Forensic Confirmation Bias
Publications
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Dror, Kukucka, Kassin, Zapf (2018). No one is immune to contextual bias—Not even forensic pathologists. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition.
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Dror, Kukucka, Kassin, & Zapf (2018). When expert decision making goes wrong: Consensus, bias, the role of experts, and accuracy. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition.
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Zapf, Kukucka, Kassin, & Dror (2018). Cognitive bias in forensic mental health assessment: Evaluator beliefs about its nature and scope. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law.

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Kukucka, Kassin, Zapf, & Dror (2017). Cognitive bias and blindness: A global survey of forensic science examiners. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition.

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Marion, Kukucka, Collins, Kassin, & Burke (2016). Lost proof of innocence: The impact of confessions on alibi witnesses. Law and Human Behavior.
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Kukucka & Kassin (2014). Do confessions taint perceptions of handwriting evidence? An empirical test of the forensic confirmation bias. Law and Human Behavior.

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Kassin, Dror, & Kukucka (2013). The forensic confirmation bias: Problems, perspectives, and proposed solutions. Journal of Applied Research in Memory & Cognition.

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Dror, Kassin, & Kukucka (2013). New application of psychology to law: Improving forensic evidence and expert witness contributions. Journal of Applied Research in Memory & Cognition.

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Kassin, Bogart, & Kerner (2012). Confessions that corrupt: Evidence from the DNA exoneration case files. Psychological Science.
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Hasel & Kassin (2009). On the presumption of evidentiary independence: Can confessions corrupt eyewitness identifications? Psychological Science.
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Kassin, Goldstein, & Savitsky (2003). Behavioral confirmation in the interrogation room: On the dangers of presuming guilt. Law and Human Behavior.
Links
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National Commission on Forensic Science. (2015). Ensuring that forensic analysis is based upon task-relevant information.

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National Academy of Sciences (2009). Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward (Executive Summary).

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Last updated Feb, 2018
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