisation and street performance embodied by New Orleans-Style jazz. Typically composed of brass instruments, this course welcomes musicians and performers of all types, from the classically trained to those with no experience who are willing to play washboards, kazoos, and experiment with other forms of sound-making. For when you travel the world after Williams, this course will prepare you to "busk," or make money playing music on the street, where some of the most dynamic forms of jazz and improvisation have been created. The course will include various street performances and culminate in a "gig" at a local music venue.
No prerequisites. Evaluation will be based on class attendance and participation in the final project which will be in the form of a performance.
Enrollment limit: 20.
We will meet twice a week for three-hour sessions, with extra band practices to be scheduled in accordance to our needs.
Instructor: ANDY KELLY (akelly21@berkshire.rr.com)
Sponsor: SWOAP

Andy Kelly, a local Jazz musician and former busker, Williams College Class of '80, now travels the world bridging cultures with music, using American jazz to make peace in the world.

BIOL 13 Introduction to Animal Tracking
This course is an introduction to the ancient art and science of animal tracking, and its use for ecological inventory. Participants will deepen their skills as naturalists, their awareness of the natural world, and discover that even the greens at Williams College are abundant with wildlife. Students will have field time in class at Hopkins Forest as well as through independent study at a convenient outdoor location of each student's choosing. Basic concepts of animal tracking, its history and use by indigenous people throughout the world will be discussed through video and slide show. Students are required to create journals and site maps of Hopkins and their personal study areas, including all major features of the landscape, flora and fauna activity.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, participation and a final presentation of their maps and journals, with attention to detail and content.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost: $75; students are expected to have appropriate outdoor gear for winter conditions.
Meeting time: 10 a.m.-2 p.m., twice a week for four hour sessions, primarily in the field. Students are also required to do extensive independent field study, demonstrating observations through journals and site maps.
Instructor: DAN YACOBELLIS (miye_yelo@yahoo.com)
Sponsor: SWOAP

Dan Yacobellis is a local naturalist and wildlife tracker who has explored forest and field for the last 20 years. He teaches courses on wilderness skills and tracking at nature education centers in Massachusetts and New York.

BIOL 21 Science Beyond Williams
Are you interested in hands-on experience in a science-related field beyond the Purple Valley? Are you curious to explore science in a university or medical school research lab, a government agency, or a not-for-profit organization? This course is designed to help students take part in scientific work or research going on outside of Williams in order to provide them with a broader sense of what it is like to work in a professional scientific setting. Any field of science or technology can be explored via this course.
In consultation with the course instructor, students will use resources such as the Office of Career Counseling, science faculty members, and Williams alumni/ae to locate a mentor in the student's area of interest at a work site in the United States. Once the course instructor approves the arrangement for a mentored, hands-on experience for three weeks of Winter Study, the student will prepare for the internship by reading literature related to the project, and discuss the readings with a faculty sponsor here at Williams in November/December. Once on site, students must remain in contact with their Williams faculty sponsor by having a weekly phone conference. Participating students would not have to be on campus during WSP prior to beginning their fieldwork. Strong interest, enthusiasm and willingness to plan and prepare for the internship are required for this course.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page paper and post-WSP public presentation to a relevant department or program on the goals and accomplishments of the project.
Prerequisites: two semesters of relevant course work in science and/or mathematics.
Enrollment limit: 10.
DEAN

BIOL 22 Introduction to Biological Research
An experimental research project will be carried out under the supervision of Biology Department faculty. It is expected that the student will spend 20 hours per week in the lab at a minimum, and a 10-page written report is required. This experience is intended for, but not limited to, first-year students and sophomores. Interested students must submit an application form available on the Biology Department webpage: http://biology.williams.edu/current-students/applications/
Prerequisites: Biology 101.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: none
Meeting time: mornings
DEAN

BIOL 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Biology 493, 494.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 10 Zymurgy
An introduction to the science, history, and practice of brewing beer. This course aims to supply the general chemical concepts and hands-on technical experience necessary to enable creative brewing and an appreciation of diverse beer styles. Lecture topics include the biochemistry of yeast, sanitary practices, analytical methods, malt types and preparation, extract vs. all-grain brewing, hops, water chemistry, the chemistry of off-flavors, and beer judging. In the lab, students progress from brewing a commercially available extract kit to producing a full-grain brew of their own original recipe. The class will also meet professional brewers and microbiologists during a private tour of a local brewery.
Evaluation is based on class/lab participation, a 10-page paper, and a final presentation.
No prerequisites (must be 21 years of age).
Preference is given to students with a strong background/aptitude in the sciences, and to those who express the earliest and most compelling interest by email to Professor Smith.
Cost: $400 for supplies and equipment
Meeting time: mornings (longer on lab days) and an all-day field trip.
T. SMITH

CHEM 11 Science for Kids (Same as SPEC 11)
Are you interested in teaching? Do you enjoy working with kids? Do you like to experiment with new things? Here is a chance for you to do all three! The aim of this Winter Study Project is to design a series of hands-on science workshops for elementary school children and their parents. Working in teams of 2-4, students spend the first two and a half weeks of Winter Study planning the workshops. This involves deciding on a focus for each workshop (based on the interests of the students involved) followed by choosing and designing experiments and presentations that will be suitable for fourth-grade children. On the third weekend of Winter Study (January 25, 26) we bring elementary school kids with their parents to Williams to participate in the workshops.
You get a chance to see what goes into planning classroom demonstrations as well as a sense of what it's like to actually give a presentation. You find that kids at this age are great fun to work with because they are interested in just about everything and their enthusiasm is infectious. You also give the kids and their parents a chance to actually do some fun hands-on science experiments that they may not have seen before, and you are able to explain simple scientific concepts to them in a manner that won't be intimidating. It is a rewarding experience for all involved.
Evaluation is based on participation in planning and running the workshops. Each group is expected to prepare a handout with descriptions of the experiments for the kids, parents, and teachers.
No prerequisites; you need not be a science major; all that is needed is enthusiasm.
Enrollment limit: 25.
Method of selection: seniors, juniors, sophomores.
Cost: none.
Meeting time: classes meet three times a week for approximately three hours each session. The workshop is run on the third weekend of Winter Study (January 25, 26) and attendance from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. is mandatory that weekend. There are also one or two brief meetings held in the fall term for preliminary planning.
RICHARDSON and BLAIR

CHEM 12 Tech Entrepreneurship (Same as CSCI 12)
Designed for students interested in careers in biotechnology and information technology, this course will give students a working knowledge of how tech startups work. We will utilize a case study approach that will pair each student with a Boston area startup (host). Students will first perform a retrospective analysis of each host company through literature review, patent review, and phone interviews. Students will then visit host companies individually to tour and meet with key staff. Following that, students will develop a forward-looking analysis of markets, product strategies, and growth. Students will summarize their findings in a case study to be submitted as the final project and shared with respective host companies.
Examples of the kinds of startups students might study include The Echo Nest in Cambridge, MA, Foundation Medicine in Cambridge, MA and T2 Biosystems in Lexington, MA.
The course will include a mandatory two-day trip to Boston for individual and class meetings.
Evaluation is based on classroom participation, presentation and a final report.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 10.
Preference given to science majors.
Meeting time: MWF mornings.
Instructor: JEFFREY THOMAS
Sponsor: T. SMITH

Jeffrey Thomas holds an M.D. and a Ph.D. from Indiana University. He helped start two biotechnology companies, Millennium Pharmaceuticals and Genstruct.

CHEM 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as PSYC 14 and SPEC 14)
Looking back on past loves and crushes, have you ever wondered "What on earth was I thinking?!" or "Why do I keep picking the wrong guys/girls for me?" While intense sexual attraction or urges may first call the shots, people who take the time to carefully choose and build caring, mutual relationships tend to be happier, healthier and more successful in their lives than those who don't. So how do we get there from here and make sense of all this? Well, no matter where you are on the dating spectrum, this self-exploration and relationship-skill-building course is for you if you are ready to learn how to follow your heart AND your mind to co-create a fulfilling relationship within the vortex of the "hook up" culture. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, How to Avoid Falling In Love with A Jerk, and Keeping the Love You Find curricula will guide this introspective, interactive relationship mastery course through meaningful discussions and exercises that explore the common issues, dirty fighting tactics, subconscious directives and emotional allergies that often sabotage relationships. Experiential exercises, personal experiences and journaling will also give you the opportunity to practice effective communication and conflict resolution skills that honor the constructive use of differences and promote intimacy.
Email your statement of interest to ssmith@williams.edu if you are curious about relationships, ready and willing to BE the change, delve into personal growth and take your relationships to the next level.
Evaluation is based on 8 hours of attendance per week, class participation, MBTI inventory completion, 20-hours per week of assigned readings, journaling, assignments, 1:1 consultations, and final 10-page reflective paper/event proposal and project.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Preference will be based on meaningful statement of interest.
Cost: $100.
Meeting time: sometime between 10 a.m.-3 p.m. (TBD)
Instructor: SHERIE RACHELLE SMITH
Sponsor: T. SMITH

Rachelle Smith, MSW, is a holistic, strengths-based Clinical Social Worker, Consultant, Educator & Mentor bridging Relationships, Wellness and Energy Psychology.

CHEM 18 Introduction To Research In Biochemistry
An independent experimental project in biochemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in biochemistry. Biochemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the molecular details of living systems including the interaction of biologically important molecules. In the Chemistry Department, studies are underway to investigate the structure/function relationship of proteins, the interaction between proteins and RNA and DNA, and the molecular basis of bacterial gene regulation.
Requirements: a 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate.
Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
Cost: none.
Meeting time: mornings.
GEHRING and KAPLAN

CHEM 20 Introduction To Research In Inorganic Chemistry
An independent experimental project in inorganic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in inorganic chemistry. Opportunities for research in inorganic chemistry at Williams include the study of complexes of transition metals as catalysts for polymerization and oxidations. Students working in this area will gain expertise in the synthesis and characterization of a diverse range of compounds, including organic molecules, metal containing complexes and polymers. The research addresses problems of applied, industrial significance.
Requirements: a 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate.
Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
Cost: none.
Meeting time: mornings.
C. GOH and PARK

CHEM 23 Introduction To Research In Organic Chemistry
An independent experimental project in organic chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in organic chemistry. Representatitve projects include: (a) The synthesis and evaluation of amphiphilic polymers as delivery vehicles. These self-assembled materials are loaded with protein or small molecule drugs for anti-cancer therapies. Depending upon project, students will use techniques in organic synthesis, materials characterization, biochemical assays, and cell culture. (b) Probing new and efficient methods for the creation of molecules of medicinal interest. Some targets include the kavalactones-the active principles of the herbal extract KAVA KAVA, which is promoted as an alternative anti-anxiety remedy, and octalactin A-an interesting 8-membered ring compound isolated from marine microorganisms that has shown significant toxicity toward human cancer cells.
Requirements: A 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate.
Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
Cost: none.
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructor: S. GOH

CHEM 24 Instroduction To Research In Physical Chemistry
An independent experimental project in physical chemistry is carried out in collaboration with a member of the Department with expertise in physical chemistry. Current research projects in the Department include computer modeling of non-linear, chaotic chemical and biochemical systems, molecular modeling of water clusters, laser spectroscopy of chlorofluorocarbon substitutes, and observing the dynamics in glasses using single molecule spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.
Requirements: a 10-page written report is required.
Prerequisites: variable, depending on the project (at least CHEM 151) and permission of the Department. Since projects involve work in faculty research labs, interested students must consult with one or more of the faculty instructors listed below and with the Department Chair before electing this course. Non-science majors are invited to participate.
Enrollment limited to space in faculty research lab.
Cost: none.
Meeting time: mornings.
BINGEMANN and PEACOCK-LOPEZ

CHEM 31 Senior Research and Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Chemistry 493, 494.

CLASSICS

CLAS 10 Rewrites of Homer (Same COMP 10)
In Jorge Luis Borges's essay "Some Versions of Homer," he (or rather Suzanne Jill Levine, who translated the article into English) posits that "No problem is more essential to literature and its small mysteries than translation." This class will read essays on the theory of translation as we consider versions of Homer, from the translations of Chapman and Hall, Cowper and Pope, Lattimore, Fitzgerald, and Fagles, to the Coen brothers' film, Oh Brother, Where Art Thou? Focusing on specific passages from the Iliad and Odyssey, we will examine the choices that are made and shifts that occur when Homer is rendered into another language as well as other media.
Requirements: readings assigned for class, class attendance and final 10-page project.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Preference to Classics and Comparative Literature majors.
Cost: $10.
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructor: SHANNON FARLEY (skfarley@complit.umass.edu)
Sponsor: HOPPIN

Shannon K. Farley is a Williams Alum (class of 1997) and a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Massachusetts in Comparative Literature.

CLAS 11 Alexander the Great (Same as HIST 11)
In this course we will be exploring the many different Alexanders that have existed over the centuries, and we will try to gain insight into the hold he has had on our imaginations for over two millennia. In different places and ages he has been the ideal warrior-king; the pious leader whose exploits serve God; the brilliant but vulnerable boy-king corrupted by sudden wealth and power; the philosopher-king who debated the sages of India or lived a life of Stoic virtues; the isolated, out-of-touch mad leader; the liberator of the oppressed; the lonely romantic seeker; the tyrannical despot. Ancient accounts of his life evolved into mythologies for the new world he had created with his conquests. These tales circulated throughout Greece, North Africa, the Near East and India, and later by way of Rome throughout the western world, growing into separate and distinct traditions as each culture made Alexander its own.
Readings include the ancient accounts of Alexander that are our primary sources for his life; selections from the Bible and Qur'an, from the medieval English Alexander tradition, and from the medieval Ethiopic, Armenian and Persian romances of Alexander; later works such as Racine's Alexandre le Grande and Kipling's The Man Who Would Be King; and selected works of modern scholarship, some of which have been surprisingly argumentative and impassioned. We will also examine visual representations of Alexander in ancient sculpture and coinage, Indian and Persian manuscripts, and European paintings of the Renaissance. We will encounter the musical Alexander in works from Handel to Iron Maiden, and view films including Oliver Stone's idiosyncratic Alexander.
Requirements: two 2-page analyses of selected course materials, an oral presentation, and a final 5- to 7-page paper, in addition to preparation for and participation in class meetings.
No prerequisites other than a serious interest in Alexander and his multiform legacy.
Enrollment limit: 15.
If the course is oversubscribed, preference will be given to majors in Classics, Comparative Literature, History, and Art History.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons.
CHRISTENSEN

CLAS 12 Greek Myth and the Modern Cinema
This course will examine the mythic narratives that formed the basis of ancient Greek religion and culture, especially those concerning cosmological and human origins, epic heroes and trickster figures-for example, Hesiod's Theogony, Homer's Odyssey, and the Homeric Hymn to Hermes. We will explore these narratives by using a variety of theoretical approaches, including psychoanalytic and structural analysis, and by comparing them to other ancient texts like The Epic of Gilgamesh and the Book of Genesis. In tandem with this project, we will view and discuss several Hollywood films, such as Star Wars: Episode IV and The Dark Knight, in order gain to insight into the important similarities and differences between Greek myths and myths of contemporary American society.
Requirements: 10-page paper or final project.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Priority given to majors in Classics, Comparative Literature, Art History, Religion and Anthropology.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons.
RUBIN

CLAS 31 Senior Thesis
May be taken by students registered for Classics 493, 494.

COGNITIVE SCIENCE

COGS 31 Senior Thesis
May be taken by students registered for Cognitive Science 494.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

COMP 10 Rewrites of Homer (Same CLAS 10)
(See under CLAS 10 for full description.)

COMP 11 Contemporary Scandinavian Film
For a long time Scandinavian cinema was, for filmgoers outside Denmark, Sweden and Norway, almost synonymous with the work of Swedish director Ingmar Bergman (1918-2007). But in the last two decades a new and heterogeneous Scandinavian cinema has been blooming: love stories, comedies, and thrillers abound-along with psychological studies that remain solidly in the Bergmanian tradition. After a brief encounter with two of Bergman's masterpieces (the drama Persona, and the autobiographical Fanny and Alexander), this class will cover some of the most interesting examples of recent Scandinavian cinema from a wide range of genres, and consider the ways these films reflect on Scandinavian society. We'll begin with Danish director Lars von Trier, whose entire oeuvre may be read as a prolonged questioning of Scandinavian rationalism and self-understanding. (We will discuss his philosophical comedy The Idiots and the apocalyptic Melancolia). We will also watch one of the great successes in recent Danish cinema, Lone Scherfig's drama An Education, as an example of psychological portraiture. From Sweden we will discuss Ruben Östlund's much debated Play, Tomas Alfredsson's vampire/love story Let the Right One In, and Roy Andersson's dreamlike You, the Living. Contemporary Norwegian film will be represented by The Bothersome Man (Jens Lien), which discusses Scandinavian society from an unexpected angle, and the fantasy versus reality/documentary film Troll Hunter (André Øvredal). Together, these films convey a rich but not unproblematic image of life in contemporary Scandinavia.
Requirements: 10-page final paper or creative project.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 25.
Method of selection: students majoring or considering a major in Comparative Literature or a related discipline.
Cost: $25.
Meeting time: afternoons; 3 times a week for a total of six hours, with additional screenings and readings related to the films.
Instructor: JÖRGEN BRUHN (jorgen.bruhn@lnu.sen)
Sponsor: C. BOLTON

Jörgen Bruhn teaches comparative literature and media theory at Linneaus University in Sweden. He has also taught in Denmark and at Williams.

COMP 12 Spain in Film: Introduction to Spanish Cinema and Film Analysis (Same as RLSP 12)
(See under RLSP 12 for full description.)

COMP 13 Organized Crime in Contemporary Culture (Same as RUSS 13)
(See under RUSS 13 for full description.)

COMP 15 By Foot: Walking As Method and Experience (Same as RLFR 15)
(See under RLFR 15 for full description.)

COMP 16 The Grand Hotel in Modern Fiction and Film
In this course, we will visit actual hotel spaces in our area, read contemporary and early twentieth-century hotel fiction, and discuss a broad range of hotel films, from drama to comedy. The grand hotel with its dual promise of luxury and estrangement was considered a theatre of social transformation in the age of travel. We will read novels, short stories, and discuss films that feature the hotel as a space that would either uphold class distinction or give rise to class conflict, allow for sexual taboo breaking, or stage gendered identity performance. Authors and filmmakers in this early period will include Edith Wharton, Thomas Mann, Franz Werfel, Vicki Baum, and F.W. Murnau. We will consider short theoretical readings by Thorstein Veblen, Georg Simmel, Siegfried Kracauer on conspicuous consumption, modernity, and metropolitan spaces. In the present, hotel dramas focus on issues of ethnic violence (Hotel Rwanda), the invisible immigrant worker (Dirty Pretty Things), cultural alienation (Lost in Translation), and the female body at work (A Single Girl). Comedies explore the fantasy of a dramatic social climb through identity confusion in a hotel setting (Maid in Manhattan); satires highlight the confidence man who profits from social pretensions (from Thomas Mann's trickster and sexual adventurer Felix Krull, to the hilarious high-school dropout/runaway posing as the scion of a wealthy executive in Thomas Brussig's Wie es leuchtet). Fantasy writing creates virtual hotel spaces (Robert Coover's The Grand Hotels of Joseph Cornell). Theoretical readings focus on private versus public spaces, social distinction, warped space, and shopping for brands by Pierre Bourdieu, Erving Goffmann, Tony Vidler and Sharon Zukin. We will also study characteristics of real-life upscale area hotels like Blantyre, The Porches through site visits.
Requirements: active class participation, one oral presentation on an aspect of hotel culture, and one 10-page final paper.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Preference given to Comparative Literature, Literary Studies, and English majors.
Cost: $45 for books and xerox package.
Meeting time: 10 a.m.-noon MWR, plus excursion TBA.
DRUXES

COMP 17 How To Be a Princess: A Performance Studio Course (Same as THEA 17 and WGSS 17)
(See under THEA 17 for full description.)

COMP 19 Cabinets of Curiosity and Wonder (Same as RLFR 17)
(See under RLFR 17 for full description.)

COMP 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Comparative Literature 493, 494.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CSCI 10 Designing and Building a Desktop Computer
This course introduces the student to computer components and the methods used to design and construct a fully working desktop system. Students will assemble a computer from existing spare parts to end up with a system suitable for a specific purpose: as a campus email and print station, for remote controlled digital signage, as a network backup server, or as a general purpose computer that can be donated off campus. We will conduct speed tests using different components to determine what impact they have on overall performance. Each student will install an operating system, choosing from free Linux distributions or licensed Windows OSs, download appropriate drivers, diagnostic software, security programs and free productivity suites. We'll look at Virtual Machines and discuss remote control software as additional tools to add functionality to a computer. Looking forward we will examine emerging computer technology, trends and intriguing advancements like quantum computers.
The class will meet three times a week in a lab equipped with the hardware, spare parts and tools for assembly. Research and written assignments outside of class will be due weekly.
Evaluation will be based on research papers, quizzes and the completion of a working system along with presentation to the class.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Method of selection: upperclass given preference.
Cost: none.
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructor: SETH ROGERS
Sponsor: FREUND

Seth Rogers is the Director of Desktop Systems in the Office for Information Technology. He's been building and fixing computers for over 15 years.

CSCI 11 Introduction to Web Programming
In this course, students will learn the basics of web programming. In particular, they will learn HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Students will also learn about a number of third-party Application Programming Interfaces (APIs), such as Google Earth and Google Maps APIs, that they will then use in their projects. Working in small teams, students will complete a series of programming assignments toward the development of a web application. They will then propose and complete small team projects of their own choosing. Each team will be required to give a brief presentation describing their final project (including a demonstration of it) and to submit a written report summarizing the design process. Though there will be some lectures, the majority of class time will be spent in the laboratory.
Requirements: programming exercises; final project and presentation.
Prerequisites: CSCI 134.
Enrollment limit: 16.
Preference given to upperclass students with consideration to formation of working groups with similar levels of background.
Cost: $35.
Meeting time: mornings.
DANYLUK

CSCI 12 Tech Entrepreneurship (Same as CHEM 12)
(See under CHEM 12 for full description.)

CSCI 13 The Williams Game Jam
The main goal of the course is for students to successfully participate in a game jam; a concentrated creative effort with the primary goal being the production of a full video game by an individual.
In the first week, there will be an introductory lecture explaining the basics of game jams, familiarizing students with the tools available, and demonstrating games produced in other successful game jams. The rest of in-class time will be lab sessions where students will work on their individual game jam games.
Game jams are traditionally 24-48 contiguous hours where participants can work on their game; we will modify the experience to fit in the 20 hours-per-week schedule of Winter Study courses. We will have 2 full game jams during the course, with an intermediate period preparing for the second jam.
Students will be graded on the game produced during the second game jam of the course and their demonstration of said game in a final meeting.
Requirements: final project (game) and presentation.
Prerequisites: some programming experience, or permission of the instructor.
Enrollment limit: 10.
Preference to those who have taken Computer Graphics, followed by those with programming experience or expressed desire in games.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Instructor: MICHAEL MARA (mikemx7f@gmail.com)
Sponsor: FREUND

Michael Mara is a computer graphics researcher working for NVIDIA studying real-time rendering and global illumination. He is a 2012 alumnus of Williams where he was a computer science major.

CSCI 14 Bots, Malware, and The Underground Economy
It is estimated that between 10 and 20% of all broadband connected systems in the US are infected with some form of bot or malware. With the rapid growth of android based infections, this problem is rapidly migrating from Windows PCs onto phones, tablets, and other machines. Malware based attacks have stolen millions, perhaps billions of dollars over the last few years, through credit/bank fraud and identity theft. Malware based DDOS have knocked major corporations, and even some governments, offline. This, in turn, has caught the attention of governments around the world, with most passing some new form of cybersecurity legislation as a result.
This course will sit at the intersection of software, cybersecurity policy, and the underground economy. Students will learn about bots (what they do, why they're used, and how they work), the underground economy (from the dropper that infects the machine to the herder who runs the infection to mules that clean out the bank accounts), and how governments have reacted with modern cybersecurity legislation. Students will examine past and current bots and malware, they will review past criminal cases (and possibly some current ones, depending), and they will review proposed and current US and foreign cybersecurity legislation.
Most reading material for this class will be made up of online articles, papers, and blog posts...although some printed books may be used. The class format will consist of reading and research assignments, with individual (or pairs of) students being assigned specific areas to present to the class at the next meeting. These presentations will then lead to class discussion, and additional lecture from the professor if required. If possible, there will be a lab exercise to analyze live malware.
Final evaluation will cover these classroom presentations, as well as the creation of a final project. The exact form of the final project will be left to the student, subject to the approval of the professor.
Requirements: classroom participation combined with a final project or paper.
Prerequisites: none; although basic computer knowledge will be required.
Enrollment limit: 25.
Preference will be given to Computer Science majors.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Instructor: CHRIS ROOSENRAAD (chris@roosenraad.com)
Sponsor: FREUND

With over 15 years of experience building high speed internet networks Chris Roosenraad is an industry expert on malware and cybersecurity policy, chairs several industry forums, and provides technical advice to the FBI, NCMEC, and ICANN (among others).

CSCI 23 Introduction to Research and Development in Computing
An independent project is completed in collaboration with a member of the Computer Science Department. The projects undertaken will either involve the exploration of a research topic related to the faculty member's work or the implementation of a software system that will extend the students design and implementation skills. It is expected that the student will spend 20 hours per week working on the project. At the completion of the project, each student will submit a 10-page written report or the software developed together with appropriate documentation of its behavior and design. In addition, students will be expected to give a short presentation or demonstration of their work. Students should consult with the instructor before the beginning of the Winter Study registration period to determine details of projects that might be undertaken.
Requirements: final paper and presentation/demonstration.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor.
Enrollment limit: 10.
Preference given to sophomores and juniors.
Cost: TBA.
Meeting time: TBA.
ALBRECHT

CSCI 31 Senior Honor Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Computer Science 493-494.

CONTRACT MAJOR

CMAJ 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Contract Major 493, 494.

DANCE

DANC 10 The MELT Method-The Art of Self Care and Hydrating Your Connective Tissue
The MELT Method is a self treatment technique to reduce and eliminate pain. The self care technique uses small rubber balls and a foam roller to effectively soften and hydrate your connective tissue or fascia. Recent research has proven that our fascia operates as it's own unique system within the body. Learn how to undo the negative effects that repetition has on our bodies. This anti-aging technique will reduce chronic pain, increase your energy level and keep you balanced an hydrated. It recalibrates your body's innate sense to want to be balanced. Students will learn the scientific theory of the body's fascia and how keeping it hydrated is essential for a pain free life. They will learn each of the techniques and how to properly perform them. Students will be requires to practice and keep a daily log. Readings will include articles on connective tissue and the MELT Method book. Students will be required to attend a weekly MELT class followed by discussion. The final project will be a summary of their daily log.
Requirements: class discussion, final 5-page paper and presentation and participation in a demonstration to the larger community.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: $85.
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructor: NICOLE METHOT (nicole.methot@gmail.com)
Sponsor: DANKMEYER

Nicole Methot is a Licensed Massage Therapist who has been practicing Massage Therapy for over 10 years. She initially studied the MELT Method to care for herself as a bodyworker and found it so effective that she trained to be a teacher to pass this self care method on to her clients and students.

DANC 12 Intermediate/Advanced Ballet Tech and Repertory
Intermediate/Advanced level ballet students will have a ballet technique class that will include pointe work for women and extra work on jumps and turns for men. A rehearsal will follow in which an original short ballet will be created on eligible, participating students. The class will meet in the studio three times per week, for three hours each meeting. Students will be expected to review and rehearse material on their own in preparation for the next meeting. The resulting work will be shown in the Dance Department's informal Winter Study showing during the last week of Winter Study.
Students who wish to take course for PE credit only must take the technique portion of the class (one-and-a-half hours) a minimum of two times per week.
Evaluation is based on quality of participation and progress.
Prerequisites: at least three years of prior ballet training. **Students must contact instructor prior to signing up for permission to join.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Method of selection: students currently enrolled in dance department ensembles or classes will be given priority.
Meeting time: afternoons.
PARKER

DANC 15 Creating ESOPUS 21 (Same as ARTS 15, ENGL 15, and THEA 15)
(See under ENGL 15 for full description.)

DANC 16 Embodying the Poetry of Gertrude Stein (Same as ENGL 16)
(See under ENGL 16 for full description.)

ECONOMICS

ECON 10 Dollars and Sense in Healthcare
This class will examine how the U.S. arrived at its current healthcare delivery and reimbursement systems, and what changes are on the horizon. Issues of access, cost and quality will be the focus, as will how the Affordable Care Act and other pertinent legislation fosters or fails these essential components. A textbook and reading packet comprise the course materials; assigned reading will average about 100 pages per week. Students should expect to spend a minimum of six hour in class each week, in addition to which there may be time allocated for speakers, field trips and final presentations.
Requirements: 1) Daily preparation for discussions of current events, 2) Daily preparation for discussions of the assigned readings, 3) A 20-minute presentation to the class on a pre-approved topic and a final 5-page paper.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Method of selection: priority in descending order by class (seniors first, etc.).
Cost: $40.
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructors: KAREN ENGBERG MD (kmemd@me.com) and DOUGLAS JACKSON MD (swatdod44@gmail.com)
Sponsor: MONTIEL

The co-instructors are primary care physicians with extensive experience in clinical and administrative medicine.

ECON 11 Public Speaking
This course will help students become effective and organized public speakers, whether public speaking means giving a class presentation, participating in a debate, or giving a formal speech before a large audience. We will primarily use extemporaneous and prepared class presentations as a means of learning this skill, but we will also study the great American speeches and presidential debates of the twentieth century for further insights into persuasive public speaking techniques. The class will provide a supportive environment to help each student create his or her own public speaking style that is comfortable, confident, and conversational. We will also focus on organizational techniques, handling visual aids effectively, eye contact and body language. Finally, receiving feedback and providing constructive criticism to other students in the class will be an important part of the course.
Evaluation will be based on in-class presentations, class participation, and a 10-page written critique of the student's own videotaped presentations.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 10.
Preference will be based on written statement of interest.
Cost: $25.
Meeting time: mornings.
SHORE-SHEPPARD

ECON 12 Introduction to Management of Industrial and Nonprofit Organizations
This course uses case study method to expose students to concepts and techniques of business management. Topics include marketing, strategy, finance, operations, organizational structure, and human relations. Most of the cases taught are published by Harvard Business School and include:
Marketing: Organic Growth at Walmart and Fisher Price Toys. Strategic Planning: Marvel Enterprises and Nantucket Nectars. Strategy and Public Relations: Drug Testing in Nigeria-Pfizer and LiveStrong.
Operations: Oakland A's. Logistics and HR: Dabbawalla. Language and Globalization: Rakuten. Finance: Manning Electronics. A 2- to 3-page summary of each case is required no later than one week after discussion of the case.
Evaluation will be based on case summary grades (50%) and class participation (50%).
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: $25.
Meeting times: afternoons, 3 times a week for 2 hours each session.
Instructor: ELIZABETH GILBERT-BONO (aagilbono@aol.com)
Sponsor: MONTIEL

Elizabeth Gilbert-Bono, a Lecturer at Brown University and Marketing Consultant for Too Faced, Inc, has a B.A. from Brown Universtiy and MBA from Harvard Business School. She has held VP Marketing positions at Houghton Mifflin Co. and LEGO Inc. She lives in Wellesley, MA and has three children (the second, Bryson, is a sophomore at Williams).

ECON 13 Reality Checks for Entrepreneurs
Reality Checks for Entrepreneurs will teach participants how to investigate and validate ideas for new businesses. Students will work in groups to develop an idea for a new business and then develop tools to validate and improve the business concept to make it more viable in the marketplace. As they work, the teams will gather the information needed to turn the business idea into a successful business plan. Guest speakers will include successful entrepreneurs.
Requirements: class participation, ongoing consultations, a business plan, and a final presentation.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Method of selection: students will be selected based on their business ideas.
Cost: $40 for books.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Instructor: STEVEN FOGEL (sfogel@berkshireenterprises.com)
Sponsor: MONTIEL

Steven Fogel has over twenty years experience helping people turn ideas into viable businesses and have worked with over 1,000 new business startups.

ECON 14 Economics of Housing and Community Portrayed in Film
The idea that a successful life must include home ownership in a decent neighborhood has been severely challenged in the recent recession. Where did this idea come from in the first place? In this class we will examine one important source: the presentation of home ownership and community in film. We will view both narrative and documentary films that present ideal and dystopic visions of housing, home-ownership and community. Most of the films are set in the American context but some deal with other countries and cultures. These stories, imagined and real, will provide the context for a wider discussion of the economic linkages between houses and communities as well as the implications for individual well-being and economic stability.
Requirements: students will prepare a 2- to 3-page written response and evaluation of each of the 10 films.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Preference given to students who have completed Economics 110.
Meeting time: afternoons.
S. SHEPPARD

ECON 17 Social Entrepreneurship: Innovating in the Social Sector (Same as LEAD 17 and POEC 17)
(See under POEC 17 for full description.)

ECON 21 Fieldwork in International Development
This course involves internship in a developing or transition economy-and an academic analysis of the development issues raised by the internship. Students work full-time typically for a non-governmental organization (NGO) active in grassroots development work (or less commonly, with a government office or a research institute). Examples include health, education, microfinance or environmental NGOs. The instructors will work with each student to help arrange a placement and to help secure funding; such arrangements must be made well in advance of Winter Study. An informational meeting will take place early in the fall for planning purposes. Students will be expected to make their own contact with internship providers. Each student's internship provider shall send a confirmation letter to the instructor verifying the placement and describing the nature of the work to be performed by the intern. Students will read a few short articles distributed at the end of fall term and must agree to keep a journal, maintain weekly contact with the instructors, and write a final paper on development issues raised by their specific internship. A group meeting of all students will occur after Winter Study to reflect on individual experiences. Students will also be encouraged to attend development talks at the Center for Development Economics throughout the academic year.
Requirements: 90 hours of fieldwork; satisfactory evaluation from the institutional sponsor; 10-page final paper or equivalent; participation in final meeting.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 10.
At the time of registration, interested students should send a resume and letter of interest to Paula Consolini. These will be used to select students if over-enrolled.
Cost: $15 for course materials; transportation costs to internship site may be partly covered.
Meeting time: some meetings will take place prior/after Winter Study, as students are off-site in internships during the term.
Instructors: RAI and PAULA CONSOLINI

Paula Consolini is Director of the Center for Learning in Action.

ECON 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) (Same as POEC 22)
This course examines tax policy towards low-income families in the United States, and has the following three objectives: 1) For students to understand the shift of redistributive policy in the United States from income support through the transfer system (Aid to Families with Dependent Children/Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) towards support of working individuals through the tax system (primarily the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC)); 2) For students to understand the challenges that low income individuals have "making ends meet" and to understand the role that the EITC has played in increasing the standard of living of the working poor; and 3) To enable students to understand the tax code well enough to prepare simple income tax returns, including those for filers claiming the EITC. Students will be trained by the IRS to prepare income tax returns for low-income individuals and families. At the end of the term, students will use their newly acquired expertise to help individuals and families in Berkshire County prepare and file their returns. Class meetings will involve a mixture of discussion of assigned readings, and exercises that help develop tax preparation skills and understanding of poverty. Assignments outside of class include: a variety of short readings on tax policy, the challenges of living in poverty in the U.S., and public policies that address these challenges; completion of an online course in IRS VITA training; and staffing approximately six hours of tax preparation assistance during the final week of winter term. The volunteer tax preparation sessions take place in North Adams and are usually Wednesday and Thursday evenings during the final week of Winter Study, and then Thursday evenings and Saturday mornings after that.
Evaluation is based on the results of the IRS certification test, students' work as tax preparers, and a ten-page analytical and reflective essay.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 14.
If overenrolled, students will be selected based on a written statement of interest.
Cost: $100 for texts and coursepack.
Meeting time: mornings 10 a.m.-noon, with possible occasional afternoon sessions to accommodate visiting speakers, plus the volunteer tax preparation sessions discussed in the course description.
BAKIJA and LALUMIA

ECON 30 Honors Project
The "Specialization Route" to the degree with Honors in Economics requires that each candidate take an Honors Winter Study Project in January of their senior year. Students who wish to begin their honors work in January should submit a detailed proposal. Decisions on admission to the Honors WSP will be made in the fall. Information on the procedures will be mailed to senior majors in economics early in the fall semester.
Seniors who wish to apply for admission to the Honors WSP and thereby to the Honors Program should register for this WSP as their first choice.
Some seniors will have begun honors work in the fall and wish to complete it in the WSP. They will be admitted to the WSP if they have made satisfactory progress. They should register for this WSP as their first choice.

ECON 31 Honors Thesis
To be taken by students participating in year-long thesis research (ECON 493-W31-494).

ENGLISH

ENGL 10 Hamlet
This course is an opportunity to immerse yourself in one of the most innovative and celebrated literary works, Shakespeare's Hamlet. We will read and reread the text, practice reading speeches aloud, and watch and discuss film versions and adaptations. Students who wish may also rehearse and perform scenes from the play.
Requirements: regular contributions to class plus a 10-page paper or the equivalent.
Prerequisites: no prior literary or theatrical experience is required.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: mornings.
I. BELL

ENGL 11 The Changing Landscape of Journalism (Same as LEAD 11)
The purpose of this course is to give students an in-depth, personal view of the inner workings of various facets of journalism. The course will feature distinguished Williams alumni from a broad spectrum of today's media universe, including print, broadcast, and newer media formats. In previous years, visitors have represented such outlets as the Wall Street Journal, Nytimes.com, the New Yorker, ABC News and Bloomberg News. Each guest lecturer will discuss specific skills and experience in his or her background. A two-night trip to New York City is planned. In previous years, organizations visited have included CNN, the New York Times, the Columbia School of Journalism, Good Morning America and Morning Joe, Pro Publica, the Wall Street Journal and more.
Requirements: students will be evaluated based on participation in class, as well as practical assignments in journalism.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 16.
Preference to juniors, seniors and students with demonstrated interest in the field.
Cost: $300.
Meeting time: variable based on visitors' travel schedules
Instructor: CHRISTOPHER MARCISZ
Sponsor: LIMON

Bio for Christopher Marcisz to come.

ENGL 12 Noir/Neo-noir
Film noir is a French term for American moviemaking. It refers to a kind of plot (violent and complicated), a kind of woman (beautiful but dangerous), and a kind of camerawork (atmospheric and anxiety-provoking). By most accounts noir gets its start in the forties, runs out in the fifties and then is revived in a secondary form-neo-noir-by later filmmakers. In this course we will watch movies from noir's so-called classic period -The Maltese Falcon, Double Indemnity, Out of the Past, Kiss Me Deadly-as well as neo-noirs including, Chinatown, Basic Instinct, Pulp Fiction, and Fargo. Students will also be required to attend three film screenings per week, to keep a viewing journal, and to write a final essay. In addition to critical discussions of noir, students will read hard-boiled detective fiction from the pulp magazine Black Mask.
Requirements: final paper, class presentation, journal.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Method of selection: written description of their interest.
Cost: $20.
Meeting time: afternoons.
KLEINER

ENGL 13 Uncreative Writing
It's clear that long-cherished notions of creativity are under attack, eroded by file-sharing, media culture, widespread sampling, and digital replication. How does writing respond to this new environment? This workshop will rise to that challenge by employing strategies of appropriation, replication, plagiarism, piracy, sampling, plundering, as compositional methods. Along the way, we'll trace the rich history of forgery, frauds, hoaxes, avatars, and impersonations spanning the arts, with a particular emphasis on how they employ language. We'll see how the modernist notions of chance, procedure, repetition, and the aesthetics of boredom dovetail with popular culture to usurp conventional notions of time, place, and identity, all as expressed linguistically. The preceding description, it should be said, is a plagiarism, appropriated from Kenneth Goldsmith's uncannily similar "Uncreative Writing" course at the University of Pennsylvania. This Winter Study course will take up modes of inexpressive writing that sometimes travel under the name of "Conceptual Writing" (a term derived by analogy from the conceptual art movements of the '60s & '70s) or "Uncreative Writing. We will run primarily as a writing workshop, with an emphasis on uncreativity and procedure-based writing assignments, both in and outside of class. We will also engage in a critical investigation of the history and theoretical bases of appropriation and chance- based modes of writing. Our main focus will be on writing and language-based works, but our stumbles will also take us into the visual arts, including conceptual art, as well as contemporary music. At least one field trip will be part of this course, as well as a visit to MassMoCA in North Adams. No creative writing experience necessary. Reading/viewing/listening will include works by Kenneth Goldsmith, Christian Bök, Vanessa Place, Marcel Duchamp, John Baldessari, John Cage, Sol Lewitt, Christian Marclay, Girl Talk, and others.
Requirements: frequent writing assignments in and outside of class, final analytic project/paper.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 20
Preference given to English majors and by interview.
Cost: $30.
Meeting time: mornings.
MCWEENY

ENGL 14 Infinite Jest
One of the most remarkable American novels in our time is Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace. The book is hilarious, devastating, compelling, and frightening. It is also a preposterously long and highly demanding text. We'll read and discuss Infinite Jest in seminar-type meetings three mornings a week.
Requirements: students will be responsible for regular attendance and participation, two brief analytical reports, and a 10-page paper at the end of Winter Study.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: $20.
Meeting time: mornings.
R. BELL

ENGL 15 Creating ESOPUS 21 (Same as ARTS 15, DANC 15 and THEA 15)
This course will offer a hands-on approach to the process of producing a multidisciplinary nonprofit arts journal. For it, Williams students will actively participate in the creation of ESOPUS 21, the spring 2014 issue of the award-winning Brooklyn-based publication ESOPUS. Over the course of the month, students will provide suggestions for contributions (for both the magazine and the enclosed audio CD compilation); solicit, review, and edit manuscripts and other submissions; deal with the specifics of fundraising (including the writing of grant applications) and distribution; gain first-hand knowledge of the logistics of printing; and create content for the ESOPUS website. Class time will also be devoted to discussions of the history of mainstream and small-press magazine publishing. If feasible, there will be one field trip to ESOPUS's offices in Brooklyn. Students will be credited in the issue for their contribution.
For more information about ESOPUS, visit http://www.esopusmag.com.
SCHEDULE:
Week 1:
Mon, Jan 6th: 2-4pm
Tue, Jan 7th: 10am-noon
Fri, Jan 10th: 4-6pm
Week 2:
Mon, Jan 13th: 2-5pm
Tue, Jan 14th: 10am-1pm
Week 3:
Mon, Jan 20th: 2-4pm
Tue, Jan 21st: 10am-noon
Fri, Jan. 24th: 4-6pm
Week 4:
Mon, Jan 27th: 2-5pm
Tue, Jan 28th: 10am-1pm
Lippy will be available for consultations with students
Requirements: final project (to be determined).
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Method of selection: CV review and/or professor recommendation
Cost: $200 (if field trip is included).
Meeting time: see description.
Instructor: TOD LIPPY (tod@esopusmag.com)
Sponsor: LIMON

Tod Lippy is the founder and editor of ESOPUS, and the executive director of the Esopus Foundation Ltd.

ENGL 16 Embodying the Poetry of Gertrude Stein (Same as DANC 16)
As a poet and personality, the American expatriate Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) has remained an attractive irritant. Her poems are playful yet relentless, literal yet obtuse, fluid yet disjointed. In this course, we will explore the kinesthetic relationship between movement and language, entering into the environment of Stein's work through physicality. We will identify many of the simultaneous, layered features of the writing by means of hand-copying, reading aloud, body tapping, moving slowly, rotating as an ensemble, drawing color pattern posters, interpreting gibberish, walking in formation, analyzing linguistic habit, eavesdropping, scoring musically, memorizing short lines of text, and presenting a showing of Stein's poetry embodied.
Stein chides in a 1934 interview, "Look here. Being intelligible is not what it seems. You mean by understanding that you can talk about it in the way that you have a habit of talking, putting it in other words. But I mean by understanding enjoyment. If you enjoy it, you understand it." (brainpickings.org)
We will work from the following texts:
Composition as Explanation, Portraits and Repetition, Poetry and Grammar, Tender Buttons, George Hugnet, If I Told Him, Cezanne, Matisse, The Life and Death of Juan Gris, Four Dishonest Ones, A Valentine to Sherwood Anderson, Van or Twenty Years After, Lipschitz, As A Wife Has A Cow: A Love Story, Four Saints in Three Acts, and The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas.
Requirements: class participation, homework assignments, showing.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 12.
A strong, affectionate curiosity about language and the arts is essential. Comfort with physical expression and theater is useful. Students may write a letter explaining why they are interested in this course and how it might inform their other studies.
Cost: reading packet and Gertrude Stein in Words and Pictures by Renate Stendhal.
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructor: SHIRA WOHLBERG (shiralynx@gmail.com)
Sponsor: LIMON

Shira Wohlberg holds degrees in Linguistics, Education, and English. She is a professional stage and street performer and a movement improvisor.

ENGL 17 The Winter Naturalist's Journal (Same as ENVI 17)
(See under ENVI 17 for full description.)

ENGL 18 Stories and Pictures (Same as ARTS 18)
What would you do if Vladimir Nabokov suddenly appeared and said: "Read this thing I wrote, and then make a twenty second stop-motion animation that captures what it feels like to long for a country that doesn't exist anymore. You have a week."? What if Julio Cortazar demanded you made a drawing which offered a realistic solution to a magical problem? You don't even want to know what Kurt Vonnegut would want from you.
"Stories and Pictures" can help you prepare for these kinds of situations. In this class, we will read a short story every week, and produce a visual response to it. We will talk about the different ways in which the written word can provide fuel for image-making, and figure out how to make good art fast. In our meetings we will discuss the stories we've read, see how other visual artists use narrative to inform their work and try out various art-making techniques such as drawing, painting, digital photography and video. We will meet 3 times weekly for 2-hour sessions, and students should plan to invest at minimum an equal amount of time on their projects outside of class.
Requirements: four artworks and one class presentation, as well as ongoing participation in class discussion.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 12
Preference will be given to students writing to the instructor with a short paragraph about why they want to be in this class.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructor: GABRIELA VAINSENCHER (gabrielav@gmail.com)
Sponsor: LIMON

Gabriela Vainsencher is a visual artist living and working in Philadelphia and Brooklyn. She was Williams College's Levitt fellow in 2009 when she taught this class for the first time. Since then she has taught it as a winter study class in January 2012 and 2013. Her recent exhibitions include a two-person show at the Musée d'art moderne André Malraux in Le Havre, France and a solo show at Recession Art gallery in New York.

ENGL 25 Morocco (Same as INST 26 and PHIL 25)
(See under PHIL 25 for full description.)

ENGL 30 Honors Project: Specialization Route
Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the specialization route.

ENGL 31 Honors Project: Thesis
Required during Winter Study of all seniors admitted to candidacy for honors via the thesis route.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

ENVI 10 Campus Sustainability: Culture Shift and Personal Behavior Change
The issue of how to change an institution like Williams to be more environmentally sustainable is complicated and multi-faceted. Much of the progress that Williams has made thus far in reducing our environmental impact has been through largely invisible technical changes: updates of mechanical and lighting systems, increases in the efficiency of our central heating plant, and insulating and weatherizing buildings. Changing individual behavior and campus culture towards sustainability has proven to be a longer and more challenging road. This course invites students to participate in that process.
The first part of the course will focus on gaining an understanding of sustainability issues and possibilities for change using Williams College as a case study. Students will lead discussions with guidance from the instructor on a range of sustainability topics, including consumption, waste, energy use, water, food, and climate change. Throughout the readings and discussions, there will be consideration of a variety of practical approaches to behavior change and culture shift. A substantial proportion of the class will be devoted to an on-campus project of the students' choosing that is designed to change the Williams campus, community or culture to be more sustainable.
Readings will include Fostering Sustainable Behavior: An Introduction to Community Based Social Marketing by Doug McKenzie-Mohr, excerpts from The Psychology of Environmental Problems by Deborah DuNann Winter and Susan M. Koger in addition to articles and excerpts from other books. Students will have readings prior to every class. Responsibility and preparation for leading discussion will rotate among students.
Requirements: 3-page final project proposal and rationale, final project, and final project reflection.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Preference will be given to first year students and sophomores.
Cost: $50 for books and reading packet.
Meeting time: mornings, 6 hours a week.
Instructor: AMY JOHNS
Sponsor: BRADBURD

Amy Johns is the Assistant Director of the Zilkha Center for Environmental Initiatives, the operating department that works with the campus community to make Williams College more environmentally sustainable.

ENVI 11 The Winter Woods
This course will focus on the winter season and its effect in molding the wild landscapes of New England. We will take a hands-on approach toward investigating how plants and animals are adapted to enduring winter conditions of our region. We will make frequent field trips to Hopkins Forest and other regional sites to explore phenomena ranging from micro-climate and snow pack; to physiological, morphological, and behavioral adaptations of flora and fauna; to winter plant identification, wildlife observation and tracking; to personal acclimation to the cold. We will also consider the effects of climate change and human impacts upon the winter landscape. Students will be expected to spend some time out of class individually making and recording observations. Field activities will be bolstered by readings and class discussions. Students should be prepared to spend many hours out in the elements and be able to hike several miles through snow. Some field trips may necessitate that students be away from campus beyond normal class hours.
Requirements: 10-page paper or equivalent work.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 10.
Preference to students who are closer to graduating.
Cost: $100.
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructor: DREW JONES
Sponsor: BRADBURD

Drew Jones has been the Manager of Hopkins Memorial Forest for thirteen years. He has a Masters Degree in Forestry and has worked as a Wildlife Biologist and Naturalist from the Southern Appalachians to the North Woods.

ENVI 12 Landscape Photography (Sames as GEOS 12)
(See under GEOS 12 for full description.)

ENVI 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Past, Its Uncertain Future (Same as JLST 13)
(See under JLST 13 for full description.)

ENVI 14 Rethinking School: Connecting Education, Environment and Community
This course will examine the idea of using the environment and community as a central focus for designing the public school system to deliver an education that parents value and that students want. The United States' public school system has the potential to deliver engaging and stimulating instruction that students find relevant and fun. We will explore using the environment as a learning tool, using technology that blends games with instruction and using communities to support students' education that will prepare students for higher education or a vocation, with the knowledge to protect and use wisely the world's natural resources and ecosystem processes.
We will examine the prominence of advertising and media as a superbly well-financed education system that achieves its mission of training consumers, but often in ways that can be detrimental to the health of the individual and of earth's processes. We will juxtapose that media and advertising system with the poorly financed public school system and study methods that the public schools can use to provide a stimulating education that focuses on educating the whole person equipped to make decisions that are beneficial to their health, wellbeing and living a productive life, and being expert in the knowledge that the earth's systems that must remain healthy and productive as well.
We will examine theories of learning using resources of the most advanced thinkers. We'll explore teaching models ranging from strict rote memorization to the experiential less structured formats found in some school systems.
A portion of the course will be hands-on and computer-based. We will learn about the upside down classroom, and the student centered learning while the teacher acts as a coach rather than a content delivery manager. We'll explore California's Education and the Environment Initiative and progress other states are making in the efforts to raise environmental literacy among an entire population.
We'll explore education theories including studies that show better student engagement when topics are taught through an environmental lens. We'll discuss theories about how learning happens and how it affects behavior change, looking especially at the Transcendent Function. And we'll discuss the efficacy of using the education system to foster behavior change.
Evaluation will be based on a 4- to 6-page essay and a PowerPoint presentation to the class on a topic of the student's choosing and approved by the instructor. Attendance and participation will also be taken into account.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 16.
Instructor will select based on consultation with sponsor.
Cost: none.
Meeting time: MTR 10:00-12:00.
Instructor: WILL PARISH (will@wattif.org)
Sponsor: BRADBURD

Will Parish '75, is the Executive Director of Ten Strands, Connecting Education, Environment and Community, the non-profit organization that he founded whose mission is to ensure that all students have access to an engaging and stimulating environmental education that will benefit them in school and in life. During his 30-year career, he has been a lawyer, entrepreneur, CA State Curriculum Commissioner, high school science teacher, airplane flight instructor, and adventurer-he drove a Jeep around the world.

ENVI 15 Geology of the National Parks (Same as GEOS 15)
(See under GEOS 15 for full description.)

ENVI 16 Shaping an Eco-Activist's LifeAddressing
What spurs an individual to become an environmental activist? What can the myriad of personal trajectories of those moved to address a pressing environmental concern teach us about how to achieve meaningful change?
This course will delve into the personal narratives of a broad range of eco-activists (US based and international), some still active today. We will be examining campaigns on issues as varied as fracking, pesticide use, species protection, and climate change and will encounter proponents of diverse tactics including non-violent protest, public awareness raising, litigation, and "monkey-wrenching." These life stories will be explored trough activists' own writings, films, and in some cases in person interactions with the class.
Requirements: three 3-page papers and a presentation.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 11.
Preference will be given to ENVP and ENVS majors and ENVI concentrators.
Cost: $120.
Meeting time: mornings.
KOHLER

ENVI 17 The Winter Naturalist's Journal (Same as ENGL 17)
This course will engage with the natural world though writing, drawing, and personal observation, supported by reading and discussion. Students will spend time out of doors exploring the ecosystem of the Williamstown area, and indoors practising reflective writing (both poetry and prose), and observational drawing. Everyone will be required to keep a nature journal, to be shared and displayed as part of the final project. This course is designed for students who are interested in environmental studies, creative writing and drawing.
Requirements: writing component is the equivalent of a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost: $60 for books and art supplies.
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructor: CHRISTIAN MCEWEN (ChristianMcEwen@aol.com)
Sponsor: BRADBURD

Christian McEwen (instructor) Christian McEwen is the author of "World Enough & Time: On Creativity and Slowing Down," and the editor of "Jo's Girls: Tomboy Tales of High Adventure" (1997) and "The Alphabet of the Trees: A Guide to Nature Writing" (2000). She lives in Northampton, MA.

ENVI 26 Urban Design for Climate Change (Same as ARTS 26)
(See under ARTS 26 for full description.)

ENVI 27 Snowed-in on a Vermont farm: Understanding Patterns in a Community Through Food (Same as SPEC 27)
(See under SPEC 27 for full description.)

ENVI 31 Senior Research and Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Environmental Studies 493-494.

GEOSCIENCES

GEOS 12 Landscape Photography (Sames as ENVI 12)
This class will broaden students' appreciation for the appearance and history of the landscape and teach the skills of making a successful photograph. Williamstown, situated in a valley between the Green and Taconic Mountains and bisected by the Green and Hoosic Rivers, is a place of great natural beauty. The local landscape is a subject that inspires both professional and amateur photographers alike. While Williamstown will be the subject of most of our work, we will use it to learn principles of universal application. Students will discover the importance of light in making a photograph. They will also learn camera skills and the mechanics of digital photography, which will be reviewed at biweekly class meetings. In addition to photographing and critiquing images, the class will visit collections at the Clark Art Institute and WCMA to see original work and examine and discuss books on reserve at Sawyer Library. An overview of the history of landscape photography will be provided with an emphasis on American workers such as Carlton Watkins, Eadweard Muybridge, Alfred Stieglitz, Eliot Porter and Ansel Adams. We will also demonstrate examples of different cameras such as a large format. Students will produce a body of successful photographs that will be projected at the Winter Study presentation day and on display at http://drm.williams.edu/projects/.
Students will submit short written explanations with each of their photographic assignments.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, the student's photography, and their presentation.
Prerequisites: students will need a digital single lens reflex camera (DSLR) or a new generation electronic viewfinder (DSL) camera such as those by Sony or Olympus. See http://digital-photography-school.com/blog/how-to-buy-a-dslr-camera/. Also a laptop pc with Adobe Lightroom.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Preference given to first-year students and sophomores.
Cost: $100.
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructor: NICHOLAS WHITMAN (nwhitman@roadrunner.com)
Sponsor: COX

Nicholas Whitman is a professional photographer and the former Curator of Photography at the New Bedford Whaling Museum. A 1977 graduate of the Rochester Institute of Technology, he has honed his craft to make landscape photographs of power and depth. See more at www.nwphoto.com.

GEOS 15 Geology of the National Parks (Same as ENVI 15)
A vicarious trip through a variety of national parks and monuments in the U.S. and Canada, with emphasis on the geological basis for their spectacular scenery. Areas to be studied will be selected in order to portray a wide range of geologic processes (volcanism, desert erosion, mountain-building, glaciation, etc.). The class will meet most mornings during the first two weeks for highly illustrated lectures and discussions, supplemented by the interpretation of topographic and geologic maps and by out-of-class study of rock samples. Readings will be from a paperback text (PARKS AND PLATES) as well as short publications by the U.S. Geological Survey and various natural history associations. The second part of the month will involve independent study and the preparation of an oral presentation about the geology of a park or monument of the student's choice. The student oral reports during the final week will be comprehensive and well illustrated, using PowerPoint, maps, samples and other reference materials. A detailed outline and bibliography will be distributed by the presenter at the time of the report.
Requirements: based on attendance, participation, and the quality of the oral report.
Prerequisites: none; open only to students with no previous college-level study of PHYSICAL geology.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Preference to first-year students.
Cost: about $60 for the text.
Meeting time: mornings.
WOBUS

GEOS 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Geology 493-494.

GERMAN

GERM S.P. Sustaining Program for German 101-102
Something new and different for students enrolled in German 101-102. Practice in the use of German for everyday purposes; creation and performance of short dramatic sketches through group collaboration; games; songs; storytelling; reading. No homework.
Requirements: active participation and regular attendance earn a "Pass" grade.
Prerequisites: German 101 or equivalent. Limited to German 101-102 students.
Cost: approximately $5 for photocopied materials.
Meeting time: mornings, three times a week 9-9:50 a.m.

GERM 11 A Taste of Austria (Same as MATH 11)
(See under MATH 11 for full description.)

GERM 30 Honors Project
To be taken by honors candidates following other than the normal thesis route.

GERM 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for German 493-494.

HISTORY

HIST 10 The South in Black and White (Same as AFR 10)
The history of the American South is a racial one, where blacks and whites lived their lives intertwined and disconnected. Peculiar intimacies produced odd affections, deep animosity, and profound fears. This course uses documentary materials, including autobiographies and memoirs; oral histories and narratives; essays and novels; and film and music to consider the racial change that took place in the South in the 20th Century.
Requirements: 8- to 10-page paper.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 25.
Method of selection: in reverse class order, seniors first.
Cost: $100.
Meeting time: afternoons, TWR
DEW and BROWN

HIST 11 Alexander the Great (Same as CLAS 11)
(See under CLAS 11 for full description.)

HIST 12 Soccer and Fever Pitch in the 21st Century
This course will use Nick Hornby's 1992 book Fever Pitch as the basis for examinations of the historical and cultural meanings of soccer fandom in specific national and transnational contexts. This course will examine both the construction of "regular" vs. "rabid" soccer fans and the lived experience of those branded as hooligans. We will analyze both more recent accounts and film depictions to address questions that include: How and why does someone identify with a particular club or national side? What (and how) do soccer/football/futebol/fútbol/calcio teams mean to their supporters? Are racism and violence inevitable outgrowths of passionate team support or just objectionable but commonplace ones?
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a 10-page paper.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 30.
Preference to History majors and students with strong backgrounds in soccer.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: mornings.
KITTLESON

HIST 13 The Horse Wrote History (Same as AMST 13)
"A dog may be man's best friend," a well-worn anonymous quote goes, "but the horse wrote history." In the last hundred years, it was the arrival of the "horseless carriage" in the 1910s that made many commentators worry that actual horses might exit the historical stage: what purpose would they serve with the arrival of much faster automobiles and trucks? While the population of domestic horses did diminish, nonetheless, current estimates of domestic horses in the United States range between 7 and 9 million horses, and all forms of equine recreation, and of course horse racing, remain immensely popular in this country. We clearly still need horses, but why? What has changed historically about horses' place in American culture? What do horses say about the changing patterns of American life and about our understandings of ourselves as individuals? And how have the meanings that Americans have assigned to horses differed from those of other cultures and societies?
This course is for the non-rider and rider alike; we will use wide-ranging materials to explore these questions-academic texts, memoirs, conversations with equine professionals, films, and at least one field trip.
Evaluation will be based on short, informal writing responses to the assigned material and a final, interdisciplinary project.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 30.
Cost: $50-75.
Meeting time: mornings, 6 hours of class-time a week, plus a couple hours of additional activity a week, such as film viewing, in addition to reading.
MERRILL

HIST 14 The Name of the Rose
Heresy, labyrinths, libraries, sex, death and laughter: All are central to The Name of the Rose, a murder mystery, historical satire, medievalist fantasy, philosophical meditation, and homage to Arthur Conan Doyle penned by the Italian medievalist Umberto Eco in 1980. The setting is an unnamed Italian monastery in 1327; the protagonist is Brother William of Baskerville, a Franciscan friar and detective in the tradition of Sherlock Holmes. He and his novice Adso happen to arrive just hours after a mysterious death has put the entire monastery on edge. William agrees to investigate, but more murders follow, one each over the next seven days- all of them (as William and Adso discover) according to a strange and disturbing apocalyptic pattern. Eco's intricate and textured novel has been widely acclaimed not only as a significant work of literature, but also as an unusually insightful and sophisticated work of historical fiction; few novels enjoy as much cred among the medievalist community. In this course we will experience Eco's novel as entertaining detective fiction, as a work of literature, and as a port of entry into the later medieval world. In addition to Eco's novel, we will consider some of its literary influences (including Doyle and Jorge Luis Borges), as well as several relevant primary sources for the medieval world.
Evaluation will depend upon attendance, class participation, and a series of short reading responses.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 30.
Preference for prior coursework in medieval history.
Cost: $30.
Meeting time: afternoons.
KNIBBS

HIST 15 Education Reform: Is it Innovation or Destruction? (Same as PSCI 15)
Some view education reform as a noble cause, others see it as cover for insidious motives such as privatization and profiteering. This course examines current debates in U.S. K-12 education, such as charter schools, teacher preparation and evaluation, and national standards, through the lens of reformers and their critics. Topics will explore the historical context and politics of national, state and local control over public education, and the role of parents in reforming their children's schools.
Students will meet one day each week from 10 a.m. to 3:50 p.m. to discuss and debate these topics, visit schools and education agencies, and meet with experts in the field. Student teams will be assigned a topic each week to research and prepare to debate in class. In addition, students will be expected to read selected texts and continue discussions online by posting short essays and critically responding to their peers.
Evaluation will be based on 1) weekly two-page essays plus critical responses to peer essays, and 2) preparation for and performance in debates.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: 10 a.m. to 3:50 p.m. one day per week to allow for discussion, debates and visits to schools and government agencies. In addition, the course will require ongoing online discussions outside of class.
Instructor: SIMEON STOLZBERG (stolzberg@aol.com)
Sponsor: SINIAWER

Simeon Stolzberg ('92) is an education consultant in new school development and school evaluation and improvement. He served in the Clinton administration at the U.S. Department of Education and has conducted national research and evaluation of federal education programs for disadvantaged children. He is the founder of the Berkshire Arts & Technology Charter School and has been a teacher and principal in inner city charter and district schools. Most recently he was the Director of School Evaluation for the SUNY Charter Schools Institute and has taught graduate education courses for Teach for America corps members.

HIST 16 From Pocahontas to Crazy Horse: Realities and Representations of Iconic Native Americans
In this course, we will explore the lives and times of four iconic Native Americans-as well as how their stories are constantly interpreted and reinterpreted-as a way of understanding more about both the history of Native North America and the national myths of the United States. Most of these figures are familiar from textbook and legend: Pocahontas, the original "Indian Princess"; Squanto, who famously taught the Pilgrims how to cultivate maize; Sacagawea, the quintessential guide, interpreter, and cultural go-between of the Lewis and Clark expedition; and Crazy Horse, a Lakota warrior and leader who participated in the Battle of the Little Big Horn and is often credited with Native success at Custer's Last Stand. By considering how these individuals' stories have been told through a variety of media such as films, websites, historic sites, sculpture, and more, we will explore the symbolic uses of these individuals in American culture. We will also delve into the realities behind the symbols to contrast the actual experiences of diverse Native peoples with the stereotypes that continue to evolve into the present day. Requirements: attendance, class preparation, final project analyzing local representation of Native peoples/pasts/cultures.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 25.
Preference: History majors.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: mornings, two days a week for three hours; students will view films and other media and complete secondary reading assignments outside of class.
Instructor: LAURA SPERO
Sponsor: SINIAWER

Laura Keenan Spero received her Ph.D. in History from the University of Pennsylvania. She is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture.

HIST 17 Eyewitness to the Civil Rights Movement: Mississippi 1964-'65
During sixteen months in 1964-'65, I worked as a civil rights organizer in rural Mississippi with the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). I witnessed and aided in the heroic effort by black citizens to dismantle the pervasive structure of Jim Crow that had oppressed them for generations. I worked with relatively uneducated people who had the stature of giants. The society I encountered was an apartheid America-a vicious police state reinforced by government and vigilante violence-beyond the understanding of most Americans and certainly beyond the imagination of young people today. The course will explore this transformative moment in recent American history, largely thru discussion. Topics will include nonviolence, the role of the black church, black nationalism, Malcolm X and Black Power, the role of women, the role of whites, the third party politics of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and the actions of the federal government during the civil rights era. The course will examine how these events and issues have played out over the ensuing decades, up to and including the election of Barack Obama. Documentary films as well as the music of the period will be utilized. Three books covering the period will be assigned. Other veterans of the civil rights movement will visit the class to tell their stories. It is the intent of the instructor to convey the immediacy that only first person experience can invoke.
Evaluation will be based on class participation and a final project in any media approved by the instructor.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost: $125.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Instructor: CHRIS WILLIAMS (chris.wiliamsvt@gmail.com)
Sponsor: SINIAWER

Chris Williams is the former College architect. He has offered Winter Study coursed at Williams on previous occasions and has taught courses in architecture at Pratt Institute and Parsons School of Design in New York City.

HIST 18 Sex in the Berkshires (Same as AMST 18 and WGSS 18)
(See under WGSS 18 for full description.)

HIST 26 Teaching, Doctoring and Living With Refugees and Immigrants (Same as AMST 26 and SPEC 26)
(See under SPEC 26 for full description.)

HIST 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by all senior honors students who are registered for HIST 493 (Fall) and HIST 494 (Spring), HIST 31 allows thesis writers to complete their research and prepare a draft chapter, due at the end of WSP.
SINIAWER

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

INST 25 Art of Experience in Egypt (Same as ARTS 25)
This travel course begins in Williamstown where students begin to consider historical and cultural frameworks along with guidelines for travel in the Middle- EasVNorth Africa. We read and discuss The Imaginary Orient by Linda Nochlin and The Yacoubian Building by Alaa AI Aswany, as well as writings on current events, ancient Egyptian art, and other relevant texts. Students are introduced to techniques of watercolor painting prior to departure during a fall semester workshop and during the first days of Winter Study on campus. In terms of art production while in Egypt: students are expected to keep an extensive sketchbook that visually documents each day's encounters, as well as attend studio workshops and critique sessions, and complete drawing and watercolor assignments. We spend the first 5 days in Cairo where students explore and visually document artist studios, museums, and other cultural sites. Overnight train to takes us to Luxor where we spend 8 days working with art students from the Luxor College of Fine Art: students will draw at cultural sites like Hassan Fathy's New Gourna Village and Karnak Temple, in the marketplace, and on the Luxor College campus. We then spend four days in the Upper Egyptian city of Aswan exploring the Nile at its most spectacular and encountering the Sudanese-influenced Nubian culture. In Aswan we focus on drawing the landscape and Nubian villages, before heading back to Cairo where we visit the Giza Pyramids and participate in a final group critique.
Requirements: completed sketchbooks and art assignments including a final project, a short paper about one of the Egyptian artists encountered, and a supportive demeanor for positive group dynamics.
Prerequisites: none, but some drawing experience highly recommended. Not open to first-year students.
Enrollment limit: 9.
Method for selection: applications, interviews, and seniority.
Cost: $3350.
Meeting: this course requires more preparation than is usual for a WSP course; there are mandatory evening orientation meetings and a studio workshop during the Fall semester. Preliminary sketchbook work and assigned readings must be completed by the start of Winter Study Period. The first two or three days of Winter Study will take place on the Williams College campus for studio workshops, orientation, and reading discussions. Only those who can attend from the first day of Winter Study are eligible for this trip. Students will present their work to the Williams Community upon return to campus.
Instructor: JULIA MORGAN-LEAMON
Sponsor: BERNHARDSSON

Julia Morgan-Leamon is a painter, installation artist, and media producer. She received her MFA in Visual Arts from Vermont College of Fine Arts, and her BA in Studio Art from Mount Holyoke College. In 2009, she was one of 25 international artists invited to participate in the Luxor International Painting Symposium and residency.

INST 26 Morocco (Same as ENGL 25 and PHIL 25)
(See under PHIL 25 for full description.)

INST 30 Senior Honors Project
To be taken by candidates for honors in International Studies.

JEWISH STUDIES

JWST 10 Russian Jewish Filmmakers and Writers as Critics of Power
Many of the most outspoken critics of Vladimir Putin's Russia have been Russian Jewish journalists, novelists, and film directors. We will examine the modalities of non-conformism in the fiction of Gary Shteyngart, the films of Pavel Lounguine, and the trenchant political essays, blogs, and short stories of the sister and brother journalist team of Masha and Keith Gessen. What are the key differences between the work of these public intellectuals and the dissent of political figures such as Garry Kasparov, Roman Abramovich and the late Boris Berezovsky? We will devote particular attention to Masha Gessen's writing and activism in support of LGBT rights in Russia, and to Louguine's two films about assimilation, corruption and the legacy of Stalinism in Russia, Tycoon: A New Russian (2002) and Tsar (2009).
Requirements: 10-page paper.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 15.
In the case of overenrollment, some preference will be given to concentrators in Jewish Studies.
Cost: none.
Meeting time: afternoons, six hours each week.
Instructor: ALEXANDAR MIHAILOVIC
Sponsor: DEKEL

Alexander Mihailovic is Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature and Russian at Hofstra University, and has recently taught in the Literature program at Bennington College, the English department at Williams, and the graduate program of Slavic at Brown University.

JWST 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for JWST 493 or 494. %%%

JLST 12 The Work of the Supreme Court: A Simulation (Same as SPEC 12)
(See under SPEC 12 for full description.)

JLST 13 United States Environmental Law: Its Historic Past, Its Uncertain Future (Same as ENVI 13)
Taught from the perspective of an experienced trial attorney, this course seeks to understand how we as Americans developed our consciousness towards the natural environment. What were the historical reasons why we treated the environment as we did during our travel westward from Jamestown in 1607 across 3,000 miles of unforgiving wilderness, brutal desert and towering mountains to the Pacific Ocean?
The course traces the development of this American consciousness through an examination of our law and our literature. The term "law" includes state and federal judicial decisions and legislation, beginning with the presidency of that "bully man," Theodore Roosevelt, and continuing through the decades following the 1970s when much of the legal basis for the American environmental protection movement was established. The term "literature" includes not just the written word (the first book we look at is "The Lorax" by your favorite childhood author, Dr. Seuss) but also painting, sculpture, and music. Nothing too heavy! We will examine the historical and legal choices Americans have made which have put our environment on trial. What in our development as a nation explains this quintessentially American phenomenon? While our journey begins with the Puritans of New England and the planters of Virginia and their predecessors in the New World, we move swiftly to the beginning of the modern era of environmental law and to its now uncertain future. During each class we will have a free-ranging discussion based upon a thorough examination of the materials assigned-historical texts, federal environmental protection statutes, Supreme Court opinions interpreting those statutes (yes, Mr. Justice Antonin Scalia is long-winded, and he seriously believes he is the smartest man on the Court (Chief Justice John Roberts is!), law review articles and texts, and current newspaper articles. There will be five one-page, single-spaced "clerk's notes" required covering historical periods (e.g., the transportation revolution in the 1790s, the Lewis and Clark Expedition, Manifest Destiny, the Gilded Age, the "trigger events" leading to the flood of federal legislation beginning in 1970, and the like) designed to form the basis for each class's discussion. We will challenge openly and freely everything we have read, reviewed and written. I teach this course as if it were the first year of law school-questions come fast and furious to everyone, me included. My students in the past seem to have enjoyed the give and take. No question is wrong, no question is right-until both are further examined.
This course will be presented from a litigator's point of view, that is to say, both the practical and the theoretical, emphasizing what is possible to achieve in the litigator's real world as informed by what the academician would present from the security of the classroom.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, classroom participation and 5 one-page, single spaced papers called "clerk's notes."
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost to students: $80 for books and materials.
Meeting time: MWF 10-noon.
Instructor: PHILIP R. MCKNIGHT '65
Sponsor: SHANKS

Philip R. McKnight'65 is a trial and appellate attorney. At Williams he completed the honors program for both American History and Literature and European History. He earned his law degree from The University of Chicago Law School and then practiced in the state and federal courts of New York and Connecticut, as well as in Europe.

JLST 17 Learning Intervention for Troubled Teens (LIFFT)
The objective of this program and winter study course is to provide an alternative sentence for adolescents involved in the Juvenile Court system in Berkshire County. Many of these children cut school, are disruptive in the classroom, and do not find learning stimulating. The goal of this program is to teach these children, through experience, that learning can be fun, providing them with the motivation to succeed in school. These students, under the guidance of Williams College undergraduates, will select a topic of interest and learn how to research and present this topic to their peers in the program, with access to Williams College facilities. Williams undergraduate students will gain experience in teaching and motivating troubled teenagers and will also present a topic of their choosing to the students in the program, modeling a classroom setting. Furthermore, Williams students will be exposed to the Juvenile Court system, gaining insight into the causes of and solutions to the incidence of juvenile crime. Williams students will be expected to read relevant training materials, meet with their teenagers three times a week in the afternoon, give a final presentation, and keep a weekly journal detailing the meetings.
Evaluation will be based on the quality of the journal and the Williams students' own topic presentations.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 8.
Preference to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Students will be asked to write a paragraph describing why they want to take the course.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: students will meet on Mondays for a Group Discussion from 2-4 PM, Tuesdays-Thursdays with their teens from 3-5 PM, and on Fridays for field trips from 8 AM-12 PM. The estimated total required time per week is 12 hours.
Instructor: MICHAEL WYNN (mwynn@pittsfieldpd.org)
Sponsor: SHANKS

Mike Wynn is the Chief of the Pittsfield Police Department and graduated from Williams in 1993.

LATINA/O STUDIES

LATS 25 The US-Mexico Border (Same as RLSP 25)
(See under RLSP 25 for full description.)

LATS 31 Latina/o Honors Thesis Seminar
Students must register for this course to complete an honors project begun in the fall or begin one to be finished in the spring.
Prerequisite: approval of program chair.
Enrollment limited to senior honors candidates.

LEADERSHIP STUDIES

LEAD 10 Institutional Leadership and Social Responsibility
This course will examine a wide variety of issues related to leadership and responsibility, in both public- and private-sector settings. We will explore these issues through the experiences of men and women who have held leadership roles in these contexts. We will look at issues of corruption and fraud in the private sector. We will examine the changing role of lawyers in advising and guiding their clients. We will look at environmental issues from the perspective of both private institutions and government regulators. We will discuss issues facing leaders in higher education. We will look at questions of responsibility facing political leaders at the state level in our federal system. And we will examine leadership issues as they have arisen in historical contexts, including crucial questions regarding the origins and development of American involvement in Asia. The majority of class sessions will be led by guest speakers, most, though not all, of whom are distinguished alumni of the college. Students will be expected to take an active role in introducing and helping to lead discussions involving the guest speakers.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, preparation, and participation in class discussions, and a final 10-page paper. You should do the readings assigned before class. All readings are online with the exception of one reading packet, which will be handed out in class, and one book. You are expected to purchase the latter, available at Water Street Books: Profiles in Leadership, edited by Walter Isaacson.
No prerequisites. Enrollment limit: 18.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: mornings.
EARL DUDLEY and FRED HITZ (Instructors)
MELLOW (Sponsor)

Earl Dudley-Professor of Law, University of Virginia School of Law, 1989-2008; Private law practice, Washington, DC 1968-1975, 1977-1989; General Counsel, Judiciary Committee, U.S. House of Representatives, 1975-1977.

Fred Hitz teaches at the University of Virginia Law School.

LEAD 11 The Changing Landscape of Journalism (Same as ENGL 11)
(See under ENGL 11 for full description.)

LEAD 12 Three Roosevelt Elections
In the presidential election of 1932, as the country was plummeting to rock bottom in Great Depression, New York's Democratic governor Franklin Roosevelt challenged incumbent President Herbert Hoover. Four years later, in the election of 1936, FDR successfully defended his New Deal record against his Republican challenger, Governor Alf Landon of Kansas. And in 1940, as European democracies fell one by one to the merciless Nazi onslaught and as American isolationists sought to appease Hitler, Roosevelt ran for an unprecedented third term, the first and only president ever to do so.
In this course we will study these three consequential elections. After reading works of history for background, we will rely on primary source material-online data bases for historical newspapers, news magazines, campaign speeches; polling data; diaries; memoirs-to understand and analyze the events, personalities, issues, and campaign strategies.
Requirements: students will give weekly class presentations and write one final paper.
Enrollment limit: 10.
Preference given to students with background in American history and American political science.
Cost: approximately $50 for books and reading packet.
Meeting time: afternoons.
DUNN

LEAD 14 The CIA and the War on Terror (Same as PSCI 14)
(See under PSCI 14 for full description.)

LEAD 17 Social Entrepreneurship: Innovating in the Social Sector (Same as ECON 17 and POEC 17)
(See under POEC 17 for full description.)

LEAD 18 Wilderness Trip Leadership & Leadership in Wilderness Emergency Care
This Winter Study project is for students who would like to participate in an off-campus experiential education opportunity. Students will be required to research an appropriate accredited program i.e., National Outdoor Leadership School, Outward Bound etc., that will provide a suitable learning environment and be at least 14 days in length. The Director of the Williams Outing Club will assist students in their search if necessary. Upon choosing a program and being accepted, students will meet with the Director in a pre-program meeting in December to create a framework for observing group dynamics and studying a variety of leadership styles. A required 10-page paper based on their journals will be required immediately after their return to campus for the start of third quarter. There will also be a follow up class to debrief the experience in the first week of February. All programs must meet with the approval of the Outing Club Director. In addition to off-campus opportunities, there will be a Wilderness First Responder Emergency Care course that will take place on campus which is open to all class years. Contact Scott Lewis for details.
Requirements: course approval by WOC Director, daily journal writing with focus on leadership and group dynamics, 10-page paper and 2 class meetings pre and post trip. Student assessment will be based on ten page paper and class discussions.
No prerequisites. Off-campus opportunities are not open to first-year students. Interested students must consult with WOC Director before registration.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost to student will vary depending on the program selected-range is generally from $1,500-3,000.
Instructor: SCOTT LEWIS, Director of the Outing Club
Sponsor: MELLOW

LEAD 20 Student Leadership Development (Same as SPEC 20)
(See under SPEC 20 for full description.)

MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS

MATH 10 A Revolution: Physical Mathematics
Through most of history, when math and science have interacted, it has overwhelmingly been the case that it is the mathematics that has shaped the science:

Mathematics => Science

In the early 1980s, the arrow was reversed, resulting in a profound change in how new mathematics is being discovered. This revolutionary approach is increasingly being called Physical Mathematics. This course will be a popular introduction to this revolution. For example, we will explore the intimate link between how heat flows in a frying pan, how stock prices change and how curvature of three dimensional objects can vary. We will also see how properties of real numbers have been discovered by examining the mathematics behind why ice melts. We will see the truly remarkable idea that understanding particle physics can explain how many conics are tangent to five fixed conic curves in the plane (here the point is these two types of problems should have no obvious connection). Future generations will see Physical Mathematics as one of the key ideas of our era. This course is aimed for people who want to get a feel for this revolution.
Evaluation will be based on problem sets and/or a 10-page paper.
Prerequisites: MATH 130 (formerly 103) or some knowledge of calculus or permission of the instructor.
Enrollment limit: 30. If overenrolled, students will be selected by interest in seeing how mathematicians discover new mathematics.
Cost: $30. for text.
Meeting time: afternoons.
GARRITY

MATH 11 A Taste of Austria (Same as GERM 11)
This course introduces students to elements of the Austrian culture around the turn of the 19th century up to today. Students will learn and prepare presentations about significant contributions to the arts and sciences from Austrians such as musician Gustav Mahler, artist Gustav Klimt, scientist Karl Landsteiner or poet Stefan Zweig. Other activities include learning how to dance the Viennese waltz composed by Johann Strauss (in case you want to attend Austria's main annual society event, the Opernball in Vienna) or how to prepare Wienerschnitzel or bake Sachertorte (the delicious cake offered by the Hotel Sacher in Vienna). We will also pursue typical Austrian winter activities such as down hill or cross country skiing, sledding or skating. The course will be conducted in both German and English.
Evaluation will be based on attendance, a 10-page paper (including presentation slides) and a corresponding presentation on a topic with an Austrian connection (possible topics will be suggested, but students can choose their own) and class discussions.
Prerequisites: no prerequisites necessary although some fluency in German is welcome.
Enrollment limit: 24. Preference will be by random selection.
Cost: $90.
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructor: SOPHIA KLINGENBERG (sklingen@williams.edu)
Sponsor: S. JOHNSON

Sophia Klingenberg was born in Graz, Austria. She graduated from the Vienna University Medical School with a doctorate in Medicine in 2004. She has worked at the University of Florida, Dept. of Pathobiology as a research scholar for three years and is currently finishing her residency in general medicine in Graz, Austria.

MATH 12 The Mathematics of Legos
Since their introduction in 1949, Legos have challenged and entertained millions. In this course we'll explore some of the connections between Legos, mathematics and popular culture. Topics include the following:
1. Given a collection of Lego bricks, how many different structures may be built using only the standard snapping? The analysis requires us to develop some of the theory of combinatorics, and deal with the issue of two configurations that look different but are the same after standard moves (such as rotation, flipping about a line, and so on). We will use this problem as a springboard to study related issues in mathematics, especially in game theory.
2. Given a collection of Lego bricks, how can you build desired objects? This ranges from building miniature replicas to functional items (which can now be done through `special' pieces).
3. The business model of the Lego Group has changed greatly since the '40s and '50s. While they still hold their products to the highest standard, the generic themes (such as city and space) are now greatly supplemented by various alliances (Superheros, Star Wars, Harry Potter, Lord of The Rings, ...). We will examine some business cases involving Lego in order to get a sense of how companies determine priorities, including a discussion of the recent Lego Friends line and gender issues.
4. One of the greatest computational advances is the ability to parallelize certain computations. Some programs must be run in order, where Step N cannot be done until Step N-1 is completed. Other problems, however, are such that multiple steps can be done simultaneously; examples include GIMPS (the Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search), SETI, mapping the human genome, factorizing numbers, and checking the Riemann Hypothesis. We will discuss the general theory of such computations and its effect on attacking important problems. We will implement our skills by parallelizing the building of the LEGO Star Wars Superstar Destroyer; as it is 3152 pieces, we see the need of having a good, efficient strategy if we are to complete it during the course!
Evaluation will be based on class participation, the completion of problem sets involving the mathematical concepts, a final report on one of the topics, and adherence to `Leg Godt'
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 25.
Preference will be determined if needed by an application essay, interview and/or meeting.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: TBD.
MILLER

MATH 13 Calculus Preparation
This course will help students prepare for a Spring Semester Math 130 or Math 140 course by reviewing pre-calculus and introductory calculus material, and covering topics that may be missing from a student's background.
Students will meet with the instructor to discuss their background and plan a course of study. Coursework will be done independently and working in small groups with the instructor.
Students are placed in this course by a Quantitative Skills Advisor, and must be preregistered for Math 130 or Math 140. If you feel this is an appropriate course for you, please contact the Math/Stat department to arrange an interview.
Evaluation will be based on participation, homework and quizzes.
Prerequisites: placement by a quantitative skills advisor.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Cost: $30.
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructor: LORI PEDERSEN (Lori.Pedersen@williams.edu)
Sponsor: S. JOHNSON

Lori Pedersen has taught many regular semester courses at Williams including precalculus, calculus and discrete mathematics.

MATH 14 An Introduction to the Chinese Tea Culture
Are you interested in the Chinese tea culture? It is not exaggerated to say that tea is a daily-life necessity in China: people drink tea in the morning, at work, and when hanging out with friends and family. The Chinese tea tasting has a long history and profound meaning that is considered to be one of the treasures in the Chinese culture. Sometimes tea is compared to personality: pleasant, elegant, low-keyed but long-lasting. This course introduces the five famous branches of Chinese tea: green tea, black tea, oolong tea, scented tea, and compressed tea. Besides studying the history, geography, representative tea, production, nutrition, taste, and market price of different kinds of tea, students will learn how to choose the matching tea wares to serve tea at various occasions, how to prepare tea in the traditional way so as to keep its best taste, etc. Students will have an opportunity to try various tea purchased directly from China. In addition, each student will have hands-on experience to prepare tea and present his/her favorite Chinese tea in class. This course is a combination of lectures, demonstrations, tea tasting, and films that are related to Chinese tea culture. Let's heat up the water, make some tea, and enjoy!
Evaluation will be based on attendance, in-class participation, and a final 5-page paper and presentation.
Prerequisites: none. Interest in Chinese culture is assumed. (Speaking Chinese is not required but welcome).
Enrollment limit: 12.
Preference will be given to students with basic Chinese language skills.
Cost: none.
Meeting time: mornings.
QING WANG

MATH 30 Senior Project
To be taken by candidates for honors in Mathematics other than by thesis route.

MATH 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Mathematics 493-494.

MUSIC

MUS 10 Crime of the Century: The Kennedy Assassination
The goal of this course, offered in conjunction with the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, will be to provide students with a broad overview of the wide ranging body of writing relating to the crime, including various assessments of the official explanation of events embodied in The Warren Commission Report.
We will begin by introducing targeted readings designed to introduce students to the basic historical context of the crime and the era in which it occurred. We will then explore issues relating to the establishment of the facts of the case, as well as questions of motivation and opportunity. Who were the principal players alleged to have been involved, and what relationships existed between them prior to the crime? Students will be expected to critically assess the various sources presented in the readings and films considered. What were the agendas of those writing about the case?
The Dramatis Personae include the President, his brother and then Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, Mafia bosses Sam Giancana (Chicago) and Carlos Marcello (New Orleans), FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover, alleged assassin Lee Harvey Oswald, and Oswald's assassin Jack Ruby, among others.
Reading will average 200 pages a week from a reading packet created by the instructor, focusing on the controversy surrounding the findings and numerous critical rebuttals of The Warren Commission Report, and including, besides the report itself, excerpts from biographies of the main players. These readings will be supplemented by a critical evaluation of the movie "JFK", which students will be expected to watch on their own outside of class prior to class discussion, and two guest lectures by a retired journalist who has studied the literature extensively. A representative sample of the many sources from which the reading packet material will be drawn are:
Accessories After the Fact by Sylvia Meagher (1967)
Mafia Kingfish, Carlos Marcello and the Assassination of John F. Kennedy by John H. Davis (1989)
JFK assassination logic [electronic resource] : how to think about claims of conspiracy, by John McAdams (2011)
Official & Confidential, The Secret Life of J. Edgar Hoover by Anthony Summers (2012)
Rush to Judgment by Mark Lane (1966)
The Warren Commission Report (1964, 1992)
The House Select Committee on Assassinations Report (1979)
Evaluation by means of a final 10-page paper with an optional alternative of an in class group presentation.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 30.
If overenrolled, students will be asked to submit a brief essay stating their reason (s) for wishing to take the class.
Cost: approxinately $30 for reading packet.
Meeting times: Tuesday through Thursday daytime but timeframe is open.
JAFFE

MUS 11 Tuning and Temperament
Our musical system conceals a fundamental flaw-an inherent, mathematical incommensurability of its intervals: a finite collection of tones cannot be built from pure fifths and thirds and also be closed at the octave (i.e. twelve fifths from C returns not to another C, but to the distinct pitch B#). Equal temperament is our modern solution to this problem: we make all fifths slightly impure, spreading the discrepancy between C and B# evenly among all intervals, thereby making the space between all tones exactly the same. Historically, this was always not so; in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, myriad competing methods arose to distribute the discrepancy in uneven but usable ways. As a result, different keys had different sounds-some were more harmonious, others less so; triads in those keys were not simply major or minor, but involved many shades of major and minor. Drawing on ancient legends, writers ascribed specific characters to particular keys, and such key characters undoubtedly shaped composers' choices: Mozart, for instance, reserved g minor for particularly tragic topics; E-flat suggested particular paths for modulation by Bach. The class will explore the theory, the mythology, and most importantly, the practice of diverse tuning systems from the Baroque era: much of the class work will involve learning how to tune a harpsichord, realizing various historical temperaments on the instrument, and performing works thereupon in multiple keys, exploring the distinct sound worlds those temperaments create.
Requirements: final tuning project with demonstration and short paper.
Evaluation will be based on a student's tuning project, and its accompanying presentation and paper.
Prerequisites: knowledge of basic musical rudiments (intervals, triads, keys).
Enrollment limit: 12.
Preference given to music majors, performers, and students who have taken a music theory course.
Cost: none.
Meeting times: mornings.
GOLLIN

MUS 12 The Operas of Giuseppe Verdi
The operas of Giuseppe Verdi have long captivated audiences with their soaring melodies, dramatic intensity, patriotic sentiments, and spectacular effects. With works such as Nabucco, La traviata, Rigoletto, Aida, and Otello, Verdi brought the 19th-century Italian operatic tradition to new aesthetic heights. Through lectures, discussion, and guided listening, this course explores Verdi's contribution to the field of opera by tracing the development of the Italian bel canto style and emergence of romantic naturalism in some of his greatest masterworks. If possible, we will take a field trip to see a performance of a Verdi opera.
Evaluation will be based on two tests and class participation. Attendance is mandatory.
Prerequisites:: none. An ability to read music is not required.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Preference given to freshmen and students with a demonstrated interest in music.
Cost: $75.
Meeting time: TWF, 10-noon; optional film viewings 2-3 evenings a week.
M. HIRSCH

MUS 13 History of American Popular Music
This course covers the development of American popular music from the birth of rock and roll in the 1950s to the music of the new millennium. This course will achieve two main objectives. First, students will learn how to speak intelligently about popular music by discussing its salient characteristics such as song form, instrumentation, and aspects of rhythm, melody, and harmony. Second, students will study connections between American popular music and significant cultural and political issues. Specifically, we will focus on one significant cultural event during each week of the Winter Study period: the civil rights movement of the 1960s, censorship in the 1980s, copyright infringement at the turn of the millennium, and musical responses to 9/11.
Concepts will be introduced primarily through lectures and listening, along with viewing of music videos and documentary excerpts.
Requirements: final paper (2500 words) and corresponding in-class presentation.
Evaluation will be based on completion of a final paper. Attendance and participation will also be taken into account.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Preference will be given to students who have not previously taken a music course.
Cost: $100.
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructor DANIEL PRINDLE (daniel.prindle@williams.edu)
Sponsor: W. A. SHEPPARD

Bassist and cellist Dan Prindle is a Ph.D. Candidate in Music Theory at the University of Massachusetts. Dan teaches Aural Skills labs in the music department at Williams College and he has been performing and recording popular music for over 15 years throughout the Northeast United States.

MUS 14 Classic American and European Musical Theatre (Same as THEA 14)
This Winter Study will give participants an opportunity to study and perform songs for one or more singers from great American musicals and European light operas. You have sung a solo, you have sung in chorus-now practice the exacting art of singing an ensemble on stage.
Selections from Kurt Weill's The Threepenny Opera will be a special focus. The course will culminate with a performance of ensembles, solos, and duets from a variety of musical theater shows. Other ensembles from European models may also be included. Singers, actors, and pianists are all welcome to participate. The course is intended especially for singers who wish to have some stage time, and for actors who wish to work on their singing.
Requirements: a student may fulfill the requirements of the course by performing, writing a 10-page discursive paper, or some combination of the two approved by the teacher.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Preference: instructor will communicate with those wishing to register either in person or via email.
Cost: none.
Meeting times: afternoons.
Instructor: KEITH KIBLER (kibler@verizon.net)
Sponsor: W. A. SHEPPARD

Keith Kibler has performed under some of the finest directors currently working including David Alden, Peter Sellars, Galina Vishnevskaya. He sang a major role in Kurt Weill's "Die Kleine Mahagonny" under Alvin Epstein with the American Repertory Theatre. He has been a featured soloist with the Boston Pops in American theater music. Keith Kibler is an adjunct teacher of singing at Williams College. He can be reached at kibler@verizon.net.

MUS 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Music 493, 494.

NEUROSCIENCE

NSCI 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Neuroscience 493-494.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 10 Food for Thought
This course will examine the philosophical, political and historical factors that underpin the American diet, how students' day-to-day food choices affect the future of human life on our planet, and finally, provide students with the basics of cooking. In part because I am a woman who broke through the ranks of a male-dominated profession, a corollary discussion will occur about how sex-differentiated roles in the procurement and production of food came to be.
First, we will consider the history of four foods: spices from Asia, sugar from the Caribbean, potatoes from the Andes, and cod from the North Atlantic. Why were spices important to Europeans? How did sugar contribute to the slave trade? How did the Andean potato contribute to the devastating effects of monoculture in Ireland? And finally, how did the humble cod lead to the first settlement of Massachusetts by the English?
Second, we will learn about the food traditions and land usage of Native Americans from New England, and the effects the English arrival had on both. We will visit Historic Deerfield and the Hancock Shaker Village for demonstrations of colonial daily life and technology of the 1700s and 1800s, respectively.
Third, we will consider the effect our modern food choices have on the future of human life. Students will choose a food and research the path it takes, the fossil fuels required, and the hidden costs we charge to future generations, in order to bring it to our plates today.
Finally, as a chef and teacher, I would like to give young people basic cooking skills to provide them with confidence in the kitchen, and leave them with a desire to learn more about why we eat what we eat.
Reading List:
Culture of the Fork: A Brief History of Food in Europe, Giovanni Rebora
Sugar, A Bittersweet History, Elizabeth Abbott
Cod, Mark Kurlansky
Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England, William Cronon
Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the American Meal, Mark Schlosser
The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan
Films:
Babette's Feast
Garlic is as Good as Ten Mothers
Food First

Instructor: ROBIN M. LENZ (robinlenz@rocketmail.com)
Sponsor: WHITE

Robin M. Lenz is a working chef, and a former restaurant owner, and finally, a certified high school teacher (Social Studies) in the state of Massachusetts. She has a lifelong love for the subject: why do we eat what we eat?

PHIL 20 Derrida's Greatest Hits (PSCI 20)
(See under PSCI 20 for full description.)

PHIL 24 Eye Care and Culture on the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua
In cooperation with Ray Hooker, President and founder of FADCANIC (the Foundation for the Autonomy and Development of the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua) and optometrists from the New England College of Optometry, we prescribe and dispense reading and distance glasses to people in remote and often impoverished communities. In this, the twelth iteration of the course, we will return to a number of small villages on the rim of Pearl Lagoon where we have not visited for 6 or 7 years, then head north to Wawashan, the experimental school and from where students spend time in regular demanding high school classes and also learn how to tend their own farm when they graduate. If time and weather permits we may spend the last day of our stay on a trip to the Pearl Keys for a day of relaxation and recuperation after 11 solid days of clinics and travel to widely dispersed and seldom visited communities.
FADCANIC (The Foundation for Development and Autonomy on the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua) headed by Ray Hooker will make the local arrangements for housing, travel and exams.
Evaluation will be based on a journal and final 10-page paper.
No prerequisites; not open to first-year students.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Selection will be based on enthusiasm and preparation.
Cost: approximately $3000.
Meeting time: mornings.
ROBERT PECK (Instructor)
BARRY (Sponsor)

Robert Peck, former Athletic Director of the College, has been doing this trip for 12 years.

PHIL 25 Morocco (Same as ENGL 25 and INST 26)
Students in this course will spend winter study in Morocco. Morocco presents a compelling blend of historical influences and modern world currents. Threads of Islam, Arab traditions, and the heritage of the native Berber people are woven into a distinctive cultural tapestry, while traces of French colonialism can still be seen in the political and social structure. Morocco is at the intersection of the West, the Middle East, and Africa. Travel there is therefore a powerful way to introduce intellectual themes that require and reward a subtle blending of insight from history, political science, religion, philosophy, and literature. We will take the first steps in engaging some of these challenging topics in order to enable independent study facilitated by serious and multifaceted exposure to the country. For the first two weeks, students will study at the Center for Cross Cultural Learning (CCCL) in Rabat, taking lessons in Moroccan Arabic each morning and then gathering for lectures by local university faculty in the afternoon. During this span students will live with Moroccan families in the Rabat medina. In the third week of the course students will travel in the interior of Morocco, exploring Fez and Marrakech, riding camels in the desert, and hiking through Berber villages in the Atlas Mountains.
Requirements: students will be expected to attend all seminars, complete a substantial research paper (10-15 pages) before the trip begins on a facet of Moroccan culture, politics, literature, or history, and complete a 5-page reflective addendum to the paper upon return.
Prerequisites: none; not open to first-year students. Arabic is the official spoken language of Morocco, and French is spoken widely. While desirable, neither is required.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Preference: student interest is more important than class year or academic major. Final selection will be based on one-page essays from all applicants explaining their interest in the course and any relevant background.
Estimated cost: $4200.

BARRY (mbarry@williams.edu) and KNOPP (Sherron.E.Knopp@williams.edu)

PHIL 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Philosophy 493-494.

PHYSICS

PHYS 10 Light and Holography
This course will examine the art and science of holography. It will introduce modern optics at a level appropriate for a non-science major, giving the necessary theoretical background in lectures and discussion. Demonstrations will be presented and students will make several kinds of holograms in the lab. Thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation, we have 7 well-equipped holography darkrooms available for student use. At the beginning of WSP, the class will meet for lecture and discussion three mornings a week and for lab 2 afternoons a week. The later part of the month will be mainly open laboratory time during which students, working in small groups, will conduct an independent project in holography approved by the instructor. Attendance at lectures and laboratory is required.
Evaluation will be based on regular attendance, completion of 4 laboratory exercises, and a holography laboratory project with either a poster presentation to the class at the end of WSP or a 10-page paper approved by the instructor. Attendance at all classes and labs is required for a passing grade.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 30.
Preference to students with no physics above Physics 109; then seniors, juniors, sophomores and first-years.
Cost: $50 for holographic film and chemicals.
Meeting time: lectures will be in the morning, labs will be in the afternoon. A detailed schedule will be circulated to students who sign up for this course. Students who cannot attend the required sessions will be advised to select a different course as it is not possible to achieve a passing grade without being able to attend the classes and laboratories.
JONES

PHYS 12 Drawing as a Learnable Skill
Representational drawing is not merely a gift, but a learnable skill. If you wanted to draw, but have never had the time to learn; or you enjoy drawing and wish to deepen your understanding and abilities, then this course is for you. This intensive course utilizes traditional drawing exercises to teach representational drawing. By using simple techniques and extensive exercises you will learn to see more accurately and realistically represent the physical world. You will learn to draw a convincing portrait, interior, and still life. This course is designed to develop your powers of observation and enhance your innate creative problem solving abilities, which are applicable in any field. Students need no previous artistic experience, just the willingness and desire to learn a new skill.
Requirements: students will be expected to attend and participate in all class sessions as well as mandatory study sessions in museums once a week. They will also be required to keep a sketchbook recording their progress and complete a final project. Evaluations will be based on participation, effort, and development. All class sessions are mandatory as well as one session per week at the Clark and Williams College Museums.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 18.
Preference: if overenrolled, selection will be based on seniority.
Cost: $5 for materials.
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructor: STELLA EHRICH (sehrich@comcast.net)
Sponsor: JONES

Stella Ehrich lived in Italy for sixteen years, where she spent seven years studying figurative realism in the Studio Simi in Florence. She holds an MFA in painting from Bennington College. Stella is a professional painter whose work includes portraits, landscapes and still life subjects.

PHYS 13 3D Printer Construction: Beyond the Basics
3D printing is a technology used to create three dimensional objects from digital information. During Winter Study 2013, students built and operated the first 3D printer on the Williams campus. The printer is a "RepRap," based on an open-source project aimed at developing a self-replicating 3D printer. In this course, we will design and build hardware to extend the applications and capabilities of the RepRap 3D printer. We will modify the printer to a dual print-head design. With two heads, the printer will be capable of creating objects with two different materials, or printing at different resolutions. The second printing extruder can also print a water soluble, thermo-plastic support structure, enabling the construction of items with overhangs and complex designs. Separately, we will fabricate a plastic filament extruder that will manufacture low-cost printing filament from raw materials, including recycled plastics. In the final week, we will concentrate on creating complex, functional or artistic objects from our own CAD designs, culminating with a presentation of the hardware and objects. The printer and filament extruder created by the class will remain in the Bronfman Science Shop, available throughout the year to support faculty and student projects.
Requirements: attendance and participation, final public presentation.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Preference based on one paragraph explanation of student's basis for interest in the course.
Cost: $35.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Instructor: MICHAEL TAYLOR (michael.taylor@williams.edu)
Sponsor: JONES

Michael Taylor is an engineer and inventor with 30 years experience in product development and manufacturing. Broad-based hands-on mechanical and electrical fabrication skills. Experienced in 3D CAD and rapid prototyping. Owns and operates a product development company. Full-time college employee in the Bronfman Science Shop. B.S./M.S in Engineering Sciences (Univ. of Florida).

PHYS 17 The Science of Musical Sound
How and why do instruments sound the way they do? What makes a violin and a piano sound different, even when they are playing the same note? How does our physiology affect our perception of musical sounds? This course is intended as an introduction to the acoustics of music, especially for non-scientists with an interest in the subject. We will discuss the origin of sound waves and the meaning of musical pitch and tone, as well as the diverse ways in which musical instruments generate musical sound. There will also be lab sessions in which we will study sounds produced by a variety of objects and instruments. All necessary mathematics, physics, and musical background will be provided during the lectures, discussions, and labs (two hours total per day, four days per week).
Requirements: a final 6- to 10-page paper on a topic of the student's choice, and a 15-minute oral presentation on the subject to the class.
Prerequisites: pre-calculus level mathematics. Some knowledge of musical notation will be useful but is not necessary. This course is not suitable for students who have previously taken PHYS 109.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Preference will be based on random selection.
Cost: $100 for books.
Meeting time: mornings.
SEIFERT

PHYS 22 Research Participation
Several members of the department will have student projects available dealing with their own research or that of current senior thesis students. Approximately 35 hours per week of study and actual research participation will be expected from each student.
Students will be required to keep a notebook and write a 5-page paper summarizing their work. Those interested should consult with members of the department as early as possible in the registration period or before to determine details of projects then expected to be available.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor.
Enrollment limit: 1 or 2 per project.
Cost: $0.
Meeting time: to be arranged with instructor.
TUCKER-SMITH and members of the department

PHYS 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Physics 493, 494.

POLITICAL ECONOMY

POEC 17 Social Entrepreneurship: Innovating in the Social Sector (Same as ECON 17 and LEAD 17)
Operating as consultants, students will work in small teams to develop and present solutions to "client" organizations seeking assistance. Clients will be innovative social enterprises in areas such as education, health care, job creation, and food and nutrition, as well as investors that allocate growth capital to them, e.g. foundations and community development financial institutions. Some of the participating organizations will be local. Others will likely be based in New York City. Examples of projects that student teams might tackle include how to position a product or service to generate income and thereby reduce reliance on grants and donations, or how to enhance the social impact of a particular type of programming. Students will assemble and analyze relevant information and, at the end of the course, present findings and recommendations to senior officials of the client organizations. The class will visit New York toward the end of the month. The emphasis of the consulting work will be creative, experience-based problem-solving in the social sector.
Classroom discussion will focus on the circumstances of participating organizations, including their financial models, organizational structures and governance arrangements. In addition, readings and guest speakers will address trends in the fields of social entrepreneurship and impact investing more broadly.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, contribution to team projects, the quality of written and oral presentations, and the value of the input that students provide to the clients.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 20.
If overenrolled, selection will be based on a statement of your interest in the course and what you hope to gain from it.
Cost: $250 (for trip to NYC for final presentations and other meetings).
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructor: WILLIAM MCCALPIN (wmccalpin@aol.com)
Sponsor: L. SHEPPARD

Bill McCalpin '79 spent 22 years in a variety of capacities in two private, endowed grantmaking foundations (the Rockefeller Brothers Fund and the MacArthur Foundation). Currently, he chairs the boards of two mutual fund families and consults with foundations and other nonprofit organizations.


POEC 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as PSCI 21)
(See under PSCI 21 for full description.)

POEC 22 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (Same as ECON 22)
(See under ECON 22 for full description.)

POEC 23 Institutional Investment
The Williams College Investment Office, based in Boston, is seeking two to three sophomores or juniors to join the Investment Office for four weeks in January 2014. The Investment Office manages the investments of the College's $2.0 billion endowment. The endowment plays a major role in supporting the operations of the College and the role of the Investment Office is to develop critical understanding of markets and investment managers to provide the best financial support possible to the College.
What is it?
This unique opportunity is a structured program designed to give students an overview of endowment and investment management. Through formal training and project work, Winter Study Analysts will gain a better understanding of how an institutional investment portfolio is managed and how investment managers are selected and monitored. Students will learn about global equities, hedge funds, venture capital, buyouts, commodities, real estate and fixed income. Exposure will cut across U.S. and non-U.S. markets, both developed and emerging. Winter Study Analysts will sharpen their professional skills and have the opportunity to meet investment professionals from across the investment industry.
Students are expected to work at the office for a minimum of 32 hours a week (four days/week), complete a set of relevant readings, keep a journal, and write an analytic essay or present a final project. No prerequisites are required.
When is it?
The Winter Study Analyst program will be based in Boston and will run for four weeks during Winter Study (January 6, 2014-January 30, 2014).
Where is it?
The Winter Study Analyst program will be based in the Investment Office in Boston, MA.
How do I apply?
To apply for enrollment, please select this course (WS POEC 23) as your first choice when registering for Winter Study. Additionally, please send an email with your resume and a cover letter discussing why you are interested in this course and what you hope to gain from it to: investmentoffice@williams.edu by 11:59 PM ET on Sunday, October 13, 2013.
Enrollment limit: 3. If overenrolled, students will be selected via interviews.
What does it cost?
No-cost housing and class related materials (i.e. books and articles) will be provided by the Investment Office. Students are responsible for the cost of food, incidentals and transportation to and from Boston at the beginning and end of the month.
Instructors: COLLETTE CHILTON (Chief Investment Officer), ABIGAIL WATTLEY (Investment Associate), SHARA SINGH (Investment Analyst) and CAITLYN CLARK (Investment Analyst). The entire Investment Office staff is integrally involved and supportive of the program and students will interact regularly with all team members. (Investmentoffice@williams.edu)
Sponsor: L. SHEPPARD

Collette Chilton, Chief Investment Officer-Collette joined Williams College in October 2006. Prior to joining Williams, Collette was President and Chief Investment Officer at Lucent Asset Management Corporation from 1998 to 2006. While at Lucent, Collette was responsible for the investment and oversight of approximately $40 billion in pension and retirement savings assets for the company. Collette received a Bachelor of Science degree in Political Economy of Natural Resources from the University of California, Berkeley in 1981 and a Masters of Business Administration from the Amos Tuck Graduate School of Business at Dartmouth College in 1986.

Abigail Wattley, Investment Associate-Abigail rejoined Williams College in September 2010 as an Investment Associate. From 2007 to 2008 Abigail worked in the Williams Investment Office in the role of Investment Analyst. Prior to working for Williams, Abigail worked as a Senior Consulting Associate at Cambridge Associates. Abigail received a B.A. in Economics from Williams College in 2005 and a Master of Business Administration from the Harvard Business School in 2010.

Shara Singh, Investment Analyst-Shara joined Williams College in July 2012. Shara received a B.A. in Mathematics and Economics from Williams College in 2012. During her time at Williams, Shara was a Teaching Assistant in Mathematics, the Co-president of Dodd residential neighborhood, and served on the Williams College Council.

Caitlyn Clark, Investment Analyst - Caitlyn joined Williams College in July 2013. Caitlyn received a B.A. in Chemistry from Williams College in 2013. During her time at Williams, Caitlyn was the captain of the women's soccer team.

POEC 31 Honors Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Political Economy 493.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

PSCI 11 The Great American Novel
In the aftermath of the Civil War, a writer and critic remarked that the "task of painting the American soul within the framework of a novel has seldom been attempted." By the dawn of the 21st century, the same statement could hardly be made seriously. From Fitzgerald to Faulkner, Steinbeck to Salinger, McCarthy to Morrison, writers of all ages, traditions, and subjects have sought-often in vain-to write something akin to a national epic, a story of America and Americans that captures the zeitgeist of its time with precision, emotion, and depth. Far from a historical survey of all those who have tried, this course is about contenders for the title of The Great American Novel in our time-literally in your reading lifetime. What defines or consumes the American spirit-American life, American existence-today? What features and forces structure our days and shape our destinies? What kinds of enthusiasms push us forward as individuals, and what kinds of anxieties hold us back as a people? We will consider these questions in the context of award-winning and critically-acclaimed books written in America during the past two decades about America of the past two decades, each of which has been hailed (by someone or another) as a nominee for The Great American Novel. Among the possibilities-from which three will be chosen at a later date-are Michael Chabon's Telegraph Avenue, Junot Diaz's The Brief Wonderful Life of Oscar Wao, Chitra Divakaruni's One Amazing Thing, Jennifer Egan's A Visit from the Goon Squad, Dave Eggers's A Hologram for the King, Jonathan Franzen's The Corrections, Dinaw Mengetsu's The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears, Karen Russell's Swamplandia!, Richard Russo's Empire Falls, and David Foster Wallace's The Pale King. Along the way, students will select a fourth book for individual reading and assessment as we seek to uncover the essence of our national identity and the challenges of those who dare to imagine it with words.
Requirements: class participation and a 10- to 12-page paper.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Preference to students with a demonstrated interest in American politics, history, literature, or culture.
Cost: approximately $45 for books.
Meeting time: mornings.
CROWE

PSCI 12 Baseball and Sabermetrics
This course will review the sabermetric revolution in the analysis of baseball. We examine and assess its underlying assumptions, methods, and philosophy. We will read Bill James, the work of his followers, various practitioners from internet publications, and critics.
Requirements: 10-page paper or project.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Preference will be base on the Professor's discretion.
Cost: $75.
Meeting time: mornings.
MACDONALD

PSCI 13 Do Political Campaigns Matter?
There are two contrary assertions in the research literature. One side claims there is little evidence that political campaigns matter in determining who wins Presidential Elections in the United States. The other side lists lots of factors, such as a better "ground game," better campaign messaging, superior campaign advertising, new strategies of voter mobilization, and more, as evidence of how one side gains advantage over the other. After reviewing the two claims, and the supporting evidence, students will select a presidential campaign a prepare a project report arguing the case of the side they find superior.
Requirements: 10-page paper and project presentation.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 30.
Preference give to political science majors first; then by class (seniors first).
Cost: about $50.
Meeting time: mornings.
MARCUS

PSCI 14 The CIA and the War on Terror (Same as LEAD 14)
This course will trace the evolution of CIA from an organization largely focused, in its early days, on coups and regime change under the Dulles brothers, to its present role in the war on terror. Some of the Agency's signal successes and failures will be examined, and some of its directors will be evaluated. The fluctuating relationship between CIA and the FBI will also be discussed. Stress will be placed on the personal experiences of those who have served in the Agency.
Requirements: 10-page paper.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 18.
Preference to Political Science majors and Leadership Studies concentrators.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Instructor: DONALD GREGG (donaldpgregg@gmail.com)
Sponsor: CRANE

Gregg served in CIA from 1951-82, worked in the White House from 1979-89, and was US Ambassador to South Korea from 1989-93. He is now chairman emeritus of The Korea Society. 1980-89, Taught a second-year graduate level course at the Master of Science in Foreign Service Program of Georgetown University. He is now chairman of the Pacific Century Institute in Los Angeles.

PSCI 15 Education Reform: Is it Innovation or Destruction? (Same as HIST 15)
(See under HIST 15 for full description.)

PSCI 16 Aikido and the Peaceful Warrior
"I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, nor the arrow for its swiftness, nor the warrior for his glory - I love only that which they defend" Faramir, from Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings.
War and Peace. Conflict and Compassion. The archetype of the Peaceful Warrior weaves together the potentially contradictory elements of battlefield prowess with a protective and compassionate embrace of culture and community. Modern leaders, whether political, military, scientific, or corporate, earn our admiration for their successful integration of these same contradictory elements. Indeed, not having both of these elements simultaneously at work renders us suspicious of their intentions or capacity.
The only way to understand how both war and peace can exist coherently within one individual is to experience it first-hand. The course therefore combines daily martial arts training with peacemaking exercises, a quest journal, and an academic exploration of the Peaceful Warrior figure in both literature and history.
The martial arts training will be every morning in Currier Ballroom, and will be in Aikido - a Japanese martial tradition that combines the samurai arts of sword and grappling with the philosophical desire to manifest harmony in the face of conflict. As such, Aikido addresses situations of conflict that manifest themselves physically, but also offers insight into how to prevent or redirect the energies - social, political, or psychological - that might otherwise become conflict in one or another aspect of our lives. The physical training will improve each student's strength, balance, posture, and flexibility. Everyone will also learn how to throw their friends across the room. About 25% of training time will be devoted to sword, staff, and dagger techniques.
The academic component of the course will survey the Peaceful Warrior archetype with specific reference to both historical and literary examples -from Arthur's knights, Charlemagne's paladins, Islamic mujahedeen, Buddhist warrior monks, UN Peacekeepers, Mohandas Gandhi, and Martin Luther King to Odysseus, Cyrano, the Lone Ranger, Kwai Chang Caine, Aragorn, and Obi Wan Kenobi. Besides readings, class discussions, and regular film screenings, students will maintain a quest journal that documents the saga of their search for . . . whatever they decide their holy grail actually is. Additional relevant experiences, such as meditation practice and an all-night vigil, will be woven into the course experience.
By integrating physical and intellectual components, the course seeks to forge in each student a more coherent perspective on the challenges of leadership and personal integrity. The course also seeks to provide an opportunity for students to imagine and articulate what full commitment to an integrated, powerful, and ethical life would be like, and for one intensive month, to live it.
Candidates need to understand that this course requires more commitment than many Winter Study options. There is simply no other way to transmit and integrate the course's physical and intellectual components. Students will be expected to want to immerse themselves in a month of peaceful warrior apprenticeship. While this will not resemble boot camp in any conventional sense, it needs to be intense in order to succeed.
Students will be evaluated on the quality of their participation in both physical and intellectual course components (class discussions, quest journal, final project) Students are encouraged to correspond with the instructor (rkent-at-williams.edu) before registration begins if they have questions.
Prerequisites: same physician's approval on file as the school requires to participate on sports teams. Students do not have to be especially athletic, and in Aikido women train as equals with men.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost: approximately $135 for uniform and wooden training weapons, books, etc..
Meeting time: Aikido sessions from 10-12. Academic Classes typically over lunch and occasional evenings.
ROBERT KENT '84 (Instructor)
CRANE (Sponsor)

Robert Kent '84 spent 3 years in Kyoto, Japan earning his Sho Dan (first degree black belt), directly after majoring in both Philosophy and Religion at Williams. He currently holds a Yon Dan rank (Fourth degree black belt) and serves as President of Aiki Extensions, Inc, a nonprofit that supports programs that bring the strategic insights and practical wisdom of Aikido into non-traditional settings. He is also founder of The PeaceCamp Initiative (a scholarship program that seeks to use Aikido principles to heal the Israeli/Palestinian conflict a few kids at a time) for which he won Ben & Jerry's 2008 Peace Pioneer Prize. He earned a Masters degree in Philosophy at Claremont Graduate School in 1993, writing his thesis on the Ethics of Authenticity. This will be the 8th time he has offered an Aikido- based Winter Study course.

PSCI 17 American Films of the 1970's
This class will explore the diversity of Hollywood films produced during the 1970's and their relationship to the turbulent politics of the decade. Films to be studied and analyzed include The Godfather, Chinatown, Klute, Taxi Driver, The Deer Hunter, Apocalypse Now, Annie Hall, All the President's Men, and Breaking Away.
Requirements: 10-page paper and weekly film critiques.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Preference will be given to political science and history majors.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons.
MCALLISTER

PSCI 18 Infectious Diseases, Public Health Crises and Human Development (Same as PHLH 18)
Compared to wars, infectious diseases and public health crises have consistently accounted for the greatest proportion of human morbidity and mortality. For instance, of the 50 million deaths recorded in 1990, infectious diseases claimed about 17 million compared with 322,000 from war. However, how disease and public health crises have shaped the course of human history is not often taken seriously. Through scholarly work and documentaries, this course considers the longstanding effect of infectious diseases and public health crises on human development.
Requirements: active participation in class and a final presentation.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 30.
Preference to Public Health concentrators and then Political Science majors.
Cost: $60.
Meeting time: mornings.
MUNEMO

PSCI 19 Same-Sex Marriage in America (Same as WGSS 19)
Most young Americans today support same-sex marriage not only as good public policy but as an obvious civil right emergent from the demands of justice and equality. Yet only twenty-five years ago same-sex marriage was not simply rejected overwhelmingly by nearly all Americans; it was a thought nearly impossible to think. How did same-sex marriage travel so much social terrain so rapidly? Why did something virtually unthinkable in the 1980s and roundly rejected across the political spectrum in the 1990s become the epitome of enlightened thought by the 2010s?
This class builds on and is informed by the instructor's current book project "Beyond Tolerance," an investigation into the cultural, social and political factors which have made same-sex marriage in America. The goal of the course is to explain and understand the recent history of incorporating same-sex couples into the institution of marriage-NOT to debate same-sex marriage on legal or ethical grounds (if you are hoping to argue over the Supreme Court's 2013 opinions re California's Proposition 8 and the federal Defense of Marriage Act, this is not the course for you). Students in the course will investigate changing cultural evaluations of both homosexuality and marriage; the social geography of these cultural changes; and the political stakes involved in being on the winning or losing side in this most pitched `culture war' battle.
Requirements: 10-page final paper.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 16.
Preference given to students majoring or planning to major in the social sciences.
Cost: $50 for books.
Meeting time: mornings, three two-hour sessions per week.
PAUL

PSCI 20 Derrida's Greatest Hits (PHIL 20)
Despite, or perhaps because of, the notorious difficulty of his writing, Jacques Derrida was in his final decades probably the world's most famous living philosopher. He was also extraordinarily controversial-hailed as a great thinker by some but denounced by others as a charlatan whose works could not reasonably be called "philosophy." In this class, we will engage a handful of the most significant and widely discussed essays by this influential yet fiercely contested figure. Although the course is not a comprehensive examination of Derrida's thought, it should introduce some of the pleasures, perplexities, and frustrations of his way of reading and writing. We will pay particular attention to how Derrida can inform thinking about problems of politics and ethics, but our primary task will simply be to read him as well as we can, taking the difficulty of the texts as a challenge to be worked through and a spur to developing our own, independent assessments. Likely course materials include Derrida: the Movie, "Structure, Sign, and Play," ". . . That Dangerous Supplement. . .," "Differance," "Plato's Pharmacy," "Signature, Event, Context," "Declarations of Independence," and sections of Specters of Marx or Rogues, as well as related excerpts from Plato, Rousseau, Jefferson, Austin, and Searle.
Evaluation based on regular, informed class participation and two 5-page papers.
Prerequisites: some prior work in political theory, philosophy, or literary theory.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Preference to Political Science and Philosophy majors and to students with strong backgrounds in theory.
Cost: $50 for reading materials.
Meeting time: mornings.
REINHARDT

PSCI 21 Fieldwork in Public Affairs and Private Non-Profits (Same as POEC 21)
This course is a participant-observation experience in which students work full-time for a governmental or nongovernmental (including voluntary, activist, and grassroots) organization or for a political campaign. Students may find placements in government and nonprofit organizations in which their work involves significant involvement with public issues. Examples include: town government offices; state or federal administrative offices (e.g., environmental agencies, housing authorities); interest groups that lobby government (e.g., ACLU, NRA); nonprofit organizations such as service providers or think tanks (e.g., Habitat for Humanity, Cato Institute); and grassroots, activist or community development organizations (e.g., Greenpeace or neighborhood associations). The instructors will work with each student to arrange a placement; such arrangements must be made in advance of the Winter Term. Students should first make their own contracts with an institution or agency. The instructors and members of the Political Science Department are available to help students find placements, if necessary. Each student's fieldwork mentor shall send a confirmation letter to the instructor verifying the placement and describing the nature of the work to be performed by the instructor, and write a final paper summarizing and reflecting upon the experience. A group meeting of all students will occur after winter study to discuss the experience.
Requirements: 90 hours of fieldwork; satisfactory evaluation from the institutional sponsor; 10-page final paper or equivalent; participation in final meeting. At the time of preregistration, interested students should send a resume and letter of interest to Paula Consolini.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 30.
Selection will be based on a resume and letter of interest.
Cost: approximately $15 for readings, student covers transportation costs to and from internship site.
Meeting time: some meetings will take place prior to Winter Study and at the end, as students are off-site in internships during the term.
Instructors: C. JOHNSON (Cathy.M.Johnson@williams.edu) and PAULA CONSOLINI (Paula.M.Consolini@williams.edu)

Paula Consolini is the Director of the Center for Learning in Action.

PSCI 25 In Collaboration with the Bard Prison Initiative-Going Wild: Nature in the Political Imagination
This course examines a classic theme in political theory-the naturalness of politics-in an unusual classroom setting-a maximum security prison in NY. Members of the seminar will be drawn in equal numbers from Williams College and from the Bard Prison Initiative, a program that allows incarcerated adults to pursue college degrees while serving their sentences. Together, we will linger with several important works of political thinking and discuss how their various accountings of nature inflect the political sensibilities they promote.
Theorists, artists, and scientists who have sought to imagine what is possible or desirable in politics often devote special attention telling stories about or picturing nature, even if they describe politics as something artificial, nature's ostensive opposite. Works of political theory, literature, film and art have imagined nature as politics' origin (which must be surpassed to found politics, yet can never be fully left behind), politics' mirror (in which politics is both distorted and reflected), or politics' foundation (at once stabilizing and destabilizing). At times, nature emerges in the political imagination as the wild pressing in at the edges of political order, and at times it is figured as the ordering law to which politics should (but perhaps never fully does) conform. Focal points for our discussion may include readings/screenings of: Hobbes's Leviathan, Thoreau's Walden, Jane Bennett's Vibrant Matter, Franz de Waal's Chimpanzee Politics, episodes of the series Lost, and Benh Zeitlin's film Beasts of the Southern Wild.
The seminar will meet 4-5 times per week for two-hour blocks of time at Eastern Correctional, in Ellenville, NY, within the prison's school area. In addition to approximately six students from Williams, the class will enroll approximately six students from Eastern who are pursuing a degree from Bard College through the Bard Prison Initiative (http://bpi.bard.edu/). BPI students will be equal partners in class discussions and be graded on the basis of identical requirements. In addition to these structured seminar meetings, 1-2 "study hall" sessions per week at Eastern will be arranged for students to collaborate informally on the course's subject matter. Williams students enrolled in the course will lodge for the duration of Winter Study in New Paltz, a college town with many local amenities approximately 35 minutes from Eastern. Transportation between New Paltz and Eastern by van will be arranged for each class and "study hall" session.
Evaluation will be based on class participation, regular short response pieces, and a final paper of 10-15 pages.
Prerequisites: permission of instruction via a selection process; participation in orientations at Eastern and at Williams in the Fall semester; security screening and fingerprinting by Eastern
Enrollment limit: 6; not open to first-year students.
Preference: instructor's selection, conducted in part through a brief written application.
Cost: $1435.
EPHRAIM

PSCI 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Political Science 493-494.

PSCI 32 Individual Project
To be taken by students registered for Political Science 495 or 496.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 10 Introduction to Complex Skill Acquisition
Learn how to juggle. All skill levels (including beginners) welcome. In addition to spending time juggling, we will read and talk about factors that affect skill learning. Students will be evaluated based on a) attendance, b) skill development, and c) a final paper. The paper will require students to propose an empirical study of skill acquisition, including an introduction that provides background and motivation for the question they are asking, a method section, and a results/discussion section describing possible findings.
Requirements: 10-page paper.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 16.
Preference will be given to non-jugglers.
Cost: approximately $15-$30 for bean bags.
Meeting time: mornings.
KORNELL

PSYC 11 Community Screening for Alzheimer's Disease
This course will consider memory screening as a strategy to address the increasing prevalence and importance of early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in Williamstown and surrounding communities. Through readings and class presentations/discussions, students will become familiar with research on the epidemiology and underdiagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, neuropsychological screening instruments for Alzheimer's disease, and the design and analysis of screening instruments. Students will learn how to administer and interpret neuropsychological instruments used to screen for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The class will then design and conduct a community screening day for AD. This will include selecting appropriate screening instruments, selecting an appropriate venue, raising community awareness of memory problems, and working with local community agencies to encourage individuals to participate in memory screening. Following the screening day, each student will analyze the data collected on the screening day and submit a report.
Evaluation will be based upon class discussions and presentations, engagement in the design of the screening day, proficiency in learning to administer screening instruments, and the written report of the results of the screening day.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 16.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: mornings.
SOLOMON

PSYC 12 Alcohol 101: Examining and Navigating the College Drinking Scene
Seventy-two percent of college students report that they used alcohol at least once within the past 30 days. Here is the line between fun and danger? This course will examine the realities of the role of alcohol in the social lives of college students. Students will engage in active discussions of readings, videos, and myths vs. facts, as well as personal observations and opinions. Participants will learn scientific facts about alcohol, including how it gets metabolized in the body differently in men and women, and how to recognize and respond to the signs of alcohol poisoning. Films will include evocative footage and interviews, such as College Binge Drinking and Sober Reflections. We will hear from emergency personnel about alcohol-related medical emergencies and problem-solve strategies to stay safe when choosing to use alcohol. Statistical data from colleges here in the Northeast will be reviewed, including survey results from the Core Institute and the Harvard School of Public Health Alcohol study.
Requirements: in-class participation and the final presentation of a project aimed at educating peers.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Preference to first-year students.
Cost: $25 for course materials.
Meeting time: afternoons, 3-hour classes that meet twice weekly.
Instructor: KATHRYN NIEMEYER (kathyniemeyer@verizon.net)
Sponsor: ZIMMERBERG

Kathy Niemeyer holds an M.A. in Counseling Psychology from Boston College and is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor with current private practices in Williamstown and Pittsfield. She has worked in Fitchburg State and Stonehill College Counseling Centers and was also the AOD Prevention Program Coordinator at Stonehill. She taught Alcohol and Other Drugs at Boston College and has been a regular guest lecturer at Williams.

PSYC 13 Economic Justice Dialogue
Economic justice, broadly defined, has become a paramount concern of our time, whether evidenced by the fervor of Occupy protests last year, revolutions in the Mideast, unprecedented inequality of income and wealth in the U.S., gutting of jobs and speedup of those that remain (productivity gains going to capital not labor), declining living standards, impoverishment of the "formerly middle class"-and by the burst of new college colleges on economic inequality and the history and culture of capitalism. At the same time, Americans have usually felt inhibited about discussing issues of class and economic inequality.
How can we learn to talk about economic justice in a meaningful, enlightened, sensitive, and nondefensive way, so that citizens can truly listen to each other and honestly consider conflicting views, seeking common ground wherever feasible?
The rise of humanistic psychology after World War II helped to usher in a generation of concern about people's communication capability and the prevalence of miscommunication and misunderstanding in an increasingly complex world. The influence of Carl Rogers et al dovetailed with the humanistic dialogue practices of Myles Horton and the Highlander Folk School; bottom-up communication pioneered by Ella Baker, Bob Moses, and Danilo Dolci; citizenship education schools in the South; Paulo Freire's popular education and "pedagogy of the oppressed"; open communication theories of Jurgen Habermas; and recently the thriving school of "nonviolent communication."
In this course we will apply a mosaic of these communication and dialogue practices (most of which the instructor has practiced in teaching and organizing), in order to engage in honest, open, and knowledgeable dialogues about economic justice at home and around the world. Students will commit to engaging in this structured dialogue process, studying the readings, and writing a paper on their experience of communicating humanistically about economic justice.

Assignments: course reader, daily internet posts, blogs, and video segments, video of dialogues.
Requirements: 10-page paper or final project.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Interested students must arrange an interview with instructor.
Cost: $100.
Meeting time: afternoons,t two times a week for three hours.
Instructor: STEWART BURNS (sburns@williams.edu)
Sponsor: ZIMMERBERG

Stewart Burns is a college educator, civil rights historian, MLK biographer, community organizer & dialogue leader, a co-founder of the Center for Learning in Action at Williams.

PSYC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as CHEM 14 and SPEC 14)
(See under CHEM 14 for full description.)

PSYC 15 Ephquilts: An Introduction to Traditional Quiltmaking
This studio course will lead the student through various piecing, appliqué and quilting styles and techniques, with some non-traditional methods included. Samples will be made of techniques learned, culminating in the completion of a sizeable project of the student's choosing (wall quilt or lap-size quilt). There will be an exhibit of all work (ephquilts), at the end of winter study. "Woven" into the classes will be discussions of the history of quilting, the controversy of "art" quilts vs. "traditional" quilts, machine vs. hand-quilting and the growing quilting market. Reading list: Pieces of the Past by Nancy J. Martin; Stitching Memories: African- American Story Quilts by Eva Ungar Grudin; Sunshine and Shadow: The Amish and Their Quilts by Phyllis Haders; A People and Their Quilts by John Rice Irwin; Treasury of American Quilts by Cyril Nelson and Carter Houck; The Quilt: New Directions for an American Tradition, Nancy Roe, Editor.
Requirements: attendance of all classes (two field trips inc), a love of fabric, design and color, an enthusiasm for handwork, participation in exhibit. Extensive time will be spent outside of class working on assigned projects.
Requirements: final projects, participation in exhibit.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Preference given to seniors, juniors, sophomores and then first-years.
Cost: $250.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Instructor: DEBRA ROGERS-GILLIG (drogers@williams.edu)
Sponsor: ZIMMERBERG

Debra Rogers-Gillig, one of the top quilters in New England, has been quilting for 35 years, and teaching classes and coordinating shows and exhibits for 30 years. She has received numerous prizes and awards from quilt shows in New York and New England and been published in quilt magazines.

PSYC 18 Residential Treatment Internship in the Berkshires
Hillcrest Educational Centers, Inc. (HEC), a leader in the field of residential treatment of children with behavior disorders, is excited to partner with Williams College in creating an internship program that provides Williams students with an opportunity to experience working in the human services field in the area of residential treatment. This program would expose course participants to the boarding environment at HEC as well as provide them with first-hand experience in working with their clients. All selected students will participate in New Staff Orientation (NSO). This extensive training includes topics such as: HEC General/Policy Information, Skills for Life Treatment Model, and extensive training in Therapeutic Crisis Intervention. Upon completion of the NSO, students will be assigned to one of the HEC campuses to work in a direct care capacity. Students will round out their experience by completing a paper on their HEC experience. All selected students must successfully complete a Background Record Check, and pre-employment physical which includes drug testing.
Requirements: 10-page paper.
Prerequisites: none, but students taking a sustaining language course will not be able to enroll in this course. Must contact instructor prior to registration by email to gcoleman@williams.edu.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Preference will be based on survey review by instructor.
Cost: $75.
Meeting times: 8-3:50 p.m., Mon. through Fri.
Instructor: GINA COLEMAN (gcoleman@williams.edu)
Sponsor: ZIMMERBERG

Dr. Gina Coleman '90 is the Director of Education at Hillcrest Educational Centers. Dr. Coleman is also the former Associate Dean of Students and current Head Coach of Women's Rugby at Williams College.

PSYC 19 Psychology Internships
Would you like to explore applications of psychology in the "real world?" This course gives students an opportunity to work full time during winter study in a mental health, business, education, law or other setting in which psychological theories and methods are applied to solve problems. Students are responsible for locating their own potential internships whether in the local area, their hometowns, or elsewhere, and are welcome to contact the course instructor for suggestions on how to do this. In any case, all students considering this course must consult with the instructor about the suitability of the internship being considered before the winter study registration period. Please prepare a brief description of the proposed placement, noting its relevance to psychology, and the name and contact information of the agency supervisor. Before Thanksgiving break, the student will provide a letter from the agency supervisor which describes the agency, and the student's role and responsibilities during Winter Study. Enrolled students will meet the instructor before Winter Study to discuss matters relating to ethics and their goals for the course, and after Winter Study to discuss their experiences and reflections.
Evaluation will be based on a 10-page minimum final paper summarizing the student's experiences and reflections, a journal kept throughout the experience, and the supervisor's evaluation.
Prerequisites: approval of Professor Zaki is required.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Cost: travel expenses in some cases.
ZAKA

PSYC 22 Introduction to Research in Psychology
This course provides a research opportunity for students who want to understand how psychologists ask compelling questions and find answers about behavior. Several faculty members, whose subfields include behavioral neuroscience, cognitive psychology, social psychology, clinical psychology, developmental psychology, and the psychology of education, will have student projects available. Since projects involve faculty research, interested students must consult with members of the Psychology Department before electing this course.
Required activities: a minimum of 20 hours per week of research participation will be expected of each student.
Evaluation will be based on the quality of research participation, student's lab journal and either an oral presentation or a written 10-page report of the research project.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor.
Enrollment limit: space available in faculty research labs.
Selection will be based on evaluation of departmental application and number of faculty available as mentors.
Meeting time: other.
HANE

PSYC 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Psychology 493-494.
K. SAVITSKY

PUBLIC HEALTH

PHLH 18 Infectious Diseases, Public Health Crises and Human Development (Same as PSCI 18)
(See under PSCI 18 for full description.)

RELIGION

REL 10 Hearts, Hands, and Minds
The class is presented under the auspices of the Chaplains Office in cooperation with the Center for Learning In Action. Lead instructor is Cantor Bob Scherr, assisted by Imam Bilal Ansari, Father Gary Caster, and the Rev. Rick Spalding.
We will focus on two work/service projects tbd, centered in Berkshire County, during the 3 1/2 weeks. Students will be immersed in the perspectives of Christianity (Catholic and Protestant), Islam, and Judaism on the intersection of theology, ethics, faith and service. Lectures and presentations, by the course instructors and guests, and class discussions will be informed by readings; works under consideration for inclusion include Ian Markham, A Theology of Engagement; Rabbi Jill Jacobs, There Shall Be No Needy; Eboo Patel, Acts of Faith; Martin Marty, When Faiths Collide; Diana Eck, Encountering God; Miroslav Volf, Allah, a Christian Response. Regular experiences of the worship and spiritual practice of adherents to these faiths will also help to facilitate learning about the their theology, practices, communities, and commitments to community service and repairing the world.
The experiential component of the course will include work on one, or perhaps two, local service projects, perhaps shared with local residents, which will enable us to put our hands onto the community in which we live, informed and motivated by our understanding of these faith perspectives. Working locally will enable us to connect more deeply to the community in which we live. The course will also include an overnight visit each week to inter-faith communities in the New York, New Haven and Boston metropolitan areas-including the Community of Living Traditions in Stony Point, NY; Hartford Seminary; and the Center for a New Economy in New Haven, CT-where inter-religious dialogue informs both the practice of faith and also work to improve the community. Students and instructors will also take part in the MLK Day of Service.
The course will conclude with a Celebration of Learning and Service, a public inter-faith expression.
Requirements: students will be required to keep a journal of reflections throughout the course; a final 10 to 15-page integrative paper will be due before the beginning of the second semester.
Enrollment limit: 10.
Meeting time: Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday class meetings will be 10-noon; Monday-Thursday 1-4 p.m. will be work sessions.
Cost: $50.
Instructor: ROBERT SCHERR, Jewish Chaplain for the College
Sponsor: BUELL

REL 12 Yoga, Wellness, and the Art of Fully Thriving
The art and science of yoga invites us into an ongoing conversation of who we are, why we are here and how we manage our energy of mind, body, and heart. Inquire into the rich fabric of your life as you explore:
* The stress reductive effects of breath, yoga, attention, and meditation.
* The power of healthy food and non-dogmatic conscious nutrition.
* Practical tools to align what you think, feel, say and do to live the life you have always wanted.
* The potency of re-inhabiting your physical body with strength and ease.
* The way yoga poses have direct impact on the primary systems of the body including our nerves, heart, lungs, hormones, digestive organs and lymph.
Requirements: 5-page final paper, projects throughout.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 30.
Preference will be based on interested students' statements of interest.
Cost: $20 for book plus $65 optional field trip.
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructor: DANNY ARGUETTY (danny@nourishyourlight.com)
Sponsor: BUELL

Danny Arguetty, M.A., E-RYT, has studied and practiced extensively in the Anusara and Kripalu approach to yoga. He blends a mix of skillful alignment cues, playful postures, and creative vinyasa flows to facilitate a heart-opening journey of conscious inquiry. He is a faculty member at Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health and leads Yoga Teacher Trainings in Southern California and India.

REL 14 Yoga as Integration of Knowledge and Practice
Many have encountered yoga as a popular form of purely physical exercise. In this course we approach yoga differently as an interconnected system of embodied and philosophical knowledge. We practice alignment based Hatha yoga poses, breathing exercises and meditation. These yogic practices are informed by our study of two classic Indian yoga texts, The Yoga Sutras and The Bhagavad Gita.
Through the synergistic combination of yogic practice and study, we investigate the nature of consciousness and the self. In personal reflection as well as practice, discussion and group exercises, we explore the ethical implications of yoga in daily life. Thus the overarching orientation of the course is two-fold: an introversive self discovery through immersion in a deep tradition of yogic knowledge and practice, and extroversively a clarified personalized vision and supporting set of practices about negotiating a life in the world.
Required Texts: The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, Bhagavad Gita.
Evaluation is based on attendance and participation in all classes and sessions, a personal practice journal, one short reflection paper (2 pgs.), and a ten page final paper focusing on the relationship between textual study and yoga practice. To earn a passing grade, students must complete all practice hours and assignments.
Prerequisites: previous study in philosophy and/or yoga asana (poses) is welcome but not required.
Meeting time: 11-1 MWR.
Costs: $70 for books yoga mat.
Instructors: NATASHA JUDSON and DREYFUS
Sponsor: BUELL

Natasha "Tasha" Judson, M.Ed., ERYT-500, loves yoga both for its refined alignment and philosophy and for its joyful expression of embodied intelligence. She took Iyengar Yoga Teacher Training (1999-2001) and became a Certified Anusara Yoga teacher (2007). In 2003 she began teaching yoga full time. For the last five years she has directed her studio Tasha Yoga in Williamstown, MA. where she leads teacher training and advanced studies courses as well as weekly classes. Currently she practices regularly with Patricia Walden and other Iyengar Yoga teachers, and is engaging ongoing studies and meditation practice with Dr. Paul Muller Ortega of Blue Throat Yoga. She enjoys the unexpected ways community forms around the practices of yoga.

REL 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Religion 493 or 494.

ROMANCE LANGUAGES

FRENCH

RLFR S.P. Sustaining Program for French 101-102
Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study period. There are five 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.
TBA (Teaching Associates)

RLFR 15 By Foot: Walking As Method and Experience (Same as COMP 15)
This is a course about walking and its relation to thinking, writing, and art. It combines discussion and analysis with audiovisual art making, and animates these practices through weekly outings in Berkshire County. We will investigate walking as a critical, artistic, and contemplative method, as well as an embodied experience inseparable from social relationships, identities, time, and place. Discussion will be informed by writers as well as artists, among them, Baudelaire, Debord, Fulton, Thoreau, Oliveros, Poe, Rousseau, Varda, and Wordsworth. Issues include: walking as choice, necessity, and performance; walking as aesthetic practice (flânerie, soundwalking, psychogeography); ability, mobility, and the creative process.
Evaluation will be based on participation, the completion of three creative assignments, documented and posted on the course blog. At the end of the course, students will present a final 10-page essay, or a final artistic or documentary project.
Prerequisites: all are welcome.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Preference given to French and Art majors
Cost: $20 for photocopies and pedometer
Meeting time: mornings, twice a week for 2 hours, and once a week for a required 3- to 5-hour walking excursion. Outside of class, students will view films, read, write, and complete creative assignments.
Instructors: ANNELLE CURULLA (ac8@williams.edu) and MATTHEW ANDERSON (cranskt@gmail.com)
Sponsor: BELL-VILLADA

Matt Anderson is a multimedia artist working in sound, performance, and installation since 1993. He studied at the Studio for Interrelated Media at the Massachusetts College of Art and has exhibited and performed in venues including the Boston Children's Museum, the Centre for Contemporary Arts (Glasgow, UK), Projektwerkstatt (Leipzig, Germany), and Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions (LACE).

RLFR 16 Contemporary Queer Cinema in France (Same as WGSS 16)
From the streets of "Gay Paris" to the cinematic premieres of the Cannes Film Festival, France has long been a beacon of queer representation. French writers from Gide and Proust to Colette and Genet celebrated gay and lesbian identities in their novels. American expatriates Gertrude Stein and Natalie Barney mentored new generations of queer artists and writers in their Parisian salons. And openly gay couturiers Jean-Paul Gaultier and Yves Saint-Laurent projected fabulous French fashion out into the world. In the past few decades, queer political activism in France has led to the creation of greater rights and protections for GLBT citizens, including the national domestic partnership law (PACS), effective health care for people living with HIV/AIDS, and the controversial victory for marriage equality in 2013. This course will examine representations of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender identity in French cinema from 1968 to 2014. We will discuss a wide variety of issues on queer cinematic representation, including the closet and coming-out, race and ethnicity, lesbian (in)visibility, bisexuality, transgender identity, butch-femme and drag performativity, queer political engagement, and HIV/AIDS. Our film discussions will be complemented by readings from contemporary French and American queer theory. Films to include works by Balasko, Berliner, Chabrol, Collard, Denis, Ducastel, Epstein, Fassbinder, Friedman, Guibert, Kechiche, Lifshitz, Martineau, Molinaro, Ozon, Veber, and Vallée. Readings to include texts by Aaron, Butler, Castle, Garber, Halberstam, Martel, Russo, and Sedgwick.
Films in French with English subtitles. Discussions in English.
Requirements: active class participation and a 10-page paper in English.
No prerequisistes.
Enrollment limit: 15. If overenrolled, preference given to majors in Romance Languages, Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, and Comparative Literature.
Cost: approximately $35 for readings.
Meeting time: 2-3 mornings or afternoon meetings per week.
MARTIN

RLFR 17 Cabinets of Curiosity and Wonder (Same as COMP 19)
In this course we will trace the history of the Cabinet of Curiosity, a practice of display that is both a precursor and foil to the modern museum, from its renaissance roots to its postmodern, neoliberal and virtual manifestations. We will read museum history, literary excerpts from 19th-century and contemporary novels, and theory that helps us think about the concepts of curiosity and wonder as ways of seeing and knowing. The final project will be the construction, display and presentation of your own cabinet of curiosity.
Requirements: final project presentation and 5- to 7-page written explanation.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Prerequisites: interest in museums and museum studies.
Cost: approximately $75 for course pack and books.
Meeting time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1 p.m.-3:50 p.m.
PIEPRZAK

RLFR 30 Honors Essay
To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLFR 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for French 493-494.

ITALIAN

RLIT S.P. Sustaining Program for Italian 101-102
Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.
NICASTRO

SPANISH

RLSP S.P. Sustaining Program for Spanish 101-102
Students registered for 101-102 are required to attend and pass the sustaining program during the Winter Study Period. Three 50-minute meetings per week.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.

TEACHING ASSOCIATES

RLSP 12 Spain in Film: Introduction to Spanish Cinema and Film Analysis (Same as COMP 12)
This course introduces students to Peninsular Spanish film through the viewing and analysis of representative works, from Buñuel's first pictures to the present. The purposes of the course are: 1) to familiarize students with Spanish film history, including canonical and lesser-known directors and works, major aesthetic trends, and the effects of censorship; 2) to examine how various forms of identity (national, regional, class, and gender), are represented in film, and how works have challenged monolithic models of identity; 3) to introduce students to the analysis of film, specialized vocabulary, and close-reading techniques; 4) to expand students' knowledge of the historical events that have transformed Spain in the 20th and 21st centuries: the arrival of the second republic, the Civil War, the Franco dictatorship, the transition to democracy and the "state of autonomous regions," the recent efforts to recover historical memory, the massive influx of immigration, and the current economic crisis.
The class will be conducted in English, and we will watch only films with subtitles.
Students will be required to view four feature films (or the equivalent), for a total of approximately eight hours a week. Students will be encouraged to attend group screenings, but where possible will be allowed to watch films individually at Sawyer library or online.
Students will also be assigned supplementary reading before each class, consisting of articles or book chapters on the films being covered, historical background, and critical theory.
The course will cover the following films:
Un chien andalou. Luis Buñuel, dir. (1929)
Tierra sin pan (Las Hurdes). Luis Buñuel, dir. (1933)
Raza. José Luis Sáenz de Heredia, dir. (1942)
Bienvenido Mr. Marshall. Luis García Berlanga, dir. (1953)
Calle Mayor. Juan Antonio Bardem, dir. (1956)
Viridiana. Luis Buñuel, dir. (1961)
El verdugo. Luis García Berlanga, dir (1963)
El espíritu de la colmena. Víctor Erice, dir. (1973)
Cría cuervos. Carlos Saura, dir. (1976)
Tasio. Montxo Armendáriz, dir. (1984)
Qué he hecho yo para merecer esto!!
Pedro Almodóvar, dir. (1984)
El día de la bestia.
Álex de la Iglesia, dir. (1995)
Barrio. Fernando León de Aranoa, dir. (1998)
Volver. Pedro Almodóvar, dir. (2006)
El laberinto del fauno. Guillermo del Toro, dir. (2006)
Biutiful. Alejandro González Iñárritu, dir. (2010)
Selection of Kimuak
(Basque film shorts), various directors, 1998-present.
In addition to selected academic articles, critical and background reading will include selections from:
100 Years of Spanish Cinema, by Tatjana Pavlovic
Blood Cinema, by Marsha Kinder
Ghosts of Spain: travels through Spain and its Silent Past, by Giles Tremlett
My Last Sigh, by Luis Buñuel
Fim Art, by David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson
Requirements: class participation, weekly guided viewing journals of approximately 1 page per film, a quiz on film criticism terms, and a final 10-page paper.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 30.
Preference based on previous experience in film and literature courses.
Meeting time: mornings, three 2-hour sessions per week, dedicated to discussion, student presentations, and instructor lectures.
COLBERT-GOICOA

RLSP 25 The US-Mexico Border (Same as LATS 25)
This course takes a close look at life and issues along the US-Mexico border, specifically the border with Arizona. The first week (on campus) will be devoted to investigating the political economy of immigration, cultural flows and identities in both social science and literary contexts, social transformations and domestic political coalitions, political and economic treaties, security concerns, and US immigration policy and practice, all with specific reference to US-Mexican immigration. The objective is to provide students with background and references in preparation of their experiential learning in Arizona and Mexico. The two-week travel portion of the course will be organized through Borderlinks, a non-profit that specializes in educational programs in the Arizona/Mexico borderlands (www.borderlinks.org/). Students will extend their understanding of the immigration issues on-site with the Borderlinks delegation and profit from an intense experiential leaming component where they have exchanges with migrants, youth groups, humanitarian activists, and community organizations in Arizona and neighboring Mexico. There will also be a service component in Arizona and/or Mexico with non-profit groups involved in border issues. There will be several films on migration and the performative border. Upon their return to campus, students will meet with the instructors to evaluate their experience in light of the reading they did before departing. Each student will complete a 10-page paper on some facet of US-Mexico immigration and the borderlands.
Requirements: 10-page paper.
No prerequisites; not open to first-year students.
Enrollment limit: 10.
Method for selection: personal essay.
Cost: $2,450 - $2,600.
Instructors: CANOVA and PITCHER

RLSP 30 Honors Essay
To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RLSP 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Spanish 493-494.

RUSSIAN

RUSS S.P. Sustaining Program for Russian 101-102
Required of all students enrolled in Russian 101-102. Three meetings per week, 50 minutes per session. Practice in speaking and comprehension based on material already covered as well as some new vocabulary and constructions. Designed to maintain and enhance what was acquired during fall semester, using new approaches in a relaxed atmosphere. No homework.
Regular attendance and active participation required to earn a "Pass." Open to all.
Meeting time: mornings; 9-9:50 a.m.
TBA

RUSS 13 Organized Crime in Contemporary Culture (Same as COMP 13)
The subcultures of organized crime groups in countries as different as Mexico, Italy, the United States, Russia, Japan and India manifest striking similarities in their social and political attitudes and folkways. In this course we will examine the self-consciously romanticized, demonized or pointedly de-glamorized images of organized crime in politics, literature, and cinema across the contemporary global village. Why do political ideologies that emphasize the inflexible rule of law and tight control of the media often express a fascination with traditional forms of systemic illegality? In attempting to answer this question, we will examine the ways in which literary, cinematic, journalistic and internet texts portray the lives of organized crime workers within the international marketplace, and how the presence of such individuals reflect the increasingly symbiotic economic relations across the globe.
Requirements: one 10- to 12-page paper, and two oral presentations.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Preference to Comparative Literature, English and Russian majors.
Cost of books $60.
Meeting times: MWTh 10-noon.
Instructor: ALEXANDER MIHAILOVIC (amihailo@williams.edu)
Sponsor: VAN DE STADT

Until 2011, Alexandar Mihailovic was Professor of Comparative literature and Russian at Hofstra University. In 2012 he was Visiting Professor of Literature at Bennington College, and in the Spring of 2013 a Visiting Professor of English at Williams and of Russian at Brown University.

RUSS 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as SPEC 25)
Williams has a unique program in the Republic of Georgia, which offers students the opportunity to engage in three-week-long internships in any field. Our students have worked in the Georgian Parliament, helped in humanitarian relief organizations like Save the Children, interned in journalism at The Georgian Times, taught unemployed women computer skills at The Rustavi Project, documented wildlife, studied with a Georgian sculptor, done rounds at the Institute of Cardiology, and learned about transitional economies at the Georgian National Bank. In addition to working in their chosen fields, students experience Georgian culture through museum visits, concerts, lectures, meetings with Georgian students, and excursions. Visit the sacred eleventh-century Cathedral of Sveti-tskhoveli and the twentieth-century Stalin Museum, take the ancient Georgian Military Highway to ski in the Caucasus Range, see the birthplace of the wine grape in Kakheti and the region where Jason sought the Golden Fleece. Participants are housed in pairs with English-speaking families in Tbilisi, Georgia's capital city.
Requirements: at the end of the course students will write a 10-page paper assessing their internship experience.
Prerequisites: none; not open to first-year students. Knowledge of Georgian or Russian is not required.
Enrollment limit: 8.
Preference will be determined through personal statements and possibly interviews with the instructor.
Cost: $2500.
GOLDSTEIN

RUSS 30 Honors Project
May be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

RUSS 31 Senior Thesis
To be taken by students registered for Russian 493-494.

SOCIOLOGY--See under ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

THEATRE

THEA 10 Life of Pie
From the origins of "four-and-twenty blackbirds baked in a pie," in the entremets entertainments of medieval banquets, to the iconic Christmas table as set by Charles Dickens with its mincemeat pies, the pastry-crust pie has a storied history and potent symbolism, especially in British and American consciousnesses. This course will trace the development of this ancient foodstuff using Janet Clarkson's Pie: A Global History, supplemented by other historical readings. Paired with this we will examine how the pie has been represented artistically, whether the macabre meat pies of Sondheim's Sweeney Todd, Gary Ross's critique of mid-century, "American as mom and apple pie" establishment culture in his film Pleasantville, or Ned the Piemaker (and raiser of the dead) in Brian Fuller's charming zombie romance, Pushing Daisies. But primarily we will bake pies. Lots of pies, sweet and savory, all from scratch. We will learn the basics of making pastry crusts, filling preparation, assembly and decoration, baking and final presentation. Students will be expected to document their process-and the resulting pies!-on a class blog. Recipes used will draw inspiration from history, novels and film, culminating in a medieval costume banquet of sweet and savory pies at which we will show off our baking prowess to friends and colleagues.
Requirements: students will be evaluated on overall class participation, homework, and involvement in the planning and execution of the final banquet during the last week of the course.
Prerequisites: no prior cooking experience is necessary, though some knowledge is helpful and a desire to learn is mandatory.
Enrollment limit: 10.
If overenrolled, selection will be based on a short essay and background.
Cost: approximately $150 for books and reading packets, cooking supplies and ingredients.
Meeting time: afternoons, 6-9 hours/week for discussion, kitchen sessions, and food tasting. An additional 8-12 hours/week of work outside of class should be expected, to include reading, film watching, and food preparation.
MORRIS

THEA 12 Writing Objects (Same as ARTH 12 and WGSS 12)
(See under ARTH 12 for full description.)

THEA 13 Making a Career in Performance
In this course, students will learn practical steps in making a career in theatre. How do you introduce your talent to the professional world? How do you find an agent, auditions, director and inspiring collaborators? How do you deal with anxiety and stay active creatively? What should be done or avoided? These and other questions will be addressed through research, discussion, exploration exercises and meeting professional theatre artists.
Evaluation will be based on committed participation in class, and preparation and performance of assigned material.
Prerequisites: none, except permission of instructor.
Enrollment limit: 10.
Cost: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.
SANGARE

THEA 14 Classic American and European Musical Theatre (Same as MUS 14)
(See under MUS 14 for full description.)

THEA 15 Creating ESOPUS 21 (Same as ARTS 15, DANC 15, and THEA 15)
(See under ENGL 15 for full description.)

THEA 16 Creating a Web Series
Over Winter Study, students will work on all aspects of creating and producing a 13 episode web-series: script development, storyboarding, location scouting and execution, camera operation, art direction, lighting, sound, editing and post-production. Each week will involve classes, rehearsal, shoot days and editing time, with students assigned to different tasks. The goal of the course is to create a multidisciplinary production team that works together to create a finished series ready for distribution. The teachers and mentors for the course are working professionals from the realm of television and film who will guide the students through the production process.
Requirements: screening of finished video.
Prerequisites: preference given to Theatre students.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Interested students must interview with Mr. O'Rourke.
Cost: none.
Meeting time: class will meet for 1-2 class sessions, and 2 days of shooting per week.
Instructors: T. KEVIN O'ROURKE (korourke@williams.edu) and JAY TARSES (tinyhibbrd@aol.com)
Sponsor: EPPEL

Kevin O'Rourke is the Artistic Director of the Summer Theatre Lab and a professional Actor/Director. He has appeared on Broadway, Off-Broadway, in film and television and won a SAG award for his work on the HBO series BOARDWALK EMPIRE. He has directed at the Williamstown Theatre Festival, the Acadia Rep, and in several Off-Broadway theaters in NY.

Jay Tarses has produced, written and created numerous television series over a 35 year career in show business.

THEA 17 How To Be a Princess: A Performance Studio Course (Same as WGSS 17 and COMP 17)
This Winter Study performance studio course will give you the tools and experience you need to be a princess or, at least, fake it really well. Over the course of the studio, you will research, write, build, and act in your own "Princess Play," based on either a real or imagined princess. For some guidance, we'll explore the role of the princess in theatre, popular media, and performance. What is a princess? What do princesses do? What are their props? What are their unique struggles and hardships? How do they do their hair? What makes them tick? For inspiration, we'll read a few plays-Shakespeare's Love's Labour's Lost, Kleist's Penthesilea, Yeats' Diarmuid and Grania, Williams' Sweet Bird of Youth, and Jelinek's Princess Plays. We'll also study the role of princesses in more contemporary media: South Korean TV drama, Disney's Princess films and dolls, and The Princess Diaries. Most importantly, we'll study the lives and of real princesses, such as Princess Nandi Zulu and Princess Kate Middleton.
Requirements: oral presentations of research, individual project work, and final presentation of an original creative performance in a public setting.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 10.
Theatre, Comparative Literature, and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies majors will be given preference.
Cost: $12.
Meeting time: afternoons, 3-hour studio segments twice a week and participation in the culminating public performance of our "Princess Plays" in front of an invited audience.
HOLZAPFEL

THEA 32 Senior Honors Thesis
See description of Degree with Honors in Theatre.

WOMEN'S, GENDER and SEXUALITY STUDIES

WGSS 12 Writing Objects (Same as ARTH 12 and THEA 12)
(See under ARTH 12 for full description.)

WGSS 16 Contemporary Queer Cinema in France (Same as RLFR 16)
(See under RLFR 16 for full description.)

WGSS 17 How To Be a Princess: A Performance Studio Course (Same as COMP 17 and THEA 17)
(See under THEA 17 for full description.)

WGSS 18 Sex in the Berkshires (Same as AMST 18 and HIST 18)
Join us on an exploratory research mission to uncover the hidden side of the Berkshires. We'll travel together to visit archives, museums, libraries, private homes, and other historical sites to interview local historians, curators, librarians, and residents about the sex lives of Berkshire's historical and literary figures, whether famous, infamous, or heretofore unknown. We will locate archives and collections, which students will examine for relevant information, stories, and traces. In particular, we are looking for figures who were somehow on the sexual margins of society-e.g., independent women and feminist pioneers, adulteresses, outlaws, prostitutes, gender-nonconforming or LGBT figures. We'll also be looking into lesser known aspects of our more famous residents, including Herman Melville, Cole Porter, W.E.B. Dubois, Susan B. Anthony, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Edith Wharton among others to be determined by the group, examining the passions, romances and affairs that shaped their legacies. (Along the way, we'll read some works by some of these people as well.) And we'll talk about the diverse cultures shaping the sexual landscape of the Berkshires, ranging from celibate Shakers to the debauched "bath tub parties" of millionaire residents in the Guilded Age. We will collectively discuss how the resources we discover together might be transformed into a future seminar, allowing students in this winter course to work with faculty and local experts from the community to build a foundation for a new class and to shape an integrated curriculum for future Williams students.
Most days (Monday through Thursday) we will leave at 10 a.m. and drive to surrounding areas, returning by 4 pm. Owing to inclement weather and the changing schedules of our interlocutors, we may not use all of these available days or we may meet on campus for a shorter time to plan our projects, discuss materials, etc. The schedule is necessarily elastic, but students are expected to reserve this time and to attend all of our field trips.
Requirements: one annotated bibliography, short informal presentation/summary, active participation.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 6.
Preference to WGSS/HIST/AMST majors or students with relevant research interests.
Cost: $100 for books and some museum admissions, etc. (Students should also pack or purchase daily lunch).
Meeting time: course meets 10-4 Monday to Thursday to allow for daily travel.
MITCHELL

WGSS 19 Same-Sex Marriage in America (Same as PSCI 19)
(See under PSCI 19 for full description.)

WGSS 25 Creating Social Enterprises with Marginalized Ugandan Youth
Description will be available soon.
Instructors: KIARAN HONDERICH, JONATHAN MORGAN-LEAMON and JUSTIN ADKINS

WGSS 30 Honors Project
To be taken by candidates for honors other than by thesis route.

SPECIALS

SPEC 10 Intentional Communities and the American College
The exponential growth of opportunities for higher education in a low-cost online environment has presented an existential question to residential colleges and universities. What additional value does a traditional collegiate experience provide given the enormous cost of such an education? Williams College President Adam Falk partially answered that question when he spoke about the unique pedagogic value of human-to-human interaction in didactic learning. What Falk did not address, but is of equal importance, is the role of a college as an intentional community that teaches its members how to live in community.
While this has always been important, the need for such an education is greater now than it ever has been. As Robert Putnam has written, many of the mediating institutions of society have disappeared from the contemporary culture. More students than ever before never have experienced a neighborhood, their families are not members of civic organizations and if they attend a house of worship, frequently even that institution no longer acts as much of a locus for community life.
The last, and often the only opportunity for young people to live in community is when they live in a residential institution of higher learning. The use of the word "in" rather than "at" is deliberate. Merely renting a room from a college or university does not make it a residential community. To establish that requires a deliberate creation of a healthy, vibrant community. More than ever, the college or university cannot assume that the students who arrive in September of their first year have any idea what it is to live in community. The university or college needs to understand that in many ways it has to undertake remedial education in socialization. To do so does not mean the creation of a set of rigid juridical standards that are enforced by the threat of sanctions; rather, it requires the same intentional instruction that is the hallmark of great intellectual education.
If living in community is not a part of each student's education, then that would amount to cheating her or him of much of what a collegiate experience should provide. It will mean that the student will be, even if well taught in the classroom, unprepared for living within the polis.
By establishing this as an overt goal of a collegiate education provides the mechanism for re-configuring colleges to accomplish this task. While establishing these goals needs to be done with students and the administration, in the need the creation and maintenance of community falls, as it should, on the faculty's shoulders. Faculty members should be selected and promoted with an eye to whether they contribute to teaching on how to live in community. It means as well that much of the responsibility for the running of the institution needs to be returned to the faculty from burgeoning administrative staffs.
This requires a return back to an older understanding of the role of the institution and faculty of higher education. It is a rejection of the German model that was imported at the end of the Ninetieth Century. To do that will require the leadership as well of trustees and officers, as the metrics used to measure such institutions by the government, accrediting institutions or the media do not value the contributions of community building and mentorship.
In this course, we will look briefly at the history of higher education from its monastic beginnings through the development of the research university model to the present. We will examine the need for teaching how to live in community and different models of intentional communities that may have saliency in their adaptation to the collegiate environment. Finally, we will look at what changes within the institutions would be required to implement such an educational goal.
Students will read selections from Robert Putnam's Bowling Alone, John Thelin's A History of American Higher Education, Ricahrd DeMillo's Abelard to Apple, Dianne Gereluk's Education and Community, Parker Palmer and Arthur Zajonc's The Heart of Higher Education: A Call to Renewal, Benjamin Ginsberg's The Fall of the Faculty: the Rise of the All-Administrative University and Why it Matters, Frank Donoghue's The Last Professors: The Corporate University and the Fate of the Humanities, as well as Andrew Delbanco's College: What it Was, Is and Should Be.
Photocopies of the readings will be provided to the students shortly after registration at no cost.
Students will be evaluated both on their contributions to the discussion as well as three short (4-6 pages) papers on the readings.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Meeting time: two 90-minute sessions.
Instructor: JAMES L.J. NUZZO (jamesljnuzzo@yahoo.com)
Sponsor: WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE

James L.J. Nuzzo is presently writing "Modern Monasteries: Intentional Communities and the American College." He is a research psychoanalyst, an ordained Anglican clergyman and has been an adjunct lecturer and has advised at Harvard University for nearly 25 years. He has been a board member of a number of educational institutions as well. He has published in scholarly legal and medical journals.

SPEC 11 Science for Kids (Same as CHEM 11)
(See under CHEM 11 for full description.)

SPEC 12 The Work of the Supreme Court: A Simulation (Same as JLST 12)
The objective of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the personal, theoretical, and institutional characteristics that impact the decision making process of the nation's highest court. At the beginning of the course, the students will be provided with briefs, relevant decisions and other materials for a case currently pending before the court. Where possible, cases will be selected that address constitutional issues that also have a political and/or historical significance. Past examples include the rights of prisoners held in Guantanamo, the extent of First Amendment rights of students, and the applicability of the State Secrets doctrine to the country's extraordinary rendition program. Four students (two on each side) will be assigned to prepare and present oral arguments to the "Court", which will consist of the other eight students, each playing the role of a Supreme Court Justice. An instructor will act as the Chief Justice to coordinate the student Justices and keep them on focus. After the oral argument, the "Court" will confer and prepare majority and minority opinions, which will be announced in "open court" at the conclusion of the term.
Evaluations will be based on the student's preparation for and performance of their assigned role, and upon a 5-page paper discussing the subjects covered by the course.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost: less than $30.
Meeting time: TBA
Instructors: ROBERT GROBAN Jr. (RGroban@ebglaw.com) and THOMAS SWEENEY III (thomas.sweeney@hoganlovels.com)
Sponsor: L. KAPLAN and the WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE

Robert S. Groban, Jr. '70 is a member of the New York and Massachusetts bars, a former Assistant U.S. Attorney and a current partner in the New York law firm of Epstein, Becker & Green, PC. Mr. Groban has previously taught this course on several occasions.

SPEC 13 Facing Violent Crime
Television, movies, and video games bombard us with fictional depictions of violent crime and the consequences of victims' responses. But what is violent crime really like? What do we know about different types of violent criminals? What are the most effective ways to avoid and deter violent crime? If you do become a victim, what are the most effective ways to avoid injury? Should you resist? If so, how? In this course we will read and discuss theories of crime and criminals, research using data from sources such as the National Crime Victimization Survey, and expert recommendations for personal safety and self-defense. (Note: This is not a hands-on self-defense training course.)
Requirements: 10-page paper.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 30.
Preference based on seniority.
Cost: less than $50 for books.
Meeting time: afternoons.
KIRBY

SPEC 14 Beyond Hooking Up: Creating Meaningful Relationships (Same as CHEM 14 and PSYC 14)
(See under CHEM 14 for full description.)

SPEC 15 Contemporary American Songwriting (Same as AMST 15 and MUS 15)
This course will focus on learning how to write and perform songs in a contemporary style. Topics addressed will include song structure, how to create a lyric that communicates, vocal and instrument presentation, performing techniques, publicity for events, and today's music industry. This class will culminate in a public performance of material written during the course. To successfully pass this course, students are required to create, edit, perform and possibly record two original songs. These songs must be conceived during the course period (previously written material is not usable). Students will be guided to create both music and lyrics. They may also be required to participate in a co-write session. At least one of these songs will be presented during the final performance, preferably by the student. Attendance at classes, feedback sessions, and all officially scheduled events is mandatory. A short writing assignment based on the assigned reading will be passed in on the last day of class.
No pre-requisites. Students with a musical background and the ability to play and instrument may be given preference, but anyone interested is encouraged to register.
Enrollment limit: 14.
Requirements: attendance, final performance, and writing assignment.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 14. Priority may be given to upperclassmen and those with musical experience.
Cost: $55 class fee.
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructor: BERNICE LEWIS (blewis@williams.edu)
Sponsor: WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE

SPEC 16 Peer Support Training
Are you the person your friends turn to for support? Are you drawn to advising or counseling roles? Good listening and communication skills are vital for anyone interested in these roles and in the helping professions, in particular. This course can help you improve your listening and relational skills and develop your identity in the helping role. Become more effective assisting others with sensitive or personal issues and decision-making without imposing your own values. We will also address working with those who may be at risk and how/when to access additional support. This is an experiential training augmented by relevant readings and out-of-class assignments designed to deepen your self-knowledge, effectiveness and confidence in the helping role.
Requirements: 10-page paper.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 18.
Preference: first-years and sophomores, then juniors, then seniors.
Cost: none.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Instructor: KAREN THEILING (ktheilin@williams.edu)
Sponsor: RUTH HARRISON

Karen Theiling is a psychotherapist at Williams College Psychological Counseling Services and a licensed mental health counselor in private practice in Northampton, MA. She has led a variety of psychosocial, educational and mindfulness groups at Williams and in the Pioneer Valley of Massachusetts.

SPEC 17 Coming Down from the High: 12 Step Recovery and Counseling
This course will explore the history and culture of the 12 Step Recovery Movement as well as diagnostic rubrics and methods of counseling/interventions that are commonly used at clinics and Employee Assistance Programs throughout the world. Students will read the text Slaying the Dragon, a variety of texts published by different 12 Step groups and watch movies such as Days of Wine and Roses, My Name is Bill, Clean and Sober, and When Love is not Enough: The Lois Wilson Story. Guest speakers will come to class and report on their personal experiences in recovery. Students will report on their impressions of at least three different 12 Step meetings that they will attend during the month of January, do some fieldwork, and take short quizzes. There will be a final research paper (5-7 pages) on a topic chosen by the student. This class is designed to help familiarize students with the disease model of addiction and help them act proactively when encountering addiction and the problems that can come from the disease(s) in personal, social, or professional contexts.
No prerequisites.
Enrollment limit: 25.
Cost: approximately $50 for books and course packet.
Meeting time: Monday and Wednesday 7:00-9:40 p.m.
Instructor: RICK BERGER (rick.berger@yahoo.com)
Sponsor: WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE

Rick Berger earned his M.A. in 2009 from Hazelden Graduate School of Addiction Studies.

SPEC 19 Medical Apprenticeship
Firsthand experience is a critical component of the decision to enter the health professions. Through this apprenticeship, students can clarify their understanding of the rewards and challenges that accompany the practice of all types of medicine. Apprenticeships are arranged in two distinct ways: some students live on campus and are matched with a local practitioner, while others make independent arrangements to shadow a distant professional. The expectation is that each student will observe some aspect of medicine for the better part of the day, five days per week. In recent years, students have shadowed physicians, veterinarians, dentists, nurses, and public health experts.
A 5-page reflective paper is required, as is attendance (for those shadowing near campus) at three Tuesday evening programs. Students will meet from 6:30-8:30 p.m. over dinner to hear from invited speakers from the medical community as a stimulus to discussion about their apprenticeship experiences.
Prerequisites: interested students must attend an information meeting in early October. Local enrollment is limited by the number of available practitioners. Preference for placements will be given on the basis of seniority and demonstrated interest in the health professions.
Cost: local apprenticeships: required vaccinations, local transportation and possibly lunches. Distant apprenticeships: costs will vary based upon location.
Instructors: Steven Anisman, M.D.; David Armet. P.T.; Childsy Art, M.D.; Deborah August, M.D.; Victoria Cavalli, M.D.; Jonathan Cluett, M.D.; Lee Delaney, D.V.M.; Marianne Demarco, M.D.; Michael Disiena. D.O.; Paul Donovan, D.O.; Simon Drew, M.D.; Stuart Dubuff, M.D.; William Duke, M.D.; Robert Fanelli, M.D.; Wade Gebera, M.D.; David Gorson, M.D.; Alison Hastings, D.O..; Deborah Henley, M.D.; Eric Holmgren, D..D.S./M.D.; Judith Holmgren, M.D.; Orion Howard, M.D.; Laura Jones, D.V.M.; Joshua Kleederman, D.M.D.; William Kober, M.D.; Jonathan Krant, M.D.; William Levy, M.D.; Rebecca Mattson, D.V.M.; Mark Mcdermott, M.D.; Ronald Mensh, M.D.; Graham Moore, M.D.; Boris Murillo, M.D.; Charles O'neill, M.D.; Judy Orton, M.D.; Daniel Perregaux, M.D.; Fernando Ponce, M.D.; Richard Provenzano, M.D.; Daniel Robbins, M.D.; Oscar Rodriguez, M.D.; Scott Rogge, M.D.; Paul Rosenthal, M.D.; Robert Sills, M.D.; Themarge Small, M.D.; Anthony Smeglin, M.D.; Anne Marie Swann, M.D.; Spyridon Triantos, M.D.; Elizabeth Warner, M.D.; Elizabeth Whatley, M.D.; James Whittum, M.D.; Katie Wolfgang, D.V.M.; Nicholas Wright, M.D.; Jeffrey Yucht, M.D.; Mark Zimpfer, M.D.; and others.
Instructor: JANE CARY, Health Professions Advisor

SPEC 20 Student Leadership Development (Same as LEAD 20)
As students move through their time in college, many will opt to take on roles of leadership in their community. This desire to be engaged and involved leads to the development of life skills and abilities that become highly desirable traits post-graduation. Student Leadership Development is focused on assisting students in developing a new understanding of themselves, the involvement and activities they already do/plan to participate in as students and as a leaders in their groups, college, community, and world. Additionally, this course will supply student development theories, and best practices through case study analysis and class discussion. Utilizing a series of guest speakers, film viewings, Pecha Kucha presentations, and specified readings, participants will focus on topics including the social change model, identifying personal leadership style, ethical and servant leadership, community building strategies, communication tactics, working with constructive feedback, personal assessment, developing purposeful programming, transferrable skill set development and expression, professionalism, servant leadership, and finding balance. Through the duration of the course, students will engage in ongoing dialogue as a whole class, and will also have the opportunity to create and share presentations connected to the topics of focus. Students will leave the course having an intimate awareness of their own leadership skills, the skills of their peers, and the research and depth of development that goes along with the day-to-day interactions that culminate into their experience as student leaders and eventually engaged citizens and community builders.
Students will be evaluated via 2 papers (total of 10 pages combined), involvement in class discussion and activities, and individual presentations.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 20.
Preference given to first-year and sophomores.
Cost: $50.
Meeting time: afternoons.
Instructors: BENJAMIN LAMB (bjl1@williams.edu) and PATRICIA LEAHEY-HAYS (patricia.a.hays@williams.edu)
Sponsor: WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE

Benjamin Lamb is the Assistant Director for Student Involvement-Student Organizations, in the Office of Student Life at Williams, Ben has worked in higher education for the last 4 years, specializing in student leadership and involvement, but also has experience in Career Services, Admissions, College Access, Community Service and Residence Life.

Patricia Leahey-Hays is the Assistant Director for Student Involvement-Residential Programs in the Office of Student Life at Williams has worked in the field higher education since 2003 in the areas of Residential Life and Education as well as the Co-operative Educational Experience, Professional Development and Business Ethics. Prior to 2003 Patricia worked at The White House under the Clinton Administration and in the Government Relations office of the accounting firm, Arthur Anderson, during the Enron financial crisis.

SPEC 21 Experience the Workplace; an Internship with Williams Alumni/Parents
Field experience is a critical element in the decision to enter a profession. Through this internship, students can clarify their understanding of the rewards and challenges that accompany the practice of many different aspects within a profession, and understand the psychology of the workplace. Internship placements are arranged through the Career Center, with selected alumni and parent acting as on-site teaching associates. The expectation is that each student will observe some aspect of the profession for the better part of the day, five days per week. It is also expected that the teaching associate will assign a specific project to be completed within the three-to-four week duration of the course depending upon appropriateness.
Participation in this winter study will require the student to quickly assess the work environment, make inferences about corporate culture, performance norms and expectations, and to take initiative not only to learn from this experience, but also to contribute where and when appropriate. Understanding the dynamics within a work environment is critical to success in any organization and this hands-on experience will illuminate lessons learned in the classroom. Upon completion of the winter study, it is expected that the student write a thorough report evaluating and interpreting the experience.
Requirements: it is expected that students will complete assigned readings, keep a daily journal, and write a 5- to 10-page expository review and evaluation that will become public record as a resource for other students.
The expectation is that each student will be in the field to observe some aspect of the profession for the better part of the day, five days per week. In addition to observation there may be an opportunity to work on distinct projects generated by the instructor depending upon appropriateness.
Prerequisites: interested students must attend an information meeting in early October, and meet individually with Career Center staff to go over the details of their placements.
Enrollment is limited by the number of available teaching associates (instructors).
Placements will be determined by the individual alum or parent sponsor based on application and possible telephone interview.
Meeting times: each student will be in the field to observe some aspect of the profession five days per week, at least 6 hours per day.
Cost to students: local apprenticeships - local transportation. Distant apprenticeships - costs will vary based upon location, BUT ARE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT. The college has no extraordinary funding to support the internship.
Instructors: Williams College alumni and parents of current Williams students will be recruited to become instructors for this course. A broad range of professions will be represented as the course develops. Alumni and parents will receive individual orientations with the course director in person or via telephone conference.
Instructor: JOHN NOBLE, Director of the Career Center
Sponsor: WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE

SPEC 24 Community Development Work and Study Project in Liberia, West Africa
Interested in a great opportunity to immerse yourself in the culture of West Africa and do some service work at the same time? This course will explore the close historical ties that exist between Liberia, the US and even Williams - think Haystack Mounument! We'll experience rural living in the tropical environment of the interior of Liberia as we join with Women's Campaign International to evaluate an ongoing leadership training program. Women's Campaign International (WCI), in coordination with the Liberian Ministry of Gender Development (MoGD), designed and is currently implementing a comprehensive program to increase women's participation in peace building and decision-making processes in Liberia. This program focuses on both the economic empowerment and political participation necessary for women to be effective leaders and bring Liberia forward to a peaceful future. It is designed to strengthen women's networks and build the leadership capacity of over 10,000 rural men and women in post conflict Liberia through supporting the National Rural Women's Program (NRWP).
Requirements: willingness to live in an environment missing many of the amenities of a 'western life style', ability to learn interviewing skills and maintain a positive attitude toward adapting to flexible schedules.
Prerequisites: informational/training meetings with myself and a representative from Women's Campaign International organization; not open to first-year students.
Requirements: students will be required to keep a journal, hand in a written assignment based on their experience, and give a community presentation about their project in early February at the start of Spring semester 2014.
Enrollment limit: 8.
Preference will be based on information meeting then a statement of interest from students and personal interviews.
Cost: $2,800 (includes round-trip air fare from New York City, visa, accommodations, in-country travel, food, pre-trip medical shots as needed).
Participants should note that, to enhance cultural learning and to stay within budget-meals will be local, not foreign tourist standard.
Instructor: SCOTT LEWIS, Director of the Outing Club (slewis@williams.edu)
Sponsor: WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE

SPEC 25 Williams in Georgia (Same as RUSS 25)
(See under RUSS 25 for full description.)

SPEC 26 Teaching, Doctoring and Living With Refugees and Immigrants (Same as AMST 26 and HIST 26)
Without getting on an airplane, you can have an international experience that gives you the chance to truly live and reflect upon critical issues in your Williams courses such as national identity, migration, immigration, human rights, the state of our public schools and health care facilities, and ultimately your own identity. Sponsored by the Gaudino Scholar and Gaudino Fund since 2008, this Winter Study course will allow a small group of students to have a relatively low-cost (compared to abroad trips) but rich and rewarding international experience in the U.S. Portland, Maine, a refugee resettlement city for over 30 years, with only 65,000 people has over 60 languages spoken by students in its schools, and residents from over 80 countries all over the world. Inspired by the transformative Williams-at-Home program, each student will live with a refugee or immigrant host family, and work either as a teacher or medical apprentice. Most students will work in one of the Portland school or adult education classrooms with students whose families are new to America. The Williams student will gain practical experience as a teacher, tutor, and mentor in multiple classrooms with many diverse students. Students will also have a chance to talk with senior teachers and administrators about the challenges facing 21st century American schools in an increasingly diverse society and global economy. There will also be an opportunity for a student or two seeking medical or public health experience to shadow doctors and nurses in the Portland community clinics with low income residents, including refugees who were tortured. Students will learn a great deal not only about others, but also about their own assumptions and values. In December students will receive articles and orientation materials to prepare for their experience, and must write a 5-page reflective essay due on arrival in Maine on how forces like ethnicity, national identity, race, and class have impacted them personally up to now. Each student must also keep a journal during the program and at the end turn in a 5-page reflective essay addressing how her or his impressions, assumptions, or values were challenged or changed concerning those topics addressed in the opening essay. We will meet at least 1-2 times per week to share insights and challenges, and also share a host families-students pot luck.
Prerequisites. open only to sophomores, junior and seniors. Information sessions will be held on campus approx. September 23-24.
Enrollment limit: 5 (possibly more depending on car availability).
Cost: $625 ($25/day) for room and board to host families, plus travel to and from Portland. Students on Financial Aid will receive Gaudino funding as determined by the Financial Aid office.
Instructor: JEFF THALER
Sponsor: BERNHARDSSON

Jeff Thaler '74 participated in Williams-at-Home with Professor Robert Gaudino in 1971-72. After Professor Gaudino's death in 1974, Jeff and some other alumni developed an initiative that eventually became the Gaudino Memorial Fund. Jeff served on the Board of the Fund for many years, including as its Chair; in 2010 he was elected to come back onto the Board,and now is Vice-Chair. Jeff graduated from Yale Law School in 1977, worked as a public defender in New York City from 1977-79, and has lived in Maine since 1979, where he has works as a trial and environmental attorney. He taught a course on refugee issues as an adjunct professor at the University of Southern Maine, as well as courses at Maine Law School and Bowdoin College. Jeff has volunteered with many refugee groups in Portland; was elected in 2009 to the Williams College Tyng Scholarship Committee; and has worked as a group facilitator for the past ten years at the Center for Grieving Children.

SPEC 27 Snowed-in on a Vermont farm: Understanding Patterns in a Community Through Food (Same as ENVI 27)
The residency at Green Mountain Girls Farm in Northfield, Vermont emphasizes the intersection of agriculture, community, and environment. Students will stay at this small diversified farm for one week engaging in farm life, developing a sense of place, and indentifying patterns evident on the farm and in the immediate community. Days structured around farm chores, interpretive tours, hands-on workshops, and guest lectures will draw on pre-departure readings. The themes of these scheduled activities include permaculture design, cooking, forestry, and community development. To learn more about Green Mountain Girls Farm, visit http://eatstayfarm.com/.
Students will submit five two-page reflection papers over the course of the residency and prepare a presentation analyzing a pattern endemic to the place. Such pattern analysis could focus on agricultural systems, food consumption practices, touristic thought, business and accounting concepts, community resiliency, or other appropriate topics. Each student will present his or her pattern concept near the end of the residency.
Two sessions prior to departure and two sessions following the residency will offer a forum for preparation, reflection, and guidance in the production of a final written or visual document that captures the pattern the student identifies during the residency.
Pre-departure sessions: January 6 and January 10
Dates of residency at Green Mountain Girls Farm: January 12-January 19
Post-residency sessions: January 20 and January 22
Prerequisites: none; not open to first-year students.
Requirements: Vermont is cold in January, and many activities will take place outside. Students must bring plenty of layered cold-weather clothing, including sturdy insulated boots suitable for snowshoeing, insulated gloves, neck warmers or scarves, winter hats, and sunglasses. Some students may be asked to bring sleeping bags and sleeping pads. Students are welcome to bring cross-country skis for recreation. Snowshoes will be provided.
Students will be evaluated on the synthesis they create in their five two-page reflection papers, the insightfulness of their pattern presentation, and their completion of the written or visual document presenting the pattern they identify.
Enrollment limit: 9. Students that express convincing interest in the themes of the course will be preferred.
Cost: $700.
Instructors: BRENT WASSER (Brent.Wasser@williams.edu) and MARI OMLAND '89
Sponsor: ZILKHA CENTER

SPEC 28 Class of 1959 Teach NYC Urban Education Program
Students in this course learn about the front-line challenges of urban public education by working in one of New York City's public schools. Participants will be expected to pursue a full day's program of observing, teaching, tutoring and mentoring in their choice of more than 20 different school situations from elementary through high school. Each of the participating schools will have a resident supervisor who will meet with the January interns to arrange individual schedules and provide mentoring during the month. There will be weekly seminar meetings of all the interns who are expected to participate in group discussions, keep a journal and write a 5 page paper reflecting upon their experience. The course will conduct orientation meetings with students prior to January, matching each student's interest with appropriate teaching subject areas and a host school. Dormitory-style housing will be provided along with some assistance with transportation and food costs-estimated at $400 for the term. Further assistance is available for financial aid students.
Evaluation will be based on a journal and a 5-page paper.
Prerequisites: sophomore, junior or senior standing; not open to first-year students.
Enrollment limit: 12.
Cost: $400.
Meeting time: off-campus fieldwork: daily 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. and weekly seminar dinners.
Instructor: TRACY FINNEGAN
Sponsor: WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE

Tracy Finnegan is a master's level teacher with training and teaching experience in a variety of approaches and settings.

SPEC 35 Making Pottery on the Potter's Wheel
Each class will begin with a lecture-demonstration, followed by practice on the potter's wheel. Each student will have the use of a potter's wheel for every class. Pottery making classes will be held in the mornings, 9 AM to 12:15 PM, at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery in Pownal, Vermont. We will work on mugs, bowls, pitchers, plates, jars, lids, vases, and bottles, and will finish these shapes as required by trimming and adding handles, lugs, lids, spouts, and knobs. We will also work on several different handbuilding projects. Early in the Winter Study Session there will be a 1.5-hour slide presentation held one afternoon at a location on Campus. After the tenth pottery making class meeting, all completed work will be biscuit-fired. The eleventh meeting will be devoted to glazing the biscuited pieces. Glazing techniques will include pouring, dipping, layering, brushing, and stamping, and using wax resist and other masking techniques to develop pattern and design. The completed work will then be glaze-fired. The last meeting, held at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery early in the new Semester, will be devoted to a "final project" (positive-orientation) critique in the studio of your finished work. Woven into lecture-demonstrations will be presentations on various topics relating to the science and history of pottery making.
Requirements: attendance at all class sessions and enthusiasm for learning the craft of pottery making.
No prerequisites or potterymaking experience necessary, but students taking a sustaining language course will not be able to enroll in this course.
Enrollment limit: 9.
Cost: $325 lab fee, plus makeup class fees ($48 per class) if applicable.
Meeting time: mornings, plus one afternoon slide presentation, and one final 1-hour critique session early in the spring semester at a time to be arranged.
Instructor: RAY BUB
Sponsor: WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE

Ray Bub is a ceramic artist and teacher at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery in Pownal, Vermont, 10 minutes north of the Williams College campus. All class meetings except the slide show take place at Oak Bluffs Cottage Pottery.

SPEC 39 "Composing A Life:" Finding Success and Balance in Life After Williams
To be at Williams you have learned to be a successful student, but how do you learn to be successful in life? How will you define success in both your career and in your personal life? How will you achieve balance between the two? In short, what will constitute the "good life" for you?
We borrow the concept of "composing a life" from Mary Catherine Bateson, as an apt metaphor for the ongoing process of defining success and balance in life. This course is designed: (1) To offer college students an opportunity to examine and define their beliefs, values, and assumptions about their future personal and professional lives before entering the "real" world; (2) To encourage students to gain a better understanding of how culture, ideology, and opportunity affect their life choices; (3) To provide an opportunity for students to consider different models of success and balance through "living cases" (in the form of guests from various professions and lifestyles); and (4) To aid students in contemplating their life/career options through individual advising and introducing various career and life planning resources.
Using selected readings, cases, and guest speakers, we will explore both the public context of the workplace as well as the private context of individuals and their personal relationships in determining life choices.
Requirements: regular attendance, class participation, field interview, and a 10-page final paper. Weekly assignments include cases and readings from a variety of related fields, and some self-reflection exercises. Class meets three times a week, two-hour sessions.
Prerequisites: none.
Enrollment limit: 15.
Preference to juniors and seniors.
Cost: approximately $30 for reading materials.
Meeting time: mornings.
Instructors: MICHELE MOELLER CHANDLER (michele.chandler2@gmail.com) and CHIP CHANDLER (chip.chandler3@gmail.com)
Sponsor: SARAH BOLTON, Dean of the College

Michele Moeller Chandler ('73) and Chip Chandler ('72) have taught this Winter Study course for the past seventeen years. Michele, a former college administrator, has an M.A. from Columbia, and a Ph.D. from Northwestern.

Chip, a retired McKinsey senior partner, has an M.B.A. from Harvard, and currently teaches in the Leadership Studies Program.

SPEC 42 International Student Curricular Practical Training (CPT)
International students, in F1 status are allowed under US immigration law, to do any training that domestic students customarily do, with certain limited exceptions (that don't apply to Williams College such as flight training, English Language instruction) and within parameters set forth in regulations. The regulations for Curricular Practical Training (CPT) allow International students to work on campus, work off-campus, engage in summer training, and otherwise do the typical things that college students do as part of their education. The purpose of CPT is to allow international students to gain the same types of educational work experiences that domestic students are required or encouraged to experience such as on campus and summer work. CPT is available to international students after completion of at least one full academic year at the F-1 sponsoring institution and must be within a framework that is "an integral part of an established curriculum." Winter Study CPT allows Williams students to meet the criteria set out by US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and engage in practical training work. Winter Study CPT will earn the international student academic credit. However, Winter Study CPT will not count toward the Winter Study graduation requirement. International students participating in Winter Study CPT must take another Winter Study course to meet their graduation requirement. The course "Winter Study CPT" does not meet the Winter Study graduation requirement.
The method of evaluation for the Winter Study CPT course for F-1 international students will be as follows: The international student will maintain a weekly journal during the practical training experience. Using the journal entries, the international student will write a capstone paper on how it their Curricular Practical Training experience relates to their academic major. The capstone paper must be a minimum of three (3) pages. The international student must also prepare a five (5) minute presentation which will combine oral presentation with another media (e.g., demonstration of skills acquired, photographs of work environment, creative mixed media presentation depicting the experience).
The learning objectives for the course are;
1) Recognize and understand how US institutions work in their chosen field of study,
2) Interpret and apply personal skills and perspectives to be able to contribute to the institution or project,
3) Analyze and evaluate personal experience and critique behaviors that need to be altered to improve success for continued participation in the field of study.
JENIFER HASENFUS and BOLTON (Instructor)
WINTER STUDY COMMITTEE (Sponsor)


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